SitePoint PHP Drupal: Building Custom cTools Plugins in Drupal 7

Planet Drupal - Fri, 02/10/2015 - 18:00

cTools is one of those critical Drupal 7 modules many others depend on. It provides a lot of APIs and functionality that makes life easier when developing modules. Views and Panels are just two examples of such powerhouses that depend on it.

cTools makes available different kinds of functionality. Object caching, configuration exportability, form wizards, dialogs and plugins are but a few. A lot of the credit you would normally attribute to Views or Panels is actually owed to cTools.

In this article, we are going to take a look at cTools plugins, especially how we can create our very own. After a brief introduction, we will immediately go hands on with a custom module that will use the cTools plugins to make defining Drupal blocks nicer (more in tune to how we define them in Drupal 8).


cTools plugins in Drupal 7 (conceptually not so dissimilar to the plugin system in Drupal 8) are meant for easily defining reusable bits of functionality. That is to say, for the ability to define isolated business logic that is used in some context. The goal is to set up that context and plugin type once, and allow other modules to then define plugins that can be used in that context automatically.

If you’ve been developing Drupal sites for more than a year you’ve probably encountered cTools plugins in one shape or form. I think the first plugin type we usually deal with is the content_type plugin which allows us to create our own custom panel panes that display dynamic content. And that is awesome. Some of the others you may have encountered in the same realm of Panels are probably context and access (visibility rules). Maybe even relationships and arguments. These are all provided by cTools. Panels adds to this list by introducing layouts and styles that we normally use for creating Panels layouts and individual pane styles. These are I think the more common ones.

However, all of the above are to a certain extent a black box to many. All we know is that we need to define a hook to specify a directory and then provide an include file with some definition and logic code and the rest happens by magic. Going forward, I would like us to look into how a plugin type is defined so that if the case arises, we can create our own plugins to represent some reusable bits of functionality. To demonstrate this, we will create a module that turns the pesky hook system of defining custom Drupal blocks into a plugin based approach similar to what Drupal 8 is using.

The final code (+ a bit more) can be found in this repository if you want to follow along. And I do expect you are familiar with the steps necessary for defining custom Drupal blocks.

Continue reading %Building Custom cTools Plugins in Drupal 7%

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InternetDevels: Best tools to test and optimize your website’s speed

Planet Drupal - Fri, 02/10/2015 - 17:22

Discover our new blog post related to QA testing
and optimizing your website's speed.
Everything can be improved! :)

Have a cup of coffee, take a bath, do some physical exercises... That’s what users wouldn’t like to do while a website is loading. According to statistics, people leave a website that loads longer than 3 seconds.

Read more
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ImageX Media: Using Mydumper with Drush

Planet Drupal - Fri, 02/10/2015 - 17:19

In my first post about mydumper I explained why developers would want to use it (it's fast!), and how to build it for MacOS.

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Microserve: Acceptance Criteria: What, why and how?

Planet Drupal - Fri, 02/10/2015 - 16:46
Acceptance Criteria: What, why and how?Oct 2nd 2015

Building a website is a complicated process. I don’t want to downplay the importance of technical expertise, but for me the most difficult part of a website build is clearly and concisely capturing a client’s requirements. So much hinges on the hours we spend discussing business processes, sketching out UML diagrams and cataloguing every detail. However so often a lot of effort goes in and the resulting documents aren’t as clear as we would have hoped.

the most difficult part of a website build is clearly and concisely capturing a client’s requirements

So how do we improve on this situation? Acceptance criteria. To the uninitiated acceptance criteria are a bit like requirements. They seem to just state a single requirement for a change or fix. The difference is that requirements come in all shapes and sizes, acceptance criteria all look the same. In fact they even have a clearly defined format to help keep to a standard. They look like this:

“Given that… When... Then…”

You should read this as “Given that some precondition is satisfied, when an action or actions take place, then a testable result will occur”. This format lets you turn requirements in to unambiguous, testable, acceptance criteria, which helps developers know exactly what to build, testers know exactly what to test and most importantly helps the actual development go as smoothly as possible.

