Elsewhere

Alexander Mikhailian: Data-mining Drupal users in a screenful of code

Planet Drupal - Sun, 18/01/2015 - 10:53
Objective

Select like-minded users from a local community website.

Pre-requisites
  1. A Drupal website with the votingapi module enabled and at least a few dozen votes by registered users.
  2. A working installation of the R language.
Exract data

For each user, select all other users that voted on same node and comments:

SELECT v1.uid uid1, v2.uid uid2, u.name name2, v2.entity_id entity_id, v1.value value1, v2.value value2 FROM votingapi_vote v1 JOIN (votingapi_vote v2, users u) ON (v1.uid != v2.uid AND v1.entity_id=v2.entity_id AND v1.entity_type=v2.entity_type AND v2.uid=u.uid) WHERE v1.uid

This produces a table

Categories: Elsewhere

Ian Campbell: Using Grub 2 as a bootloader for Xen PV guests on Debian Jessie

Planet Debian - Sun, 18/01/2015 - 10:23

I recently wrote a blog post on using grub 2 as a Xen PV bootloader for work. See Using Grub 2 as a bootloader for Xen PV guests over on https://blog.xenproject.org.

Rather than repeat the whole thing here I'll just briefly cover the stuff which is of interest for Debian users (if you want all full background and the stuff on building grub from source etc then see the original post).

TL;DR: With Jessie, install grub-xen-host in your domain 0 and grub-xen in your PV guests then in your guest configuration, depending on whether you want a 32- or 64-bit PV guest write either:

kernel = "/usr/lib/grub-xen/grub-i386-xen.bin"

or

kernel = "/usr/lib/grub-xen/grub-x86_64-xen.bin"

(instead of bootloader = ... or other kernel = ..., also omit ramdisk = ... and any command line related stuff (e.g. root = ..., extra = ..., cmdline = ... ) and your guests will boot using Grub 2, much like on native.

In slightly more detail:

The forthcoming Debian 8.0 (Jessie) release will contain support for both host and guest pvgrub2. This was added in version 2.02~beta2-17 of the package (bits were present before then, but -17 ties it all together).

The package grub-xen-host contains grub binaries configured for the host, these will attempt to chainload an in-guest grub image (following the Xen x86 PV Bootloader Protocol) and fall back to searching for a grub.cfg in the guest filesystems. grub-xen-host is Recommended by the Xen meta-packages in Debian or can be installed by hand.

The package grub-xen-bin contains the grub binaries for both the i386-xen and x86_64-xen platforms, while the grub-xen package integrates this into the running system by providing the actual pvgrub2 image (i.e. running grub-install at the appropriate times to create an image tailored to the system) and integration with the kernel packages (i.e. running update-grub at the right times), so it is the grub-xen which should be installed in Debian guests.

At this time the grub-xen package is not installed in a guest automatically so it will need to be done manually (something which perhaps could be addressed for Stretch).

Categories: Elsewhere

Guido Günther: whatmaps 0.0.9

Planet Debian - Sun, 18/01/2015 - 10:17

I have released whatmaps 0.0.9 a tool to check which processes map shared objects of a certain package. It can integrate into apt to automatically restart services after a security upgrade.

This release fixes the integration with recent systemd (as in Debian Jessie), makes logging more consistent and eases integration into downstream distributions. It's available in Debian Sid and Jessie and will show up in Wheezy-backports soon.

This blog is flattr enabled.

Categories: Elsewhere

Rogério Brito: Uploading SICP to Youtube

Planet Debian - Sun, 18/01/2015 - 02:52
Intro

I am not alone in considering Harold Abelson and Gerald Jay Sussman's recorded lectures based on their book "Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs" is a masterpiece.

There are many things to like about the content of the lectures, beginning with some pearls and wisdom about the craft of writing software (even though this is not really a "software enginneering" book), the clarity with which the concepts are described, the Freedom-friendly aspects of the authors regarding the material that they produced and much, the breadth of the subjects covered and much more.

