Elsewhere

Clemens Tolboom: Which route belongs to which path fragment?

Planet Drupal - Tue, 28/10/2014 - 13:21
AttachmentSize Drupal menu tree with GraphViz650.46 KB Drupal menu tree with d3js216.41 KB Drupal menu tree PNG55.17 KB Drupal menu radial tree with d3js217.39 KB Drupal-menu-tree-radial.png221.33 KB Drupal menu tree graphviz75.85 KB

Visualization some complex part of Drupal is helping understand Drupal better. This is about the menu tree using Graph Viz for a static SVG diagram and D3JS for a dynamic version.

Categories: Elsewhere

KnackForge: Ajax Autocomplete Customization for Textfield in Drupal

Planet Drupal - Tue, 28/10/2014 - 12:23

Autocomplete is a feature for textfields in Drupal. It provides a dropdown list of matching options from the server. It is implemented through AJAX. To know how to add an autocomplete form element in Drupal visit https://www.drupal.org/node/854216

 

For customizing autocomplete we need to override the Drupal system file "misc/autocomplete.js". This can be achieved ideally in two ways:

  • Replace the entire "autocomplete.js" with your customised version

    function MY_MODULE_js_alter(&$javascript) { $javascript['misc/autocomplete.js']['data'] = drupal_get_path('module', 'MY_MODULE') . '/js/autocomplete.js'; }
  • Override "Drupal.ACDB.prototype.search" with a custom behaviour in theme script.js or module js file, as long as it's added after /misc/autocomplete.js it will override it.

Categories: Elsewhere

Jonny Lamb: Sciopero

Planet Debian - Tue, 28/10/2014 - 12:11

Public transport strikes in Rome are so frequent that it’s hard to remember when they are. I wrote a Gnome Shell extension to help remind me when there’s one either coming up or in progress. Find it on extensions.gnome.org. It gets its data from another little service I just made.

A Roma gli scioperi dei mezzi pubblici sono così frequenti che spesso è facile dimenticarsi quando ci sono. Ho scritto un’estensione per Gnome Shell per avvisare quando c’è o si avvicina uno sciopero dell’Atac. La puoi trovare su extensions.gnome.org. Funziona grazie ad un altro piccolo servizio che ho creato.

Categories: Elsewhere

Visitors Voice: “Can our site search be like Google?”

Planet Drupal - Tue, 28/10/2014 - 07:58
When we discuss site search with clients they often say they want it to work like Google. The problem with this is not that they don’t understand that Google plays in another league when it comes to resources – of course they do. The main problem is that the clients often doesn’t understand the main […]
Categories: Elsewhere

Keith Packard: Goodbye-Barnes-and-Noble

Planet Debian - Tue, 28/10/2014 - 04:54
Goodbye Barnes & Noble

I've read books on electronic devices for many years now; the convenience of having a huge library with me while traveling makes up for the lower quality of the presentation. I've read books on a selection of Palm devices, an old OpenInkpot compatible ereader, my phone and, most recently, on my Kobo Aura.

To get reading material, I've used a variety of sources, including the venerable Project Gutenberg, the Internet Archive, directly from authors like Cory Doctorow and even our local Multnomah County Public Library.

I like to have books in epub format; it's a published standard, based on HTML and CSS. My recent devices have all happily supported that, and it allows for editing when I feel the need to correct typos or formatting problems.

Purchasing Books

When I wanted to actually purchase a book, I bought from Barnes & Noble; they have a good selection, and reasonable automatic recommendations. According to their web site, since I started shopping there, I've purchased 51 books. I can't tell how much I've spent, but probably in excess of $500.

Not knowing which device I'd be reading on at any one time, and liking to have the assurance of ongoing access to my library, I would always download the epub files to my laptop and then transfer them to whichever device I wanted to read on. This ensured that my books would be available even when I didn't have a network connection (as happened yesterday during a wind storm which cut the power to the DSLAM which connects me to the internet).

I'd created a simple shell script which captured the file after it was downloaded on my laptop and prepared it for my reader. A bit of browser configuration and it really was as simple as clicking the 'download' button to get a book onto both my laptop and my reading device.

