Feed aggregator

Károly Négyesi: Drupal 8 progress from my / MongoDB perspective: update #29

Planet Drupal - 5 hours 15 min ago

Perhaps the most important development is the final naming of what was field/field instance in Drupal 7: in Drupal 8 these are configuration entities. The machine names are field_storage_config and field_config. There has been several renames but we have settled on these finally (although the field_config rename is not yet in). It does reflect the most important difference between them: field storage contains everything pertaining to the storage of the field. The things that do not change the storage of it go into the instance. However, some confusion might come from already existing Drupal 8 documentation and other materials where field_config was the name for what ended up as field_storage_config.

In other rename news, entity storage/list/form/render "controllers" are now handlers. This probably decreases confusion as controllers are used by the router system to deliver the page content.

Migrate now tracks the whether a migration has been run or not. Previously we were guessing from the id mappings -- but if a source returned zero rows we couldn't really say whether the migration ran or not. Now we could clarify for real what are hard dependencies and what are optional. In the Drupal 6 migration, there are few optional ones which is just as it should be.

There's a Views migration in the works. As expected it's really complicated with lots of moving parts but it's coming along nicely.

Only book storage needs entity field query conversion after the epic comment query conversion issue finally got resolved.

One of the child issues of the last beta blocker removes the special casing for SQL storage -- hurray! Instead of requesting the schema of entity tables during module install (and other places) and then creating the tables there are now events on entity type create, update and delete. This makes it possible to create mongodb indexes cleanly.

Categories: Elsewhere

Gregor Herrmann: RC bugs 2014/34-37

Planet Debian - Sun, 14/09/2014 - 23:13

the perl 5.20 transition is over, debconf14 is over, so I should have more time for RC bugs? yes & no: I fixed some, but only in "our" (as in: pkg-perl) packages:

  • #711418 – src:libanyevent-dbi-perl: "libanyevent-dbi-perl: FTBFS: Failed test 'Using an unknown function results in error'"
    add patch for newer SQLite (pkg-perl)
  • #756566 – libxml-dt-perl: "libxml-dt-perl: Insecure use of temporary files (CVE-2014-5260)"
    upload new upstream release (pkg-perl)
  • #759838 – src:padre: "padre: FTBFS: Failed test 'no warnings'"
    fix 2/3 of the test failures in git, last one fixed by dod (pkg-perl)
  • #759942 – src:cpanminus: "cpanminus: FTBFS: Can't write to cpanm home '/sbuild-nonexistent/.cpanm': You should fix it with chown/chmod first."
    set HOME once more in debian/rules (pkg-perl)
  • #759964 – src:libhtml-formhandler-model-dbic-perl: "libhtml-formhandler-model-dbic-perl: FTBFS: dh_auto_test: make -j1 test returned exit code 2"
    upload new upstream release (pkg-perl)
  • #761312 – libdbix-class-resultset-recursiveupdate-perl: "libdbix-class-resultset-recursiveupdate-perl: missing dependency on liblist-moreutils-perl"
    add missing dependency (pkg-perl)
  • #761313 – libgeo-google-mapobject-perl: "libgeo-google-mapobject-perl: missing dependency on libjson-perl"
    add missing dependency (pkg-perl)
  • #761315 – libfile-read-perl: "libfile-read-perl: missing dependency on libfile-slurp-perl"
    add missing dependency (pkg-perl)
  • #761319 – libpod-wordlist-hanekomu-perl: "libpod-wordlist-hanekomu-perl: missing dependency on libtest-spelling-perl"
    add missing dependency (pkg-perl)
  • #761526 – src:liblocale-maketext-gettext-perl: "liblocale-maketext-gettext-perl: FTBFS: Tests failures"
    skip test which needs internet and a writable $HOME (pkg-perl)
  • #761558 – src:libposix-strptime-perl: "libposix-strptime-perl: FTBFS: Tests failures"
    skip test which needs internet and a writable $HOME (pkg-perl)
Categories: Elsewhere

d7One: Step by step guide to installing Commerce from scratch

Planet Drupal - Sun, 14/09/2014 - 20:50
The following guide was used in a presentation at DrupalCamp Montreal 2014. The presentation focused on how to install Drupal Commerce from scratch. FIRST FLOOR
  1. https://www.drupal.org/project/commerce
  2. Install required modules
    • drush dl ctools views entity rules addressfield commerce
    • drush en ctools views entity rules addressfield commerce -y
Tags:
Categories: Elsewhere

Steve Purkiss: Case Study - NickJr. Colour CMS & API - Feedback sought!

Planet Drupal - Sun, 14/09/2014 - 20:00
Sunday, 14th September 2014Case Study - NickJr. Colour CMS & API - Feedback sought!