The videos, their length, and splitting them

The course consists of 20 video files and they are all uploaded on Youtube already.

There is one thing, though: while the lectures are naturally divided into segments (the instructors took a break in after every 30 minutes or so worth of lectures), the videos corresponding to each lecture have all the segments concatenated.

To better watch them, accounting for the easier possibility to put a few of the lectures in a mobile device or to avoid fast forwarding long videos from my NAS when I am watching them on my TV (and some other factors), I decided to sit down, take notes for each video of where the breaks where, and write a simple Python script to help split the videos in segments, and, then, reencode the segments.

I decided not to take the videos from Youtube to perform my splitting activities, but, instead, to operate on one of the "sources" that the authors once had in their homepage (videos encoded in DivX and audio in MP3). The videos are still available as a torrent file (with a magnet link for the hash 650704e4439d7857a33fe4e32bcfdc2cb1db34db), with some very good souls still seeding it (I can seed it too, if desired). Alas, I have not found a source for the higher quality MPEG1 videos, but I think that the videos are legible enough to avoid bothering with a larger download.

I soon found out that there are some beneficial side-effects of splitting the videos, like not having to edit/equalize the entire audio of the videos when only a segment was bad (which is understandable, as these lectures were recorded almost 30 years ago and technology was not as advanced as things are today).

So, since I already have the split videos lying around here, I figured out that, perhaps, other people may want to download them, as they may be more convenient to watch (say, during commutes or whatever/whenever/wherever it best suits them).

Of course, uploading all the videos is going to take a while and I would only do it if people would really benefit from them. If you think so, let me know here (or if you know someone who would like the split version of the videos, spread the word).

Categories: Elsewhere

Jonathan Wiltshire: Alcester BSP, day two

Planet Debian - Sun, 18/01/2015 - 00:02

Neil has abandoned his reputation as an RM machine, and instead concentrated on making the delayed queue as long as he can. I’m reliably informed that it’s now at a 3-year high. Steve is delighted that his reigning-in work is finally having an effect.

Alcester BSP, day two is a post from: jwiltshire.org.uk | Flattr

Categories: Elsewhere

Tim Retout: CPAN PR Challenge - January - IO-Digest

Planet Debian - Sat, 17/01/2015 - 23:01

I signed up to the CPAN Pull Request Challenge - apparently I'm entrant 170 of a few hundred.

My assigned dist for January was IO-Digest - this seems a fairly stable module. To get the ball rolling, I fixed the README, but this was somehow unsatisfying. :)

To follow-up, I added Travis-CI support, with a view to validating the other open pull request - but that one looks likely to be a platform-specific problem.

Then I extended the Travis file to generate coverage reports, and separately realised the docs weren't quite fully complete, so fixed this and added a test.

Two of these have already been merged by the author, who was very responsive.

Part of me worries that Github is a centralized, proprietary platform that we now trust most of our software source code to. But activities such as this are surely a good thing - how much harder would it be to co-ordinate 300 volunteers to submit patches in a distributed fashion? I suppose you could do something similar with the list of Debian source packages and metadata about the upstream VCS, say...

Categories: Elsewhere

Akshay Kalose: Drupal 8: Ajax in Forms

Planet Drupal - Sat, 17/01/2015 - 22:45

Why reload the whole page, when you can just update a certain parts of the DOM? Ajax allows you to do just this, to dynamically update content. Just one of the many great uses of Ajax is Form Validation. In this example, we will see how to implement this.

We will be making a simple form which will contain a text field that will validate if the username entered exists, and a button that will replace the text field value with a random existing username.

Building The Form

First, we need to define our two form elements:

$form['user_name'] = array( '#type' => 'textfield', '#title' => 'Username', '#description' => 'Please enter in a username', ); $form['random_user'] = array( '#type' => 'button', '#value' => 'Random Username', );

Next, to start using Ajax in Drupal, all you need to specify is the “callback“, or function to call, when the “event“, or trigger, is fired on that certain form element, in an array under the “#ajax” key:

$form['user_name'] = array( '#type' => 'textfield', '#title' => 'Username', '#description' => 'Please enter in a username', '#ajax' => array( // Function to call when event on form element triggered. 'callback' => 'Drupal\ajax_example\Form\AjaxExampleForm::usernameValidateCallback', // Javascript event to trigger Ajax. Currently for: 'onchange'. 'event' => 'change', );

In the “callback”, include the full namespaced class and function you want to call. The event can be any Javascript event without the “on”. A list of Javascript events can be found here.