Barnes & Noble Disables Downloading

I was traveling in Bordeaux a couple of weeks ago and wanted to get the latest volume in a series I was reading. My library didn't have it available, and so I decided that it was worth a few dollars to purchase it for the flight home.

After clicking through the Barnes & Noble store, I was ready to download the book so that I could transfer it to my reader. Going to 'My Library', I found my new purchases but the usual 'Download' button was missing. I was a bit surprised as I'd purchased and downloaded the previous volume just before leaving without any troubles.

At first, I assumed there was some kind of region restriction on the distribution of this book. I'm familiar with that from DVD region locking of movies, and supposed that the same could be done with books for some reason. However, after setting up a VPN back to home and browsing through that (to ensure that my browser would appear with an Oregon address), the download button was still not present.

The unhelpful Barnes & Noble representative that I accessed through the 'help' button disclosed that the 'download' "feature" had been disabled for "security" reasons.

Not really having any alternative, I requested a refund for the new book.

Barnes & Noble Loses a Customer

With no way to actually use ebooks purchased through the Barnes & Noble store, I won't be spending any more money with them.

I'm not sure how that helps their "security" issues, although if they lose enough customers and they close their doors, I guess that would make them about as secure as imaginable.

Kobo Makes a Sale

Having purchased a Kobo Aura, it had built-in access to their book store, which made it easy to download the book that I wanted. Then, I simply connected my reader to my laptop and copied the file over for safe keeping.

Buying Books under Linux

After I got home, I had to figure out how to get Adobe Digital Editions installed on my laptop. Fortunately, I discovered that version 2.0.1 runs fine under wine.

Now, purchasing books can be done with my laptop (a vastly superior browsing experience). The .acsm file can be dragged straight from the iceweasel download menu to Adobe Digital Editions, which happily downloads the actual .epub file and makes it available for transferring to my reader.

Of course, now that I've got Adobe Digital Editions working, I can also get digitally restricted books from all over the net, greatly expanding my options for purchasing (or borrowing) books. It's a bit less convenient, and requires that I run an icky Windows binary under wine, but at least I have choices, which is some consolation.

Categories: Elsewhere

Junichi Uekawa: Running git grep under emacs compilation mode.

Planet Debian - Mon, 27/10/2014 - 22:49
Running git grep under emacs compilation mode. It's driving me nuts because there's 0xfeff(BOM) at the beginning which seems to break file name matching.

Categories: Elsewhere

Chapter Three: Drupal 8 Administration is Faster, Cheaper and Easier

Planet Drupal - Mon, 27/10/2014 - 20:53

Drupal 8 is the most fully featured Drupal version ever. Site builders will notice this most immediately when looking at what is available out of the box. Drupal 8 is faster because features that are expected of a modern CMS, like a WYSIWYG editor, are in Core. It's cheaper because you don't have to pay for custom development to change administration listings since they are Views And it's better because there are less "why does this not work" moments including the ability to place the same block in multiple regions. Below are four videos that demonstrate these new Drupal 8 features and a few more.



Create Custom Administration Experiences

Categories: Elsewhere

Petter Reinholdtsen: First Jessie based Debian Edu released (alpha0)

Planet Debian - Mon, 27/10/2014 - 20:40

I am happy to report that I on behalf of the Debian Edu team just sent out this announcement:

