Elsewhere

Drupal Watchdog: Connecting Drupal to Salesforce in Three Easy Steps

Planet Drupal - Wed, 08/04/2015 - 16:20
Article

The Salesforce Suite of Drupal modules is an easy way to connect Drupal to Salesforce, a Customer Relationship Management system used by retailers and non-profits alike, which allows non-technical staff to create extensive reports – reports that would be difficult to create using Drupal alone.

Although entities can be synchronized to Salesforce objects – and custom mappings created – there is lots more that can be done with Salesforce. Let’s take a look.

Getting started

For openers, you’ll need:

To get the Developer Edition, create a developer account.

Once you’re in Salesforce, you’ll quickly notice that the site seems overwhelming. A complete overview is way beyond the scope of this article; the most important objects for our purposes are Campaigns, Leads, Contacts, and Cases.

There are many other extensions for Salesforce, extensions that provide new object types. Also, existing object types can be extended in much the same way as in Drupal.

As a best practice, always work in a sandbox environment when not working within a dev instance. It will help ensure that you can create a proper development -> testing -> production workflow.

To create a sandbox (Enterprise, Performance, Unlimited, and Database.com), go to Setup » Sandboxes » Create new Sandbox.

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal @ Penn State: Drupal speed tuning: analyzing and further optimizing Pressflow

Planet Drupal - Wed, 08/04/2015 - 15:06
If you've read my past posts on here, you'll probably find a trend: I'm obsessed with performance tuning. Any time you can get more responsiveness without more hardware, I'm very, very happy. I've been running a modified drupal core for ELMSLN for some time now and decided instead of keeping these changes / tuning to myself, I'd try and document them / test them and see if any changes make sense for pressflow. In https://github.com/btopro/Presser-Flow-FORK you can see 3 folders: _PATCHES - all the patches (from drupal.org) utilized in the metrics _RECIPES - a drush recipe that auto optimizes to the level used in testing, there are also recipes for each of the sites in the test so you can see exactly what was used for testing. _METRICS - XLS file with detailed metrics of how testing was performed, where, and what combinations
Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal @ Penn State: Drush recipes cookin' up sweet beta eats!

Planet Drupal - Wed, 08/04/2015 - 15:06
Drush Recipes has come a long way since the project was first announced on planet a month ago.
Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal @ Penn State: ELMSLN optimization: Cost and Scale

Planet Drupal - Wed, 08/04/2015 - 15:06
I did a post the other day about ELMSLN Performance Optimization all about lessons learned and looking at some popular techniques and applying them. These are techniques that can be applied to ANY Drupal (and in many cases non Drupal) application to increase performance. This article looks at the real world price of performance tuning.
Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal @ Penn State: ELMSLN performance tuning

Planet Drupal - Wed, 08/04/2015 - 15:06
Update 2: Apache tuning / Costs There’s another posting thats dedicated to the cost and scale metrics of ELMSLN vs D6 legacy systems we were using. This is an example performance pack of conf settings that should work to do sane tuning on ANY apache system let alone drupal.
Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal @ Penn State: Drupal, Singularity, Digital Activism, and saving our institutions

Planet Drupal - Wed, 08/04/2015 - 15:06
It is as important to tell a great story using technology as it is to author technology that allows more stories to be told.
Categories: Elsewhere

Modules Unraveled: 132 How and Why Acquia is Training Drupal Talent Before They Hire Them with Amy Parker - Modules Unraveled Podcast

Planet Drupal - Wed, 08/04/2015 - 07:00
Published: Wed, 04/08/15Download this episodeAcquiaU

While this episode might end up sounding like a giant advertisement for AcquiaU, it’s really not intended to be. I wanted to have you on to talk about the concept of, how a company that hires Drupal developers, can and should go about training them before they are hired.

In order to set the backdrop for the rest of our conversation, I’d like to quote a bit from the AcquiaU website:

The challenge the community is facing is one of supply and demand. Simply put, there just aren’t enough people to fill the needs. At any given time in the past 6 months, job aggregator Indeed.com has over 2,500 open position across the US for Drupal talent.