Once you have added these two keys, you can add extra options such as “effect”, and “progress”. More options can be found on the Ajax API. Here are the finished elements:

$form['user_name'] = array( '#type' => 'textfield', '#title' => 'Username', '#description' => 'Please enter in a username', '#ajax' => array( // Function to call when event on form element triggered. 'callback' => 'Drupal\ajax_example\Form\AjaxExampleForm::usernameValidateCallback', // Effect when replacing content. Options: 'none' (default), 'slide', 'fade'. 'effect' => 'fade', // Javascript event to trigger Ajax. Currently for: 'onchange'. 'event' => 'change', 'progress' => array( // Graphic shown to indicate ajax. Options: 'throbber' (default), 'bar'. 'type' => 'throbber', // Message to show along progress graphic. Default: 'Please wait...'. 'message' => NULL, ), ), ); $form['random_user'] = array( '#type' => 'button', '#value' => 'Random Username', '#ajax' => array( 'callback' => 'Drupal\ajax_example\Form\AjaxExampleForm::randomUsernameCallback', 'event' => 'click', 'progress' => array( 'type' => 'throbber', 'message' => 'Getting Random Username', ), ), );

Creating The Callbacks

After creating our form elements, it is time to create the callback functions which will return the response of what to update on the page.

These callbacks will return an instance of \Drupal\Core\Ajax\AjaxResponse. Each AjaxResponse instance will contain jQuery commands that will execute on the form. You can use the “addCommand()” method on AjaxResponse to add commands that implement \Drupal\Core\Ajax\CommandInterface.

Some commands such as CssCommand and ChangedCommand did not work. Thankfully, there is InvokeCommand which allows you to run any jQuery command. You can construct it with a jQuery selector, method, and arguments:

public InvokeCommand::__construct($selector, $method, array $arguments = array())

Here are the two callbacks for our form:

public function usernameValidateCallback(array &$form, FormStateInterface $form_state) { // Instantiate an AjaxResponse Object to return. $ajax_response = new AjaxResponse(); // Check if Username exists and is not Anonymous User (''). if (user_load_by_name($form_state->getValue('user_name')) && $form_state->getValue('user_name') != false) { $text = 'User Found'; $color = 'green'; } else { $text = 'No User Found'; $color = 'red'; } // Add a command to execute on form, jQuery .html() replaces content between tags. // In this case, we replace the desription with wheter the username was found or not. $ajax_response->addCommand(new HtmlCommand('#edit-user-name--description', $text)); // CssCommand did not work. //$ajax_response->addCommand(new CssCommand('#edit-user-name--description', array('color', $color))); // Add a command, InvokeCommand, which allows for custom jQuery commands. // In this case, we alter the color of the description. $ajax_response->addCommand(new InvokeCommand('#edit-user-name--description', 'css', array('color', $color))); // Return the AjaxResponse Object. return $ajax_response; } public function randomUsernameCallback(array &$form, FormStateInterface $form_state) { // Get all User Entities. $all_users = entity_load_multiple('user'); // Remove Anonymous User. array_shift($all_users); // Pick Random User. $random_user = $all_users[array_rand($all_users)]; // Instantiate an AjaxResponse Object to return. $ajax_response = new AjaxResponse(); // ValCommand does not exist, so we can use InvokeCommand. $ajax_response->addCommand(new InvokeCommand('#edit-user-name', 'val' , array($random_user->get('name')->getString()))); // ChangedCommand did not work. //$ajax_response->addCommand(new ChangedCommand('#edit-user-name', '#edit-user-name')); // We can still invoke the change command on #edit-user-name so it triggers Ajax on that element to validate username. $ajax_response->addCommand(new InvokeCommand('#edit-user-name', 'change')); // Return the AjaxResponse Object. return $ajax_response; }

Finished Form

Here is our finished Ajax Example Form:

 

This blog post was created for Google Code-In 2014 to learn about a Drupal Core System.

