Elsewhere

LevelTen Interactive: Why Organizations Struggle With Web Analytics

Planet Drupal - Wed, 08/10/2014 - 23:42

Web analytics software is being used in most organizations for basic analysis and reporting, but provides little (if any) actionable insight into marketing efforts. Many people login to analytics searching for “the magic answers to their business problems”, but they don’t have specific goals, or challenges they want to analyze/address. Then they become overwhelmed with the amount of information they receive. They throw their hands in the air and concede defeat.... Read more

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Jonathan Dowland: Ansible

Planet Debian - Wed, 08/10/2014 - 22:12

I've just recently built the large bulk of VMs that we use for first semester teaching. This year that was 112. We use the same general approach for these as our others: get a generic base image up and running, with just enough configuration complete so a puppet client starts up; get it talking to our master; let puppet take it from there.

There are pragmatic balances between how much we do in the kickstart versus how much we do in puppet, but also when we build a new VM from scratch versus when we clone an existing image, and how specialisation we do in the clone image.

Unfortunately this year we ended up in a situation where our clone image wouldn't talk to our puppet master out of the box, due to some changes we'd made to our master set up since the clone image was prepared. We didn't really have enough time to re-clone the entire set of VMs from a fixed base image, and instead needed to fix them whilst up. However we couldn't rely on puppet to do that, since they wouldn't talk to the puppet master.

We needed to manually reset the puppet client state per VM and then re-establish a trust relationship with the correct master (which is not the default master hostname in our environment anymore). Luckily, we deploy a local account with a known passphrase via the kickstart, which also has sudo access, as an interim measure before puppet strips it back out again and sets up proper LDAP and Kerberos authentication. So we can at least get into the boxes. However logging into 112 VMs by hand is not a particularly pleasant task.

In the past I might have tried to achieve this using something like clusterssh but this year I decided to give ansible a try instead.

Ansible started life, I believe, as a tool that would let you run arbitrary commands on remote hosts, including navigating ssh and sudo as required, without needing any agent software on the remote end. It has since seemed to grow into an enterprise product in its own right, seemingly in competition with puppet, chef, cfengine et al.

Looking at the Ansible website now I'd be rather put off by just how "enterprisey" it has become - much as I am by the puppet website, if I'm honest - but if you persevere past the webinars, testimonials, etc. etc., you can find yourself to the documentation, and running an arbitrary command is as simple as

  • defining a list of hosts
  • running an ansible command line referencing some or all of those hosts

The hosts file format is simple

[somehosts] host1 host2 ... [otherhosts] host3

The command line can be a little bit more complex, especially if you need to use one username for ssh, another for sudo, and you don't want to use ssh key auth:

ansible -i ./hostsfile somehosts -k -u someuser \ --sudo -K -a 'puppet agent --onetime --no-daemonize --verbose’

"all" would work where I've used somehosts in the example above.

So there you go: using one configuration management system to bootstrap another. I'm sure I've reserved myself a special place in hell for this.

Categories: Elsewhere

Phase2: DrupalCon Amsterdam Roundup

Planet Drupal - Wed, 08/10/2014 - 21:44

As I write this, I’m on a plane back to the US after a whirlwind 10 days in Amsterdam for DrupalCon Amsterdam 2014. As always it is so gratifying to meet and work with the international Drupal community. I love getting to take a look at what everyone is working on and collaborate with people that you might otherwise only know as IRC nicks. Here are my highlights of DrupalCon Amsterdam:

Sprints and Drupal.org Logging

I volunteer my time to help the drupal.org infrastructure team with their logging infrastructure. I was very happy to be able to sprint for 3 days, mainly on drupal.org infrastructure. On Sunday, Friday, and Saturday, I worked with the Drupal.org Puppet configuration to get a new CentOS 6-based log aggregation host ready to go running the latest versions of the ELK (ElasticSearch, Logstash, and Kibana) stack. The new Logstash configuration that we’ll be rolling out is much simpler. Stay tuned to the blog for information on some of the improvements we made in the process. We hope to deploy the new logging host within the week.

