Elsewhere

Steve Kemp: Lumail 2.x ?

Planet Debian - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 22:39

I've continued to ponder the idea of reimplementing the console mail-client I wrote, lumail, using a more object-based codebase.

For one thing having loosely coupled code would allow testing things in isolation, which is clearly a good thing.

I've written some proof of concept code which will allow the following Lua to be evaluated:

-- Open the maildir. users = Maildir.new( "/home/skx/Maildir/.debian.user" ) -- Count the messages. print( "There are " .. users:count() .. " messages in the maildir " .. users:path() ) -- -- Now we want to get all the messages and output their paths. -- for k,v in ipairs( users:messages()) do -- -- Here we could do something like: -- -- if ( string.find( v:headers["subject"], "troll", 1, true ) ) then v:delete() end -- -- Instead play-nice and just show the path. print( k .. " -> " .. v:path() ) end

This is all a bit ugly, but I've butchered some code together that works, and tried to solicit feedback from lumail users.

I'd write more but I'm tired, and intending to drink whisky and have an early night. Today I mostly replaced pipes in my attic. (Is it "attic", or is it "loft"? I keep alternating!) Fingers crossed this will mean a dry kitchen in the morning.

Categories: Elsewhere

Sune Vuorela: Is linux about choice?

Planet Debian - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 22:10

Occasionally, various quotes from people having an opinion if linux is about choice or not. Even pages like http://www.islinuxaboutchoice.com/ has shown up.

My short answer is “YES”. Linux is about choice. And you get all your choices directly from your f/loss definition of choice (FSF’s 4 freedoms / OSI’s opensource definition / Debian Free Software Guidelines)

It doesn’t mean that you get all the gui configuration bits that you want. It doesn’t mean that you without any problems can switch out any component. But it does mean that you can get it exactly your way. But it might require you to edit some source code and compile some stuff.

Categories: Elsewhere

Daniel Pocock: rtc.debian.org updated for latest browsers

Planet Debian - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 17:24

I've just updated rtc.debian.org with the latest versions of JSCommunicator and JsSIP.

The version of JsSIP that had been on the site was actually quite old, from February 2014 and the browsers have evolved a lot since then.

If you've tried it before and it didn't work consistently please try again and feel free to share any feedback you have.

Categories: Elsewhere

Paul Booker: How to determine the A and MX records for a given Domain for a given DNS server

Planet Drupal - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 11:36
$ dig A paulbooker.co.uk @208.67.220.220 ; <<>> DiG 9.8.3-P1 <<>> A paulbooker.co.uk @208.67.220.220 ;; global options: +cmd ;; Got answer: ;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 55528 ;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 1, AUTHORITY: 0, ADDITIONAL: 0 ;; QUESTION SECTION: ;paulbooker.co.uk. IN A ;; ANSWER SECTION: paulbooker.co.uk. 10800 IN A 92.243.12.252 ;; Query time: 131 msec ;; SERVER: 208.67.220.220#53(208.67.220.220) ;; WHEN: Fri May 31 17:44:54 2013 ;; MSG SIZE rcvd: 50 $ dig MX paulbooker.co.uk @208.67.220.220 ; <<>> DiG 9.8.3-P1 <<>> MX paulbooker.co.uk @208.67.220.220 ;; global options: +cmd ;; Got answer: ;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 42037 ;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 5, AUTHORITY: 0, ADDITIONAL: 0 ;; QUESTION SECTION: ;paulbooker.co.uk. IN MX ;; ANSWER SECTION: paulbooker.co.uk. 10800 IN MX 5 ALT2.ASPMX.L.GOOGLE.COM. paulbooker.co.uk. 10800 IN MX 1 ASPMX.L.GOOGLE.COM. paulbooker.co.uk. 10800 IN MX 10 ASPMX2.GOOGLEMAIL.COM. paulbooker.co.uk. 10800 IN MX 10 ASPMX3.GOOGLEMAIL.COM. paulbooker.co.uk. 10800 IN MX 5 ALT1.ASPMX.L.GOOGLE.COM. ;; Query time: 122 msec ;; SERVER: 208.67.220.220#53(208.67.220.220) ;; WHEN: Fri May 31 17:46:13 2013 ;; MSG SIZE rcvd: 167

If no DNS server argument is provided, dig consults /etc/resolv.conf and queries the name servers listed there.

