Elsewhere

Gbyte blog: Simple Views display switch

Planet Drupal - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 20:55

If you need a simple Views display switch to toggle e.g between a list and a grid display of a view, there are a couple of plug & play options already.

Display Suite and Quick Tabs are modules which provide this functionality but they seem to be quite an overkill for a simple display switch. View modes on the other hand seems to be exactly what is needed, however there is no stable version and the development one did not work for me.

How it needs to work

Our use case dictates that the filters and the page number have to stay intact while switching to a different views display. The page will be reloaded, no AJAX magic here.

Categories: Elsewhere

Propeople Blog: A Content Staging Solution for Drupal 8 (and more)

Planet Drupal - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 19:02

Moving content between different environments is a need for many big companies that have a Drupal site and content that should be created, reviewed, edited and published on different environments. Although Drupal 8 is not yet released, a content staging solution is already in the works. Dick Olsson (dixon_ on drupal.org) and I are working on this solution together and we aim to release an alpha version soon.

The content staging solution for Drupal 8 is based on a re-designed version of the Deploy module. This solution consists of some contrib modules and depends on three Drupal core modules. The core dependencies are Entity API, Serialization and Restful Web Services. The contributed module dependencies are Relaxed Web Services, Multiversion, Key-value Extensions and (soon) Deploy.

The Relaxed Web Services module provides a Restful/Relaxed JSON API and endpoints for entities, file attachments, administrative tasks like revisions comparison, starting/stopping replication, etc. It extends the core REST API with better support for handling UUID references, revisions, file attachments, etc. This module is borrowing the API interface from CouchDB and its Replication API. CouchDB is a NoSQL, document-oriented database.

The Multiversion module provides revision support for all content entities. It also tracks update sequences to make dependency management easier and tracks revision trees (similar to Git) in order to support conflict detection. With Multiversion, entities are never deleted, they are just flagged as deleted. This is needed in order to replicate deletions and for conflict handling.

Key-value Extensions provides an extension of the core key-value API with a backend for lists and sorted sets that you can do range queries on. This module is needed because of the way the Multiversion module stores its sequence indexes.

Deploy (will be implemented soon) - provides a simple user interface to manage replication and conflicts.

Replication

At the moment, we are using the CouchDB replicator to test content replication between different systems. The CouchDB Replication protocol is a protocol for synchronizing documents between 2 peers over HTTP. This protocol will be used to implement the Replication Web Service module for Drupal 8.

The Replication Web Service module will provide the possibility to replicate content between different systems and Drupal 8, it will also have a Drush plugin for running the replication. Furthermore, it will be possible to run live replications in order to synchronize applications.

Offline applications

By using a standardized HTTP replication protocol for Drupal, such as the one CouchDB is using, the same solution will be applicable to other very interesting use cases as well.

The Offline First principle is quite new in web development, but it has many benefits for users and their experience. A website designed after these principles will continue to work, even if there is no Internet connection available. Now it’s possiblel to create Offline First applications with Drupal 8! We can build offline applications using the same suite of modules that we introduced earlier. To do this we need a remote database - represented by a Drupal 8 site and a local browser-based database, for example PouchDB.

The content staging suite provides all necessary features, such as synchronization, revisioning and file attachments, to create an offline application. At the moment, it’s working with PouchDB version 3.2.1. I’ve created a video to demonstrate how synchronization between PouchDB and Drupal 8 works

Video of Test pull and push replication using Drupal 8 and PouchDB

To test this I use an application based on ToDoMVC and PouchDB 3.2.1.

Headless Drupal

In Drupal 8, we have integrated the Twig template framework, a very good thing, especially for front-end developers. However, sometimes we want to create an absolutely custom frontend using the power of libraries and frameworks like AngularJS and Hoodie, combined with Drupal 8 on the back-end.

The solution we implement provides a lot more possibilities than the Restful Web Services module from Drupal 8 core. This will make possible to create awesome applications using frameworks like AngularJS, a PouchDB database and Drupal 8.

Other Systems

The content staging suite will have many different use-cases, allow for replication between different systems and database, not just between Drupal sites.

Currently we have test suites for replication between Drupal 8 and CouchDB (using the CouchDB replicator, but later you will be able to use the Replication Web Services module). We also have test suites for replication between Drupal 8 and PouchDB.