DevOps Meetup

Tuesday evening, I attended the DevOps Amsterdam meetup.  The meetup was sponsored by ElasticSearch, who bought a delicious dinner for all attendees as well as some drinks. During dinner, I sat with some folks from Germany and had a chance to speak with a number of ops-attuned folks about Docker and the possible use cases for it.

The meetup had some great content. There was a talk on how GitLab uses omnibus to package GitLab with far less hassle, a talk from fellow d.o infra team volunteer Ricardo Amaro on building the next-gen Drupal testbot on Docker, and a great talk from the DrupalCon Amsterdam DevOps chair Bastian Widmer on developing culture and sharing knowledge in an agency.

LSD Leadership Meeting

Earlier this year, Phase2 contributed some of its innovation hours to the LSD project and worked with Acquia to present a webinar on Behat and release a pre-built virtual machine designed to make it easy to start doing automated testing using Behat. During the LSD leadership meeting I joined Melissa Anderson of Tag1 Consulting and Hugh Fidgens of Pfizer in a breakout session discussing Behat. Quite a few organizations present were very interested in how they could use Behat to enable a behavior-driven development workflow with their developers, or to develop a good set of automated tests that could be run either as smoke tests or as end-to-end integration tests.

Behat Everywhere

In addition to the LSD leadership meeting, automated testing and BDD were topics on everyone’s minds throughout DrupalCon.

I attended 2 BoF about automated testing or Behat, the Testing Drupal 8 BoF, and Hugh Fidgen’s Organizational Behat BoF. These talked about how we could better leverage automated testing tools in Drupal core and in client work we build today, respectively. Many people have had some success in getting automated tests or a BDD workflow started, but there was a lot of talk about writing good sustainable tests and how to integrate these tools into your workflow.

Speaking of writing sustainable tests, my favorite session of the conference was definitely the session by Konstantin Kudryashov (the creator of Behat and Mink) on how to do BDD with Behat. The session was remarkable and left an impact on many folks who went there. It really emphasized the point that BDD must be about identifying and delivering business value in our projects, and that doing that is the way to write good tests. It is definitely worth an hour of your time to watch.

As testing best practices are refined in the Drupal community as well as in Phase2, I’m very excited that the talented Jonathan Hedstrom has joined the Phase2 team.  Jonathan is a maintainer of the Behat DrupalExtension, and is sure to help us further refine our testing practices as Phase2. Jonathan has been doing work recently on upgrading the DrupalExtension to support Behat 3 and has plans to generalize the drivers that the Behat DrupalExtensions provides so that it could be used with Mink for writing tests in straight PHP without needing to use Behat.

My “Open Source Logging and Monitoring Tools” Session

On Wednesday I presented my session “Using Open Source Logging and Monitoring Tools.” I covered a lot of information in my session including using Logstash, ElasticSearch, and Kibana.  Thanks to the tireless work of the DrupalCon A/C crew, the video recording of my session is online, and the slides are available on SlideShare if you would like to follow along.  The session had an excellent turnout, and there were some great questions and discussions following my session. I was quite pleased at the large turnout, and so was @KrisBuytaert, who been bringing information about DevOps-related topics to DrupalCons for years.

I need to rephrase my state of #devops and #drupal conclusion, 2 years ago in Munich there were 10 people in this talk ..(1/2)

— Kris Buytaert (@KrisBuytaert) October 1, 2014

Back then by @samkottler , this year @stevenmerrill ‘s talk is packed , we are winning this ! #logstash, #drupalcon #elasticsearch

— Kris Buytaert (@KrisBuytaert) October 1, 2014

We were also fortunate to have Leslie Hawthorne of ElasticSearch in the audience. She gave out ElasticSearch ELKs to sprinters at the Friday event.