Full Module Code .gist table { margin-bottom: 0; }

The post Drupal 8: Ajax in Forms appeared first on Akshay Kalose.

Categories: Elsewhere

3C Web Services: How to remove the Fieldset from a Drupal Address Field

Planet Drupal - Sat, 17/01/2015 - 16:57

INTRODUCTION

The Drupal Address Field Module is a great tool that we use often. There are, however, many times when the default output causes some issues for us. Be default, Address Field places all of its individual field components inside of a Feldset wrapper. This is usually a nice feature but there are times when you may want to remove this Fieldset wrapper for ascetics. Or, perhaps, you'd like to place additional fields within the Address Field's Fieldset. We'll show you how to do both.

Categories: Elsewhere

Ulrike Uhlig: Updating a profile in Debian’s apparmor-profiles-extra package

Planet Debian - Sat, 17/01/2015 - 16:00

I have gotten my first patch to the Pidgin AppArmor profile accepted upstream. One of my mentors thus suggested that I’d patch the updated profile in the Debian package myself. This is fairly easy and requires simply that one knows how to use Git.

If you want to get write access to the apparmor-profiles-extra package in Debian, you first need to request access to the Collaborative Maintenance Alioth project, collab-maint in short. This also requires setting up an account on Alioth.

Once all is set up, one can export the apparmor-profiles-extra Git repository.
If you simply want to submit a patch, it’s sufficient to clone this repository anonymously.
Otherwise, one should use the “–auth” parameter with “debcheckout”. The “debcheckout” command is part of the “devscripts” package:

debcheckout --auth apparmor-profiles-extra

Go into the apparmor-profiles-extra folder and create a new working branch:

git branch workingtitle git checkout workingtitle

Get the latest version of profiles from upstream. In “profiles”, one can edit the profiles.

Test.

The debian/README.Debian file should be edited: add what relevant changes one just imported from upstream.

Then, one could either push the branch to collab-maint:

git commit -a git push origin workingtitle

or simply submit a patch to the Debian Bug Tracking System against the apparmor-profiles-extra package.

The Debian AppArmor packaging team mailing list will receive a notification of this commit. This way, commits can be peer reviewed and merged by the team.

Categories: Elsewhere

DrupalOnWindows: Node Comments and Forums working together to boost user engagement

Planet Drupal - Sat, 17/01/2015 - 13:07

It is frequent that customers approach us asking for help to rescue their projects from site builders. Sometimes they have technological issues (mainly slow sites) but sometimes it's just plain bad usability os some wrong marketing concepts.

We recently were asked for help from a site that gets about 5,000 unique visitors a day. Despite the not so bad visitor numbers for their niche, this page was getting very low user interaction. They barely got a handful (<10) of comments and forum posts in a whole year timespan.

Language English
Categories: Elsewhere

Guido Günther: krb5-auth-dialog 3.15.4

Planet Debian - Sat, 17/01/2015 - 10:42

To keep up with GNOMEs schedule I've released krb5-auth-dialog 3.15.4. The changes of 3.15.1 and 3.15.4 include among updated translations, the replacement of deprecated GTK+ widgets, minor UI cleanups and bug fixes a header bar fix that makes us only use header bar buttons iff the desktop environment has them enabled:

This makes krb5-auth-dialog better ingtegrated into other desktops again thanks to mclasen's awesome work.

This blog is flattr enabled.

Categories: Elsewhere

Diego Escalante Urrelo: Link Pack #03

Planet Debian - Sat, 17/01/2015 - 01:45

What’s that? The third edition of Link Pack of course!