How do we close the gap? Find the people with the right passion and grow their talent from the inside-out. We're not looking for people with years and years of Drupal experience. We're looking for people who are curious, motivated, determined, and who can inspire a little crazy in us all. At Acquia, culture and a person's POTENTIAL to contribute and grow with us matters. A lot. These are the underpinnings of a successful candidate.

What I love about that is that you’re not looking for senior level developers with 5+ years experience. Because you’re not going to find them. They all already have jobs.

Mike and I ranted about that in the last podcast, so I won’t rehash it here, but what we boiled it down to is that Drupal shops need to create a talent pipeline for recruitment, which, as I understand it, is essentially what AcquiaU is for Acquia.

Ok, with all that said, I’ll shut up now, and let you do the talking.

  • Can you give us your description of what AcquiaU is?
  • The program is 14-weeks of hands-on training in Drupal, Acquia Products, related web technologies, and professional development skills like team building, leadership, and communication skills. We spend the first 6 weeks in a classroom environment, which is a combination of lecture, group projects, individual assignments, and self-paced learning. The most recent graduates’ project was to redesign the program’s website, u.acquia.com Each participant is assigned an Acquia Mentor who is there to not just be a buddy, but to help from a technical perspective. The next 8 weeks are spent with job rotations where they work with our customer facing Professional Services developers and customer support. Each person is assigned a client team and works side-by-side on real projects. You might think it is like any other tech bootcamp out there but we differentiate ourselves in a couple of key areas. First, we make sure we have an open job opportunity for each person who joins the program and second, we pay people to learn. Many other bootcamps have a high cost- on average up to $10,000 and while they help with job placement, I can’t say how many have jobs lined up for graduates BEFORE they join the program.

  • How do you select your candidates? Or can anyone join the class?

  • We have a rigorous screening process and look for people with 2-3 years of technology experience, but who might not be able to get a job with a development shop. A lot of times, this level of talent is overlooked because companies don’t have the internal mechanisms to train, mentor, and coach junior level talent. They are already stretched thin and want new hires to hit the ground running at a fairly high level of proficiency.

  • What types of skills do you teach?

  • We dive deep into Drupal and other web tech skills like Drush, GitHub, and Agile and a dive into our own products and services. Helping people become well rounded also means that we do workshops in team building, communication skills, and presentation skills. The next session will have an engineering focus so we will be digging into LAMP stack and web architecture.

  • Do the students have any obligation to Acquia at the end of the program? (Like they have to work for you for a given time period after the program?)

  • People are hired on as temp employees and we really hope they have had a great experience and want to stay on. The program’s goal is to hire them at Acquia or with one of our partners.

  • What percentage of students would you say you hire on average?

  • So far we have a 90% hire rate. The goal for 2016 is to expand the program and hire more people into other Drupal shops

  • Do you have information about those that you don’t hire? Do you know if they’re employed somewhere else? Or did they decide Drupal wasn’t for them?

Expanding the Concept
  • Now that you have a few classes under your belt, is this something you think other shops should look into doing?

    • People have asked me this and I think they should think about what the end goal is. Our program is not to just train more people for Acquia, but to give back to the Drupal community by creating a long-form drupal training program with learning paths and a structured hands-on curriculum.
  • We were talking before we started recording about this idea. Mike had mentioned that shops should create a talent pipeline. And while I agree with that in theory, what that means is that the shops first have to develop a training program, and one or more people who are skilled at both Drupal and teaching in a way that doesn’t alienate the trainee. From your perspective, how would you respond to that?

    • Having a talent pipleline means that you have a people development strategy that aligns to your business strategy, and that you have launched that people plan long before you launch the business strategy. Most companies play catch-up and are more reactive than proactive. Being proactive means you’re looking ahead 2-4 years out and making plans for your people.
  • If there is a shop owner out there listening right now, what would your advice be on how to go about creating a program like this?

