Elsewhere

Lullabot: DrupalCon 2015: Lullabot Sessions

Planet Drupal - Wed, 25/03/2015 - 15:54
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This year we have a variety of presentations for you at DrupalCon LA. These all come out of the hard work we're doing all year round on projects such as Tesla, Syfy, SNL, NBC, Bravo (to name a few), and also within the Drupal community.

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Association News: 2015 At-Large Board Elections Announced

Planet Drupal - Wed, 25/03/2015 - 15:00

Everyone on the staff and Board of the Drupal Association would like to congratulate our newest board member:

Addison Berry.

In addition to congratulating Addison, please join me in thanking the 23 other candidates who put themselves out there in service of Drupal and stood for election. 

This was the fourth election we've held for At-Large board seats at the Drupal Association. This year we had two specific goals for the elections:

  • Increase the diversity of the candidates - Although we only had one female candidate, we saw great success by other measures of diversity. 24 candidates came from 14 different countries - including South American and Asian countries. 
  • Increase voter turnout - We fielded 1,432 votes in this election. Our pool of eligible voters was 159,758, so that means our voter tunrout was .89%. This is still low, but a vast improvement over the last election, which saw a .36% turnout. 

Our next steps will be to reach out to the candidates for their evaluation of the elections experience. We also want to hear from you. Please tell us about your experience with the elections process in the comments below so that we can include them in our planning for the 2016 elections.

Flickr photo: Kodak Views

Categories: Elsewhere

Bits from Debian: Hewlett-Packard Platinum Sponsor of DebConf15

Planet Debian - Wed, 25/03/2015 - 14:45

We are very pleased to announce that HP has committed support of DebConf15 as Platinum sponsor.

"The hLinux team is pleased to continue HP's long tradition of supporting Debian and DebConf," said Steve Geary, Senior Director at Hewlett-Packard.

Hewlett-Packard is one of the largest computer companies in the world, providing a wide range of products and services, such as servers, PCs, printers, storage products, network equipment, software, cloud computing solutions, etc.

Hewlett-Packard has been a long-term development partner of Debian, and provides hardware for port development, Debian mirrors, and other Debian services (HP hardware donations are listed in the Debian machines page).

With this additional commitment as Platinum Sponsor, HP contributes to make possible our annual conference, and directly supports the progress of Debian and Free Software, helping to strengthen the community who continue to collaborate on their Debian projects throughout the rest of the year.

Thank you very much, Hewlett-Packard, for your support of DebConf15!

Become a sponsor too!

DebConf15 is still accepting sponsors. Interested companies and organizations may contact the DebConf team through sponsors@debconf.org, and visit the DebConf15 website at http://debconf15.debconf.org.

Categories: Elsewhere

Richard Hartmann: Visiting Hongkong and Shenzhen

Planet Debian - Wed, 25/03/2015 - 10:56

TSDgeos had a good idea:

Lazyweb travel recommodations.

So, dear lazyweb: What are things to do or to avoid in Hongkong and Shenzhen if you have one and a half week of holiday before and after work duties? Any hidden gems to look at? What electronic markets are good? Should I take a boat trip around the waters of Hongkong?

If you have any decent yet affordable sleeping options for 2-3 nights in Hongkong, that would also be interesting as my "proper" hotel stay does not start immediately. Not much in ways of comfort is needed as long as I have a safe place to lock my belongings.

In somewhat related news, this Friday's bug report stats may be early or late as I will be on a plane towards China on Friday.

Categories: Elsewhere

Francois Marier: Keeping up with noisy blog aggregators using PlanetFilter

Planet Debian - Wed, 25/03/2015 - 10:55

I follow a few blog aggregators (or "planets") and it's always a struggle to keep up with the amount of posts that some of these get. The best strategy I have found so far to is to filter them so that I remove the blogs I am not interested in, which is why I wrote PlanetFilter.