Packed house for @stevenmerrill in #DrupalCon #DevOps track. About to learn how the d.o infra team uses #elkstack pic.twitter.com/MThDhkA48E

— Leslie Hawthorn (@lhawthorn) October 1, 2014

Takeaways

Based on the sheer number of people interested and sessions to devoted to both topics, it is clear that there is a growing interest in both logging and metrics and automated testing or BDD in the Drupal Community. This is also the 11th DrupalCon I’ve been to, and this year’s keynotes were the best I could remember. I really enjoyed Dries’s ideation around sustainable methods for getting contributions to Drupal core and contrib, and getting to see Cory Doctorow speak live about the perils of DRM and restrictions software freedoms was also excellent.

This is an exciting time for Drupal. Drupal 8 beta 1 is live. The community is active and engaged around making Drupal better, both by contributing to Drupal 8 and by doing a better job testing projects built on it. The DA and an army of volunteers have made huge strides on improving the infrastructure around core testing as well as around all the online communities under drupal.org.

Categories: Elsewhere

Mediacurrent: Drupal Agency, Mediacurrent, Awarded Best Overall SMB by Salesforce

Planet Drupal - Wed, 08/10/2014 - 21:33

Today, Mediacurrent is extremely proud to announce that we have been named the 2014 Best Overall Small Business by Salesforce. The award celebrates the best overall marketing and sales story at the SMB level (1-100 employees). Over 100,000 companies use Salesforce, and hundreds of nominations were submitted for the Salesforce Surfboard awards, so saying “we’re honored” to, not only be nominated, but win this award would be an understatement.

Categories: Elsewhere

Steve Kemp: Writing your own e-books is useful

Planet Debian - Wed, 08/10/2014 - 21:03

Before our recent trip to Poland I took the time to create my own e-book, containing the names/addresses of people to whom we wanted to send postcards.

Authoring ebooks is simple, and this was a useful use. (Ordinarily I'd have my contacts on my phone, but I deliberately left it at home ..)

I did mean to copy and paste some notes from wikipedia about transport, tourist destinations, etc, into a brief guide. But I forgot.

In other news the toy virtual machine I hacked together got a decent series of updates, allowing you to embed it and add your own custom opcode(s) easily. That was neat, and fell out naturely from the switch to using function-pointers for the opcode implementation.

Categories: Elsewhere

Mark Shropshire: DrupalCamp Atlanta 2014

Planet Drupal - Wed, 08/10/2014 - 20:54

As expected, I had a great time at DrupalCamp Atlanta 2014 last weekend. While I enjoy attending sessions, it is the chance to catch up with old friends and make new ones that I love.

I want to thank all of those who made this camp a great one (sponsors, ADUG, presenters, volunteers, and attendees)!

Some of my session notes can be found below (unedited):

Sessions Blog Category: 
Categories: Elsewhere

Elena 'valhalla' Grandi: New gpg subkey

Planet Debian - Wed, 08/10/2014 - 20:42
The GPG subkey I keep for daily use was going to expire, and this time I decided to create a new one instead of changing the expiration date.

Doing so I've found out that gnupg does not support importing just a private subkey for a key it already has (on IRC I've heard that there may be more informations on it on the gpg-users mailing list), so I've written a few notes on what I had to do on my website, so that I can remember them next year.

The short version is:

* Create your subkey (in the full keyring, the one with the private master key)
* export every subkey (including the expired ones, if you want to keep them available), but not the master key
* (copy the exported key from the offline computer to the online one)
* delete your private key from your regular use keyring
* import back the private keys you have exported before.
Categories: Elsewhere

Ian Donnelly: A Comparison of Elektra Merge and Git Merge

Planet Debian - Wed, 08/10/2014 - 20:02

Hi everybody,

We have gotten some inquires about how Elektra’s merge functionality compares to the merge functionality built into git: git merge-file. I am glad to say that Elektra outperforms git’s merge functionality in the same ways it outperforms diff3 when applied to configuration files. Obviously, git’s merge functionality does a much better job with source-code as that is not the goal of elektra. In that previous example, I showed that because diff3 is lined based, where Elektra is not (unless you mount a file using the line plugin). The example I used before, and I will go over again, is using smb.conf and in-line comments.

Many of our storage plug-ins understand the difference between comments and actual configuration data. So if a configuration file has an inline comment like so:
max log size = 10000 ; Controls the size of the log file (in KiB)
we can compare the actual Keys, value pairs between versions max log size = 10000 and deal with the comments separately.