    • I think you really have to be prepared to commit. Budgets need to allow for hiring junior talent, the business needs to be ready to bring in this level of need. It takes a lot of planning to launch a program like this. For companies that can’t support hiring 5-10 junior level talent, they should start out with a smaller number. A really strong learning program doesn’t just focus on the skills, but on different ways that people will need to learn and being able to translate really complex ideas into ways that different people will relate to. If you’ve ever heard about the adult learning cycle and experiential learning, we know that people tend to be most successful learning new skills when they can reach back into their own experience and apply them to the new content. Being a really strong developer doesn’t always mean that you can tap into other peoples’ experiences and make it relevant to them now. So when you look at creating that pipeline and having junior level talent come on board, you also have to figure out the most effective way to do it.
Episode Links: Amy on TwitterAcquia on TwitterAcquiaU on TwitterAcquiaU WebsiteTags: JobsCareersHiringplanet-drupal
Categories: Elsewhere

Junichi Uekawa: New Month.

Planet Debian - Wed, 08/04/2015 - 04:05
New Month. New Life.

Categories: Elsewhere

Wouter Verhelst: C11 function overloading

Planet Debian - Wed, 08/04/2015 - 00:12

About four years ago, the ISO 9899:2011 "C11" standard was announced. At the time, I had a short look at (a draft version of) the standards document, and found a few interesting bits in there. Of course, however, due to it only very recently having been released, I did not have much hope of it being implemented to any reasonable amount anywhere yet. Which turned out to be the case. Even if that wasn't true, writing code that uses C11 features and expecting it to work just about anywhere else would have been a bad idea back then.

We're several years down the line now, however, and now the standard has been implemented to a reasonable extent in most compilers. GCC claims its "support [for C11] is at a similar level of completeness to (...) C99 support" since GCC 4.9.

Since my laptop has GCC 4.9, I looked at one feature in C11 that I have been wanting to use for a while: Generic selection.

#include <stdint.h> #include <inttypes.h> #include <stdio.h> void say32(uint32_t i) { printf("32-bit variable: %" PRId32 "\n", i); } void say64(uint64_t i) { printf("64-bit variable: %" PRId64 "\n", i); } void sayother(int i) { printf("This is something else.\n"); } #define say(X) _Generic((X), uint32_t: say32, uint64_t: say64, default: sayother)(X) int main(void) { uint32_t v32 = 32; uint64_t v64 = 64; uint8_t v8 = 8; say(v32); say(v64); say(v8); }

Output of the above:

32-bit variable: 32 64-bit variable: 64 This is something else.

or, "precompiler-assisted function overloading for C". Should be useful for things like:

#define ntoh(X) _Generic((X), int16_t: ntohs, uint16_t: ntohs, int32_t: ntohl, uint32_t: ntohl)(X) #define hton(X) _Generic((X), int16_t: ntohs, uint16_t: htons, int32_t: ntohl, uint32_t: htonl)(X)

... and if one adds the ntohll found here, it can do 64 bit as well.

Categories: Elsewhere

Thorsten Glaser: exciting news, or so

Planet Debian - Wed, 08/04/2015 - 00:02

I implemented <? support (including <?php…) script embedding support for *.inc in MirWebseite today; the specific syntax was explicitely requested by Natureshadow. Ugh.

My own hacking activities are progressing, even if slowly. I do some other interesting, funny, social, beneficial, etc. stuff in between, though. I’ll even have to get some of my DD buddies to sponsor me some QA uploads of packages I formerly maintained, whereever changes are queued up… such as better old-format repo compatibility in cvs(GNU) ☺ Though some of the stuff I do at work is currently done only there… sorry.

Also: prepare to be fully enlightened about just what evil (nice picture) Docker is. I especially liked the comparison of containers to a herd of cattle, mere numbers, replaceable, whereas VMs are cats, each with their individual name, lovely petted each day, etc.