$ cat /etc/resolv.conf # # Mac OS X Notice # # This file is not used by the host name and address resolution # or the DNS query routing mechanisms used by most processes on # this Mac OS X system. # # This file is automatically generated. # nameserver 194.168.4.100 nameserver 194.168.8.100

These nameservers are provided by my broadband provider ..

$ dig -x 194.168.4.100 ; <<>> DiG 9.8.3-P1 <<>> -x 194.168.4.100 ;; global options: +cmd ;; Got answer: ;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 48388 ;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 1, AUTHORITY: 0, ADDITIONAL: 0 ;; QUESTION SECTION: ;100.4.168.194.in-addr.arpa. IN PTR ;; ANSWER SECTION: 100.4.168.194.in-addr.arpa. 22026 IN PTR cache1.service.virginmedia.net. ;; Query time: 12 msec ;; SERVER: 194.168.4.100#53(194.168.4.100) ;; WHEN: Fri May 31 17:50:01 2013 ;; MSG SIZE rcvd: 88

.. virgin media via DHCP.

If you want to find out more about dig then you need to "man dig" not sure what man is, then you need to "man man". Dig? :D

Tags:
Categories: Elsewhere

Jonathan Wiltshire: Getting things into Jessie (#7)

Planet Debian - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 11:18
Keep in touch

We don’t really have a lot of spare capacity to check up on things, so if we ask for more information or send you away to do an upload, please stay in touch about it.

Do remove a moreinfo tag if you reply to a question and are now waiting for us again.

Do ping the bug if you get a green light about an upload, and have done it. (And remove moreinfo if it was set.)

Don’t be afraid of making sure we’re aware of progress.

Getting things into Jessie (#7) is a post from: jwiltshire.org.uk | Flattr

Categories: Elsewhere

Paul Booker: Allowing a user to login only if they have an active infusionsoft CRM contact.

Planet Drupal - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 11:17
/** * Implements hook_user_login(). */ function mymodule_infusionsoft_user_login(&$edit, $account) { global $tag; if (user_access('administer site configuration')) { return TRUE; } $contact_active = _mymodule_infusionsoft_contact_active($account->mail); if ($contact_active == FALSE) { session_destroy(); session_start(); // Load the anonymous user $user = drupal_anonymous_user(); drupal_set_message(variable_get('mymodule_infusionsoft_message', 'Infusionsoft account not created or has expired.'), 'warning'); if (empty($tag)) drupal_goto('user/register'); if ($tag == "expired") drupal_goto('account-expired'); if ($tag == "blocked") drupal_goto('account-blocked'); } else { // Update membership roles to match CRM groups/tags _mymodule_infusionsoft_update_membership_roles($account); } } function _mymodule_infusionsoft_contact_active($mail) { global $tag; $contact_active = FALSE; $contact_id = infusionsoft_contact_load_by_email($mail); if (!empty($contact_id) && is_numeric($contact_id)) { $groups = infusionsoft_group_contact_options($contact_id); $num_groups = count($groups); if ($num_groups == 0) return FALSE; if (in_array(STATUS__EXPIRED, $groups)) { $tag = "expired"; return FALSE; } if (in_array(STATUS__LIVE, $groups)) { $tag = "active"; return TRUE; } } Tags:
Categories: Elsewhere

Craig Small: WordPress 4.0.1 for Debian

Planet Debian - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 09:49

WordPress recently released an update that had multiple security patches for their (then) current version 4.0. This release is 4.0.1 and includes important security fixes.  The Debian packages got just uploaded, if you are running the Debian packaged wordpress, you should update to 4.0.1+dfsg-1 or later.

I am going to look at these patches and see if they can and need to be backported to wordpress 3.6.1. Unfortunately I believe they will be. I’m also asking it to be unblocked into Jessie as it is a security fix.

There was, at the time of writing, no CVE numbers.

Categories: Elsewhere

Petter Reinholdtsen: How to stay with sysvinit in Debian Jessie

Planet Debian - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 01:00

By now, it is well known that Debian Jessie will not be using sysvinit as its boot system by default. But how can one keep using sysvinit in Jessie? It is fairly easy, and here are a few recipes, courtesy of Erich Schubert and Simon McVittie.