It's been an embarrassing amount of time since I last blogged or did anything to my site so I've started to create some content, but before I submit it as a case study on Drupal's site I'd love to have some feedback, it's been years since I wrote case studies so a little rusty. Is it of interest? Does it help? Does it answer the right questions? Are there any questions you'd like me to answer?

Brief overview

Viacom’s Nick Jr. is a digital television channel aimed younger children, home to popular shows including Dora the Explorer, Angelina Ballerina, and PAW Patrol. 'Colour' is a section of the Nick Jr. website where, daily, tens of thousands of users interact with predefined line-art drawings using paint brushes and stickers. They can then, if they wish to, send pictures they create to their friends via email. The mostly Flash-based front-end currently connects to a legacy back-end system which is being replaced with Drupal.

Completed Drupal site or project URL

http://www.nickjr.co.uk/create/#!/colour

Why Drupal was chosen

Drupal's core and contributed modules along with customisable web administration interface provided all the functionality required out-of-the-box and is already used widely throughout the organisation.

Describe the project (goals, requirements and outcome) Project Goals

The goal of this project was to provide a bespoke back-end CMS based on Drupal to replace the legacy system, along with introducing new functionality enabling Send to Gallery and Pic of the Week features. The CMS needed to as simple as possible for content managers to use, and the whole system had to be able to cope with the tens of thousands of users using the API on a daily basis.

Deliverables

The site was to be delivered as a Drupal install profile so it can be adapted and re-used – an initial step towards creating internal Nickelodeon-specific distributions of Drupal, further lowering costs and time-to-market for future projects with similar requirements. Purkiss built a similar system a few months prior for Universal Artists uView Augmented Reality App and have extensive experience integrating Drupal with 3rd party services so were ideally placed to deliver this type of Drupal project.

Theme

First we set up the install profile with Shiny, the administration theme which comes with Drupal Commerce Kickstart, to be the main theme to the site. Shiny is a great theme for this kind of system where there's really only one main display the content managers interact with – it's easy on the eye with good typography and spacing.

Legacy Migration

We then re-created what functionality was required from the legacy system using Drupal Services – the calls for saving images, retrieving images for a show, etc. There was a major difference here as the legacy system stored all the data in flat XML files with no user data linked. Drupal is a relational database system so we have user accounts, content types and taxonomies – this proved to be an exercise in both education of the client as to the benefits of hooking into the Drupal API, along with re-architecting of the current content model and workflow.

Features

We used a Features-based approach to development with each of these features, along with the install profile, having their own private Git code repository in the cloud in order for issue tracking and maintenance to be easier.

The features we delivered were as follows:

  • Content Types
    • NickJr Colour Image – stores the user’s image along with a Canvas ID which refers to the line art used, a taxonomy field to link to the associated show, and two flags – one to show if the user has sent the image in to Nickelodeon for consideration to be included in the showcase, and one to denote whether it is in the associated show’s showcase.
  • Fields
    • User Profile Fields – extra profile fields to store the user’s name and age.
  • Rules
    • Redirect after login – redirects to the front page view after logging in.
    • Pic of the Week – Views Bulk Operations Component – one rule to set and one to unset an image as Pic of Week
    • Showcase – one to set and one to unset an image as to be in a Show's Showcase
  • Services
    • NickJr. Colour API – the Services settings for the custom API endpoints.
  • Taxonomy
    • Shows Taxonomy – with Pic of the Week field
  • Variables
    • Always harmonize views filters – Allows views to use both contextual and exposed filters for views
  • Views
    • Front Page – Displays all images, defaults to only show images Sent to Nick
    • Showcase – Displays images in showcase, all if no show_id sent through
    • User Profile – Displays users images on their profile page
Schedule

Project timescale and budget was for an incredibly tight 10 days which we delivered in, however were subsequently hired for a further 7 days to re-factor the API and provide a few final additions to the administration interface.

Out-of-the-box, Drupal Services module provide a standard set of API calls so you can do things like create a user, a node, etc. so all the functionality required was there however required a number of calls to the API to achieve the desired workflow. It was decided to spend extra time creating custom API endpoints which would hide this functionality, reduce the number of API calls required, and make it easier for future users of the API.

The downside to this approach is the technical debt introduced when diverting away from the *.drupal.org infrastructure of support, i.e. core and contributed modules. In this instance the code was simply wrapping existing API calls and the client has access to technical resources so the decision was to take on the technical debt in order to produce a more tailored outcome.

Outcome

We used the extra time to create a RESTful API which abstracted away from Drupal Services out-of-the-box API endpoints along with coding an auto account creation system to link up user data from the front-end without users having to enter their email address, a requirement of Drupal’s user account creation. We documented the API using Drupal’s inbuilt help module and passed the system over to the client, helping them through building the system from the Drush make file.