In the future, this solution may be used to integrate Drupal 8 with other libraries and frameworks.

For more information, check out:

Tags: Drupal 8content stagingCheck this option to include this post in Planet Drupal aggregator: planetTopics: Tech & Development
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Shomeya: 3 Pro-Theming Tips for Drupal 7

Planet Drupal - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 19:00

Most developers know how to do these, but a lot of people follow the temptation and skip them in the rush to go live.

These simple steps reassure future developers and clients that you know what you are doing, subsequently increasing your value with just a few minutes of work.

All which means you can charge more and book more clients, both of which lead to the ability to do more of the things you love that are just for fun!

Read more
Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Watchdog: Will The Revolution Be Drupalized?

Planet Drupal - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 17:38
Feature

Recently I found myself musing about two Drupal-related posts from back in 2007 that projected very different futures for the software project.

The first was by Jeff Robbins of Lullabot: “How Drupal Will Save the World.”

Robbins took as his reference case a community in Nigeria facing exploitation by a multinational oil company. Drupal, he suggested, could empower the community and “give a voice to those who might not otherwise be heard,” driving an internet that was “a powerful force for social change.” To achieve that vision, Robbins laid out technical challenges, centered on making the software easier to learn and use.[1]

A few months after Robbins’ post, Drupal contributor Fergus Geraghty initiated a Drupal.org discussion, “7 million reasons to consider democratising Drupal?” Drupal project lead Dries Buytaert had recently co-founded the company Acquia, and Buytaert’s start-up had just announced its first round of $7 million in venture capital financing. Geraghty expressed concern that the new commercial demands of Acquia could come to shape the overall direction of Drupal, pushing the project in the direction of profit maximization. Against this future, Geraghty proposed the creation of a co-operative to serve as the owner of the Drupal project.[2]

Seven years later, which of these futures are we living? Is Drupal empowering the marginalized and saving the world?

Or is it serving “the man”?

Software Freedom and Social Change

The idea that Drupal and free software could have a role in revolutionizing society might not be as off-the-wall as it sounds.

In Mutual Aid: A Factor of Evolution, the 19th century anarchist Peter Kropotkin countered the social Darwinist “survival of the fittest” thesis by arguing that cooperation was a driving force of evolution and a basis for free human societies.[3]

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EvolvisForge blog: tomcat7 log encoding

Planet Debian - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 17:09

TIL: the encoding of the catalina.out file is dependent on the system locale, using standard Debian wheezy tomcat7 package.

Fix for ‘?’ instead of umlauts in it:

cat >>/etc/default/tomcat7 <<EOF LC_CTYPE=C.UTF-8 export LC_CTYPE EOF

My “problem” here is that I have the system locale be the “C” locale, to get predictable behaviour; applications that need it can set a locale by themselves. (Many don’t bother with POSIX locales and use different/separate means of determining especially encoding, but possibly also i18n/l10n. But it seems the POSIX locales are getting more and more used.)

Update: There is also adding -Dfile.encoding=UTF-8 to $JAVA_OPTS which seems to be more promising: no fiddling with locales, no breakage if someone defined LC_ALL already, and it sets precisely what it should set (the encoding) and nothing else (since the encoding does not need to correlate to any locale setting, why should it).

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Tag1 Consulting: How to Maintain Contrib Modules for Drupal and Backdrop at the Same Time - Part 3

Planet Drupal - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 15:54

This is the third in a series of blog posts about the relationship between Drupal and Backdrop CMS, a recently-released fork of Drupal. The goal of the series is to explain how a module (or theme) developer can take a Drupal project they currently maintain and support it for Backdrop as well, while keeping duplicate work to a minimum.

read more

Categories: Elsewhere

Zlatan Todorić: Useless web

Planet Debian - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 15:49

Or maybe they want to say use less web? Who would know but once you get into it, its hard to get out. You get taken. You become addicted. You know you want it. Say please. You welcome.

Categories: Elsewhere

EvolvisForge blog: tomcat7 init script is asynchronous

Planet Debian - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 15:24

TIL: the init script of tomcat7 in Debian is asynchronous.