Other options

In my opinion, the first step in starting a new free software project should be to look for a reason not to do it So I started by looking for another approach and by asking people around me how they dealt with the firehoses that are Planet Debian and Planet Mozilla.

It seems like a lot of people choose to "randomly sample" planet feeds and only read a fraction of the posts that are sent through there. Personally however, I find there are a lot of authors whose posts I never want to miss so this option doesn't work for me.

A better option that other people have suggested is to avoid subscribing to the planet feeds, but rather to subscribe to each of the author feeds separately and prune them as you go. Unfortunately, this whitelist approach is a high maintenance one since planets constantly add and remove feeds. I decided that I wanted to follow a blacklist approach instead.

PlanetFilter

PlanetFilter is a local application that you can configure to fetch your favorite planets and filter the posts you see.

If you get it via Debian or Ubuntu, it comes with a cronjob that looks at all configuration files in /etc/planetfilter.d/ and outputs filtered feeds in /var/cache/planetfilter/.

You can either:

  • add file:///var/cache/planetfilter/planetname.xml to your local feed reader
  • serve it locally (e.g. http://localhost/planetname.xml) using a webserver, or
  • host it on a server somewhere on the Internet.

The software will fetch new posts every hour and overwrite the local copy of each feed.

A basic configuration file looks like this:

[feed] url = http://planet.debian.org/atom.xml [blacklist] Filters

There are currently two ways of filtering posts out. The main one is by author name:

[blacklist] authors = Alice Jones John Doe

and the other one is by title:

[blacklist] titles = This week in review Wednesday meeting for

In both cases, if a blog entry contains one of the blacklisted authors or titles, it will be discarded from the generated feed.

Tor support

Since blog updates happen asynchronously in the background, they can work very well over Tor.

In order to set that up in the Debian version of planetfilter:

  1. Install the tor and polipo packages.
  2. Set the following in /etc/polipo/config:

    proxyAddress = "127.0.0.1" proxyPort = 8008 allowedClients = 127.0.0.1 allowedPorts = 1-65535 proxyName = "localhost" cacheIsShared = false socksParentProxy = "localhost:9050" socksProxyType = socks5 chunkHighMark = 67108864 diskCacheRoot = "" localDocumentRoot = "" disableLocalInterface = true disableConfiguration = true dnsQueryIPv6 = no dnsUseGethostbyname = yes disableVia = true censoredHeaders = from,accept-language,x-pad,link censorReferer = maybe
  3. Tell planetfilter to use the polipo proxy by adding the following to /etc/default/planetfilter:

    export http_proxy="localhost:8008" export https_proxy="localhost:8008"
Bugs and suggestions

The source code is available on repo.or.cz.

I've been using this for over a month and it's been working quite well for me. If you give it a go and run into any problems, please file a bug!

I'm also interested in any suggestions you may have.

Categories: Elsewhere

KnackForge: PDOException - SQLSTATE[22003] - Numeric value out of range

Planet Drupal - Wed, 25/03/2015 - 10:20
This blog describes how to solve PDOException - SQLSTATE[22003] - Numeric value out of range: 1264 Out of range. When you try to store large integer value in 'integer' field type, then you will get this error. It is because the maximum value of 'integer' field type is exceeded.  For example, you want to store phone number in a content type. Then you may create new field with 'integer' field type in the content type. When you store 10 digit phone number in this field, "PDOException error" will be shown. MySQL allows you to store values from -2147483648 to 2147483647 in integer field type if signed, so you can't store phone number in 'integer' field type. MySQL allocates 4 bytes for 'integer' field type ie., 4 bytes = 4 x 8 = 32 bits 2^32 => 4294967296 values 2^32 - 1 => 4294967295 (if unsigned, 0 to 4294967295 values) -2^(32 - 1) to (2^(32 - 1) - 1) => -2147483648 to 2147483647 (if signed, -2147483648 to 2147483647 values). If you want to store large integer value, then you need to use field type either 'bigint' or 'text field'. If you choose 'bigint', then there is no need to add custom validation for phone number field. On the other hand, if you choose 'text field' then you need to add custom validation using either hook_form_alter() or hook_form_form_id_alter(). <?php /** * Implement hook_form_alter() */ function kf_form_alter(&$form, &$form_state, $form_id) { if ($form_id == 'your_form_id') {
Categories: Elsewhere