If you already are using Wheezy and want to upgrade to Jessie and keep sysvinit as your boot system, create a file /etc/apt/preferences.d/use-sysvinit with this content before you upgrade:

Package: systemd-sysv Pin: release o=Debian Pin-Priority: -1

This file content will tell apt and aptitude to not consider installing systemd-sysv as part of any installation and upgrade solution when resolving dependencies, and thus tell it to avoid systemd as a default boot system. The end result should be that the upgraded system keep using sysvinit.

If you are installing Jessie for the first time, there is no way to get sysvinit installed by default (debootstrap used by debian-installer have no option for this), but one can tell the installer to switch to sysvinit before the first boot. Either by using a kernel argument to the installer, or by adding a line to the preseed file used. First, the kernel command line argument:

preseed/late_command="in-target apt-get install -y sysvinit-core"

Next, the line to use in a preseed file:

d-i preseed/late_command string in-target apt-get install -y sysvinit-core

One can of course also do this after the first boot by installing the sysvinit-core package.

I recommend only using sysvinit if you really need it, as the sysvinit boot sequence in Debian have several hardware specific bugs on Linux caused by the fact that it is unpredictable when hardware devices show up during boot. But on the other hand, the new default boot system still have a few rough edges I hope will be fixed before Jessie is released.

Categories: Elsewhere

3C Web Services: How to redirect all traffic to HTTPS on your Drupal site

Planet Drupal - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 00:57

Since Google announced that it gives an additional SEO boost for sites that are fully encrypted with HTTPS it is now advisable to encrypt your entire site and not just pages with sensitive information such as user login and checkout pages.

There are multiple method to achieve this. We like using the below modification to .HTACCESS file. Simply add this code to the .HTACCESS file that is located in the Drupal root directory after the the line "" and all traffic to your site will now automatically be redirected from HTTP to HTTPS.

Categories: Elsewhere

Joey Hess: propelling containers

Planet Debian - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 22:33

Propellor has supported docker containers for a "long" time, and it works great. This week I've worked on adding more container support.

docker containers (revisited)

The syntax for docker containers has changed slightly. Here's how it looks now:

example :: Host example = host "example.com" & Docker.docked webserverContainer webserverContainer :: Docker.Container webserverContainer = Docker.container "webserver" "joeyh/debian-stable" & os (System (Debian (Stable "wheezy")) "amd64") & Docker.publish "80:80" & Apt.serviceInstalledRunning "apache2" & alias "www.example.com"

That makes example.com have a web server in a docker container, as you'd expect, and when propellor is used to deploy the DNS server it'll automatically make www.example.com point to the host (or hosts!) where this container is docked.

I use docker a lot, but I have drank little of the Docker KoolAid. I'm not keen on using random blobs created by random third parties using either unreproducible methods, or the weirdly underpowered dockerfiles. (As for vast complicated collections of containers that each run one program and talk to one another etc ... I'll wait and see.)

That's why propellor runs inside the docker container and deploys whatever configuration I tell it to, in a way that's both replicatable later and lets me use the full power of Haskell.

Which turns out to be useful when moving on from docker containers to something else...

systemd-nspawn containers

Propellor now supports containers using systemd-nspawn. It looks a lot like the docker example.

example :: Host example = host "example.com" & Systemd.persistentJournal & Systemd.nspawned webserverContainer webserverContainer :: Systemd.Container webserverContainer = Systemd.container "webserver" chroot & Apt.serviceInstalledRunning "apache2" & alias "www.example.com" where chroot = Chroot.debootstrapped (System (Debian Unstable) "amd64") Debootstrap.MinBase

Notice how I specified the Debian Unstable chroot that forms the basis of this container. Propellor sets up the container by running debootstrap, boots it up using systemd-nspawn, and then runs inside the container to provision it.

Unlike docker containers, systemd-nspawn containers use systemd as their init, and it all integrates rather beautifully. You can see the container listed in systemctl status, including the services running inside it, use journalctl to examine its logs, etc.

But no, systemd is the devil, and docker is too trendy...

chroots

Propellor now also supports deploying good old chroots. It looks a lot like the other containers. Rather than repeat myself a third time, and because we don't really run webservers inside chroots much, here's a slightly different example.

example :: Host example = host "mylaptop" & Chroot.provisioned (buildDepChroot "git-annex") buildDepChroot :: Apt.Package -> Chroot.Chroot buildDepChroot pkg = Chroot.debootstrapped system Debootstrap.buildd dir & Apt.buildDep pkg where dir = /srv/chroot/builddep/"++pkg system = System (Debian Unstable) "amd64"

Again this uses debootstrap to build the chroot, and then it runs propellor inside the chroot to provision it (btw without bothering to install propellor there, thanks to the magic of bind mounts and completely linux distribution-independent packaging).