For some piece of software, our rollout (install and upgrade) process works like this:

  • service tomcat7 stop
  • rm -rf /var/lib/tomcat7/webapps/appname{,.war}
  • cp newfile.war /var/lib/tomcat7/webapps/appname.war
  • service tomcat7 start # ← here
  • service tomcat7 stop
  • edit some config files under /var/lib/tomcat7/webapps/appname/WEB-INF/
  • service tomcat7 start

The first tomcat7 start “here” is just to unzip the *.war files. For some reason, people like to let tomcat7 do that.

This failed today; there were two webapps. Manually unzipping it also did not work for some reason.

Re-doing it, inserting a sleep 30 after the “here”, made it work.

In a perfect world, initscripts only return when the service is running, so that the next one started in a nice sequential (not parallel!) init or manual start sequence can do what it needs to, assuming the previous command has fully finished.

In this perfect world, those who do wish for faster startup times use a different init system, one that starts things in parallel, for example. Even there, dependencies will wish for the depended-on service to be fully running when they are started; even more so, since the delays between starting things seem to be less for that other init system.

So, this is not about the init system, but about the init script; a change that would be a win-win for users of both init schemes.

Update: Someone already contacted me with feedback: they suggested to wait until the “shutdown port” is listened on by tomcat7. We’ll look at this later. In the meantime, we’re trying to also get rid of the “config (and logs) in webapps/” part…

PS: If someone is interested in an init script (Debian/LSB sysvinit, I made the effort to finally learn that… some months before the other system came) that starts Wildfly (formerly known as JBoss AS) synchronously, waiting until all *.?ar files are fully “deployed” before returning (though with a timeout in case it won’t ever finish), just ask (maybe it will become a dialogue, in which we can improve it together). (We have two versions of it, the more actively maintained one is in a secret internal project though, so I’d have to merge it and ready it for publication though, plus the older one is AGPLv3, the newer one was relicenced to a BSDish licence.)

Categories: Elsewhere

Michael Banck: 26 Feb 2015

Planet Debian - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 12:45
My recent Debian LTS activities

Over the past months, my employer credativ has sponsored some of my work time to keep PostgreSQL updated for squeeze-lts. Version 8.4 of PostgreSQL was declared end-of-life by the upstream PostgreSQL Global Development Group (PGDG) last summer, around the same time official squeeze support ended and squeeze-lts took over. Together with my colleagues Christoph Berg (who is on the PostgreSQL package maintainer team) and Bernd Helmle, we continued backpatching changes to 8.4. We tried our best to continue the PGDG backpatching policy and looked only at commits at the oldest still maintained branch, REL9_0_STABLE.

Our work is publicly available as a separate REL8_4_LTS branch on Github. The first release (called 8.4.22lts1) happened this month mostly coinciding with the official 9.0, 9.1, 9.2, 9.3 and 9.4 point releases. Christoph Berg has uploaded the postgresql-8.4 Debian package for squeeze-lts and release tarballs can be found on Github here (scroll down past the release notes for the tarballs).

We intend to keep the 8.4 branch updated on a best-effort community basis for the squeeze-lts lifetime. If you have not yet updated from 8.4 to a more recent version of PostgreSQL, you probably should. But if you are stuck on squeeze, you should use our LTS packages. If you have any questions or comments concerning PostgreSQL for squeeze-lts, contact me.
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more onion - devblog: Howto: Uninstall a field-based module.

Planet Drupal - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 12:27

Usually when you try to uninstall a field-based module you're confronted with the following error message:

[module] is a required module and can't be disabled. Reason: Field type(s) in use - see Field list

In this blogpost I'm showing you how to uninstall such a module anyway (deleting all the stored data).

Tags:
Categories: Elsewhere

ERPAL: These 3 questions help you to ensure satisfactory project results

Planet Drupal - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 10:51

When you start a new project, you want your client to be happy with your solution because then you’ll get paid for what you’ve delivered. But what if your customer isn’t happy with your project results? Most likely, you won’t get paid the full amount of your order. The project setup with all the necessary agreements is one of the most critical parts of a project, and it influences the overall project's results. The good thing is that it’s not as hard as it seems to draft solid project agreements. When we at Bright Solutions start a new project, we always consider the following three questions. This provides a good basis for a robust project process that will deliver results and, ultimately, make clients happy.

1) What should you deliver and when?