KnackForge: Drupal - Updating File name

Planet Drupal - Wed, 25/03/2015 - 08:45

If you know the file id, it is really simple,
Code:

$file = file_load($fid); file_move($file, 'public://new_file_name);

How it works:

We need a source file object to move file to the new location and update the files database entry. Moving a file is performed by copying the file to the new location and then deleting the original. To get source file object, we can use file_load() function.
file_load($fid) - loads a single file object from the database
$fid - file id
return object representing the file, or FALSE if the file was not found.

After that, we can use file_move() function to move the file new location and delete the original file..

file_move($file, 'public://new_file_name)

Parameter1 - Source File Object
Parameter2 - A string containing the destination that $source should be moved to. This must be a stream wrapper URI.
Parameter3 - Replace behaviour (Default value : FILE_EXISTS_RENAME)

For more details, check here.
 

Categories: Elsewhere

Kristian Polso: My talk on Drupal security in Drupal Days Milan

Planet Drupal - Wed, 25/03/2015 - 08:06
So I just came back from European Drupal Days in Milan. I had great fun at the event, it was well organized and filled with interesting talks. I'll be sure to attend it next year too!
Categories: Elsewhere

Steinar H. Gunderson: GCC 5 and AutoFDO

Planet Debian - Wed, 25/03/2015 - 01:22

Buried in the GCC 5 release notes, you can find this:

A new auto-FDO mode uses profiles collected by low overhead profiling tools (perf) instead of more expensive program instrumentation (via -fprofile-generate). SPEC2006 benchmarks on x86-64 improve by 4.7% with auto-FDO and by 7.3% with traditional feedback directed optimization.

This comes from Google, with some more information at this git repository and the GCC wiki, as far as I can tell. The basic idea is that you can do feedback-directed optimization by low-overhead sampling of your regular binaries instead of a specially instrumented one. It is somewhat less effective (you get approx. half the benefit of full FDO, it seems), but it means you don't need to write automated, representative benchmarks—you can just sample real use and feed that into the next build.

Now, question: Would it be feasible to do this for all of Debian? Have people volunteer running perf in the background every now and then (similar to popularity-contest), upload (anonymized) profiles to somewhere, and feed it into package building. (Of course, it means new challenges for reproducible builds, as you get more inputs to take care of.)

Categories: Elsewhere

Steinar H. Gunderson: GCC 5 and AutoFDO

Planet Debian - Wed, 25/03/2015 - 01:22

Buried in the GCC 5 release notes, you can find this:

A new auto-FDO mode uses profiles collected by low overhead profiling tools (perf) instead of more expensive program instrumentation (via -fprofile-generate). SPEC2006 benchmarks on x86-64 improve by 4.7% with auto-FDO and by 7.3% with traditional feedback directed optimization.

This comes from Google, with some more information at https://github.com/google/autofdo and https://gcc.gnu.org/wiki/AutoFDO, as far as I can tell. The basic idea is that you can do feedback-directed optimization by low-overhead sampling of your regular binaries instead of a specially instrumented one. It is somewhat less effective (you get approx. half the benefit of full FDO, it seems), but it means you don't need to write automated, representative benchmarks—you can just sample real use and feed that into the next build.

Now, question: Would it be feasible to do this for all of Debian? Have people volunteer running perf in the background every now and then (similar to popularity-contest), upload (anonymized) profiles to somewhere, and feed it into package building. (Of course, it means new challenges for reproducible builds, as you get more inputs to take care of.)

Categories: Elsewhere

ThinkShout: The How and Why of Nonprofits Contributing to Open Source

Planet Drupal - Wed, 25/03/2015 - 01:00

Originally published on February 23rd, 2015 on NTEN.org. Republished with permission.