Playing with Power (7 minutes, Vimeo)
A super awesome story about a stop motion animator that turned a Nintendo Power Glove into the perfect animation tool. It’s a fun, inspiring video :-). I love the Power Glove, it’s so bad.

The Power Glove – Angry Video Game Nerd – Episode 14 (12 minutes, YouTube)
On the topic of the Power Glove, here’s the now classic Angry Video Game Nerd video about it. James Rolfe is funny.

Ship Your Enemies Glitter
A rising star in the internet business landscape. You pay them $9.99 and they send an envelope full of glitter to your worst enemy. They promise it will jump into everything, as usual. Damn you glitter.

A Guide to Practical Contentment
Be happy with what you have, but understand why:

(…) if you start in this place of fixing what’s wrong with you, you keep looking for what else is wrong with you, what else you need to improve. So maybe now feel like you don’t have enough muscles, or six pack abs, or you think your calves don’t look good, or if it’s not about your body, you’ll find something else.

So it’s this never-ending cycle for your entire life. You never reach it. If you start with a place of wanting to improve yourself and feeling stuck, even if you’re constantly successful and improving, you’re always looking for happiness from external sources. You don’t find the happiness from within, so you look to other things.

The Comments Section For Every Video Where Someone Does A Pushup
Comments. From YouTube. Enough said.

“These are dips. Not pushups. In the entire history of the world, no one has ever successfully performed a pushup. They’re all just dips.”

“STOP DRIVING WITH YOUR HIPS. IF YOU’RE DOING A PUSHUP CORRECTLY, YOUR HIPS SHOULD CEASE TO EXIST.”

“You could do 100 pushups like this and it wouldn’t improve your strength at all. You’re just bending your arms.”

Self-Taught Chinese Street Photographer Tao Liu Has an Eye for Peculiar Moments
This Chinese photog uses his lunch break to snap interesting street photography. Funny selection by PetaPixel, his Flickr page has even more stuff. Even more in his photoblog.

By Liu Tao. https://www.flickr.com/photos/58083590@N05/14613273495/

Enrique Castro-Mendivil’s Agua Dulce photo set
Another interesting photo link. This time it’s the most popular beach in Lima, with most people coming from low income neighborhoods, it shows how fragmented the city is.

By Enrique Castro-Mendivil. http://www.castromendivilphoto.com/index.php/component/content/article/11-work/69-agua-dulce
Categories: Elsewhere

Jonathan Wiltshire: Alcester BSP, day one

Planet Debian - Sat, 17/01/2015 - 01:25

Perhaps I should say evening one, since we didn’t get going until nine or so. I have mostly been processing unblocks – 13 in all. We have a delayed upload and a downgrade in the pipeline, plus a tested diff for Django. Predictably, Neil had the one and only removal request so far.

Alcester BSP, day one is a post from: jwiltshire.org.uk | Flattr

Categories: Elsewhere

The Cherry Hill Company: Creating a Context Plugin

Planet Drupal - Fri, 16/01/2015 - 22:49

On a recent project I was using the combination of Field Collection, Entity Reference, Taxonomy Terms, and Context to make a reusable set of references to terms on various content types. Then, based on the referenced term, I wanted to satisfy a context condition.

Due to the somewhat complex structure, the context was not aware of the term referenced through entity reference and the field collection.

In a case like this, creating a custom context plugin was a good solution.

I got started by reading a couple of helpful posts by others: Custom Context Conditions and Extending Drupal's Context Module: Custom...

Read more »
Categories: Elsewhere

Advomatic: Views in Drupal 8: Improved Displays

Planet Drupal - Fri, 16/01/2015 - 20:09
Now that Drupal 8 is in beta, I’ve been trying to spend some more time with it. Reading articles and watching presentations are good ways to keep up with where things are (or are going), but nothing beats actually using it. Simplytest.me, Pantheon, and Acquia Cloud all now provide free ways to spin up an instance... Read more »
Categories: Elsewhere