In fact, the systemd-nspawn container code reuses the chroot code, and so turns out to be really rather simple. 132 lines for the chroot support, and 167 lines for the systemd support (which goes somewhat beyond the nspawn containers shown above).

Which leads to the hardest part of all this...

debootstrap

Making a propellor property for debootstrap should be easy. And it was, for Debian systems. However, I have crazy plans that involve running propellor on non-Debian systems, to debootstrap something, and installing debootstrap on an arbitrary linux system is ... too hard.

In the end, I needed 253 lines of code to do it, which is barely one magnitude less code than the size of debootstrap itself. I won't go into the ugly details, but this could be made a lot easier if debootstrap catered more to being used outside of Debian.

closing

Docker and systemd-nspawn have different strengths and weaknesses, and there are sure to be more container systems to come. I'm pleased that Propellor can add support for a new container system in a few hundred lines of code, and that it abstracts away all the unimportant differences between these systems.

PS

Seems likely that systemd-nspawn containers can be nested to any depth. So, here's a new kind of fork bomb!

infinitelyNestedContainer :: Systemd.Container infinitelyNestedContainer = Systemd.container "evil-systemd" (Chroot.debootstrapped (System (Debian Unstable) "amd64") Debootstrap.MinBase) & Systemd.nspawned infinitelyNestedContainer

Strongly typed purely functional container deployment can only protect us against a certian subset of all badly thought out systems. ;)

Categories: Elsewhere

ImageX Media: Delivery Documentation

Planet Drupal - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 22:11
When buying a car, there’s a reason you are given such a comprehensive user's manual to cover everything that the salesperson or technician was unable to show you how to do in the first demonstration. Things like what to do when the "Check Engine" light comes on, or which grade of oil to use when it comes time for an oil change. Although you may not reference it often, when needed the supporting user manual is worth its weight in gold.
Categories: Elsewhere

Blink Reaction: Matt Korostoff Talks REST and SOAP

Planet Drupal - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 21:53

This talk was given at Drupal Camp Baltimore 2014. In it, I discuss REST and (briefly) SOAP APIs built with Drupal. I give a number of hands on examples using Views Datasource, RESTful Web Services (restws), and the Services module.

Categories: Elsewhere

Niels Thykier: Release Team unblock queue flushed

Planet Debian - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 21:46

At the start of this week, I wrote that we had 58 open unblock requests open (of which 25 were tagged moreinfo).  Thanks to an extra effort from the Release Team, we now down to 25 open unblocks – of which 18 are tagged moreinfo.

We have now resolved 442 unblock requests (out of a total of 467).  The rate has also declined to an average of ~18 new unblock requests a day (over 26 days) and our closing rated increased to ~17.

With all of this awesomeness, some of us are now more than ready to have a well-deserved weekend to recharge our batteries.  Meanwhile, feel free to keep the RC bug fixes flowing into unstable.


Categories: Elsewhere

Richard Hartmann: Release Critical Bug report for Week 47

Planet Debian - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 21:31

There's a BSP this weekend. If you're interested in remote participation, please join #debian-muc on irc.oftc.net.

The UDD bugs interface currently knows about the following release critical bugs:

  • In Total: 1213 (Including 210 bugs affecting key packages)
    • Affecting Jessie: 342 (key packages: 152) That's the number we need to get down to zero before the release. They can be split in two big categories:
      • Affecting Jessie and unstable: 260 (key packages: 119) Those need someone to find a fix, or to finish the work to upload a fix to unstable:
        • 37 bugs are tagged 'patch'. (key packages: 20) Please help by reviewing the patches, and (if you are a DD) by uploading them.
        • 12 bugs are marked as done, but still affect unstable. (key packages: 3) This can happen due to missing builds on some architectures, for example. Help investigate!
        • 211 bugs are neither tagged patch, nor marked done. (key packages: 96) Help make a first step towards resolution!
      • Affecting Jessie only: 82 (key packages: 33) Those are already fixed in unstable, but the fix still needs to migrate to Jessie. You can help by submitting unblock requests for fixed packages, by investigating why packages do not migrate, or by reviewing submitted unblock requests.
        • 65 bugs are in packages that are unblocked by the release team. (key packages: 26)
        • 17 bugs are in packages that are not unblocked. (key packages: 7)

How do we compare to the Squeeze release cycle?