The Debian Edu Team is pleased to announce the release of Debian Edu Jessie 8.0+edu0~alpha0 Debian Edu is a complete operating system for schools. Through its various installation profiles you can install servers, workstations and laptops which will work together on the school network. With Debian Edu, the teachers themselves or their technical support can roll out a complete multi-user multi-machine study environment within hours or a few days. Debian Edu comes with hundreds of applications pre-installed, but you can always add more packages from Debian. For those who want to give Debian Edu Jessie a try, download and installation instructions are available, including detailed instructions in the manual[1] explaining the first steps, such as setting up a network or adding users. Please note that the password for the user your prompted for during installation must have a length of at least 5 characters! [1] <URL: https://wiki.debian.org/DebianEdu/Documentation/Jessie > Would you like to give your school's computer a longer life? Are you tired of sneaker administration, running from computer to computer reinstalling the operating system? Would you like to administrate all the computers in your school using only a couple of hours every week? Check out Debian Edu Jessie! Skolelinux is used by at least two hundred schools all over the world, mostly in Germany and Norway. About Debian Edu and Skolelinux =============================== Debian Edu, also known as Skolelinux[2], is a Linux distribution based on Debian providing an out-of-the box environment of a completely configured school network. Immediately after installation a school server running all services needed for a school network is set up just waiting for users and machines being added via GOsa², a comfortable Web-UI. A netbooting environment is prepared using PXE, so after initial installation of the main server from CD or USB stick all other machines can be installed via the network. The provided school server provides LDAP database and Kerberos authentication service, centralized home directories, DHCP server, web proxy and many other services. The desktop contains more than 60 educational software packages[3] and more are available from the Debian archive, and schools can choose between KDE, Gnome, LXDE, Xfce and MATE desktop environment. [2] <URL: http://www.skolelinux.org/ > [3] <URL: http://people.skolelinux.org/pere/blog/Educational_applications_included_in_Debian_Edu___Skolelinux__the_screenshot_collection____.html > Full release notes and manual ============================= Below the download URLs there is a list of some of the new features and bugfixes of Debian Edu 8.0+edu0~alpha0 Codename Jessie. The full list is part of the manual. (See the feature list in the manual[4] for the English version.) For some languages manual translations are available, see the manual translation overview[5]. [4] <URL: https://wiki.debian.org/DebianEdu/Documentation/Jessie/Features > [5] <URL: http://maintainer.skolelinux.org/debian-edu-doc/ > Where to get it --------------- To download the multiarch netinstall CD release (624 MiB) you can use * ftp://ftp.skolelinux.org/skolelinux-cd/debian-edu-8.0+edu0~alpha0-CD.iso * http://ftp.skolelinux.org/skolelinux-cd/debian-edu-8.0+edu0~alpha0-CD.iso * rsync -avzP ftp.skolelinux.org::skolelinux-cd/debian-edu-8.0+edu0~alpha0-CD.iso . The SHA1SUM of this image is: 361188818e036ce67280a572f757de82ebfeb095 New features for Debian Edu 8.0+edu0~alpha0 Codename Jessie released 2014-10-27 =============================================================================== Installation changes -------------------- * PXE installation now installs firmware automatically for the hardware present. Software updates ---------------- Everything which is new in Debian Jessie 8.0, eg: * Linux kernel 3.16.x * Desktop environments KDE "Plasma" 4.11.12, GNOME 3.14, Xfce 4.10, LXDE 0.5.6 and MATE 1.8 (KDE "Plasma" is installed by default; to choose one of the others see manual.) * the browsers Iceweasel 31 ESR and Chromium 38 * !LibreOffice 4.3.3 * GOsa 2.7.4 * LTSP 5.5.4 * CUPS print system 1.7.5 * new boot framework: systemd * Educational toolbox GCompris 14.07 * Music creator Rosegarden 14.02 * Image editor Gimp 2.8.14 * Virtual stargazer Stellarium 0.13.0 * golearn 0.9 * tuxpaint 0.9.22 * New version of debian-installer from Debian Jessie. * Debian Jessie includes about 42000 packages available for installation. * More information about Debian Jessie 8.0 is provided in the release notes[6] and the installation manual[7]. [6] <URL: http://www.debian.org/releases/jessie/releasenotes > [7] <URL: http://www.debian.org/releases/jessie/installmanual > Fixed bugs ---------- * Inserting incorrect DNS information in Gosa will no longer break DNS completely, but instead stop DNS updates until the incorrect information is corrected (Debian bug #710362) * and many others. Documentation and translation updates ------------------------------------- * The Debian Edu Jessie Manual is fully translated to German, French, Italian, Danish and Dutch. Partly translated versions exist for Norwegian Bokmal and Spanish. Other changes ------------- * Due to new Squid settings, powering off or rebooting the main server takes more time. * To manage printers localhost:631 has to be used, currently www:631 doesn't work. Regressions / known problems ---------------------------- * Installing LTSP chroot fails with a bug related to eatmydata about exim4-config failing to run its postinst (see Debian bug #765694 and Debian bug #762103). * Munin collection is not properly configured on clients (Debian bug #764594). The fix is available in a newer version of munin-node. * PXE setup for Main Server and Thin Client Server setup does not work when installing on a machine without direct Internet access. Will be fixed when Debian bug #766960 is fixed in Jessie. See the status page[8] for the complete list. [8] <URL: https://wiki.debian.org/DebianEdu/Status/Jessie > How to report bugs ------------------ <URL: http://wiki.debian.org/DebianEdu/HowTo/ReportBugs > About Debian ============ The Debian Project was founded in 1993 by Ian Murdock to be a truly free community project. Since then the project has grown to be one of the largest and most influential open source projects. Thousands of volunteers from all over the world work together to create and maintain Debian software. Available in 70 languages, and supporting a huge range of computer types, Debian calls itself the universal operating system. Contact Information For further information, please visit the Debian web pages[9] or send mail to press@debian.org. [9] <URL: http://www.debian.org/ >
Categories: Elsewhere

