Elsewhere

Thorsten Glaser: “I don’t like computers”

Planet Debian - Sun, 13/11/2016 - 21:28

cnuke@ spotted something on the internet, and shared. Do read this, including the comments. It’s so true. (My car is 30 years old, I use computers mostly for sirc, lynx and ssh, and I especially do not buy any product that needs to be “online” to work.)

Nice parts of the internet, to offset this, though, do exist. IRC as a way of cheap (affordable), mostly reliant, communication that’s easy enough to do with TELNET.EXE if necessary. Fanfiction; easy proliferation of people’s art (literature, in this case). Fast access to documentation and source code; OpenBSD’s AnonCVS was a first, nowadays almost everything (not Tom Dickey’s projects (lynx, ncurses, xterm, cdk, …), nor GNU bash, though) is on a public version control system repository. (Now people need to learn to not rewrite history, just commit whatever shit they do, to record thought process, not produce the perfect-looking patch.) Livestreams too, I guess, but ever since live365.com went dead due to a USA law change on 2016-01-02, it got bad.

Categories: Elsewhere

Thorsten Glaser: “I don’t like computers”

Planet Debian - Sun, 13/11/2016 - 21:28

cnuke@ spotted something on the internet, and shared. Do read this, including the comments. It’s so true. (My car is 30 years old, I use computers mostly for sirc, lynx and ssh, and I especially do not buy any product that needs to be “online” to work.)

Nice parts of the internet, to offset this, though, do exist. IRC as a way of cheap (affordable), mostly reliant, communication that’s easy enough to do with TELNET.EXE if necessary. Fanfiction; easy proliferation of people’s art (literature, in this case). Fast access to documentation and source code; OpenBSD’s AnonCVS was a first, nowadays almost everything (not Tom Dickey’s projects (lynx, ncurses, xterm, cdk, …), nor GNU bash, though) is on a public version control system repository. (Now people need to learn to not rewrite history, just commit whatever shit they do, to record thought process, not produce the perfect-looking patch.) Livestreams too, I guess, but ever since live365.com went dead due to a USA law change on 2016-01-02, it got bad.

Categories: Elsewhere

Dirk Eddelbuettel: pkgKitten 0.1.4: Creating R Packages that purr

Planet Debian - Sun, 13/11/2016 - 18:09

A new minor release 0.1.4 of pkgKitten just hit on CRAN this morning.

One small change is that the package manual page it creates now makes use of the (still new-ish and under-documented and under-used) Rd macros described at the end of Section 2.13 of Writing R Extensions:

See the system.Rd file in share/Rd/macros for more details and macro definitions, including macros \packageTitle, \packageDescription, \packageAuthor, \packageMaintainer, \packageDESCRIPTION and \packageIndices.

By using these macros, and referencing them from the DESCRIPTION file, we can avoid redundancy, or worse, inconsitency, between both files. Or just be plain lazy and describe things just once in the higher-level file: A good thing!

Otherwise we fixed a URL to the manual thanks to a PR, and just added some of the regular polish to some of the corners which R CMD check --as-cran is looking into:

Changes in version 0.1.4 (2016-11-13)
  • Utilize newer R macros in package-default manual page.

  • Repair a link to Wrting R Extensions (PR #7 by Josh O'Brien)

More details about the package are at the pkgKitten webpage and the pkgKitten GitHub repo.

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Categories: Elsewhere

Dirk Eddelbuettel: pkgKitten 0.1.4: Creating R Packages that purr

Planet Debian - Sun, 13/11/2016 - 18:09

A new minor release 0.1.4 of pkgKitten just hit on CRAN this morning.

One small change is that the package manual page it creates now makes use of the (still new-ish and under-documented and under-used) Rd macros described at the end of Section 2.13 of Writing R Extensions:

See the system.Rd file in share/Rd/macros for more details and macro definitions, including macros \packageTitle, \packageDescription, \packageAuthor, \packageMaintainer, \packageDESCRIPTION and \packageIndices.

By using these macros, and referencing them from the DESCRIPTION file, we can avoid redundancy, or worse, inconsitency, between both files. Or just be plain lazy and describe things just once in the higher-level file: A good thing!