For the last 15 years or so, we’ve seen consistent growth in nonprofits’ appreciation for how open source tools can support their goals for online engagement. Rarely do we run across an RFP for a nonprofit website redesign that doesn’t specify either Drupal or WordPress as the preferred CMS platform. The immediate benefits of implementing an open source solution are pretty clear:

  • With open source tools, organizations avoid costly licensing fees.

  • Open source tools are generally easier to customize.

  • Open source tools often have stronger and more diverse vendor/support options.

  • Open source platforms are often better suited for integration with other tools and services.

The list goes on… And without going down a rabbit hole, I’ll simply throw out that the benefits of open source go well beyond content management use cases these days.

But the benefits of nonprofits supporting and contributing to these open source projects and communities are a little less obvious, and sometimes less immediate. While our customers generally appreciate the contributions we make to the larger community in solving their specific problems, we still often get asked the following in the sales cycle:

"So let me get this straight: First you want me to pay you to build my organization a website. Then you want me to pay you to give away everything you built for us to other organizations, many of whom we compete with for eyeballs and donations?"

This is a legitimate question! One of the additional benefits of using an open source solution is that you get a lot of functionality "for free." You can save budget over building entirely custom solutions with open source because they offer so much functionality out of the box. So, presumably, some of that saving could be lost if additional budget is spent on releasing code to the larger community.

There are many other arguments against open sourcing. Some organizations think that exposing the tools that underpin their website is a security risk. Others worry that if they open source their solutions, the larger community will change the direction of projects they support and rely upon. But most of the time, it comes down to that first argument:

"We know our organization benefits from open source, but we’re not in a position to give back financially or in terms of our time."

Again, this is an understandable concern, but one that can be mitigated pretty easily with proper planning, good project management, and sound and sustainable engineering practices.

Debunking the Myths of Contributing to Open Source

Myth #1: "Open sourcing components of our website is a security risk."

Not really true. Presumably the concern here is that if a would-be hacker were to see the code that underlies parts of your website, they could exploit security holes in that code. While yes, that could happen, the chances are that working with a software developer who has a strong reputation for contributing to an open source project is pretty safe. More importantly, most strong open source communities, such as the Drupal community, have dedicated security teams and thousands of developers who actively review and report issues that could compromise the security of these contributions. In our experience, unreviewed code and code developed by engineers working in isolation are much more likely to present security risks. And on the off chance that someone in the community does report a security issue, more often than not, the reporter will work with you, for free, to come up with a security patch that fixes the issue.

Myth #2: "If we give away our code, we are giving away our organization’s competitive advantage."

As a software vendor that’s given away code that powers over 45,000 Drupal websites, we can say with confidence: there is no secret sauce. Trust me, all of our competitors use Drupal modules that we’ve released - and vice versa.

By leveraging open source tools, your organization can take advantage of being part of a larger community of practice. And frankly, if your organization is trying to do something new, something that’s not supported by such a community, giving away tools is a great way to build a community around your ideas.

We’ve seen many examples of this. Four years ago, we helped a local nonprofit implement a robust mobile mapping solution on top of the Leaflet Javascript library. At the time, there wasn’t an integration for this library and Drupal. So, as part of this project we asked the client invest 20 hours or so for us release the barebones scaffolding of their mapping tool as a contributed Drupal module.

At first, this contributed module was simply a developer tool. It didn’t have an interface allowing Drupal site builders to use it. It just provided an easier starting point for custom map development. However, this 20 hour starting point lowered the cost for us to build mapping solutions for other clients, who also pitched in a little extra development time here and there to the open source project. Within a few months, the Leaflet module gained enough momentum that other developers from other shops started giving back. Now the module is leveraged on over 5,700 websites and has been supported by code contributions from 37 Drupal developers.