ObHint: Some may have noticed I do have a Twitter account now. I do not really use it much. I got it because I wanted to rant at someone who only gave Twitter as means to contact them (a European company running a lottery for USA citizens only). But I found one nice thing: @HourlyCats (though @FacesPics and @BahnAnsagen are funny too, and the Postillon anyway). The internet is there for cat content, anyway.
Ahem. Do not contact me there, use IRC, more specifically, the Freenode network, and possibly memoserv to mirabilos instead, I can’t fit things into 140 chars, that’s just ridiculous. Also, don’t follow me. It may contain rants, it’s NSFW, and I’m not censoring there. As I said: I do not use it. So should you. (But kudos for having a mostly functional “fallback” site (the “mobile” one), which even works in PocketIE (Windows Mobile) and Opera 9, though not so much lynx(1)…)

odc (from #!/bin/mksh on IRC) is hacking support to use mksh instead of GNU bash for bootstrapping pkgsrc® (e.g. on Solaris). Nice! Good luck!

… à propos mksh(1), dear Debian armel and armhf buildd maintainer colleagues, pretty please with strawberries and chocolate ice on top (I just had that on waffles at my favourite ice salon, so I may be biased), do like s390x and update your chroots and wanna-build give-back mksh, as we requested, so the privacy fix makes it into jessie. Thanks in advance!

Oh, and Y_Plentyn and I have both putting more and updated packages into my APT repository. XTaran held a talk at CLT 2015 mentioning it… maybe I should write up some docs about how to use it for which purposes (e.g. how to avoid systemd but not get the other packages from it, or how to use it with systemd (trivial but has to be stated, it’s freedom of choice after all), etc.)?

Besides decent fanfiction (the stories in the Uzumaki Naruto universe seem, on average, to be much longer than those in the Harry Potter one), the weather is becoming good, so I’ve already been enjoying myself with geocaching and will have the bike fixed at the shop RSN (it suffers a bit each winter, as it stands outside, since our basement is mouldy, which is worse than a bit of rust IMHO) to get more activity in. Also planning to head to the GPS Maze in Mainz and, besides what time FrOSCon (including preparation) allows, heading to DebConf for a while.

Categories: Elsewhere

Wouter Verhelst: C11 operator overloading

Planet Debian - Tue, 07/04/2015 - 23:53

C11 function overloading

About four years ago, the ISO 9899:2011 "C11" standard was announced. At the time, I had a short look at (a draft version of) the standards document, and found a few interesting bits in there. Of course, however, due to it only very recently having been released, I did not have much hope of it being implemented to any reasonable amount anywhere yet. Which turned out to be the case. Even if that wasn't true, writing code that uses C11 features and expecting it to work just about anywhere else would have been a bad idea back then.

We're several years down the line now, however, and now the standard has been implemented to a reasonable extent in most compilers. GCC claims its "support [for C11] is at a similar level of completeness to (...) C99 support" since GCC 4.9.

Since my laptop has GCC 4.9, I looked at one feature in C11 that I have been wanting to use for a while: Generic selection.

#include <stdint.h> #include <inttypes.h> #include <stdio.h> void say32(uint32_t i) { printf("32-bit variable: %" PRId32 "\n", i); } void say64(uint64_t i) { printf("64-bit variable: %" PRId64 "\n", i); } void sayother(int i) { printf("This is something else.\n"); } #define say(X) _Generic((X), uint32_t: say32, uint64_t: say64, default: sayother)(X) int main(void) { uint32_t v32 = 32; uint64_t v64 = 64; uint8_t v8 = 8; say(v32); say(v64); say(v8); }

Output of the above:

32-bit variable: 32 64-bit variable: 64 This is something else.

or, "precompiler-assisted function overloading for C". Should be useful for things like:

#define ntoh(X) _Generic((X), int16_t: ntohs, uint16_t: ntohs, int32_t: ntohl, uint32_t: ntohl)(X) #define hton(X) _Generic((X), int16_t: ntohs, uint16_t: htons, int32_t: ntohl, uint32_t: htonl)(X)

... and if one adds the ntohll found here, it can do 64 bit as well.

Categories: Elsewhere

Promet Source: My Experience with Acquia Certification

Planet Drupal - Tue, 07/04/2015 - 23:03
My Advice

 

Preparing for the exam:

- Review this great guide: Five Steps to Get Ready for the Acquia Certified Developer Exam (pdf)

- As the guide says, review topics (in the pdf appendix) and identify your weaknesses, read up on your weaknesses.