As a result, if we have a base:
max log size = 1000 ; Size in KiB

Ours:
max log size = 10000 ; Size in KiB

Theirs:
max log size = 1000 ; Controls the size of the log file (in KiB)

The result using elektra-merge would be:
max log size = 10000 ; Controls the size of the log file (in KiB)

Just like diff3, git merge-file can only compare these lines as lines, and thus there is a conflict. When running git merge-file smb.conf.ours smb.conf.base smb.conf.theirs we get the following output showing a conflict:
<<<<<<< smb.conf.ours
max log size = 2000 ; Size in KiB
=======
max log size = 1000 ; Controls the size of the log file (in KiB)
>>>>>>> smb.conf.theirs

This really shows the strength of Elektra’s plugin system and why it makes merge an obvious use-case of Elektra. I hope this example makes it clear why using Elektra’s merge functionality is advantageous over git’s merge functionality. Once again I would like to stress the importance of quality storage plug-ins for Elektra. The more quality plugins we have the more powerful Elektra can be. If you are interested in plugins and would like to help us by adding functionality to Elektra by creating a new plug-in be sure to read my basic tutorial on how to do so.

Sincerely,
Ian Donnelly

Categories: Elsewhere

Acquia: Drupal 8 - An intro field guide for front-end developers

Planet Drupal - Wed, 08/10/2014 - 19:22

Drupal 8 is almost here, and it’s bringing big front-end improvements, including new methods to display data on mobile devices using breakpoints, build flexible templates in Twig and better management for tools and libraries.

Most importantly, changes to the display layer mean that Drupal has become much more agile and extendable for Front-end Developers.

The journey so far

Up till now, Front-end Developers have been working with a display layer that was originally introduced in Drupal 4.5, here’s how it worked...

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Acquia: 1st DrupalCon, 1st Contribution! Meet Oliver and Victoria

Planet Drupal - Wed, 08/10/2014 - 18:18

DrupalCon Amsterdam was something of a family outing for me. My wife Francesca attended all week and my kids were able to come out Thursday evening to attend Trivia Night and the Friday sprints. My daughter Victoria had sewn a dress and a cape to appear as Drupal Girl on Thursday evening. Her weeks of work on that really paid off; she was a big hit. She also got to meet her Drupal idol, MortenDK, who was the inspiration for her brand new Drupal.org and Twitter username: Drupal_Princess. There's a great photo of her meeting Webchick floating around online, too.

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Appnovation Technologies: OS Initiative Community Site Launched

Planet Drupal - Wed, 08/10/2014 - 17:28
The community site for our OS Initiative is now live! var switchTo5x = false;stLight.options({"publisher":"dr-75626d0b-d9b4-2fdb-6d29-1a20f61d683"});
Categories: Elsewhere

mcdruid.co.uk: How to cleanly delete a Drupal file with drush

Planet Drupal - Wed, 08/10/2014 - 16:43

This is a simple trick which (unless my googlefu simply failed me) I didn't find described anywhere when I had a quick look:

$ drush ev '$file = file_load(21749); var_dump(file_delete($file, TRUE));' bool(true)

This means all the appropriate hooks are called in file_delete so the Drupal API gods should smile on you, and you should get to see the TRUE/FALSE result reflecting success or otherwise. Note that we're passing $force=TRUE "indicating that the file should be deleted even if the file is reported as in use by the file_usage table." So be careful.

To delete multiple files you could use file_load_multiple but there's not a corresponding file_delete_multiple function, so you'd have to loop over the array of file objects.

That's all there is to this one.

Categories: Elsewhere

EvolvisForge blog: PSA: #shellshock still unfixed except in Debian unstable

Planet Debian - Wed, 08/10/2014 - 15:57

I just installed, for work, Hanno Böck’s bashcheck utility on our monitoring system, and watched all¹ systems go blue.

① All but two. One is not executing remote scripts from the monitoring for security reasons, the other is my desktop which runs Debian “sid” (unstable).

This means that all those distributions still have unfixed #shellshock bugs.