What did that first nonprofit and the other handful of early adopters get for supporting the initial release? Within less than a year of initially contributing to this Drupal module, they opened the door to many tens of thousands of dollars worth of free enhancements to their website and mapping tools.

Did they lose their competitive advantage or the uniqueness of their implementation of these online maps? I think you know what I’m gonna say: No! In fact, the usefulness of their mapping interfaces improved dramatically as those of us with an interest in these tools collaborated and iterated on each other’s ideas and design patterns.

Myth #3: "Contributing to an open source project will take time and money away from solving our organization’s specific problems."

This perception may or may not be true, depending on some of the specifics of the problems your organization is trying to solve. More importantly, this depends upon the approach you use to contribute to an open source project. We’ve definitely seen organizations get buried in the weeds of trying to do things in an open source way. We’ve seen organizations contribute financially to open source projects on spec (on speculation that the project will succeed). This can present challenges. We’ve also seen vendors try to abstract too much of what they’re building for clients up front, and that can lead to problems as well.

Generally, our preferred approach is generally to solve our clients immediate problems first, and then abstract useful bits that can be reused by the community towards the end of the project. There are situations when the abstraction, or the open source contribution, needs to come first. But for the most part, we encourage our clients to solve their own problems first, and in so doing so provide real-life use cases for the solutions that they open source. Then, abstraction can happen later as a way of future-proofing their investment.

Myth #4: "If we open source our tools, we’ll lose control over the direction of the technologies in which we’ve invested."

Don’t worry, this isn’t true! In fact:

Contributing to an open source project is positively selfish.

By this I mean that by contributing to an open source project, your organization actually gets to have a stronger say in the direction of that project. Most open source communities are guided by those that just get up and do, rather than by committee or council.

Our team loves the fact that so many organizations leverage our Drupal modules to meet their own needs. It’s great showing up at nonprofit technology conferences and having folks come up to us to thank us for our contributions. But what’s even better is knowing that these projects have been guided by the direct business needs of our nonprofit clients.

How to Go About Contributing to Open Source

There are a number of ways that your nonprofit organization can contribute to open source. In most of the examples above, we speak to financial contributions towards the release of open source code. Those are obviously great, but meaningful community contributions can start much smaller:

  • Participate in an open source community event. By engaging with other organizations with similar needs, you can help guide the conversation regarding how a platform like Drupal can support your organization’s needs. Events like Drupal Day at the NTC are a great place to start.

  • Host a code sprint or hackathon. Sometimes developers just need a space to hack on stuff. You’d be surprised at the meaningful that connections and support that can come from just coordinating a local hackathon. One of our clients, Feeding Texas, recently took this idea further and hosted a dedicated sprint on a hunger mapping project called SNAPshot Texas. As part of this sprint, four developers volunteered a weekend to helping Feeding Texas build a data visualization of Food Stamp data across the state. This effort built upon the work of Feeding America volunteers across the country and became a cornerstone of our redesign of FeedingTexas.org. Feeding Texas believes so strongly in the benefits they received from this work that they felt comfortable open sourcing their entire website on GitHub.

Of course, if your organization is considering a more direct contribution to an open source project, for example, by releasing a module as part of a website redesign, we have some advice for you as well:

  • First and foremost, solve your organization’s immediate problems first. As mentioned earlier in the article, the failure of many open source projects is that their sponsors have to handle too many use cases all at once. Rest assured that if you solve your organization’s problems, you’re likely to create something that’s useful to others. Not every contribution needs to solve every problem.

  • Know when to start with abstraction vs. when to end with abstraction. We have been involved in client-driven open source projects, such as the release of RedHen Raiser, a peer-to-peer fundraising platform, for which the open source contribution needed to be made first, before addressing our client’s specific requirements. In the case of RedHen Raiser, the Capital Area Food Bank of Washington, DC came to us with a need for a Drupal-based peer-to-peer fundraising solution. Learning that nothing like that existed, they were excited to help us get something started that they could then leverage. In this case, starting with abstraction made the most sense, given the technical complexities of releasing such a tool on Drupal. However, for the most part, the majority of open source contributions come from easy wins that are abstracted after the fact. Of course, there’s no hard and fast rule about this - it’s just something that you need to consider.