Summary

The resulting system is a clean, simple-to-use CMS with RESTful API handling thousands of users on a daily basis. Content managers have a separate role with very restricted access so can only do what they need to do on the system.

We really enjoyed delivering this project, however alert anyone thinking of building similar to allow extra time, especially if it is their first Drupal experience - no matter how good specifications are, issues usually arise in one form or another. Also often once people do start using Drupal and see the possibilities available, requirements change and it is good to allow for those to be taken into account.

About Purkiss

Purkiss helps organisations onboard Drupal through consultancy, development, training and support. For more information about Purkiss services please visit http://purkiss.com

Modules/Themes/Distributions

boolean_formatter
cors
eva
features
filter_harmonizer
mimemail
rules
services
shiny
smtp
strongarm
views_bulk_operations
views

Why these modules/theme/distribution were chosen
  • boolean_formatter – makes the user interface a little nicer by providing icons for boolean fields such as ticks and crosses
  • CORS – required for connecting to the front-end
  • EVA - we used an Entity Views Attachment to display users pictures on their profiles
  • features - features allows you to export configuration settings to code
  • filter_harmonizer - Views Filter Harmonizer fixes an issue when using multiple filters on views
  • mimemail - used to send images via email
  • rules - as described above, used for redirecting user on login and for custom views bulk operations
  • services - used for the RESTful API
  • shiny - an administration theme we are using for the entire site
  • smtp - for sending email
  • strongarm - for storing variables in features
  • views_bulk_operations - to enable easy workflow, such as adding an image to a showcase
  • views - so we can display the data we want easily
Community contributions

As the API is specific to the client and used mostly existing functionality we had no code to contribute. The only custom code was for automatic account creation and there are existing modules which provide similar functionality which we used the code from but is too specific to this install to re-use externally.

This is however the second time we’ve been asked for this sort of system, and with the growth of mobile apps we are currently working out whether it would be possible to create a distribution which will help get most of the way there - at least have relevant modules and perhaps an example scenario based on the simple image requirements for this project.

tags: case studiesDrupal PlanetPlanet Drupal
Categories: Elsewhere

Ben Armstrong: Bluff Wilderness Trail Hike, Summer 2014

Planet Debian - Sun, 14/09/2014 - 00:30

Happy to be back from our yearly hike with my friend, Ryan Neily, on the Bluff Wilderness Trail. We’re proud of our achievement, hiking all four loops. Including the trip to and from the head of the trail, that was 30 km in all. Exhausting, but well worth it.

On the trip we bumped into one of the people from WRWEO who helps to maintain the trail, and stopped for a bit to talk to swap stories and tips about hiking the trail. Kudos to Nancy for helping keep this trail beautiful and accessible. We really appreciate the tireless work of this organization, and the thought they’ve put into it. It’s a treasure!

Categories: Elsewhere

Keith Packard: Altos1.5

Planet Debian - Sat, 13/09/2014 - 20:47
AltOS 1.5 — EasyMega support, features and bug fixes

Bdale and I are pleased to announce the release of AltOS version 1.5.

AltOS is the core of the software for all of the Altus Metrum products. It consists of firmware for our cc1111, STM32L151, LPC11U14 and ATtiny85 based electronics and Java-based ground station software.

This is a major release of AltOS, including support for our new EasyMega board and a host of new features and bug fixes

AltOS Firmware — EasyMega added, new features and fixes

Our new flight computer, EasyMega, is a TeleMega without any radios:

  • 9 DoF IMU (3 axis accelerometer, 3 axis gyroscope, 3 axis compass).

  • Orientation tracking using the gyroscopes (and quaternions, which are lots of fun!)

  • Four fully-programmable pyro channels, in addition to the usual apogee and main channels.

AltOS Changes

We’ve made a few improvements in the firmware:

  • The APRS secondary station identifier (SSID) is now configurable by the user. By default, it is set to the last digit of the serial number.

  • Continuity of the four programmable pyro channels on EasyMega and TeleMega is now indicated via the beeper. Four tones are sent out after the continuity indication for the apogee and main channels with high tones indicating continuity and low tones indicating an open circuit.

  • Configurable telemetry data rates. You can now select among 38400 (the previous value, and still the default), 9600 or 2400 bps. To take advantage of this, you’ll need to reflash your TeleDongle or TeleBT.

AltOS Bug Fixes

We also fixed a few bugs in the firmware:

  • TeleGPS had separate flight logs, one for each time the unit was turned on. Turning the unit on to test stuff and turning it back off would consume one of the flight log ‘slots’ on the board; once all of the slots were full, no further logging would take place. Now, TeleGPS appends new data to an existing single log.