For example, a typical requirement might be:

we want single sign on between the website and our invoicing system

This could translate in to any number of acceptance criteria so it is important to be unambiguous about what is meant.

Given that I am a user in both the invoicing system and the website, when I visit the website and I am already logged in to the invoicing system, then I am automatically logged in to the website on the first page load

This is much clearer about what is needed. It is still not especially detailed, but it better highlights the additional information which is required, meaning it will be easier to write further acceptance criteria for that as well.

We like to introduce clients to acceptance criteria early on in the requirement gathering stage to let them know what we’re aiming for. It helps guide discussions when you are all internally trying to boil down requirements to these simple little maxims. We still go through all the same processes to uncover the requirements in the first place, the workshops, the diagrams and flowcharts, but then before we start development we review all of that documentation and produce a functional specification including all the acceptance criteria.

This process really ties the requirement gathering phase and development phase together. You can be the best business analyst in the world and have a lot of great techniques for discussing your clients requirements, but unless you can translate them into manageable, testable chunks it’s very tricky to know if you’re delivering what was asked for. That’s why for me this will always be the most important part of a project.


Written by: Rob Humphries, Project Manager

Microserve is a Drupal Agency based in Bristol, UK. We specialise in Drupal Development, Drupal Site Audits and Health Checks, and Drupal Support and Maintenance. Contact us for for further information.

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Tim Millwood: How can we know if a page in Drupal 8 has changed?

Planet Drupal - Fri, 02/10/2015 - 16:27
This was a question I got from a client. So I set to work on finding a solution to alert the team...
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Norbert Preining: Updates for OSX 10.11 El Capitan: cjk-gs-integrate and jfontmaps 20151002.0

Planet Debian - Fri, 02/10/2015 - 09:52

Now that OSX 10.11 El Capitan is released and everyone is eagerly updating, in cooperation with the colleagues from the Japanese TeX world we have released new versions of the jfontmaps and cjk-gs-integrate packages. With these two packages in TeX Live, El Capitan users can take advantage of the newly available fonts in the Japanese TeX engines ((u)ptex et al), and directly in Ghostscript.

For jfontmaps the changes were minimal, Yusuke Terada fixed a mismatch in ttc index numbers for some fonts. Without this fix, Hiragino Interface is used instead of HiraginoSans-W3 and -W6.

On the other hand, cjk-gs-integrate has seen a lot more changes:

  • add support for OSX 10.11 El Capitan provided fonts (by Yusuke Terada)
  • added 2004-{H,V} encodings for Japanese fonts (by Munehiro Yamamoto)
  • fix incorrect link name – this prevented kanji-config-updmap from the jfontmaps package to find and use the linked fonts
  • rename --link-texmflocal to --link-texmf [DIR] with an optional argument
  • add a --remove option to revert the operation – this does clean up completely only if the same set of fonts is found

For more explanations concerning how to run cjk-gs-integrate, please see the dedicated page: CJK fonts and Ghostscript integration.

For feedback and bug reports, please use the github project pages: jfontmaps, cjk-gs-support.

Both packages should arrive in your local TeX Live CTAN repository within a day or two.

We hope that with this users of El Capitan can use their fonts to the full extend.


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OSTraining: How to Create Custom 403 and 404 Pages in Drupal

Planet Drupal - Fri, 02/10/2015 - 01:14

One of our users didn't like the generic "Access denied" message for restricted pages. So we created this tutorial for him.

This tutorial will show you go tot create custom error pages for 403 (Access Denied) and also 404 (Not Found) errors. 

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Cocomore: Barcelona Con from jsbalsera point of view

Planet Drupal - Fri, 02/10/2015 - 00:00

Drupalcon Barcelona has finished and we are back at our offices, with the head full of ideas about how to improve our daily work, the conviction that Drupal 8 will be here soon and it will allow us to achieve amazing things in future projects, and the batteries recharged after having such a great time with such great people.