Week Squeeze Wheezy Jessie 43 284 (213+71) 468 (332+136) 319 (240+79) 44 261 (201+60) 408 (265+143) 274 (224+50) 45 261 (205+56) 425 (291+134) 295 (229+66) 46 271 (200+71) 401 (258+143) 427 (313+114) 47 283 (209+74) 366 (221+145) 342 (260+82) 48 256 (177+79) 378 (230+148) 49 256 (180+76) 360 (216+155) 50 204 (148+56) 339 (195+144) 51 178 (124+54) 323 (190+133) 52 115 (78+37) 289 (190+99) 1 93 (60+33) 287 (171+116) 2 82 (46+36) 271 (162+109) 3 25 (15+10) 249 (165+84) 4 14 (8+6) 244 (176+68) 5 2 (0+2) 224 (132+92) 6 release! 212 (129+83) 7 release+1 194 (128+66) 8 release+2 206 (144+62) 9 release+3 174 (105+69) 10 release+4 120 (72+48) 11 release+5 115 (74+41) 12 release+6 93 (47+46) 13 release+7 50 (24+26) 14 release+8 51 (32+19) 15 release+9 39 (32+7) 16 release+10 20 (12+8) 17 release+11 24 (19+5) 18 release+12 2 (2+0)

Graphical overview of bug stats thanks to azhag:

Categories: Elsewhere

Jonathan Wiltshire: On kFreeBSD and FOSDEM

Planet Debian - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 20:16

Boy I love rumours. Recently I’ve heard two, which I ought to put to rest now everybody’s calmed down from recent events.

kFreeBSD isn’t an official Jessie architecture because <insert systemd-related scare story>

Not true.

Our sprint at ARM (who kindly hosted and caffeinated us for four days) was timed to coincide with the Cambridge Mini-DebConf 2014. The intention was that this would save on travel costs for those members of the Release Team who wanted to attend the conference, and give us a jolly good excuse to actually meet up. Winners all round.

It also had an interesting side-effect. The room we used was across the hall from the lecture theatre being used as hack space and, later, the conference venue, which meant everybody attending during those two days could see us locked away there (and yes, we were in there all day for two days solid, except for lunch times and coffee missions). More than one conference attendee remarked to me in person that it was interesting for them to see us working (although of course they couldn’t hear what we were discussing), and hadn’t appreciated before that how much time and effort goes into our meetings.

Most of our first morning was taken up with the last pieces of architecture qualification, and that was largely the yes/no decision we had to make about kFreeBSD. And you know what? I don’t recall us talking about systemd in that context at all. Don’t forget kFreeBSD already had a waiver for a reduced scope in Jessie because of the difficulty in porting systemd to it.

It’s sadly impossible to capture the long and detailed discussion we had into a couple of lines of status information in a bits mail. If bits mails were much longer, people would be put off reading them, and we really really want you to take note of what’s in there. The little space we do have needs to be factual and to the point, and not include all the background that led us to a decision.

So no, the lack of an official Jessie release of kFreeBSD has very little, if anything, to do with systemd.

Jessie will be released during (or even before) FOSDEM

Not necessarily true.

Debian releases are made when they’re ready. That sets us apart from lots of other distributions, and is a large factor in our reputation for stability. We may have a target date in mind for a freeze, because that helps both us and the rest of the project plan accordingly. But we do not have a release date in mind, and will not do so until we get much closer to being ready. (Have you squashed an RC bug today?)

I think this rumour originated from the office of the DPL, but it’s certainly become more concrete than I think Lucas intended.

However, it is true that we’ve gone into this freeze with a seriously low bug count, because of lots of other factors. So it may indeed be that we end up in good enough shape to think about releasing near (or even at) FOSDEM. But rest assured, Debian 8 “Jessie” will be released when it’s ready, and even we don’t know when that will be yet.

(Of course, if we do release before then, you could consider throwing us a party. Plenty of the Release Team, FTP masters and CD team will be at FOSDEM, release or none.)

On kFreeBSD and FOSDEM is a post from: jwiltshire.org.uk | Flattr

Categories: Elsewhere

Gunnar Wolf: Status of the Debian OpenPGP keyring — November update

Planet Debian - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 19:29

Almost two months ago I posted our keyring status graphs, showing the progress of the transition to >=2048-bit keys for the different active Debian keyrings. So, here are the new figures.