  • Increase the maximum computed altitude from 32767m to 2147483647m. Back when TeleMetrum v1.0 was designed, we never dreamed we’d be flying to 100k’ or more. Now that’s surprisingly common, and so we’ve increased the size of the altitude data values to fit modern rocketry needs.

  • Continuously evaluate pyro firing condition during delay period. The previous firmware would evaluate the pyro firing requirements, and once met, would delay by the indicated amount and then fire the channel. If the conditions had changed state, the channel would still fire. Now, the conditions are continuously evaluated during the delay period and if they change state, the event is suppressed.

  • Allow negative values in the pyro configuration. Now you can select a negative speed to indicate a descent rate or a negative acceleration value to indicate acceleration towards the ground.

AltosUI and TeleGPS — EasyMega support, OS integration and more

The AltosUI and TeleGPS applications have a few changes for this release:

  • EasyMega support. That was a simple matter of adapting the existing TeleMega support.

  • Added icons for our file types, and hooked up the file manager so that AltosUI, TeleGPS and/or MicroPeak are used to view any of our data files.

  • Configuration support for APRS SSIDs, and telemetry data rates.

Categories: Elsewhere

Laura Arjona: Disabling comments in the blog

Planet Debian - Sat, 13/09/2014 - 16:23

I’m getting more spam than the amount that I can stand in this blog. Comments are moderated, so the public is not suffering that, only me. From time to time I go to my dashboard and clean the spam. I’m afraid that I delete some legit comment in these spam-cleaning-fevers, or, more probably, that a legit comment waits in the queue for several days (weeks?), just because I’m lazy to deal with spam and let days pass by (until the fever comes).

I think I’m going to follow the wisdom of Bradley M. Kuhn and link to a pump.io note for comments on my blog posts (disabling them here in WordPress.com). I usually post a notice when I write something in my blog, so the only task is to update the blog post with the pump.io URL of the thread for comments.

While WordPress.com allows to write comments quickly, without need of an account (you write just a name and an email, and the comment), in pump you need to have an account and sign in to comment. That looks as a bad thing, a barrier for people to participate. But of course, it stops spam :)

After thinking about it a bit, pump.io it’s a federated network, you can choose the pump server that they want, you can create a fake account, you don’t need to provide personal information… and it’s another way to promote one of the social networks where I live. Other systems link to facebook, twitter, or other places, and nobody complains! Even when those services don’t have any of the advantages of being in a federated free-software powered social network :)

If anybody don’t want to use pump.io but wants to comment, other ways to reach me or the related blog post are:

  • Comment in the GNUSocial fediverse: the post announcing the thread for each blog post will be propagated to my quitter.se account too.
  • While I’m still using Twitter, they can comment on the corresponding tweet, but beware that I’m seriously thinking about closing my account there, since I rarely use it and don’t like the platform.
  • Drop me an email, I can post the comment on behalf of that person (if you want your comment to be “anonymous”, please state it in the email).

So now it’s decided, and this is the first post of this new experiment. This text is posted in pump.io too, and you can comment there :)


Filed under: My experiences and opinion, Tools Tagged: Blog, English, federation, pump.io, social networks, Wordpress
Categories: Elsewhere

Steve Kemp: Storing and distributing secrets.

Planet Debian - Fri, 12/09/2014 - 22:10

I run a number of hosts, and they are controlled via a server automation tool I wrote called slaughter [Documentation].

The policies I use to control my hosts are public and I don't want to make them private because they server as good examples.

Because the roles are public I don't want to embed passwords in them, which means I need something to hold secrets securely. In my case secrets are things like plaintext-passwords. I want those secrets to be secure and unavailable from untrusted hosts.

The simplest solution I could think of was an IP-address based ACL and a simple webserver. A client requests something like:

  • http://secret.example.com/user-passwords

That returns a JSON object, if the requesting host is permitted to read the data. Otherwise it returns a HTTP 403 error.

The layout is very simple:

|-- secrets | |-- 206.190.139.148 | | `-- auth.json | |-- 127.0.0.1 | | `-- example.json | `-- 80.68.84.109 | `-- chat.json

Each piece of data is beneath a directory/symlink which controls the read-only access. If the request comes in from the suitable IP it is granted, if not it is denied.

For example a failing case:

skx@desktop ~ $ curl http://sss.steve.org.uk/chat missing/permission denied

A working case :

root@chat ~ # curl http://sss.steve.org.uk/chat { "steve": "haha", "bot": "notreally" }

(The JSON suffix is added automatically.)