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Easy: Drupal Goes to College

Planet Drupal - Tue, 07/04/2015 - 22:04

DrupalEasy is so excited to announce that we are teaming up with Stetson University to present the first comprehensive, university-based Drupal career professional development program in Florida! The Drupal Career Certificate Program (DCCP), which is built on DrupalEasy’s Drupal Career Starter Program curriculum, marks an official entrance to the Drupal talent pipeline through the US higher education system. The DCCP, now part of the university’s Boundless Learning programs, will be officially announced at Florida DrupalCamp 2015!  The first course will kick off this Fall at the Stetson Celebration Center located right in the middle of Florida's High Tech corridor on the outskirts of Orlando.

-->

read more

Categories: Elsewhere

Mario Lang: I am sorry, but this looks insane

Planet Debian - Tue, 07/04/2015 - 21:03

I am a console user. I really just started to use X11 again about two weeks ago, to sometimes test an a Qt application I am developing. I am not using Firefox or anything similar, all my daily work happens in shells and inside of emacs, in a console, not in X11. BRLTTY runs all the time, translating the screen content to something that my braille display can understand, sent out via USB. So the most important programs to me, are really emacs, and brltty.

This is my desktop, that is up since 179 days.

PID USER PR NI VIRT RES SHR S %CPU %MEM TIME+ COMMAND 1227 message+ 20 0 7140 2860 672 S 0,0 0,1 153:33.10 dbus-daemon 21457 root 20 0 44456 1116 788 S 0,0 0,1 146:42.47 packagekitd 1 root 20 0 24348 2808 1328 S 0,0 0,1 109:16.99 systemd 7897 mlang 20 0 585776 121656 4188 S 0,0 6,0 105:22.40 emacs 13332 root 20 0 10744 432 220 S 0,0 0,0 91:55.96 ssh 19581 root 20 0 4924 1632 1076 S 0,0 0,1 53:33.56 systemd 19596 root 20 0 20312 9764 9660 S 0,0 0,5 48:10.76 systemd-journal 10172 root 20 0 85308 2472 1672 S 0,0 0,1 20:30.18 NetworkManager 29 root 20 0 0 0 0 S 0,0 0,0 18:40.24 kswapd0 13334 root 20 0 120564 5748 304 S 0,0 0,3 16:20.89 sshfs 7 root 20 0 0 0 0 S 0,0 0,0 15:21.15 rcu_sched 14245 root 20 0 7620 316 152 S 0,0 0,0 15:08.64 ssh 438 root 20 0 0 0 0 S 0,0 0,0 12:14.80 jbd2/dm-1-8 11952 root 10 -10 42968 2028 1420 S 0,0 0,1 10:36.20 brltty

I am sorry, but this doesn't look right, not at all. I am not even beginning to talk about dbus-daemon and systemd. Why the HECK does packagekitd (which I definitely don't use actively) use up more then two hours of plain CPU time? What did it do, talk to NSA via an asymmetric cipher, or what?! I play music via sshfs, sometimes FLAC files. That barely consumed more CPU time then brltty, which is probably the most active daemon on my system, erm, it should be.

I don't want to chime into any flamewars. I have accepted that we have systemd. But this does not look right! I remember, back in the good old days, emacs and brltty were my top CPU users.

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupalpress, Drupal in the Health Sciences Library at UVA: equipment booking system — simplify(ing) comments

Planet Drupal - Tue, 07/04/2015 - 20:52

We don’t have a lot of feedback about how our patrons are using the current equipment booking system. There may be information that users could share with one another (and the library) if given a mechanism to do so. So as part of the new booking system implementation in Drupal, we set a task of including a commenting feature. Each reservable piece of equipment stands alone as a node so all we have to do is turn on commenting, right?

Basically.

But there are a couple of things that are worth noting about that.

If you’re enabling comments on a content type, it’s probably a good idea to consider who can view (and post comments to) that content. That’s all in the permissions table.

In our scenario, we didn’t want unauthenticated comments and we didn’t want to restrict the individual equipment pages (e.g. the page for iPad copy 2) to any kind of login. The request to reserve equipment from that page would trigger the login.