Categories: Elsewhere

Junichi Uekawa: Playing with FUSE and git.

Planet Debian - Thu, 01/10/2015 - 23:58
Playing with FUSE and git. I've been playing with FUSE and git to make a file system, for fun. There's already many filesystems that are implemented with FUSE, and there are quite a few ones that implement filesystem for git, but I don't use any of them. I wondered why that is the case but tried to build one anyway. It's in github repository gitlstreefs. I have created several toy file systems in C++. ninjafs is one where it shows ninja targets as files and builds the file target when file is actually needed. They aren't quite as useful yet but an interesting excercise, FUSE was reasonably straightforward to implement simple filesystems with.

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VM(doh): Drupal's Recent Twitter Vulnerability Underscores Importance of Continuous Monitoring

Planet Drupal - Thu, 01/10/2015 - 23:57

Drupal's recent problem with the Twitter module provides a crucial lesson for all of us: a proactive, vigilant approach to security -- i.e. practices such as continuous monitoring, which we'll explore a little in this post -- are becoming a necessity in an online environment saturated with black hat hackers.

The Twitter Module Flaw

In Drupal versions 6.x and 7.x, the Twitter module had some slight security issues, to say the least. It did not check for access in the proper way, which meant that any authenticated Twitter user could sneak into your Twitter account, post a tweet, change your account settings, or even delete your account.

Drupal issued a request to users to update their Twitter module to the latest version to fix the security bug.

Continuous Monitoring

The term "continuous monitoring" has become popular. And it means exactly what it sounds like: companies enact policies and procedures that enforce 24/7 close monitoring of their infrastructure. Information-Age.com defines it this way:

The main role of continuous monitoring is to keep your security team constantly aware of newly detected vulnerabilities, weaknesses, missing patches and configuration flaws that appear to be exploitable.

Part of the reason for the urgency is the rise of "zero-day exploits," which are vulnerabilities in software that no one previously knew about and for which a patch does not exist.

The Pressure is On: In Competition with Black Hats

As Information Age points out in their article linked above, black hat hackers have developed their own continuous monitoring capabilities. In some cases, they will even patch the vulnerabilities of a website -- without the owner's knowledge -- after they've exploited the weakness.


Because these cyber gangs, groups of black hats who function like well-coordinated attack squadrons, don't want the competition (other black hat cyber gangs) also exploiting your site's weakness. Black hat hackers will claim your site as their turf and actually use continuous monitoring to protect it against other black hats. (After, of course, they've exploited your site for their own purposes.)

Drupal Security Team Warns About the Speed of Black Hats

Well-organized black hat cyber gangs are so efficient, and in many cases so well-equipped with their own in-house continuous monitoring technology, that they will detect vulnerabilities before anyone else does -- even before Drupal.

When a weakness in Drupal 7 was detected, this announcement from Drupal demonstrates how fast the Black Hats can exploit a vulnerability:

Automated attacks began compromising Drupal 7 websites that were not patched or updated to Drupal 7.32 within hours of the announcement of SA-CORE-2014-005 - Drupal core - SQL injection. You should proceed under the assumption that every Drupal 7 website was compromised unless updated or patched before Oct 15th, 11pm UTC, that is 7 hours after the announcement.

Continuous Monitoring Isn't Easy, But It's Becoming a Necessity

The question is simple: do you want black hat hackers or your company's IT/Security team to do your continuous monitoring for you? If black hat hackers rely on continuous monitoring to be successful, then companies and website owners must respond in kind and fight fire with fire.

That doesn't mean it's easy, of course. It requires systemic transformation. As quoted by Information Age, Jan Schreuder of PwC sympathized with the challenges that continuous monitoring creates: "...[it] represents a significant change to the way IT departments operate, and to be successful it requires significant commitment through leadership support, enforcement, and system owner responsibility and accountability."