It is hardly rocket-science, but I couldn't find anything else packaged neatly for this - only things like auth/secstore and factotum. So I'll share if it is useful.

Simple Secret Sharing, or Steve's secret storage.

Categories: Elsewhere

Richard Hartmann: Release Critical Bug report for Week 37

Planet Debian - Fri, 12/09/2014 - 22:08

Remember, remember; the fifth of November.

The UDD bugs interface currently knows about the following release critical bugs:

  • In Total: 1422
    • Affecting Jessie: 410 That's the number we need to get down to zero before the release. They can be split in two big categories:
      • Affecting Jessie and unstable: 355 Those need someone to find a fix, or to finish the work to upload a fix to unstable:
        • 52 bugs are tagged 'patch'. Please help by reviewing the patches, and (if you are a DD) by uploading them.
        • 26 bugs are marked as done, but still affect unstable. This can happen due to missing builds on some architectures, for example. Help investigate!
        • 277 bugs are neither tagged patch, nor marked done. Help make a first step towards resolution!
      • Affecting Jessie only: 55 Those are already fixed in unstable, but the fix still needs to migrate to Jessie. You can help by submitting unblock requests for fixed packages, by investigating why packages do not migrate, or by reviewing submitted unblock requests.
        • 0 bugs are in packages that are unblocked by the release team.
        • 55 bugs are in packages that are not unblocked.

Graphical overview of bug stats thanks to azhag:

Categories: Elsewhere

Jonathan McDowell: Back from DebConf 14

Planet Debian - Fri, 12/09/2014 - 16:00

I previously forgot to mention that I was planning to attend DebConf14, having missed DebConf13. This year the conference was held in Portland, OR. This is a city I've been to many times before, and enjoy, but I hadn't spent any time wandering around its city centre as a pedestrian. I have to say I really prefer DebConfs that are held in middle of city. It always seems a bit of a shame to travel some distance to somewhere new and spend all the time there in a conference venue. Plus these days I have the added lure of going out and playing Ingress in a new location. DebConf14 didn't disappoint in these respects; the location was super easy to get to from the airport via public transportation, all of the evening social events were within reasonable walking distance (I'll tend to default to walking when possible) and the talk venue/accommodation were close to each other and various eating + drinking options. Throw in the fact at Portland managed to produce some excellent weather (modulo my Ingress session on the last Saturday morning, when rained on me) and it's impossible to fault the physicalities of DebConf this year.

This year the conference format was a bit different; previous years have had a week long DebConf before the week of the conference itself. This year went for a 9 day talk schedule (Saturday -> Sunday) with various gaps of hacking time interspersed. I've found it hard to justify a full two weeks away in the past, so this setup worked a lot better from my viewpoint. Also I rarely go to DebConf with a predetermined list of things to do; the stuff I work on naturally falls out of talks I attend and informal discussions I have. Having hack time throughout the conference helped me avoid feeling I was having to trade off hacking vs talks.

Naturally enough a lot of my involvement at DebConf was around OpenPGP. Gunnar and I spent a fair bit of time getting Daniel up to speed with the keyring-maint team (Gunnar more than I, I'll confess). We finally set a hard timeframe for freeing Debian of older 1024 bit keys. I was introduced to the Gnuk, which is a particularly interesting piece of open specification hardware with a completely Free software stack on top if it that implements the OpenPGP smartcard spec. Currently it's limited to 2K keys but it's hoped that 4K support can be added (and I ended up spending a couple of hours after the closing talk hacking on the source and seeing how much needs to change for 4K support, aided by the very patient Niibe). These are the sort of things that really benefit from the face time that DebConf offers to the Debian project. I've said it before, but I think it's worth saying again: Debian is a bit like a huge telecommuting organization and it's my opinion that any such organization should try and ensure its members actually spend some time together on a regular basis. It improves the ability to work remotely a hell of a lot if you can actually put a face to the entity you're emailing / IRCing and have some sort of idea where they're coming from because you've spent some time with them, whether that's in talks or over dinner or just casual hallway chats.

For once I also found myself considering alternative employment while at DebConf and it was incredibly useful to be able to have various conversations with both old friends and people who were there with an eye on recruitment. Thanks to all those whose ears I bent about the subject (and more on the outcome in a future post). Thank you also to the many people involved with the organization of DebConf; I've been on the periphery a few times over the years and it's given me a glimpse into the amount of hard work all of the volunteers (be they global team, local organizing team, video team or just random volunteers) put into making DebConf one of my must-attend yearly conferences. If you're at all involved in Debian and haven't attended I strongly urge you to do so - I'll see you all next year at DebConf15 in Heidelberg!