Erich Schubert: Year 2014 in Review as Seen by a Trend Detection System

Planet Debian - Fri, 16/01/2015 - 18:22
We ran our trend detection tool Signi-Trend (published at KDD 2014) on news articles collected for the year 2014. We removed the category of financial news, which is overrepresented in the data set. Below are the (described) results, from the top 50 trends (I will push the raw result to appspot if possible due to file limits). The top 10 trends are highlighted in bold. January 2014-01-29: Obama's State of the Union address February 2014-02-05..23: Sochi Olympics (11x, including the four below) 2014-02-07: Gay rights protesters arrested at Sochi Olympics 2014-02-08: Sochi Olympics begins 2014-02-16: Injuries in Sochi Extreme Park 2014-02-17: Men's Snowboard cross finals called of because of fog 2014-02-19: Violence in Ukraine and Kiev 2014-02-22: Yanukovich leaves Kiev 2014-02-23: Sochi Olympics close 2014-02-28: Crimea crisis begins March 2014-03-01..06: Crimea crisis escalates futher (3x) 2014-03-08: Malaysia Airlines machine missing in South China Sea (2x) 2014-03-18: Crimea now considered part of Russia by Putin 2014-03-28: U.N. condemns Crimea's secession April 2014-04-17..18: Russia-Ukraine crisis continues (3x) 2014-04-20: South Korea ferry accident May 2014-05-18: Cannes film festival 2014-05-25: EU elections June 2014-06-13: Islamic state fighting in Iraq 2014-06-16: U.S. talks to Iran about Iraq July 2014-07-17..19: Malaysian airline shot down over Ukraine (3x) 2014-07-20: Israel shelling Gaza kills 40+ in a day August 2014-08-07: Russia bans EU food imports 2014-08-20: Obama orders U.S. air strikes in Iraq against IS 2014-08-30: EU increases sanctions against Russia September 2014-09-04: NATO summit 2014-09-23: Obama orders more U.S. air strikes against IS Oktober 2014-10-16: Ebola case in Dallas 2014-10-24: Ebola patient in New York is stable November 2014-11-02: Elections: Romania, and U.S. rampup 2014-11-05: U.S. Senate elections 2014-11-25: Ferguson prosecution Dezember 2014-12-08: IOC Olympics sport additions 2014-12-11: CIA prisoner center in Thailand 2014-12-15: Sydney cafe hostage siege 2014-12-17: U.S. and Cuba relations improve unexpectedly 2014-12-19: North Korea blamed for Sony cyber attack 2014-12-28: AirAsia flight 8501 missing
Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Watchdog: Drush: The Swiss Army Knife for Drupal

Planet Drupal - Fri, 16/01/2015 - 17:41
Article

I’m personally amazed at the new features and advances of Drupal 8. There are so many changes to talk about, but for this article I want to cover configuration management. In case you haven't yet heard, with the new version of Drupal we see all configuration stored in files instead of in the database. With the new version of Drush there are some built in tools to help manage these files.

At the time of this writing, the recommended version of Drush is 6; however, this article uses commands that were introduced with version 7. Before you can try any of these, you’ll need to be running that version of Drush. The tricky part is that it currently does not have a full release. Typically, you would not want to install a project’s dev release in a production environment. I’m going to assume you will be working locally, on a development server, or are confident you can’t hurt anything otherwise.

In a previous article I explained how to install Drush using Pear; however, the project is shifting to Composer. You can still install via Pear, or even manually, but it's recommended you switch to Composer. Drush has also been moved to GitHub; you will find additional instructions for installing with something other than composer there.

Assuming your environment already has Composer installed, get the latest release of Drush 7 and issue the below command.

composer global require drush/drush:dev-master --prefer-source

Next, verify that it installed:

drush version

The output should indicate you have Drush 7.0-dev, or something along those lines. If it didn't work you may need to log out and back in again before your SSH user will know it's installed.

Now that we have the latest and greatest, the next thing to do is get Drupal 8. Using Drush you can request a specific version of Drupal, or any project, by providing the version number. If you don’t provide a version it will find the recommended version and download that instead.