The snippet from the permissions table below shows how we adjusted the comment access. Note that these will be permissions that will apply anywhere else on we’re using comments on our site … we’re not currently, but if we do in the future we’re fine with this access level.

Once authenticated, the comment form defaults to give users a text format selection option. There are advantages to users selecting a WYSIWYG format This too can be handled in the text format configurations or even the permissions table. An easier way is with the Simplify module.

Simplify gives you an interface to hide a bunch of stuff that may be noisy to users adding content — publishing options, path settings, etc.

And for comments it lets you hide text formats.

The finished product:

Categories: Elsewhere

Carl Chenet: Backup Checker, the ServerSpec for your backups

Planet Debian - Tue, 07/04/2015 - 19:38

Follow me on Identi.ca  or Twitter  or Diaspora*

Sysadmins usually know ServerSpec, a tool allowing to check if your servers are correctly configured. The use of automated deployment tools makes deployments easier and easier, but lot of unexpected situations can come up using this tool, especially when more and more servers are implied. ServerSpec allows to verify that the result of your deployments are what you were expecting for and that no exception or unexpected event goes undetected.

Backup Checker (Github stars appreciated :)) offers the same kind of controls, but for your backups. Once you have backups, you don’t know if they contain what you are expecting for. And this is especially important because having broken backups mean losing your data after a major outage! Moreover if you think you are well protected with backups but they are eventually broken (corrupted archives, archives being filled with empty files, saving useless files…), you will perform your server or database upgrades without being really protected, leading to terrible situations.

Backup Checker on github

 

Backup Checker offers lots of controls over backups:

  • check if an archive is corrupted
  • control if some files or directories exist inside an archive exist
  • check if a file size inside an archive is not null or has a specific size (operators smaller than, equals, greater than supported)
  • owner, group, uid, gid of files/directories inside an archive
  • and a lot more. Check the official documentation!
Use Backup Checker with Backup-Manager or Rsnapshot

Starting from Backup Checker 1.7,if you use a backup tool like Backup-Manager or Rsnapshot, you’ll be glad to know that Backup Checker perfectly works with them. The documentation is available on the Backup Checker Community page with the howtos to install and configure Backup Checker with Backup-Manager or with Rsnapshot.

What about you? Let us know in the comments what you think of Backup Checker and its features to connect with other backup tools. We would be happy to get your feedbacks about how you use Backup Checker or what you expect from a backup checking solution.


Categories: Elsewhere

Zlatan Todorić: Atlassian honors 10 years of Git

Planet Debian - Tue, 07/04/2015 - 19:37

and even mentions Debian.Here under info for Git installations skyrocket (January 2010).

Categories: Elsewhere

Red Crackle: Why We Chose Drupal Organic Groups: A Comparative Study

Planet Drupal - Tue, 07/04/2015 - 19:30
This article explains why we went ahead with Organic Groups for one of our Drupal projects. As part of our research, we did a detailed analysis of the following platforms: Organic Groups, Open Atrium, Drupal Commons, Open Scholar and Domain Access. We have listed the positive and negatives in the article. You will understand why we finally decided to go with Organic Groups. Follow this article to make informed decisions while choosing a platform for your business needs.
Categories: Elsewhere

Mediacurrent: Mediacurrent Dropcast: Episode 3

Planet Drupal - Tue, 07/04/2015 - 18:40

This week on the show we will be discussing the new Configuration Management system in Drupal 8 based on an article by Victor Kane, and once again dive into RESTFUL Drupal, or Headless as the cool kids say, based on a blog post from Joris Snoek. We’ll go over some Drupal 8 news and once again Ryan will bring it home the Closing Bell.

Categories: Elsewhere

Lucas Nussbaum: Tentative systemd slides

Planet Debian - Tue, 07/04/2015 - 17:52

I recently spent some time updating my systemd knowledge and decided to put together some slides that I’ll use for a lecture. I’m interested in feedback about things that are missing,  unclear, etc. Available on slideshare, as PDF, and as LaTeX source.

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