KnackForge: To check Caps lock is on/off status in jQuery

Planet Drupal - Mon, 27/10/2014 - 19:49
I'm sure that this script will help you in some of your projects that needs a username and password. Sometimes when we want access to a secure page that asks for a username and password and we submit the information but we didn't know that the password was submitted in upper case, we get an error.   Solution:  jQuery('#username').keypress(function(e) { var s = String.fromCharCode( e.which ); if ( s.toUpperCase() === s && s.toLowerCase() !== s && !e.shiftKey ) { jQuery('#capslockdiv').show(); } else { jQuery('#capslockdiv').hide(); } }); jQuery('#password').keypress(function(e) { var s = String.fromCharCode( e.which ); if ( s.toUpperCase() === s && s.toLowerCase() !== s && !e.shiftKey ) { jQuery('#capslockdiv').show(); } else { jQuery('#capslockdiv').hide(); } });

Sample HTML code

Categories: Elsewhere

a-fro.com: Keeping Compiled CSS Out of your Git Repository on Acquia

Planet Drupal - Mon, 27/10/2014 - 17:13
Keeping Compiled CSS Out of your Git Repository on Acquia

A couple of months ago, after a harrowing cascade of git merge conflicts involving compiled css, we decided it was time to subscribe to the philosophy that compiled CSS doesn't belong in a git repository.

Mon, 10/27/2014 - 12:13 aaron
Categories: Elsewhere

TimOnWeb.com: How To Force Search API To Reindex a Node / an Entity

Planet Drupal - Mon, 27/10/2014 - 17:00

By default Search API (Drupal 7) reindexes a node when the node gets updated. But what if you want to reindex a node / an entity on demand or via some other hook i.e. outside of update cycle?

Turned out it is a quite simple exercise. You just need to execute this function call whenever you want to reindex a node / an entity:

Drupal Tags  drupal 7, drupal planet Read on about How To Force Search API To Reindex a Node / an Entity
Categories: Elsewhere

KnackForge: Add class to image tags and panel titles

Planet Drupal - Mon, 27/10/2014 - 16:20

      Nowadays twitter bootstrap theme has become famous among Drupal world due to its flexibility for responsive websites. It is very easy to apply responsive css to the web page by adding appropriate bootstrap classes. If you are new to the twitter bootstrap theme, see here http://getbootstrap.com/css/ for more details about classes. Is it easy to add class to drupal site pages ? If yes, what to do to add class to panel title and image tags ? Lets come to the heart of the topic.

Adding class to panel title

      Eventhough it is easy to apply responsive css to the web page, when comes to drupal site we need to follow some standard approaches for adding classes. I need to add class to panel title in one of my requirements. By sticking with standard approach for this, I found this hook template_preprocess_panels_pane very useful to add class to panel title. Below code snippet will explain more detail about the usage.

function themename_preprocess_panels_pane(&$variables) { $variables['title_attributes_array']['class'][] = 'your class'; }

The above code snippet need to be written in theme's template.php file.

Adding class to img tags

      Then I need to add class to img tags to make the image responsive as one of my requirements. Similar to panel, I found this hook template_preprocess_image very useful to achieve this. See the below code snippet to know in detail

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupalize.Me: Using A Remote Debugger With CasperJS and PhantomJS

Planet Drupal - Mon, 27/10/2014 - 15:04

Earlier this year fellow Lullabot Juampy wrote about how we've started using CasperJS at Lullabot in order to do regression testing. I haven't had much chance to dig into it until recently, when we decided to implement some CasperJS tests for Drupalize.Me. So far, I'm really enjoying it—except for those occasions where something in my test is simply not working, and I end up spending hours asking CasperJS to take screenshots using console.log(), and trying to figure out what is going on. Fed up with this process I wanted a debugger.