To get the dev version of Drupal, type this:

drush dl drupal-8.x-dev

Next, let’s get a site installed. Keep in mind that you will need to configure your web server and database since this command only handles the install of Drupal.

Categories: Elsewhere

Richard Hartmann: Release Critical Bug report for Week 03

Planet Debian - Fri, 16/01/2015 - 17:21

The UDD bugs interface currently knows about the following release critical bugs:

  • In Total: 1100 (Including 178 bugs affecting key packages)
    • Affecting Jessie: 172 (key packages: 104) That's the number we need to get down to zero before the release. They can be split in two big categories:
      • Affecting Jessie and unstable: 128 (key packages: 80) Those need someone to find a fix, or to finish the work to upload a fix to unstable:
        • 19 bugs are tagged 'patch'. (key packages: 10) Please help by reviewing the patches, and (if you are a DD) by uploading them.
        • 8 bugs are marked as done, but still affect unstable. (key packages: 5) This can happen due to missing builds on some architectures, for example. Help investigate!
        • 101 bugs are neither tagged patch, nor marked done. (key packages: 65) Help make a first step towards resolution!
      • Affecting Jessie only: 44 (key packages: 24) Those are already fixed in unstable, but the fix still needs to migrate to Jessie. You can help by submitting unblock requests for fixed packages, by investigating why packages do not migrate, or by reviewing submitted unblock requests.
        • 18 bugs are in packages that are unblocked by the release team. (key packages: 7)
        • 26 bugs are in packages that are not unblocked. (key packages: 17)

How do we compare to the Squeeze release cycle?

Week Squeeze Wheezy Jessie 43 284 (213+71) 468 (332+136) 319 (240+79) 44 261 (201+60) 408 (265+143) 274 (224+50) 45 261 (205+56) 425 (291+134) 295 (229+66) 46 271 (200+71) 401 (258+143) 427 (313+114) 47 283 (209+74) 366 (221+145) 342 (260+82) 48 256 (177+79) 378 (230+148) 274 (189+85) 49 256 (180+76) 360 (216+155) 226 (147+79) 50 204 (148+56) 339 (195+144) ??? 51 178 (124+54) 323 (190+133) 189 (134+55) 52 115 (78+37) 289 (190+99) 147 (112+35) 1 93 (60+33) 287 (171+116) 140 (104+36) 2 82 (46+36) 271 (162+109) 157 (124+33) 3 25 (15+10) 249 (165+84) 172 (128+44) 4 14 (8+6) 244 (176+68) 5 2 (0+2) 224 (132+92) 6 release! 212 (129+83) 7 release+1 194 (128+66) 8 release+2 206 (144+62) 9 release+3 174 (105+69) 10 release+4 120 (72+48) 11 release+5 115 (74+41) 12 release+6 93 (47+46) 13 release+7 50 (24+26) 14 release+8 51 (32+19) 15 release+9 39 (32+7) 16 release+10 20 (12+8) 17 release+11 24 (19+5) 18 release+12 2 (2+0)

Graphical overview of bug stats thanks to azhag:

Categories: Elsewhere

EvolvisForge blog: Debian/m68k hacking weekend commencing soonish

Planet Debian - Fri, 16/01/2015 - 15:26

As I said, I did not certain events that begun with “lea” and end with “ing” prevent me from organising a Debian/m68k hack weekend. Well, that weekend is now.

I’m too unorganised, and I spent too much time in the last few evenings to organise things so I built up a sleep deficit already ☹ and the feedback was slow. (But so are the computers.) And someone I’d have loved to come was hurt and can’t come.

On the plus side, several people I’ve long wanted to meet IRL are coming, either already today or tomorrow. I hope we all will have a lot of fun.

Legal disclaimer: “Debian/m68k” is a port of Debian™ to m68k. It used to be official, but now isn’t. It belongs to debian-ports.org, which may run on DSA hardware, but is not acknowledged by Debian at large, unfortunately. Debian is a registered trademark owned by Software in the Public Interest, Inc.

Categories: Elsewhere

Pages

Subscribe to jfhovinne aggregator - Elsewhere