First, the Non-uploading keyring: We were already 100% transitioned. You will only notice a numerical increase: That little bump at the right is our dear friend Tássia finally joining as a Debian Developer. Welcome! \o/

As for the Maintainers keyring: We can see a sharp increase in 4096-bit keys. Four 1024-bit DM keys were migrated to 4096R, but we did have eight new DMs coming in To them, also, welcome \o/.

Sadly, we had to remove a 1024-bit key, as Peter Miller sadly passed away. So, in a 234-key universe, 12 new 4096R keys is a large bump!

Finally, our current-greatest worry — If for nothing else, for the size of the beast: The active Debian Developers keyring. We currently have 983 keys in this keyring, so it takes considerably more effort to change it.

But we have managed to push it noticeably.

This last upload saw a great deal of movement. We received only one new DD (but hey — welcome nonetheless! \o/ ). 13 DD keys were retired; as one of the maintainers of the keyring, of course this makes me sad — but then again, in most cases it's rather an acknowledgement of fact: Those keys' holders often state they had long not been really involved in the project, and the decision to retire was in fact timely. But the greatest bulk of movement was the key replacements: A massive 62 1024D keys were replaced with stronger ones. And, yes, the graph changed quite abruptly:

We still have a bit over one month to go for our cutoff line, where we will retire all 1024D keys. It is important to say we will not retire the affected accounts, mark them as MIA, nor anything like that. If you are a DD and only have a 1024D key, you will still be a DD, but you will be technically unable to do work directly. You can still upload your packages or send announcements to regulated mailing lists via sponsor requests (although you will be unable to vote).

Speaking of votes: We have often said that we believe the bulk of the short keys belong to people not really active in the project anymore. Not all of them, sure, but a big proportion. We just had a big, controversial GR vote with one of the highest voter turnouts in Debian's history. I checked the GR's tally sheet, and the results are interesting: Please excuse my ugly bash, but I'm posting this so you can play with similar runs on different votes and points in time using the public keyring Git repository:

  1. $ git checkout 2014.10.10
  2. $ for KEY in $( for i in $( grep '^V:' tally.txt |awk '{print "<" $3 ">"}' ); do grep $i keyids|cut -f 1 -d ' ' ;done )
  3. do
  4. if [ -f debian-keyring-gpg/$KEY -o -f debian-nonupload-gpg/$KEY ]
  5. then
  6. gpg --keyring /dev/null --keyring debian-keyring-gpg/$KEY --keyring debian-nonupload-gpg/$KEY --with-colons --list-key $KEY 2>/dev/null | head -2 |tail -1 | cut -f 3 -d :
  7. fi
  8. done | sort | uniq -c
  9. 95 1024
  10. 13 2048
  11. 1 3072
  12. 371 4096
  13. 2 8192

So, as of mid-October: 387 out of the 482 votes (80.3%) were cast by developers with >=2048-bit keys, and 95 (19.7%) were cast by short keys.

If we were to run the same vote with the new active keyring, 417 votes would have been cast with >=2048-bit keys (87.2%), and 61 with short keys (12.8%). We would have four less votes, as they retired:

  1. 61 1024
  2. 14 2048
  3. 2 3072
  4. 399 4096
  5. 2 8192

So, lets hear it for November/December. How much can we push down that pesky yellow line?

Disclaimer: Any inaccuracy due to bugs in my code is completely my fault!

Categories: Elsewhere

Paul Booker: How to Override Core Functionality in your Theme

Planet Drupal - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 19:12

If you wanted to add right double angle quotes or raquo to each of your comment block comments. First you would track down the functionality that needs changing to theme_comment_block() inside the comments module ..

function theme_comment_block() { $items = array(); $number = variable_get('comment_block_count', 10); foreach (comment_get_recent($number) as $comment) { $items[] = l($comment->subject, 'comment/' . $comment->cid, array('fragment' => 'comment-' . $comment->cid)) . ' ' . t('@time ago', array('@time' => format_interval(REQUEST_TIME - $comment->changed))) . ''; } if ($items) { return theme('item_list', array('items' => $items)); } else { return t('No comments available.'); } } function comment_block_view($delta = '') { if (user_access('access comments')) { $block['subject'] = t('Recent comments'); $block['content'] = theme('comment_block'); return $block; } }

and then make your changes by overriding theme_comment_block inside your theme's template.php as ..

function mytheme_comment_block() { $items = array(); $number = variable_get('comment_block_count', 10); foreach (comment_get_recent($number) as $comment) { $items[] = l('» ' . $comment->subject, 'comment/' . $comment->cid, array('fragment' => 'comment-' . $comment->cid, 'html' => true)) . ' ' . t('@time ago', array('@time' => format_interval(REQUEST_TIME - $comment->changed))) . ''; } if ($items) { return theme('item_list', array('items' => $items)); } else { return t('No comments available.'); } }

After clearing the cache your theme function will be now called instead of the theme function provided by the core comment module.