Categories: Elsewhere

Patrick Matthäi: BASH fix Debian Lenny (5.0) CVE-2014-6271, CVE-2014-7169 aka Shellshock

Planet Debian - Mon, 27/10/2014 - 13:11

Hello,

I have decided to create fixed bash packages for Debian Lenny. I have applied the upstream patchsets from from 052 until 057, so some other issues are also addressed in it. :-)
And here they are:

Source .dsc: http://misc.linux-dev.org/bash_shellshock/bash_3.2-4.1.dsc
amd64 package: http://misc.linux-dev.org/bash_shellshock/bash_3.2-4.1_amd64.deb
i386 package: http://misc.linux-dev.org/bash_shellshock/bash_3.2-4.1_i386.deb

Much fun with it!

Categories: Elsewhere

Joey Hess: a programmable alarm clock using systemd

Planet Debian - Sun, 26/10/2014 - 23:00

I've taught my laptop to wake up at 7:30 in the morning. When it does, it will run whatever's in my ~/bin/goodmorning script. Then, if the lid is still closed, it will go back to sleep again.

So, it's a programmable alarm clock that doesn't need the laptop to be left turned on to work.

But it doesn't have to make noise and wake me up (I rarely want to be woken up by an alarm; the sun coming in the window is a much nicer method). It can handle other tasks like downloading my email, before I wake up. When I'm at home and on dialup, this tends to take an hour in the morning, so it's nice to let it happen before I get up.

This took some time to figure out, but it's surprisingly simple. Besides ~/bin/goodmorning, which can be any program/script, I needed just two files to configure systemd to do this.

First, /etc/systemd/system/goodmorning.timer

[Unit] Description=good morning [Timer] Unit=goodmorning.service OnCalendar=*-*-* 7:30 WakeSystem=true Persistent=false [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target

Second, /etc/systemd/system/goodmorning.service

[Unit] Description=good morning RefuseManualStart=true RefuseManualStop=true ConditionACPower=true [Service] Type=oneshot ExecStart=/bin/systemd-inhibit --what=handle-lid-switch --why=goodmorning /bin/su joey -c /home/joey/bin/goodmorning

After installing these files, run (as root): systemctl enable goodmorning.timer; systemctl start goodmorning.timer

Then, you'll also need to edit /etc/systemd/logind.conf, and set LidSwitchIgnoreInhibited=no -- this overrides the default, which is not to let systemd-inhibit block sleep on lid close.

The WakeSystem=true relies on some hardware support for waking from sleep; my laptop supported it with no trouble but I don't know how broadly available that is.

I don't think this would be anywhere near as easy to do without systemd, logind, etc. Especially the handling of waking the system at the right time, and the behavior around lid sleep inhibiting. Also, notice the ConditionACPower=true, which I added once I realized I don't want the job to run if I forgot to leave the laptop plugged in overnight. Quite a lot of nice peices of systemd all working together here!

(It would perhaps be better to use the per-user systemd, not the system wide one. Then I could change the time the alarm runs without using root. What's prevented me from doing this is that systemd-inhibit uses policykit, and policykit prevents it from being used in this situation. It's a lot easier to run it as root and use su, than it is to reconfigure policykit.)

Categories: Elsewhere

Hideki Yamane: Open Source Conference 2014 Tokyo/Fall

Planet Debian - Sun, 26/10/2014 - 23:00

18th and 19th October,  "Open Source Conference 2014 Tokyo/Fall" was held in Meisei University, Tokyo.  About 1,500 participates there. "Tokyo area Debian Study Meeting" booth was there, provided some flyers, DVDs and chat.

 

 
In our Debian community session, Nobuhiro Iwamatsu talked about status of Debian8 "Jessie". Thanks, Nobuhiro :)

It seems to be not a "conference" itself but a festival for FOSS and other IT community members, so they enjoyed a lot.