Thankfully, Drupal responds quickly to security crises, but there's only so much it can do. Each user has a responsibility as well, and continuous monitoring has become an unavoidable necessity for security vigilance.

Contact us for more information on how we can help monitor and protect your Drupal website against security vulnerabilities.

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Wunderkraut blog: DrupalCon Barcelona: What Happened and What to Watch

Planet Drupal - Thu, 01/10/2015 - 23:56

Last week’s DrupalCon was an outstanding event that saw over 2,000 people from the community come together in Barcelona to attend sessions, sprints, and socialise.

We sent 74 of our own team members to the conference (over a third of our group) and we asked them about their experiences to offer a vision of DrupalCon from Wunderkraut’s perspective. Here you will find out what happened, what you should catch up on, and what we recommend to prepare you for next year’s conference in Dublin.

Pre-Conference Opening - Sunday 20th September

Before the conference officially opened for registration, members of our team met with other community developers to get sprinting at Makers of Barcelona - a beautiful and quirky co-working space 25 minutes from the conference centre.

With D8 close and everyone keen to hear what the first days of the conference had to offer in the way of Drupal 8 news, everyone was in high spirits to collaborate and code face-to-face at the extended sprints.

Registration Day - Monday 21st September

Barcelona International Convention Centre opened its doors for attendees to register. Whilst contributors and coders headed to the Contribution Lounge, leaders of Drupal businesses came together at the Business Summit to share experiences, learn new things, and make acquaintances.

Exhibitors and organisers were also buzzing around the exhibitor hall to prepare their stands and catering areas for the evening’s opening reception, giving all attendees a great opportunity to network and discuss the days ahead.

Watch our roundup of Monday at DrupalCon:

DrupalCon Barcelona Monday from WunderTV on Vimeo.

Day 1 - Tuesday 22nd September

The day opened with Dries’ keynote which gave people a status update on Drupal 8’s release, an overview of the state of the CMS market, and an introduction to new techniques for contributing to Drupal. Overall this was well received and the first deadline of October 7th 2015 was set for D8’s Release Candidate.

Our team then went on to enjoy a variety of tracks and sessions throughout the day. Here’s what Wunderkraut recommends watching from the first day:

Highly recommended by our team

Cut the crap. Practical tips and real world examples for removing waste from your development process.

Recommended by our consultants

Caching at the Edge: CDNs for everyone

Drupal 8 media status update

Design to support strategic objectives (hosted by our own Roy Scholten)

Recommended by our back-end developers

Self-Managing Organizations: Teal is the new Orange

Drupal in 2020

Following a day full of fantastic sessions, the Wunderkraut team headed over to Barcelona’s beaches to have a WunderParty. This gave our international group a great opportunity to socialise and network with one another over good food and a few drinks, which our friends from the conference also attended.

Watch our roundup of Tuesday at DrupalCon

DrupalCon Barcelona Tuesday from WunderTV on Vimeo.

Day 2 - Wednesday 23rd September

The second day of the conference kicked off with an inspirational keynote by Nathalie Nahai on web psychology. This lead nicely into the second day of sessions, sprints and BoFs. Here is what our attendees recommend:

Recommended by our back-end developers

Defense in Depth: Lessons learned securing 100,000 Drupal Sites

Recommended by our consultants

Making Drupal fly - The fastest Drupal ever is here!

No therapist needed: clients, teams and no tears (hosted by our own Alice Richmond)

Recommended by our care team

How to print 200.000 Magazines Weekly, and Have Them Published on the Web and Mobile From a Single Drupal Site

Recommended by our operations team

Breaking Down Silos - How channel thinking limits companies and agencies in creating succesful sites and campaigns

Creating a collaborative agency culture that scales

Recommended by our front-end team

Next generation graphics: SVG

Trophy Winning Teams

What's your type?