Otherwise we fixed a URL to the manual thanks to a PR, and just added some of the regular polish to some of the corners which R CMD check --as-cran is looking into:

Changes in version 0.1.4 (2016-11-13)
  • Utilize newer R macros in package-default manual page.

  • Repair a link to Wrting R Extensions (PR #7 by Josh O'Brien)

More details about the package are at the pkgKitten webpage and the pkgKitten GitHub repo.

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Categories: Elsewhere

Andrew Cater: Debian MiniConf, ARM, Cambridge 11/11/16 - Day 2 post 2

Planet Debian - Sun, 13/11/2016 - 17:09
It's raining cats and dogs in Cambridge.

Just listening to Lars Wirzenius - who shared an office with Linus Torvalds, owned the computer that first ran Linux, founded the Linux Documentation Project. Living history in more than one sense :)

Live streaming is also happening.

Building work is also happening - so there may be random noise happening occasionally.
Categories: Elsewhere

Andrew Cater: Debian MiniConf, ARM, Cambridge 11/11/16 - Day 2 post 2

Planet Debian - Sun, 13/11/2016 - 17:09
It's raining cats and dogs in Cambridge.

Just listening to Lars Wirzenius - who shared an office with Linus Torvalds, owned the computer that first ran Linux, founded the Linux Documentation Project. Living history in more than one sense :)

Live streaming is also happening.

Building work is also happening - so there may be random noise happening occasionally.
Categories: Elsewhere

Andrew Cater: Debian Miniconf ARM Cambridge - 11/11/16 - Day 2 post 1

Planet Debian - Sun, 13/11/2016 - 17:09
Lots of chatting at various points  - a couple of extra folk have joined us today.

I've been fighting UEFI network booting: found inconsistencies on various Wiki pages - then found that the laptop I was intending to boot was just too old to support UEFI properly. In the meantime, the person I was intending to help has moved on and hit something else ...

Release team have managed to hammer out a couple of points: various other progress from the video team. It's all going fairly well.

Lunch - and coffee - excellent once again.

Thanks to front desk folks - and ARM folks - who are tolerating the end of their working week being invaded by Debian folk.
Categories: Elsewhere

Andrew Cater: Debian Miniconf ARM Cambridge - 11/11/16 - Day 2 post 1

Planet Debian - Sun, 13/11/2016 - 17:09
Lots of chatting at various points  - a couple of extra folk have joined us today.

I've been fighting UEFI network booting: found inconsistencies on various Wiki pages - then found that the laptop I was intending to boot was just too old to support UEFI properly. In the meantime, the person I was intending to help has moved on and hit something else ...

Release team have managed to hammer out a couple of points: various other progress from the video team. It's all going fairly well.

Lunch - and coffee - excellent once again.

Thanks to front desk folks - and ARM folks - who are tolerating the end of their working week being invaded by Debian folk.
Categories: Elsewhere

Andrew Cater: Debian Miniconf, ARM Cambridge 10/11/16 - post 3

Planet Debian - Sun, 13/11/2016 - 17:08
Quiet room with occasional outbursts of talking. One of my problems with radio gear down to broken cable so that's OK-ish - I have spares.

And suddenly it's 1720 and we need to leave at about 1730.

2 x radio receivers tried: 2 x transmitters working ready for talk on Saturday.

Spare huge bag of cables appreciated by others - it's amazing how often you find someone else needs stuff :)





Categories: Elsewhere

Andrew Cater: Debian Miniconf ARM, Cambridge 10/11/16 - post 2

Planet Debian - Sun, 13/11/2016 - 17:08
Now about 30 people here: the video team are chasing down power leads and cables in readiness for the weekend.

One large open plan room with about 30 small quadrilateral tables - two make a hexagon. Very quiet for open plan: periodically the room falls completely silent - lots of developers quietly coding / reading screens.

Lunch was very good curry: ARM caterers feed us very well indeed :D

The radio I'm trying to program refuses to play with the software: the maintainer is at the back of the room and has offered to sort out a backport to Debian stable. Debian can occasionally seem like a dysfunctional family but it's good to be a member.