  • lenny (with Md’s packages): bash (3.2-4.2) = 3.2.53(1)-release
    • CVE-2014-6277 (lcamtuf bug #1)
  • squeeze (LTS): bash (4.1-3+deb6u2) = 4.1.5(1)-release
    • CVE-2014-6277 (lcamtuf bug #1)
  • wheezy (stable-security): bash (4.2+dfsg-0.1+deb7u3) = 4.2.37(1)-release
    • CVE-2014-6277 (lcamtuf bug #1)
    • CVE-2014-6278 (lcamtuf bug #2)
  • jessie (testing): bash (4.3-10) = 4.3.27(1)-release
    • CVE-2014-6277 (lcamtuf bug #1)
    • CVE-2014-6278 (lcamtuf bug #2)
  • sid (unstable): bash (4.3-11) = 4.3.30(1)-release
    • none
  • CentOS 5.5: bash-3.2-24.el5 = 3.2.25(1)-release
    • extra-vulnerable (function import active)
    • CVE-2014-6271 (original shellshock)
    • CVE-2014-7169 (taviso bug)
    • CVE-2014-7186 (redir_stack bug)
    • CVE-2014-6277 (lcamtuf bug #1)
  • CentOS 5.6: bash-3.2-24.el5 = 3.2.25(1)-release
    • extra-vulnerable (function import active)
    • CVE-2014-6271 (original shellshock)
    • CVE-2014-7169 (taviso bug)
    • CVE-2014-7186 (redir_stack bug)
    • CVE-2014-6277 (lcamtuf bug #1)
  • CentOS 5.8: bash-3.2-33.el5_10.4 = 3.2.25(1)-release
    • CVE-2014-6277 (lcamtuf bug #1)
  • CentOS 5.9: bash-3.2-33.el5_10.4 = 3.2.25(1)-release
    • CVE-2014-6277 (lcamtuf bug #1)
  • CentOS 5.10: bash-3.2-33.el5_10.4 = 3.2.25(1)-release
    • CVE-2014-6277 (lcamtuf bug #1)
  • CentOS 6.4: bash-4.1.2-15.el6_5.2.x86_64 = 4.1.2(1)-release
    • CVE-2014-6277 (lcamtuf bug #1)
  • CentOS 6.5: bash-4.1.2-15.el6_5.2.x86_64 = 4.1.2(1)-release
    • CVE-2014-6277 (lcamtuf bug #1)
  • lucid (10.04): bash (4.1-2ubuntu3.4) = 4.1.5(1)-release
    • CVE-2014-6277 (lcamtuf bug #1)
  • precise (12.04): bash (4.2-2ubuntu2.5) = 4.2.25(1)-release
    • CVE-2014-6277 (lcamtuf bug #1)
    • CVE-2014-6278 (lcamtuf bug #2)
  • quantal (12.10): bash (4.2-5ubuntu1) = 4.2.37(1)-release
    • extra-vulnerable (function import active)
    • CVE-2014-6271 (original shellshock)
    • CVE-2014-7169 (taviso bug)
    • CVE-2014-7186 (redir_stack bug)
    • CVE-2014-6277 (lcamtuf bug #1)
    • CVE-2014-6278 (lcamtuf bug #2)
  • trusty (14.04): bash (4.3-7ubuntu1.4) = 4.3.11(1)-release
    • CVE-2014-6277 (lcamtuf bug #1)
    • CVE-2014-6278 (lcamtuf bug #2)

I don’t know if/when all distributions will have patched their packages ☹ but thought you’d want to know the hysteria isn’t over yet…

… however, I hope you were not stupid enough to follow the advice of this site which suggests you to download some random file over the ’net and execute it with superuser permissions, unchecked. (I think the Ruby people were the first to spread this extremely insecure, stupid and reprehensible technique.)

Thanks to ↳ tarent for letting me do this work during $dayjob time!

Categories: Elsewhere

Jan Wagner: Updated Monitoring Plugins Version is coming soon

Planet Debian - Wed, 08/10/2014 - 13:27

Three months ago version 2.0 of Monitoring Plugins was released. Since then many changes were integrated. You can find a quick overview in the upstream NEWS.