Categories: Elsewhere

Deeson Online: PHP 5.5 Generators and Drupal

Planet Drupal - Fri, 12/09/2014 - 16:00

PHP 5.5 introduces generator functions.  Generator functions return an object that can be iterated over - often to be used with a foreach loop, for example:

function gen_one_to_three() { for ($i = 1; $i <= 3; $i++) { // Note that $i is preserved between yields. yield $i; } }   $generator = gen_one_to_three(); foreach ($generator as $value) { echo "$value\n"; }

Which will output:

123

(Example taken from php.net).

PHP calls the generator function when it needs values - when the generator yields a value the state of the generator is saved, so it can then be resumed when the next value is required. This can lead to significant performance boosts over creating an array which only exists to be looped over as less memory is needed.

There is more detail on http://codingexplained.com/coding/php/introduction-to-php-generators.

So how can this apply to Drupal …

A render array might look like...

$wrapper = array( '#type' => 'container', '#attributes' => array( 'class' => array('class'), ), ‘item-one’ = array ( … ); ‘item-two’ = array ( … ); ‘item-three’ = array ( … ); );

The element_children function returns an array which contains the array keys of the children array elements. This breaks from the standard PHP foreach pattern where you perform operations directly on the value created by the foreach loops - I don’t think this is ideal - I had to look twice to see what was happening the first time I saw it.

Using generators, you can use a more typical php pattern - the following is equivalent to the above.

foreach(element_children_generator($variables) as $key => &$element) { ... $element[‘#example’] = ‘example’; dpm($element); ... }

As well as being a more typical PHP pattern, referencing the element within the loop is cleaner.

There are downsides to this approach too. A developer familiar with Drupal may have to look twice to see what is going on with the yield keyword. Obviously this can’t go into Drupal 7 Core (which supports php 5.2.5+), and I wouldn’t recommend it for Contrib either for the same reason. 

However since PHP 5.3 and below is EOL I think this pattern is well worth adopting in your own projects with low risk.

Read morePHP 5.5 Generators and DrupalBy Chris | 12th September 2014
Categories: Elsewhere

DrupalCon Amsterdam: Training spotlight: Introduction to Headless Drupal

Planet Drupal - Fri, 12/09/2014 - 14:47

We know Drupal is an amazing platform for making websites. But did you know it’s also a world-class content API that can easily be integrated with a other technologies?

In Introduction to Headless Drupal you'll write your first Node.js application(s) and learn how to integrate Node.js's real-time wizardry into Drupal's content management magic.

Meet the Trainers from Four Kitchens

Matt Grill (drpal) Engineer at Four Kitchens
Matt taught himself HTML in 1996 while making a fansite for The Simpsons, even though he’s never actually watched the show. Matt’s interests in technology range from Arduino to automation and deployment. Matt currently maintains Is It Shaking?, a Node.js powered app for tracking and analysing earthquakes worldwide, Is It Shaking?. He has been working with JavaScript for nearly 10 years.

Michal Minecki (mirzu) Director of Technology at Four Kitchens
Mike Minecki has been building websites since 1999, and has been working with Node.js and Drupal for about a year. He has worked on www.drupalpoetry.com, a responsive web game that mimics the experience of playing with magnetic poetry on the web. He has taught Node.js in Austin and San Francisco, and has been speaking at events around the country about how to integrate Node.js and Drupal.

Attend this Drupal Training

This training will be held on Monday, 29 September from 09:00-17:00 at the Amsterdam RAI during DrupalCon Amsterdam. The cost of attending this training is €400 and includes training materials, meals and coffee breaks.

Many of our training courses, including Introduction to Headless Drupal, are nearing capacity and we will not have waitlists, so if you are planning to attend, we strongly recommend you register this week.

Register today

Categories: Elsewhere

Code Karate: Drupal 7 Entity Registration Module

Planet Drupal - Fri, 12/09/2014 - 13:57
Episode Number: 167

The Drupal 7 Entity Registration Module makes it easy to host sign-ups or registration forms directly on your Drupal 7 website. This solution works great for event, conference, webinar, or training signup forms.

In this lesson you will learn:

Tags: DrupalDrupal 7Drupal Planet
Categories: Elsewhere

Elena 'valhalla' Grandi: Sometimes apologies are the worst part

Planet Debian - Fri, 12/09/2014 - 13:53
I am sick of hearing apologies directed to me just after a dirty joke.

Usually, I don't mind dirty jokes in themselves: I *do* have a dirty mind and make my share of those, or laugh for the ones my friends with even dirtier minds make.

There are of course times and places where they aren't appropriate, but I'd rather live in a world where they are the exception (although a common one) rather than the norm.