The Cubietruck I bought last year is sitting with another developer as I speak - he's going to try adding multiple disks for a RAID array on a machine that only draws 5W or so.
Categories: Elsewhere

Andrew Cater: Debian Miniconf ARM, Cambridge 10/11/16 - post 2

Planet Debian - Sun, 13/11/2016 - 17:08
Now about 30 people here: the video team are chasing down power leads and cables in readiness for the weekend.

One large open plan room with about 30 small quadrilateral tables - two make a hexagon. Very quiet for open plan: periodically the room falls completely silent - lots of developers quietly coding / reading screens.

Lunch was very good curry: ARM caterers feed us very well indeed :D

The radio I'm trying to program refuses to play with the software: the maintainer is at the back of the room and has offered to sort out a backport to Debian stable. Debian can occasionally seem like a dysfunctional family but it's good to be a member.

The Cubietruck I bought last year is sitting with another developer as I speak - he's going to try adding multiple disks for a RAID array on a machine that only draws 5W or so.
Categories: Elsewhere

Andrew Cater: Debian Miniconf, ARM, Cambridge 10/11/16 - Post 1

Planet Debian - Sun, 13/11/2016 - 17:07
More or less just getting going: there are eight of us here.

Release team are round one desk and a couple of others of us are on adjacent tables. Coffee is good, as ever :)

ARM very helpful as ever: they have been able to provide a disabled space for me though parking here is really, really tight

Categories: Elsewhere

Andrew Cater: Debian Miniconf, ARM, Cambridge 10/11/16 - Post 1

Planet Debian - Sun, 13/11/2016 - 17:07
More or less just getting going: there are eight of us here.

Release team are round one desk and a couple of others of us are on adjacent tables. Coffee is good, as ever :)

ARM very helpful as ever: they have been able to provide a disabled space for me though parking here is really, really tight

Categories: Elsewhere

Petter Reinholdtsen: Coz profiler for multi-threaded software is now in Debian

Planet Debian - Sun, 13/11/2016 - 12:30

The Coz profiler, a nice profiler able to run benchmarking experiments on the instrumented multi-threaded program, finally made it into Debian unstable yesterday. Lluís Vilanova and I have spent many months since I blogged about the coz tool in August working with upstream to make it suitable for Debian. There are still issues with clang compatibility, inline assembly only working x86 and minimized JavaScript libraries.

To test it, install 'coz-profiler' using apt and run it like this:

coz run --- /path/to/binary-with-debug-info

This will produce a profile.coz file in the current working directory with the profiling information. This is then given to a JavaScript application provided in the package and available from a project web page. To start the local copy, invoke it in a browser like this:

sensible-browser /usr/share/coz-profiler/viewer/index.htm

See the project home page and the USENIX ;login: article on Coz for more information on how it is working.

Categories: Elsewhere

Petter Reinholdtsen: Coz profiler for multi-threaded software is now in Debian

Planet Debian - Sun, 13/11/2016 - 12:30

The Coz profiler, a nice profiler able to run benchmarking experiments on the instrumented multi-threaded program, finally made it into Debian unstable yesterday. Lluís Vilanova and I have spent many months since I blogged about the coz tool in August working with upstream to make it suitable for Debian. There are still issues with clang compatibility, inline assembly only working x86 and minimized JavaScript libraries.

To test it, install 'coz-profiler' using apt and run it like this:

coz run --- /path/to/binary-with-debug-info

This will produce a profile.coz file in the current working directory with the profiling information. This is then given to a JavaScript application provided in the package and available from a project web page. To start the local copy, invoke it in a browser like this:

sensible-browser /usr/share/coz-profiler/viewer/index.htm

See the project home page and the USENIX ;login: article on Coz for more information on how it is working.

Categories: Elsewhere

Daniel Pocock: Are all victims of French terrorism equal?

Planet Debian - Sun, 13/11/2016 - 11:50

Some personal observations about the terrorist atrocities around the world based on evidence from Wikipedia and other sources

The year 2015 saw a series of distressing terrorist attacks in France. 2015 was also the 30th anniversary of the French Government's bombing of a civilian ship at port in New Zealand, murdering a photographer who was on board at the time. This horrendous crime has been chronicled in various movies including The Rainbow Warrior Conspiracy (1989) and The Rainbow Warrior (1993).