This question is essential and the most important one, so I’ll devote a few words to it. Spend as much time as needed to clarify all your client’s detailed requirements and have him commit to them. This detailed agreement should already be part of your quote. Don't just talk vaguely about requirements; use mind maps, mock-ups and user stories – they’re good tools for requirements engineering. This will help you avoid misunderstandings and failed projects. I’ll give you a short example:
"We need a registration process" is a requirement, in fact. You could agree on this – but you really should elaborate the particulars to reduce the risk of change requests down the road. "We need a registration process that allows a user to enter his/her company and user name in a single-line text field and with a button to sign in via Facebook" is a much more detailed requirement! Any old process by which a user can register would fulfill the first requirement, but this may not be what your customer expects. Next, always clarify the type of contract that underlies your business relationship. There are really only two kinds:

  • Time and material: You’ll be hired for your skills and paid by the working hour, regardless of the result. Freelancers mostly work on this basis in project teams.
  • Contract for work and labor: With this sort of contract you get paid only for the results, no matter how long you spend on delivering it.

Be conscientious and don't confuse these two contract types. Take care of the details during the engineering of requirements and write them all down.

2) Who is responsible for what?

Clarify your role in the project and what kind of responsibility you’re assuming in this role. Are you a project manager, responsible for the project’s success? Are you a developer who just does the work you’re assigned? Or, are you an architect who transforms requirements into the software architecture that the developers need to do their part? This should be defined at the start of every undertaking to avoid misunderstandings during the project.

3) When will I get paid?

Last but not least you should clarify when you’ll get paid. There are several options and it should be clear which one applies. Your client won’t be happy if you just send an invoice whenever you want: you should invoice according to your agreement. This could take one of the following forms:

  • After the project is completely finished and successful (this payment modality is mostly for work-and-labor contracts)
  • At the end of a specific time period (week, month, year), based on the hours you spent on a project (mostly for time-and-material contracts)
  • After delivering pre-defined milestones

 

Add your payment modality to your quote to ensure that both you and your client agree on the same facts.

There’s a lot of project-related jargon floating around these days, like "agile", "fixed price", "waterfall" and "T&M". Ask 10 different people and you’ll get 11 different opinions on how these terms might apply to your projects! But my advice is: when it comes to negotiations with your client or contractor, simply focus on clarifying these three crucial questions and you’ll lay a strong foundation for your business relationship. Don’t be misled by buzzwords if you don't know exactly what they mean for you.

In upcoming blog posts I’ll share some additional information about successful project setup, management and controlling.

Business administration systems such as ERPAL for Service Providers and ERPAL Platform can help you control these agreements and automate the work of administration.

Categories: Elsewhere

Wouter Verhelst: Dear non-Belgian web developer,

Planet Debian - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 10:22

Localization in the web context is hard, I know. To make things easier, it may seem like a good idea to use GeoIP to detect what country an IP is coming from and default your localization based on that. While I disagree with that premise, this blog post isn't about that.

Instead, it's about the fact that most of you get something wrong about this little country. I know, I know. If you're not from here, it's difficult to understand. But please get this through your head: Belgium is not a French-speaking country.

That is, not entirely. Yes, there is a large group of French-speaking people who live here. Mostly in the south. But if you check the numbers, you'll find that there are, in fact, more people in Belgium who speak Dutch rather than French. Not by a very wide margin, mind you, but still by a wide enough margin to be significant. Wikipedia claims the split is 59%/41% Dutch/French; I don't know how accurate those numbers are, but they don't seem too wrong.

So please, pretty please, with sugar on top: next time you're going to do a localized website, don't assume my French is better than my English. And if you (incorrectly) do, then at the very least make it painfully obvious to me where the "switch the interface to a different language" option in your website is. Because while it's annoying to be greeted in a language that I'm not very good at, it's even more annoying to not be able to find out how to get the correctly-localized version.

Thanks.