Tags:
Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Watchdog: Call For Contributions: Spring/Summer 2015, Strategy Cookbook

Planet Drupal - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 18:43

As Drupal Watchdog approaches its fifth year of publication, we’re sending out a call for contributions to our upcoming Spring/Summer 2015 issue. Guided by helpful feedback from our readers, I’m excited to announce that our next issue will be a Strategy Cookbook. What does that mean? I’m glad you asked…

Anyone that has spent any time with Drupal knows that it is a very flexible tool. And while flexibility is wonderfully powerful, it can also be wickedly complex. Whether you’re a business owner or product owner, site builder or developer, a site maintainer or a project manager, a business strategist or analyst, a themer or a systems administrator, a designer or a student, you have certainly struggled with complexity around Drupal.

This next issue of Drupal Watchdog aims to document a variety of useful strategies for navigating this complexity in all of its forms. We are looking for useful recipes, case studies, tips, and tricks for how to best leverage Drupal to solve strategic business problems.

We are looking for articles on Content Strategy: the analyzing, sorting, constructing, placing and managing of content on a web site. Why are people visiting your website, what is the content they’re interested in, and how can you assure them a meaningful experience? What contributed modules and configuration choices do you use to support your content strategy?

We’re looking for articles on Business Strategy: how stakeholders set goals and objectives that take into account available resources, competition, and the entire business environment. Are there key questions that need to be asked, specific to using Drupal? How does a business adapt to meet the changing landscape?

We’re looking for articles that help readers differentiate the forest from the trees, focusing on value. We’re looking for explorations of the role of analytics in evaluating content and deployment strategy. And we’re looking for examples of organizational and business problems that Drupal is good at solving.

Our Strategy Cookbook will be this and much more: please email me at jeremy@drupalwatchdog.com with proposals for what you’d like to write for this next issue of Drupal Watchdog!

For more information on content length and process, visit the following links:
http://drupalwatchdog.com/contribute
http://drupalwatchdog.com/submission-guidelines

We will require a rough draft of your contribution and any supporting materials by Monday, February 2nd, 2015. We must receive the final draft (including all images, tables, code snippets, etc) by February 16th, 2015.

Email your proposals to jeremy@drupalwatchdog.com.

Tags:  Content strategy Deployment strategy Business strategy
Categories: Elsewhere

Code Karate: Drupal 7 Protected Pages Module

Planet Drupal - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 17:48
Episode Number: 180

In this video we look at the Protected Pages module for Drupal 7. This module allows for password protection on paths in Drupal. In other words, this module will prompt a visitor to a specific page to enter a password before they are able to see the content.

This is one of those modules that exists to just make this use case simple. There are a ton of other ways to accomplish this with permissions and roles in Drupal, but it is always nice to have a simple way to accomplish this task.

Tags: DrupalUsersDrupal 7Drupal Planet
Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Association News: We Want Your Feedback

Planet Drupal - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 17:45

At the Drupal Association, we’re focused on making Drupal better for everyone. You may have heard that we are working to make the Drupal.org experience better for all of our visitors, but we’re not going to stop there. We also want to make DrupalCon a more valuable and inclusive experience for everyone.

For that, we need help from our friends in the Drupal community. We’re looking for people who work at companies that use Drupal, but don’t provide a Drupal product or service. Whether you’re in the C-suite at Twitter, a developer working for a small business, or a manager who oversees the running of a Drupal website, we want to talk to you.

If you fit this criteria and do not attend DrupalCon, and would be willing to speak with us, please fill out this contact form or leave us a comment. Megan Sanicki, our Associate Director, will be in touch with you shortly to talk to you about how we can improve DrupalCon to better fit the needs of you and your business.

Image credit to Alan Levine on flickr.

Categories: Elsewhere

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