Then there is the kind of dirty jokes strongly based on the assumptions that women are sexual objects, a nuisance that must be tolerated because of sex or both: of course I don't really find them fun, but that's probably because I'm a nuisance and I don't even give them reason to tolerate me. :)

Even worse that those, however, is being singled out as the only women in the group with an empty apology for the joke (often of the latter kind): I know you are not really sorry, you probably only want to show that your parents taught you not to speak that way in front of women, but since I'm intruding in a male-only group I have to accept that you are going to talk as appropriate for it.

P.S. no, the episode that triggered this post didn't happen in a Debian environment, it happened in Italy, in a tech-related environment (and not in a wanking club for penis owners, where they would have every right to consider me an intruder).
Categories: Elsewhere

John Goerzen: The Thrill and Stress of Too Many Hobbies

Planet Debian - Fri, 12/09/2014 - 05:10

Today, 4PM. Jacob and Oliver excitedly peer at the box in our kitchen – a really big box, taller than them. Inside is is the first model airplane I’d ever purchased. The three of us hunkered down on the kitchen floor, opened the box, unpacked the parts, examined the controller, and found the manual with cryptic assembly directions. Oliver turned some screws while Jacob checked out the levers on the controllers. Then they both left for a bit to play with their toy buses.

A little while later, the three of us went outside. It was too windy to fly. I had never flied an RC plane before — only RC quadcopters (much easier to fly), and some practice time on an RC simulator. But the excitement was too much. So out we went, and the plane took off perfectly, climbed, flew over the trees, and circled above our heads at my command. I even managed a good landing in the wind, despite about 5 aborted attempts due to coming in too high, wrong angle, too fast, or last-minute gusts of wind throwing everything off. I am not sure how I pulled that all off on my first flight, but somehow I did! It was thrilling!

I’ve had a lot of hobbies in my life. Computers have run through many of them; I learned Pascal (a programming language) at about the same time I learned cursive handwriting and started with C at around age 10. It was all fun. I’ve been a Debian developer for some 18 years now, and have written a lot of code, and even books about code, over the years.

Photography, music, literature, history, philosophy, and theology have been interests for quite some time as well. In the last few years, I’ve picked up amateur radio, model aircraft, etc. And last month, Laura led me into Ada’s Technical Books during our visit to Seattle, resulting in me getting interested in Arduino. (The boys and I have already built a light-activated crossing gate for their HO-gauge model trains, and Jacob can now say he’s edited a few characters of C!)

Sometimes I find ways to merge hobbies; I’ve set up all sorts of amateur radio systems on Linux, take aerial photographs, and set up systems to stream music in my house.

But I also have a lot less time for hobbies overall than I once did; other things in life, such as my children, are more important. Some of the code I once worked on actively I no longer use or maintain, and I feel guilty about that when people send bug reports that I have no interest in fixing anymore.

Sometimes I feel a need to cut down, and perhaps have; and then, I get an interest in RC aircraft and find an airplane that is great for a beginner and fairly inexpensive.

Perhaps it is the curse of being a curious person living in an interesting world. Do any of the rest of you have a large number of hobbies? How do you feel about that?

Categories: Elsewhere

Stefano Zacchiroli: debsources bugs and easy hacks

Planet Debian - Thu, 11/09/2014 - 19:31
debsources debbugs oh

My ongoing quest for lowering the barrier for contributing to Debsources continues.
In this chapter:

  • I've migrated bug reports from the previous ad-hoc text file in the Git repo to the Debian BTS, under the umbrella of the qa.debian.org pseudo-package.
    From now on this is the recommended (and documented) way of reporting bugs against http://sources.debian.net.

    Look ma, it also has one of those newfangled short URLs: http://deb.li/debsrcbugs!

  • While at it, I've also properly tagged the current easy hacks on Debsources using the gift tag. There are definitely opportunities for new contributors there, and there might be more if you submit your own Debsources' pet peeves to the BTS.

    Again, mandatory mnemonic/short URL: http://deb.li/debsrceasy.

What's your excuse for not contributing to Debsources, again?

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Watchdog: Cooking Up Sites With Open Outreach

Planet Drupal - Thu, 11/09/2014 - 19:25
Article

Drupal distributions can be a huge leg up in building a website, especially for those with little technical knowledge. The “ingredients” (modules) you need are already assembled, leaving you with just the task of stirring it up, and perhaps adding your own personalizing flavors. The Open Outreach distribution is specifically designed for nonprofit and grassroots groups. It comes with a wide range of apps — bundles of modules and configurations that are geared to the needs of groups, such as contact management or mapping. It also includes a number of helper features, such as a text editor, commenting, and social media handling.

For more detailed instructions on how to work with Open Outreach, see the complete user documentation.