Categories: Elsewhere

Isovera Ideas & Insights: Tips for Success for Enterprise-level Drupal Projects

Planet Drupal - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 09:38
I imagine Isovera isn’t the only Drupal shop noticing a gradual but unmistakable shift toward more “enterprise-level” projects. It’s a welcome trend, of course, and one that’ll only intensify as the adoption of Drupal 8 starts in earnest. But it also brings with it some unwelcome growing pains, not least of which is the discovery that many of the management tools that work perfectly fine for small- to medium-sized teams can start to break down when projects get bigger.
Categories: Elsewhere

groups.drupal.org frontpage posts: DrupalCamp Johannesburg 2015

Planet Drupal - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 09:09
Start:  2015-03-28 09:00 - 15:00 Africa/Johannesburg Drupalcamp or Regional Summit Organizers:  Riaan Burger Renate Ehlers mckeen_greg robin.prieschl DunnLofts dubois Jason Lewis

http://dasa.org.za/drupalcamp-johannesburg.html

DrupalCamp Johannesburg 2015 will be held on Saturday the 28th of March 2015, from 09:00 until 15:00 at:

Business Connexion

Block Q
Business Connexion Park North
789 16th Road
Randjespark
Midrand

Just off New Road, Midrand

Google Map
OpenStreetMap

Attendance to DrupalCamp Johannesburg is free; Let us know you are going to be there on meetup.com.

Sponsors

Please consider sponsoring DrupalCamp Johannesburg 2015, we have very affordable options available:

Gold Sponsors: R 6 000
  • Logo on a Stage Banner.
  • Logo on a large Shark Fin.
  • 6 Vinyl (back-of-laptop) Gold Sponsor Stickers.
  • Noted, always, on DASA.org.za website as a Gold Sponsor.
Silver Sponsors: R 3 000
  • Logo on a Stage Banner.
  • Logo on a medium Shark Fin.
  • 4 Vinyl (back-of-laptop) Silver Sponsor Stickers.
  • Noted, always, on DASA.org.za website as a Silver Sponsor.
Individual Sponsors: R 150
  • 2 Vinyl (back-of-laptop) Individual Sponsor Stickers.
  • Noted, always, on DASA.org.za website as an Individual Sponsor.

Because we have printed material to prepare, the deadline for confirming that you will be a sponsor and for receiving your creative (logo for landscape, ISO216) is noon the 5th of March. It's urgent to contact info@dasa.org.za as soon as possible to arrange sponsorship. The deadlines are tight and it may be tough to handle a heavier load of work close to the deadline.

DASA Board

DASA Governing Board Members agreed, when we formed DASA, to always stand aside if limited sponsorship options are available and the community wishes to sponsor an event. We have only five Gold and five Silver sponsorship spots open. If the community sponsors those and board members already also booked sponsorship, the board members' sponsorship will be downgraded to the first available lower level sponsorship.

Categories: Elsewhere

Midwestern Mac, LLC: Introducing the Dramble - Raspberry Pi 2 cluster running Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 07:08


Version 0.9.3 of the Dramble—running Drupal 8 on 6 Raspberry Pis

I've been tinkering with computers since I was a kid, but in the past ten or so years, mainstream computing has become more and more locked down, enclosed, lightweight, and, well, polished. I even wrote a blog post about how, nowadays, most computers are amazing. Long gone are the days when I had to worry about line voltage, IRQ settings, diagnosing bad capacitors, and replacing 40-pin cables that went bad!

But I'm always tempted back into my earlier years of more hardware-oriented hacking when I pull out one of my Raspberry Pi B+/A+ or Arduino Unos. These devices are as raw of modern computers as you can get—requiring you to actual touch the silicone chips and pins to be able to even use the devices. I've been building a temperature monitoring network that's based around a Node.js/Express app using Pis and Arduinos placed around my house. I've also been working a lot lately on a project that incorporates three of my current favorite technologies: The Raspberry Pi 2 model B (just announced earlier this month), Ansible, and Drupal!

In short, I'm building a cluster of Raspberry Pis, and designating it a 'Dramble'—a 'bramble' of Raspberry Pis running Drupal 8.

Categories: Elsewhere

Out & About On The Third Rock: Drupal Camp Tunis 2015 – Call to Action

Planet Drupal - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 01:27
Speaking to Willie Seabrook took me back to 2011-2012 when a few of us were trying to get Drupalists in Pakistan to morph into a local community, connect with the regional and global Drupal community and reap the benefits that come from the wisdom of the crowd. Willie is doing for Tunisian Drupal community what I […]
Categories: Elsewhere

Darren Mothersele: The Drupal Site Builder Manifesto

Planet Drupal - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 01:00

I wanted to get some clarity on what I mean by the term "site builder". In a general sense, it refers to the actual process of building a website, but in Drupal the term Site Builder tends to have a specific meaning. I realised that my definition may vary from others so I wanted to be precise about what I think it means, and what I think it means to be a Drupal Site Builder.