... and we also enjoyed beer after party (of course :)



see you - next event!
Categories: Elsewhere

Colin Watson: Moving on, but not too far

Planet Debian - Sun, 26/10/2014 - 22:55

The Ubuntu Code of Conduct says:

Step down considerately: When somebody leaves or disengages from the project, we ask that they do so in a way that minimises disruption to the project. They should tell people they are leaving and take the proper steps to ensure that others can pick up where they left off.

I've been working on Ubuntu for over ten years now, almost right from the very start; I'm Canonical's employee #17 due to working out a notice period in my previous job, but I was one of the founding group of developers. I occasionally tell the story that Mark originally hired me mainly to work on what later became Launchpad Bugs due to my experience maintaining the Debian bug tracking system, but then not long afterwards Jeff Waugh got in touch and said "hey Colin, would you mind just sorting out some installable CD images for us?". This is where you imagine one of those movie time-lapse clocks ... At some point it became fairly clear that I was working on Ubuntu, and the bug system work fell to other people. Then, when Matt Zimmerman could no longer manage the entire Ubuntu team in Canonical by himself, Scott James Remnant and I stepped up to help him out. I did that for a couple of years, starting the Foundations team in the process. As the team grew I found that my interests really lay in hands-on development rather than in management, so I switched over to being the technical lead for Foundations, and have made my home there ever since. Over the years this has given me the opportunity to do all sorts of things, particularly working on our installers and on the GRUB boot loader, leading the development work on many of our archive maintenance tools, instituting the +1 maintenance effort and proposed-migration, and developing the Click package manager, and I've had the great pleasure of working with many exceptionally talented people.

However. In recent months I've been feeling a general sense of malaise and what I've come to recognise with hindsight as the symptoms of approaching burnout. I've been working long hours for a long time, and while I can draw on a lot of experience by now, it's been getting harder to summon the enthusiasm and creativity to go with that. I have a wonderful wife, amazing children, and lovely friends, and I want to be able to spend a bit more time with them. After ten years doing the same kinds of things, I've accreted history with and responsibility for a lot of projects. One of the things I always loved about Foundations was that it's a broad church, covering a wide range of software and with a correspondingly wide range of opportunities; but, over time, this has made it difficult for me to focus on things that are important because there are so many areas where I might be called upon to help. I thought about simply stepping down from the technical lead position and remaining in the same team, but I decided that that wouldn't make enough of a difference to what matters to me. I need a clean break and an opportunity to reset my habits before I burn out for real.

One of the things that has consistently held my interest through all of this has been making sure that the infrastructure for Ubuntu keeps running reliably and that other developers can work efficiently. As part of this, I've been able to do a lot of work over the years on Launchpad where it was a good fit with my remit: this has included significant performance improvements to archive publishing, moving most archive administration operations from excessively-privileged command-line operations to the webservice, making build cancellation reliable across the board, and moving live filesystem building from an unscalable ad-hoc collection of machines into the Launchpad build farm. The Launchpad development team has generally welcomed help with open arms, and in fact I joined the ~launchpad team last year.

So, the logical next step for me is to make this informal involvement permanent. As such, at the end of this year I will be moving from Ubuntu Foundations to the Launchpad engineering team.

This doesn't mean me leaving Ubuntu. Within Canonical, Launchpad development is currently organised under the Continuous Integration team, which is part of Ubuntu Engineering. I'll still be around in more or less the usual places and available for people to ask me questions. But I will in general be trying to reduce my involvement in Ubuntu proper to things that are closely related to the operation of Launchpad, and a small number of low-effort things that I'm interested enough in to find free time for them. I still need to sort out a lot of details, but it'll very likely involve me handing over project leadership of Click, drastically reducing my involvement in the installer, and looking for at least some help with boot loader work, among others. I don't expect my Debian involvement to change, and I may well find myself more motivated there now that it won't be so closely linked with my day job, although it's possible that I will pare some things back that I was mostly doing on Ubuntu's behalf. If you ask me for help with something over the next few months, expect me to be more likely to direct you to other people or suggest ways you can help yourself out, so that I can start disentangling myself from my current web of projects.

Please contact me sooner or later if you're interested in helping out with any of the things I'm visible in right now, and we can see what makes sense. I'm looking forward to this!