Below you’ll find some recipes for whipping up a specific kind of Open Outreach site, giving you the apps you need: to enable; required configuration; suggested themes for the look and feel of your site; and tips on customizations to take your site further. Happy site building!

Environmental group focused on mining impacts

You’re a board member of this small but enthusiastic group. You’ve been tasked with creating a website that will serve as the public face, but more importantly also track membership contacts as well as your contacts with other groups, government bodies, and industry.

Categories: Elsewhere

Lullabot: Finding related content faster with Apache Solr

Planet Drupal - Thu, 11/09/2014 - 19:00

We recently fixed a performance issue at the MSNBC project: the More Like This list of content related to the current page was stressing our database servers with slow, complicated MySQL queries. Here is a screenshot of the block in question:

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Association News: Drupalaton 2014 in Hungary, at the largest lake in Central Europe

Planet Drupal - Thu, 11/09/2014 - 17:22

This post originally ran on Imagine Creativity, and has been reprinted with permission.

Wow my Hungarian friends - you have done it again! Two weeks ago, I spent a long weekend at Drupalaton, a Drupal camp in Hungary with the difference that it also served as a short relaxing break. It was the perfect combination of a holiday and work with the beautiful surroundings of Central Europe’s largest lake Balaton.

I was very excited to return to the country after the amazing Drupal Developer Days in Szeged event that I went to in March. It was also filled with meeting amazing people from all around the world, learning and sharing knowledge and connecting with so many inspiring people.

At both events the thing that really stood out for me was the great hospitality shown by the Hungarians I met there. I have really been humbled by how friendly and hospitable they have been, and all of the time they put into making the event so amazing for all the attendees.

This was the fifth year that large Drupal events have been taking place in the country, but the second where the language hasn’t been exclusively in Hungarian. Last year’s event brought people from Romania, Serbia and other neighbouring countries but this year we had a much more international event with people from Austria, Belgium, Finland, Germany, Spain, & the UK in attendance.

Patchy, the sprint whale. Unofficial @drupalaton mascot with @ChandeepKhosa @brynvertesi @rteijeiro pic.twitter.com/AxydLT3JiO

— Bryn Vertesi (@brynvertesi) August 9, 2014

The team that made it happen

Tamás ‘York’ Pintér, was the main organiser and lives in the area of the camp, Zsófi Major co-ordinated many aspects of the event including community outreach over social media & sponsorship management, István Csáki, helped to create the website and other support, Bálint Fekete, made some amazing design work (in particular the innovative scroll on the website where the boat moves across the page which I spent far too long playing with!).

Also on the team were Gábor Hojtsy, (Drupal 8 multilingual initiative lead) helping with event-marketing, István 'PP' Palócz who helped with finances (and helped me learning some basic Hungarian phrases) and last but not least Tamás ‘TeeCee’ Szügyi, the photographer who documented the great event.

Some numbers

In the recent newsletter to all attendees from the organisers the following statistics were disclosed.

"We are really proud of the following numbers, so let us share with you:
Our 79 attendees came from 13 countries from all over the world, and only a bit more than half of them were from Hungary. This lucky number is significant for us, as Drupalaton started as a local Drupalcamp, and now we can proudly say that we are on the big Drupalmap :)"

  • You spent more than 1420 minutes (almost 24 hours) on 8 workshops with learning.
  • The sprinters worked on 70+ issues during the 4 days. This a great number, you can find more thoughts about it in Gábor Hojtsy's blog post.
  • During the 4 days you consumed 134 pcs of Túró Rudis, 132 ps of Marzipan ladybugs, 260 cans of beer, 60 kilograms of different fruits and  7 kilograms of nuts."

Next year

If any of that sounds good you should attend next year, 6-9 August 2015, I'm very excited about returning. Even the founder of Drupal, Dries Buytaert, regrets not attending! Maybe he will join us too next year, that would be awesome!

Photos from Drupalaton: https://t.co/TP0ARVawzb Wish I could have been there!

— Dries Buytaert (@Dries) August 11, 2014

Check out the pictures from Flickr below, or on Twitter and the Facebook page!

Categories: Elsewhere

Dirk Eddelbuettel: pkgKitten 0.1.2: Still creating R Packages that purr

Planet Debian - Thu, 11/09/2014 - 16:41

A brown bag release 0.1.2 of pkgKitten is now on CRAN, following yesterday's 0.1.1 upload

Next time I'll try to remember that when I have parameters name and path, it won't work so well to call them as path and name ...

Changes in version 0.1.2 (2014-09-11)
  • Brown-bag fix of calling the new helper function with then correct order of arguments.

More details about the package are at the pkgKitten webpage and the pkgKitten GitHub repo.

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Categories: Elsewhere

Pages

Subscribe to jfhovinne aggregator