I am a developer. I studied programming languages in depth. I did research into the semantic analysis of object oriented languages. But, when it comes to Drupal, I love to be a Site Builder.

I run a Creative Coding Meetup in London. At last night's meeting I was explaining Friday's Drupal Camp training to someone. I am clear about the aims and objectives of the training, I know my material, and I've given similar trainings many times before, but, the fact I labelled it an "intermediate" and "site builder" training causes some confusion.

First of all, I realised that using the word "intermediate" doesn't really mean anything. Drupal developers (or anyone building Drupal sites) of all skill levels have benefited from this training. So, perhaps what I mean by "intermediate" is actually "not beginner". As all I am really saying is that I'm not covering the very basics of getting Drupal up and running.

The term "site builder" is more problematic, possibly because my definition of a Drupal Site Builder may be wider than what most people expect. I thought about this a lot, and what I came up with was a clear set of statements of what I think it means to be a Drupal Site Builder...

The Drupal Site Builder Manifesto

As Drupal Site Builders...

We work in a multi-disciplinary role.

We take initiative, and play a central role in the web development process.

We are usually the ones to take ownership of the final product.

We don't just “click and configure” websites. We have knowledge of all the areas involved in building a Drupal website.

We work with the rest of the team to ensure everyone is doing what they do best and contributing to the project in a meaningful way.

We may not all be trained developers, but we do appreciate how to think like a developer. We apply software development principles and Drupal best practises when creating Drupal configuation.

We may not all know how to write optimal PHP code, but we know when to build something using Drupal core or contributed modules, and when we need a custom plugin or custom module creating.

We may not all be able to produce the most stunning web designs, but because we understand how Drupal works we will work with designers to ensure their designs are consistent and well structured.

We may not all know all the latest front-end tricks, but when given well build front-end code we know how to get Drupal to generate the appropriate markup.

Most importantly, we know how to get the best results out of Drupal's building blocks, we know how to turn good designs and ideas into great websites, and we know how to build websites in a methodical, flexible, and maintainable way.

Categories: Elsewhere

Holger Levsen: 20150225-apparmor-user-stories

Planet Debian - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 00:07
Developing is a use case too

For whatever reason Ulrike's blog post about AppArmor user stories and user tags was not syndicated to planet.d.o, despite it should have been and despite planet admins nicely having looked into it. Whatever...

As you might have guessed by now, the user stories referred to in this blog post are about developers supporting AppArmor (a kernel module for restricting capabilities of processes) in their Debian packages. So if you're maintaining packages and have always been pondering to look into this apparmor thingy, go read that blog post!

Hopefully the next post will "magically" appear on planet again

Categories: Elsewhere

Joachim Breitner: DarcsWatch End-Of-Life’d

Planet Debian - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 00:00

Almost seven years ago, at a time when the “VCS wars” have not even properly started yet, GitHub was seven days old and most Haskell related software projects were using Darcs as their version control system of choice, when you submitted a patch, you simply ran darcs send and mail with your changes would be sent to the right address, e.g. the maintainer or a mailing list. This was almost as convenient as Pull Requests are on Github now, only that it was tricky to keep track of what was happening with the patch, and it would be easy to forget to follow up on it.

So back then I announced DarcsWatch: A service that you could CC in your patch submitting mail, which then would monitor the repository and tell you about the patches status, i.e. whether it was applied or obsoleted by another patch.

Since then, it quitely did its work without much hickups. But by now, a lot of projects moved away from Darcs, so I don’t really use it myself any more. Also, its Darcs patch parser does not like every submissions by a contemporary darcs, so it is becoming more and more unreliable. I asked around on the xmonad and darcs mailing lists if others were still using it, and noboy spoke up. Therefore, after seven years and 4660 monitored patches, I am officially ceasing to run DarcsWatch.

The code and data is still there, so if you believe this was a mistake, you can still speak up -- but be prepared to be asked to take over maintaining it.

I have a disklike for actually deleting data, so I’ll keep the static parts of DarcsWatch web page in the current state running.

I’d like to thank the guys from spiny.org.uk for hosting DarcsWatch on urching for the last 5 years.

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