In the evening a number of our team members headed into the “old town” area of Barcelona to enjoy the local tapas, sangria, and local culture. All of the local people were out and celebrating La Mercè Festival which involved fireworks, parties, and fun.

Watch our roundup of Wednesday at DrupalCon

Drupalcon Barcelona Wednesday from WunderTV on Vimeo.

Day 3 - Thursday 24th September

Thursday was the final day of sessions and by this point a lot of new information, local culture, and sangria had been consumed by conference attendees who stayed since the start. It was hard to find one of our bean bags free at the conference that didn’t have an attendee catching a nap on it!

The final day of sessions, however, was great and they were started by two excellent community keynotes by David Rozas and Mike Bell on mental health in the open source world and the phenomenon of contributing to a community. Both talks were received very well by our team and the community.

Here’s what else Wunderkraut recommends from the day:

Recommended by our back-end developers

Testing with Monkeys: Using Chaos for Better Code

Building the Front End with Angular.js

Recommended by our consultants

Visual Regression Testing

Making Drupal a better out-of-the-box product: Report on usability testing results and how we can make 8.1.x+ shine (joint hosted by our own Lewis Nyman)

All of the conference’s sessions ended with Holly Ross’ Closing Session that provided some cool community and conference stats, in addition to the location of next year’s Drupalcon - Ireland!

To celebrate a successful DrupalCon, most of the attendees headed down to the Trivia Night where they had an opportunity to win some fun prizes, including these sought after goodies:

Some @Wunderkraut beanbags are up 4 grabs. A lot of folk have their eye on this prize, even sans-beans. #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/B5Bti8iyJi

— Andrew Macpherson (@MartianWebDev) September 24, 2015 Sprinting for Beginners and All - Friday 25th September

Friday was a day for first-time sprinters to meet the mentors and get started with contributing to Drupal. It began with a workshop on downloading the tools required to contribute and lead to people being assigned to different contribution tasks and issues, depending on their different skills.

Later on in the afternoon Angie Byron (webchick) committed a selection of contributions that newcomers made to Drupal 8 whilst they were at the conference and everyone celebrated the new additions together.

Extended Sprints - Saturday 26th - Sunday 27th September

The rest of the weekend was spent sprinting by contributors back at the creative co-working space, Makers of Barcelona. Overall, a nice way to finish of the week in beautiful Barcelona.

Tips for future DrupalCon Goers

With over 70 odd of our team attending this year’s DrupalCon we’d like to leave a few bits of advice for future participants who may be completely new to the conference to make their experiences as enjoyable as ours.

Marc Galang, Software Developer

“Attend the prenote! Also if you're joining the sprints make sure you have a running environment before you leave your country/office because sometimes the internet could be really slow that it takes A LOT of time to download stuff that is needed for the sprints.

Bert Boerland, Sales Manager

Sleep as much as you can upfront. You should also add the checkmark of being at the con in your Drupal.org profile.

Mikael Kundert, Software Developer

After you start to find sessions that aren’t that useful for you, move on to participate in BoFs and sprints!

Bernt Andreas Drange, Software Developer

Remember your business cards and cash for coffee!

Jenny Kannelsuo, Service Manager

Plan ahead and check the sessions beforehand.

Randal Whitmore, Marketing Assistant

Embrace as much as you can, especially if this is your first experience with the community. Communicating with people in person and getting to understand those behind Drupal is invaluable.

Categories: Elsewhere

InternetDevels: The UX myths — infographics (part 1)

Planet Drupal - Thu, 01/10/2015 - 15:38

Talking about UX design services becomes a new trend. While not so many people are certain who is a user and what is his or her experience, hundreds would like to contribute into the discussion about proper approaches to it. Let’s take a look on 5 the most widespread UX myths and their disproof.