Now it's time to move forward and a new release is expected soon. It would be very welcome if you could give the latest source snapshot a try. You also can give the Debian packages a go and grab them from my 'unstable' and 'wheezy-backports' repositories at http://ftp.cyconet.org/. Right after the stable release, the new packages will be uploaded into Debian unstable. The whole packaging changes can be observed in the changelog.

Feedback is very appreciated via Issue tracker or the Monitoring Plugins Development Mailinglist.

Categories: Elsewhere

Michal &#268;iha&#345;: Wammu 0.37

Planet Debian - Wed, 08/10/2014 - 12:00

It has been more than three years since last release of Wammu and I've decided it's time to push changes made in the Git repos to the users. So here comes Wammu 0.37.

The list of changes is not really huge, but in total that means 1470 commits in git (most of that are translations):

  • Translation updates (Indonesian, Spanish, ...).
  • Add export of contact to XML.
  • Add Get all menu option.
  • Added appdata metadata.

I will not make any promises for future releases (if there will be any) as the tool is not really in active development.

Filed under: English Gammu Wammu | 0 comments | Flattr this!

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Drupal Bits at Web-Dev: Codit and Codit: Local Introduction Video

Planet Drupal - Wed, 08/10/2014 - 08:04

This is a short screencast showing the basic concept of Codit and Codit: Local and where to place them in a Drupal site.

Categories: Elsewhere

Don't Panic: A blog about Drupal: DrupalCon Amsterdam: &quot;There and back again&quot;

Planet Drupal - Wed, 08/10/2014 - 01:01

DrupalCon Amsterdam has come to an end (well, it ended last week, buy hey, I need to catch up on some work as well). It was the biggest DrupalCon in Europe ever, 2,300 attendees! Pretty impressive. I've written a couple of blog entries, trying to capture my stay in Amsterdam and my feelings for a DrupalCon which I attended for more than three days (which has been the case with DrupalCon London and DrupalCon Munich).

Not only did Drupal 8 get a BETA during these days, but a lot of sprinting was happening (as always) and it was pure joy walking through the Berlage in the center of town and at the venue, seeing all that work being put into Drupal.

Tuesday and Wednesday was filled with interesting sessions, and both Tuesday evening with nice boat rides and pub crawl and Wednesday evening with open museums (the light installations at the EYE was spectacular!) was very nice indeed. Thursday, the day for separation for many of us, was also filled with good sessions and the closing talk with Holly and Stephanie both invited us to DrupalCon Barcelona next year, as well as presenting cool statistics about the Con.  

The good...

All of the sessions I attended was good, and, as always, I'm impressed by the time and energy people devote to making Drupal happen and spreading the knowledge and some love. Dries Buytaert's keynote ('the Driesnote') was inspiring, but I didn't agree with everything he said. He talked about the "free-riders", the ones who doesn't help out with Drupal, the ones who only take advantage of the system witouth giving something back. Such a thing is a bad thing, according to Dries. But I think that we also need those free-riders, becuase those free-riders are the ones using the system, making the statistics for Drupal go up worldwide, spreading the word of Drupal. If we don't have free-riders, are the only ones who should use Drupal the ones who code it and support it? If so, Drupal won't get far...

Amsterdam RAI, the venue, was a good venue. Apart from some sessions being very popular (which is a pain in the a** forseeing) so I couldn't get into them, the rooms and hallways were good for sessions and sprinting. The technique was good as well, sound and vision in the sessions was flawless. Big thumbs up for that. The recorded sessions was also professionally made, at least the ones I've had time to watch. Finding them on YouTube the same day or, to some extent, the next is also impressive. Big thumbs up to the techinal team who worked on that during the Con.

The evening activites was also impressive. Ingenuity, local connection and very nice people raised the bar a lot. I kind of fell in love with the architecture of Amsterdam with it's old crooked buildings, canals and the narrow streets, and the boatride on Tuesday evening was magical!

...the bad...