Categories: Elsewhere

Gregor Herrmann: RC bugs 2014/38-43

Planet Debian - Sun, 26/10/2014 - 22:47

it's this time of the year^Wrelease cycle again – almost. in ten days (& roughly two hours), the freeze for the next debian release, codenamed jessie, will start. by this time packages must be in testing in order to be candidates for the release, as explained in the release team's detailed freeze policy. this also means, with the regular testing migration time set to ten days, that tonight's dinstall run closed the regular upload window.

& this also means that we should all concentrate on fixing RC bugs to make the freeze as short as possible & jessie yet another great release. before I head over to the UDD bugs page, I'd like to summarize my work on RC bugs in the last weeks, which was again focussed on packages in the Debian Perl Group.

  • #736739 – src:lemonldap-ng: "[src:lemonldap-ng] Sourceless file"
    upload new upstream release prepared by Xavier Guimard (pkg-perl)
  • #736807 – src:lemonldap-ng: "[src:lemonldap-ng] Non free file"
    upload new upstream release prepared by Xavier Guimard (pkg-perl)
  • #742409 – libsereal-encoder-perl: "libsereal-encoder-perl: FTBFS on some architectures"
    upload new upstream release, with patch from ntyni (pkg-perl)
  • #755317 – src:libnet-bonjour-perl: "libnet-bonjour-perl: FTBFS: Tests failures"
    lower severity (pkg-perl)
  • #755328 – src:libgraph-writer-graphviz-perl: "libgraph-writer-graphviz-perl: FTBFS: Tests failures"
    update patches for test suite (pkg-perl)
  • #759966 – src:libvideo-fourcc-info-perl: "libvideo-fourcc-info-perl: FTBFS: dh_auto_test: perl Build test returned exit code 255"
    close bug, fixed in #762334 (pkg-perl)
  • #762333 – libcgi-application-plugin-ajaxupload-perl: "libcgi-application-plugin-ajaxupload-perl: FTBFS with libjson-any-perl 1.36-1: test failures"
    close, as the bug is fixed in libpackage-stash-perl, cf. #762334 (pkg-perl)
  • #763254 – src:libcrypt-gcrypt-perl: "libcrypt-gcrypt-perl: FTBFS: GCrypt.xs:59:5: error: unknown type name 'gcry_ac_handle_t'"
    add patch from CPAN RT (pkg-perl)
  • #765053 – libapache-dbilogger-perl: "libapache-dbilogger-perl: FTBFS - undefined symbol: modperl_is_running"
    close, as the bug is fixed in libapache2-mod-perl2, cf. #765174 (pkg-perl)
  • #765137 – src:libcgi-fast-perl: "libcgi-fast-perl: FTBFS: Tests failures"
    upload new upstream release (pkg-perl)
  • #765150 – src:libhtml-formfu-perl: "libhtml-formfu-perl: FTBFS: Tests failures"
    lower severity (pkg-perl)
  • #765165 – liblog-dispatch-perl: "liblog-dispatch-perl: missing dependency/recommendation on libdevel-globaldestruction-perl"
    add missing (build) dependency (pkg-perl)
Categories: Elsewhere

Sune Vuorela: KDE makes Qt

Planet Debian - Sun, 26/10/2014 - 22:36

Recently I was trying some statistics on the qtbase-module (where QtCore, QtGui, QtWidgets and so on lives) and was wondering who made them.
Not based on their current paid affilation, like Thiago’s graphs, but if each commit was made by a person coming from KDE.

So, I got hold of Thiago’s scripts, a lovely mix of perl and zsh, and a QtBase git repository. First steps was to try to classify people as person coming from KDE or not. Of course, I’m a KDE person. Thiago is a KDE person. David Faure is a KDE person. Olivier Goffart is a KDE person. Lars Knoll is a KDE person.

By the help of the KDE accounts file, and some of the long time KDE contributors, I got after a half day of work a good list of it. Then next steps was trying to put it into Thiago’s perlscripts

All of it kind of succeeded:

So, KDE people makes up for 40-60% of the weekly commits to QtBase. This is again shows that KDE is important to Qt, just as the reverse is. So, let’s keep KDE healthy.

KDE is running a end-of-year fundraiser over here https://www.kde.org/fundraisers/yearend2014/. Go ahead and donate, and help KDE stay healthy. For your own sake. And for Qt’s.

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