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Zengenuity: September's Most Interesting New Drupal Modules

Planet Drupal - Thu, 01/10/2015 - 15:00

Some of the most interesting new modules I saw posted to drupal.org in September:

Views Advanced Routing

(for Drupal 8) Allows you to specify the routing configuration YAML for a Views page. Meaning, you can use custom access control callbacks, default parameters, etc. Sweet!

Commerce Responsive UI

Provides replacement interfaces for the parts of Drupal Commerce that are table dependent and non-mobile responsive by default. These include Responsive Cart, Responsive Checkout, and Responsive User Facing Orders.

Drupal 8 Contrib Porting Tracker

Not a module, but a centralized place for tracking the Drupal 8 porting status of contributed projects (modules, themes, distributions). The best place to find out that the Bad Judgement module is ready for D8!

Advanced Image Crop

This image field cropper lets the user do a different crop in each of the image styles configured by the admin. You better have some saavy users to comprehend this, but if you do, it looks awesome.

Webform Replay [sandbox]

Extends the Webform module by adding an option to “replay” selected webform values in situations where multiple webform submissions per user are allowed, and some of that information is likely to be repeated on each submission. By enabling webform replay for these fields, the user only needs to complete them for the initial webform submission, and on subsequent entries these fields will be pre-populated with the values from the previous submission.

Forbidden File Format

Flips the file field extension checking around so that you can allow all types of files except the extensions specified. So you could deny .js, .exe, .bat, and .com, but allow other types.

Tableau WDC [sandbox]

Tableau 9.1 includes a new Web Data Connector feature, which lets you build connections to data accessible over HTTP with JSON data and REST APIs. This module attempts to bridge the gap between Drupal and Tableau by adding a new views plugin (tableau_wdc) which renders content as a JSON with some extra meta information needed by Tableau. Once you have created your endpoints, you can add the tableau-wdc block to any page and it will automatically render a button for each data source together with all the necessary scripts to parse and prepare the data for import.

Nuke Drupal Frontend

Allows you to completely disable frontend HTML access to a Drupal site, for when you’re building a headless site, and you’re not using the Drupal-provided frontend.

Doubtfire [sandbox]

An alternative to the Masquerade module, with some useful UI additions.

Gmail Connector [sandbox]

Lets users view their Gmail inbox and messages in Drupal using the Gmail RESTful API.

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Sylvain Beucler: Android Free developer tools rebuilds

Planet Debian - Thu, 01/10/2015 - 14:41

I published some Free rebuilds of the Android SDK, NDK and ADT at:


As described in my previous post, Google is click-wrapping all developer binaries (including preview versions for which source code isn't published yet) with a non-free EULA, notably an anti-fork clause.

There's been some discussion on where to host this project at the android@lists.fsfe.org campaign list.

Build instructions are provided, so feel free to check if the builds are reproducible, and contribute instructions for more tools!

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Drupal CMS Guides at Daymuse Studios: Upgrade Your Tools: Build a Drupal Developer Toolkit Tutorial

Planet Drupal - Thu, 01/10/2015 - 14:03

Drupal Developer Toolkit tutorial series reviews web apps, desktop applications, mobile tools, and web services to improve your work and quality of life.

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Petter Reinholdtsen: French Docbook/PDF/EPUB/MOBI edition of the Free Culture book

Planet Debian - Thu, 01/10/2015 - 13:20

As I wrap up the Norwegian version of Free Culture book by Lawrence Lessig (still waiting for my final proof reading copy to arrive in the mail), my great dblatex helper and developer of the dblatex docbook processor, Benoît Guillon, decided a to try to create a French version of the book. He started with the French translation available from the Wikilivres wiki pages, and wrote a program to convert it into a PO file, allowing the translation to be integrated into the po4a based framework I use to create the Norwegian translation the the English edition. We meet on the #dblatex IRC channel to discuss the work. If you want to help create a French edition, check out his git repository and join us on IRC. If the French edition look good, we might publish it as a paper book on lulu.com. A French version of the drawings and the cover need to be provided for this to happen.