  • Celebrate your contributions and the development team! It might sound silly, but many software nerds take great pride in just knowing that the stuff they build is going to be seen by their peers. By offering to open source even just small components of your project, you are more likely to motivate your development partners. They will generally work harder and do better work, which again adds immediate value to your project.

In conclusion, I hope that this article helps you better understand that there’s a lot of value in contributing to open source. It doesn’t have to be that daunting of an effort and it doesn’t have to take you off task.

Categories: Elsewhere

btmash.com: Using Dev Desktop with Composer Drush

Planet Drupal - Wed, 25/03/2015 - 00:55

Before recently settling into the path of using Vagrant + Ansible for site development (speaking of Ansible: I absolutely love it and need to blog about some of my fun with that), I had been using Acquia Dev Desktop. Even now, I'll use it from time to time since it is easy to work with.

planet drupaldrush
Categories: Elsewhere

Simon Josefsson: Laptop indecision

Planet Debian - Tue, 24/03/2015 - 23:11

I wrote last month about buying a new laptop and I still haven’t made a decision. One reason for this is because Dell doesn’t seem to be shipping the E7250. Some online shops claim to be able to deliver it, but aren’t clear on what configuration it has – and I really don’t want to end up with Dell Wifi.

Another issue has been the graphic issues with the Broadwell GPU (see the comment section of my last post). It seems unlikely that this will be fixed in time for Debian Jessie. I really want a stable OS on this machine, as it will be a work-horse and not a toy machine. I haven’t made up my mind whether the graphics issue is a deal-breaker for me.

Meanwhile, a couple of more sub-1.5kg (sub-3.3lbs) Broadwell i7’s have hit the market. Some of these models were suggested in comments to my last post. I have decided that the 5500U CPU would also be acceptable to me, because some newer laptops doesn’t come with the 5600U. The difference is that the 5500U is a bit slower (say 5-10%) and lacks vPro, which I have no need for and mostly consider a security risk. I’m not aware of any other feature differences.

Since the last round, I have tightened my weight requirement to be sub-1.4kg (sub-3lbs), which excludes some recently introduced models, and actually excludes most of the models I looked at before (X250, X1 Carbon, HP 1040/810). Since I’m leaning towards the E7250, with the X250 as a “reliable” fallback option, I wanted to cut down on the number of further models to consider. Weigth is a simple distinguisher. The 1.4-1.5kg (3-3.3lbs) models I am aware that of that is excluded are the Asus Zenbook UX303LN, the HP Spectre X360, and the Acer TravelMate P645.

The Acer Aspire S7-393 (1.3kg) and Toshiba Kira-107 (1.26kg) would have been options if they had RJ45 ports. They may be interesting to consider for others.

The new models I am aware of are below. I’m including the E7250 and X250 for comparison, since they are my preferred choices from the first round. A column for maximum RAM is added too, since this may be a deciding factor for me. Higher weigth is with touch screens.

Toshiba Z30-B 1.2-1.34kg 16GB 13.3″ 1920×1080 Fujitsu Lifebook S935 1.24-1.36kg 12GB 13.3″ 1920×1080 HP EliteBook 820 G2 1.34-1.52kg 16GB 12.5″ 1920×1080 Dell Latitude E7250 1.25kg 8/16GB? 12.5″ 1366×768 Lenovo X250 1.42kg 8GB 12.5″ 1366×768

It appears unclear whether the E7250 is memory upgradeable, some sites say max 8GB some say max 16GB. The X250 and 820 has DisplayPort, the S935 and Z30-B has HDMI, and the E7250 has both DisplayPort/HDMI. The E7250 does not have VGA which the rest has. All of them have 3 USB 3.0 ports except for X250 that only has 2 ports. The E7250 and 820 claims NFC support, but Debian support is not given. Interestingly, all of them have a smartcard reader. All support SDXC memory cards.