But there's always something that brings a frown to the face. This time I frowned upon three things. The wi-fi. The coffee. The food.

The wi-fi. It's shouldn't be that hard to calculate that if 2,300 persons gather in a closed area and at least half of them have both laptops and phones, there will be much traffic. I don't want to drag Drupal Association of the local community in the dirt here, they hired a company to manage the network and wi-fi, but it's irritating trying to get online for various reasons, and the network dies several times a day.

The coffee. Apparantely the coffee last year in Prague was bad. The worst thing about coffee this year, was that it wasn't free. It cost me 2.5 Euro. When I pay this much for a ticket to a DrupalCon I kind of expect coffee or some other drink to be free. If it's too hard to calculate, try giving out beverage tickets, two or three per day. Some will get lost, some won't be used, but at least I won't have to pay 2.5 Euro for a small cup of coffee that's not even that good.

The food. A small bowl of pasta or paella. A sandwich and some dessert. I was hungry three hours later. I had the opportunity to visit DrupalCon Munich in 2012 and the food there was out of this world. Every DrupalCon after that will always have worse food. But this one is a killer. No imagination. Lots of garbage (in a time where we try to limit our carbon footprints). No drink. (At least I couldn't find any. Or maybe I was supposed to go and buy me a drink for 2-3 Euros.) Didn't get that. Didn't do that either.

There. Now that's out of my system. I won't remember that when I', 60. But I'll remember the rest of DrupalCon Amsterdam. The sessions. The laughs. The excursions.

...and the ugly...

Well... I found an ugly statue somewhere in town, but otherwise that headline was only in it for the Clint Eastwood reference.

Special thanks to...

It takes a lot of work making a DrupalCon happen, and the Drupal Association pulled it off with a gold star I think. Sure, there were flaws, but then perhaps those won't happen next time, or there were good reasons to why there were flaws. But the Drupal Association do this for a living, so I will only give them a normal-sized 'thank you'. The big 'thank you' goes to the local community who gave the DrupalCon a Dutch feeling. I also want to say thank you to those people who were mentoring before, during and after DrupalCon. Instead of working with the code like you perhaps wanted to, you devoted your time and energy to encourage us lesser beings who want to learn more about Drupal. Also, a big hug to Annertech, who made the Quiz Night happen. It's not an easy task trying to get Morton and Bert the crowd quiet so you can present questions and answers. The man with the microphone also liked the name of our team - Fools drush in - which was nice!

You all know who you are - THANK YOU!

Categories: Elsewhere

Chapter Three: 5 Hurdles to Adopting Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - Wed, 08/10/2014 - 00:36

Drupal 8 presents major improvements to the existing Drupal ecosystem. It offers much, including a revamped Entity API that adds tremendous flexibility to content modeling, a core-level translation system for multilingual sites, responsive theming, in-place editing and the configuration management system. But with all of its improvements, Drupal 8 presents some hurdles for agencies like Chapter Three to identify and overcome.



Categories: Elsewhere

Tyler Frankenstein: Drupal User Entity Reference Field with Custom Autocomplete that uses an Address Field

Planet Drupal - Tue, 07/10/2014 - 23:24

User reference fields (aka entity reference fields) are great. As you may have guessed, we can use these fields to reference users on other entities (e.g. nodes).

Say we had a user reference field on the Article content type... by default, when selecting a user to reference, we could configure the field widget to be an autocomplete. This allows us to begin typing the user's login name as a way to reference them. This works well in most cases.

What if we had an address field on our user entities, and collected the user's first and last names? It may be more usable for site administrators to be able to search across the user's actual name instead of their user name for logging in.

We can use hook_menu(), hook_form_alter(), and a custom callback function to provide a custom autocomplete widget that searches across our address field's values instead...

Categories: Elsewhere

Mediacurrent: Installing the Pardot Drupal Module

Planet Drupal - Tue, 07/10/2014 - 22:40

Mediacurrent has made a commitment to work with the Drupal community to help maintain and improve modules for the leading Marketing Automation services. In this tutorial, we will show you how to set up the newly upgraded Pardot (a Salesforce Company) module.

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