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Mike Gabriel: My FLOSS activities in August/September 2015

Planet Debian - Thu, 01/10/2015 - 13:18

Here comes my "monthly" FLOSS report for August and September 2015. As 50% of August 2015 had been dedicated to taking some time off (spending time in Sweden with the family), it happened that even more workload had to be processed in September 2015.

  • Completion of MATE 1.10 in Debian testing/unstable and Ubuntu 15.10
  • Contribution to Debian LTS, Debian packaging
  • Development of GOsa² Plugin SchoolManager
  • Automatic builds for Arctica Project
  • Forking Unity Greeter as Arctica Greeter (with focus on the remote logon part inside Unity Greeter)
Received Sponsorship

My monthly 8h portion of working for the Debian LTS project I had to dispatch from August into September. Thus, I received 16h of paid work for working on Debian LTS in September 2015. For details, see below. Thanks to Raphael Hertzog for having me on the team [1]. Thanks to all the people and companies sponsoring the Debian LTS Team's work.

The development of GOsa² Plugin SchoolManager (for details, see below) was done on contract for a school in Nothern Germany. The code will be released under the same license as the GOsa² software itself.

Completion of MATE 1.10 in Debian testing/unstable and Ubuntu 15.10

In the first half of September all MATE 1.10 package finally landed in Debian testing (aka stretch). Martin Wimpress handled most the packaging changes, whereas my main job was being reviewer and uploader of his efforts. Thanks to John Paul Adrian Glaubitz for jumping in as reviewer and uploader during my vacation time.

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Mike Gabriel: Nightly builds for Arctica Project (Debian / Ubuntu)

Planet Debian - Thu, 01/10/2015 - 12:42

I am happy to announce that The Arctica Project can now provide automatic nightly builds of its developers' coding code work.

Packages are built automatically via Jenkins, see [1] for an overview of the current build queues. The Jenkins system builds code as found on our CGit mirror site [2].

NOTE: The Arctica Project's nightly builds may especially be interesting to people that want to try out the latest development steps on nx-libs (3.6.x branch) as we provide nx-libs 3.6.x binary preview builds.

Currently, we only build our code against Debian and Ubuntu (amd64, i386), more distros and platforms are likely to be added. If people can provide machine power (esp. non-Intel based architectures), please get in touch with us on Freenode IRC (channel: #arctica).

This is how you can add our package repositories to your APT system.

Debian APT (here: stretch)

Please note that we only support recent Debian versions (currently version 7.x and above).

$ echo 'deb http://packages.arctica-project.org/debian-nightly stretch main' | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/arctica.list sudo apt-key adv --recv-keys --keyserver pgp.mit.edu 0x98DE3101 apt-get update Ubuntu APT (here: trusty)

Please note that we support recent Ubuntu LTS versions only (Ubuntu 14.04 only at the moment).

$ echo 'deb http://packages.arctica-project.org/debian-nightly trusty main' | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/arctica.list sudo apt-key adv --recv-keys --keyserver pgp.mit.edu 0x98DE3101 apt-get update


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Michal Čihař: IMAP utils 0.5

Planet Debian - Thu, 01/10/2015 - 12:00

I've just released new version of imap-utils. Main reason for new release was change on PyPI which now needs files to be hosted there.

However the new release also comes with other changes:

  • Changed license to GPL3+.
  • Various coding style fixes.

Also this is first release done from Git repository hosted on GitHub.

Filed under: Coding English IMAP | 0 comments

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Sooper Drupal Themes: Module Spotlight #3: Yoast Drupal SEO

Planet Drupal - Thu, 01/10/2015 - 07:48
Yoast Drupal SEO Module: Tested and Reviewed

Yoast SEO is a household name in the WordPress community and as a premium drupal themes shop owner I was jealous of their favorite tool. Yoast SEO gained popularity because it didn't just make SEO finetuning possible in WP, it made it fun.  Important onpage SEO factors are pulled together...

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