The S935 has an interesting modular bay which can actually fit a CD reader or an additional battery. There is a detailed QuickSpec PDF for the HP 820 G2, haven’t found similar detailed information for the other models. It mentions support for Ubuntu, which is nice.

Comparing these laptops is really just academic until I have decided what to think about the Broadwell GPU issues. It may be that I’ll go back to a fourth-gen i7 laptop, and then I’ll probably pick a cheap reliable machine such as the X240.

Categories: Elsewhere

Web Wash: Define Custom Validation using Field Validation in Drupal 7

Planet Drupal - Tue, 24/03/2015 - 22:45

Out of the box, Drupal offers only a single type of validation for fields; required or not required. For most use cases this is fine, however, it can be a little difficult to define your own custom validation logic. What if you need to validate a field value and make sure it's unique?

The Field validation module allows you to define custom validation rules using Drupal's administration interface. The module ships with a lot of its own validators: "Plain text", "Specific value(s)" and much more.

If none of the validators meet your requirement, you can write your own by implementing a validator plugin. Because validators are Ctools plugin, they are easy to maintain as each one gets its own file.

In this tutorial, we'll use Field validation to validate a field value and make sure it's unique.

Categories: Elsewhere

Web Wash: Define Custom Validation using Field Validation in Drupal 7

Planet Drupal - Tue, 24/03/2015 - 22:45

Out of the box, Drupal offers only a single type of validation for fields; required or not required. For most use cases this is fine, however, it can be a little difficult to define your own custom validation logic. What if you need to validate a field value and make sure it's unique?

The Field validation module allows you to define custom validation rules using Drupal's administration interface. The module ships with a lot of its own validators: "Plain text", "Specific value(s)" and much more.

If none of the validators meet your requirement, you can write your own by implementing a validator plugin. Because validators are Ctools plugin, they are easy to maintain as each one gets its own file.

In this tutorial, we'll use Field validation to validate a field value and make sure it's unique.

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal for Government: Drupal, Tableau, and Media Tableau

Planet Drupal - Tue, 24/03/2015 - 20:31

Tableau is a helluva tool.  For data visualization it is at the top of its game... we recently had a 3 day seminar at UVa regarding Tableau, and I was stoked to see that they use Drupal heavily for their portal design.  

While I don't have the $$'s to run Tableau Server right now, it's a cool tool and something to consider...  Anyhow - here's a quick look at Tableau + Drupal + media tableau.  The upshot is that by integrating at the database level you can use views to display all of your workbooks... if all you want is to embed some visualizations in your content this isn't necessary as tableau provides iFrames for workbooks too... to use that just install media tableau, integrate with your wysiwyg editor of choice and move on... I wanted to test it all, so here's the kitchen sink :)

Here are the steps I've taken for the complete integration with views etc... if you just want to embed some tableau views in drupal skip down a bit :)

Categories: Elsewhere

Lullabot: Paying It Forward: Drupal 8 Accelerate

Planet Drupal - Tue, 24/03/2015 - 19:00

Have you heard about the Drupal 8 Accelerate fund? The Drupal Association is collaborating with Drupal 8 branch maintainers to provide grants for those actively working on Drupal 8, with the goal of accelerating its release.

Categories: Elsewhere

Mediacurrent: A Comparison of Drupal 7 Image Caption Methods using WYSIWYG Module with CKEditor

Planet Drupal - Tue, 24/03/2015 - 18:18

I recently had the opportunity to explore popular methods of adding captions to images inside the WYSIWYG editor using the setup of WYSIWYG module with CKEditor library. Our two main criteria were Media module integration and a styled caption in the WYSIWYG editor. As I discovered, we couldn’t have both without custom coding which the budget didn’t allow for. Media module integration won out and the File Entity with View Modes method was chosen. 