The Paris attacks are a source of great anxiety for the people of France but they are also an attack on Europe and all civilized humanity as well. Rather than using them to channel more anger towards Muslims and Arabs with another extended (yet ineffective) state of emergency, isn't it about time that France moved on from the evils of its colonial past and "drains the swamp" where unrepentant villains are thriving in its security services?

François Hollande and Ségolène Royal. Royal's brother Gérard Royal allegedly planted the bomb in the terrorist mission to New Zealand. It is ironic that Royal is now Minister for Ecology while her brother sank the Greenpeace flagship. If François and Ségolène had married (they have four children together), would Gérard be the president's brother-in-law or terrorist-in-law?

The question has to be asked: if it looks like terrorism, if it smells like terrorism, if the victim of that French Government attrocity is as dead as the victims of Islamic militants littered across the floor of the Bataclan, shouldn't it also be considered an act of terrorism?

If it was not an act of terrorism, then what is it that makes it differ? Why do French officials refer to it as nothing more than "a serious error", the term used by Prime Minister Manuel Valls during a recent visit to New Zealand in 2016? Was it that the French officials felt it was necessary for Liberté, égalité, fraternité? Or is it just a limitation of the English language that we only have one word for terrorism, while French officials have a different word for such acts carried out by those who serve their flag?

If the French government are sincere in their apology, why have they avoided releasing key facts about the atrocity, like who thought up this plot and who gave the orders? Did the soldiers involved volunteer for a mission with the code name Opération Satanique, or did any other members of their unit quit rather than have such a horrendous crime on their conscience? What does that say about the people who carried out the orders?

If somebody apprehended one of these rogue employees of the French Government today, would they be rewarded with France's highest honour, like those tourists who recently apprehended an Islamic terrorist on a high-speed train?

If terrorism is such an absolute evil, why was it so easy for the officials involved to progress with their careers? Would an ex-member of an Islamic terrorist group be able to subsequently obtain US residence and employment as easily as the French terror squad's commander Louis-Pierre Dillais?

When you consider the comments made by Donald Trump recently, the threats of violence and physical aggression against just about anybody he doesn't agree with, is this the type of diplomacy that the US will practice under his rule commencing in 2017? Are people like this motivated by a genuine concern for peace and security, or are these simply criminal acts of vengence backed by political leaders with the maturity of schoolyard bullies?

Categories: Elsewhere

Daniel Pocock: Are all victims of French terrorism equal?

Planet Debian - Sun, 13/11/2016 - 11:50

Some personal observations about the terrorist atrocities around the world based on evidence from Wikipedia and other sources

The year 2015 saw a series of distressing terrorist attacks in France. 2015 was also the 30th anniversary of the French Government's bombing of a civilian ship at port in New Zealand, murdering a photographer who was on board at the time. This horrendous crime has been chronicled in various movies including The Rainbow Warrior Conspiracy (1989) and The Rainbow Warrior (1993).

The Paris attacks are a source of great anxiety for the people of France but they are also an attack on Europe and all civilized humanity as well. Rather than using them to channel more anger towards Muslims and Arabs with another extended (yet ineffective) state of emergency, isn't it about time that France moved on from the evils of its colonial past and "drains the swamp" where unrepentant villains are thriving in its security services?

François Hollande and Ségolène Royal. Royal's brother Gérard Royal allegedly planted the bomb in the terrorist mission to New Zealand. It is ironic that Royal is now Minister for Ecology while her brother sank the Greenpeace flagship. If François and Ségolène had married (they have four children together), would Gérard be the president's brother-in-law or terrorist-in-law?

The question has to be asked: if it looks like terrorism, if it smells like terrorism, if the victim of that French Government attrocity is as dead as the victims of Islamic militants littered across the floor of the Bataclan, shouldn't it also be considered an act of terrorism?

If it was not an act of terrorism, then what is it that makes it differ? Why do French officials refer to it as nothing more than "a serious error", the term used by Prime Minister Manuel Valls during a recent visit to New Zealand in 2016? Was it that the French officials felt it was necessary for Liberté, égalité, fraternité? Or is it just a limitation of the English language that we only have one word for terrorism, while French officials have a different word for such acts carried out by those who serve their flag?