The modules/methods I reviewed were:

Categories: Elsewhere

Daniel Pocock: The easiest way to run your own OpenID provider?

Planet Debian - Tue, 24/03/2015 - 17:57

A few years ago, I was looking for a quick and easy way to run OpenID on a small web server.

A range of solutions were available but some appeared to be slightly more demanding than what I would like. For example, one solution required a servlet container such as Tomcat and another one required some manual configuration of Python with Apache.

I came across the SimpleID project. As the name implies, it is simple. It is written in PHP and works with the Apache/PHP environment on just about any Linux web server. It allows you to write your own plugin for a user/password database or just use flat files to get up and running quickly with no database at all.

This seemed like the level of simplicity I was hoping for so I created the Debian package of SimpleID. SimpleID is also available in Ubuntu.

Help needed

Thanks to a contribution from Jean-Michel Nirgal Vourgère, I've just whipped up a 0.8.1-14 package that should fix Apache 2.4 support in jessie. I also cleaned up a documentation bug and the control file URLs.

Nonetheless, it may be helpful to get feedback from other members of the community about the future of this package:

  • Is it considered secure enough?
  • Have other people found it relatively simple to install or was I just lucky when I tried it?
  • Are there other packages that now offer such a simple way to get OpenID for a vanilla Apache/PHP environment?
  • Would anybody else be interested in helping to maintain this package?
  • Would anybody like to see this packaged in other distributions such as Fedora?
  • Is anybody using it for any online community?
Works with HOTP one-time-passwords and LDAP servers

One reason I chose SimpleID is because of dynalogin, the two-factor authentication framework. I wanted a quick and easy way to use OTP with OpenID so I created the SimpleID plugin for dynalogin, also available as a package.

I also created the LDAP backend for SimpleID, that is available as a package too.

Works with Drupal

I tested SimpleID for login to a Drupal account when the OpenID support is enabled in Drupal, it worked seamlessly. I've also tested it with a few public web sites that support OpenID.

Categories: Elsewhere

Daniel Pocock: The easiest way to run your own OpenID?

Planet Drupal - Tue, 24/03/2015 - 17:57

A few years ago, I was looking for a quick and easy way to run OpenID on a small web server.

A range of solutions were available but some appeared to be slightly more demanding than what I would like. For example, one solution required a servlet container such as Tomcat and another one required some manual configuration of Python with Apache.

I came across the SimpleID project. As the name implies, it is simple. It is written in PHP and works with the Apache/PHP environment on just about any Linux web server. It allows you to write your own plugin for a user/password database or just use flat files to get up and running quickly with no database at all.

This seemed like the level of simplicity I was hoping for so I created the Debian package of SimpleID. SimpleID is also available in Ubuntu.

Help needed

Thanks to a contribution from Jean-Michel Nirgal Vourgère, I've just whipped up a 0.8.1-14 package that should fix Apache 2.4 support in jessie. I also cleaned up a documentation bug and the control file URLs.

Nonetheless, it may be helpful to get feedback from other members of the community about the future of this package:

  • Is it considered secure enough?
  • Have other people found it relatively simple to install or was I just lucky when I tried it?
  • Are there other packages that now offer such a simple way to get OpenID for a vanilla Apache/PHP environment?
  • Would anybody else be interested in helping to maintain this package?
  • Would anybody like to see this packaged in other distributions such as Fedora?
  • Is anybody using it for any online community?
Works with HOTP one-time-passwords and LDAP servers

One reason I chose SimpleID is because of dynalogin, the two-factor authentication framework. I wanted a quick and easy way to use OTP with OpenID so I created the SimpleID plugin for dynalogin, also available as a package.

I also created the LDAP backend for SimpleID, that is available as a package too.

Works with Drupal

I tested SimpleID for login to a Drupal account when the OpenID support is enabled in Drupal, it worked seamlessly. I've also tested it with a few public web sites that support OpenID.

Categories: Elsewhere

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