If the French government are sincere in their apology, why have they avoided releasing key facts about the atrocity, like who thought up this plot and who gave the orders? Did the soldiers involved volunteer for a mission with the code name Opération Satanique, or did any other members of their unit quit rather than have such a horrendous crime on their conscience? What does that say about the people who carried out the orders?

If somebody apprehended one of these rogue employees of the French Government today, would they be rewarded with France's highest honour, like those tourists who recently apprehended an Islamic terrorist on a high-speed train?

If terrorism is such an absolute evil, why was it so easy for the officials involved to progress with their careers? Would an ex-member of an Islamic terrorist group be able to subsequently obtain US residence and employment as easily as the French terror squad's commander Louis-Pierre Dillais?

When you consider the comments made by Donald Trump recently, the threats of violence and physical aggression against just about anybody he doesn't agree with, is this the type of diplomacy that the US will practice under his rule commencing in 2017? Are people like this motivated by a genuine concern for peace and security, or are these simply criminal acts of vengence backed by political leaders with the maturity of schoolyard bullies?

Categories: Elsewhere

Hideki Yamane: LTS for PowerPC?

Planet Debian - Sun, 13/11/2016 - 06:19
Debian9 "Stretch" drops powerpc as release architecture, it means Debian based powerpc box would need more effort to maintain in the future.

If you use Debian for powerpc box in production environment, it maybe better to consider to join LTS funding and ask LTS team to add it to Jessie LTS architecture. I'm not sure they accept it or not, but if it's okay (as they did for armel and armhf), it may be worth to reduce your trouble.
Categories: Elsewhere

John Goerzen: Morning in the Skies

Planet Debian - Sat, 12/11/2016 - 20:35

This is morning. Time to fly. Two boys, happy to open the hangar door and get the plane ready.

It’s been a year since I passed the FAA exam and became a pilot. Memories like these are my favorite reminders why I did. It is such fun to see people’s faces light up with the joy of flying a few thousand feet above ground, of the beauty and freedom and peace of the skies.

I’ve flown 14 different passengers in that time; almost every flight I’ve taken has been with people, which I enjoy. I’ve heard “wow” or “beautiful” so many times, and said it myself even more times.

I’ve landed in two state parks, visited any number of wonderful small towns, seen historic sites and placid lakes, ascended magically over forests and plains. I’ve landed at 31 airports in 10 states, flying over 13,000 miles.

Not once have I encountered anyone other than friendly, kind, and outgoing. And why not? After all, we’re working around magic flying carpet machines, right?

(That’s my brother before a flight with me, by the way)

Some weeks it is easy to be glum. This week has been that way for many, myself included. But then, whether you are in the air or on the ground, if you pay attention, you realize we still live in a beautiful world with many wonderful people.

And, in fact, I got a reminder of that this week. Not long after the election, I got in a plane, pushed in the throttle, and started the takeoff roll down a runway in the midst of an Indiana forest. The skies were the best kind of clear blue, and pretty soon I lifted off and could see for miles. Off in the distance, I could see the last cottony remnants of the morning’s fog, lying still in the valleys, surrounding the little farms and houses as if to give them a loving hug. Wow.

Sometimes the flight is bumpy. Sometimes the weather doesn’t cooperate, and it doesn’t happen at all. Sometimes you can fly across four large states and it feels as smooth as glass the whole way.

Whatever happens, at the end of the day, the magic flying carpet machine gets locked up again. We go home, rest our heads on our soft pillows, and if we so choose, remember the beauty we experienced that day.

Really, this post is not about being a pilot. This post is a reminder to pay attention to all that is beautiful in this world. It surrounds us; the smell of pine trees in the forest, the delight in the faces of children, the gentle breeze in our hair, the kind word from a stranger, the very sunrise.

I hope that more of us will pay attention to the moments of clear skies and wind at our back. Even at those moments when we pull the hangar door shut.

Categories: Elsewhere

John Goerzen: Morning in the Skies

Planet Debian - Sat, 12/11/2016 - 20:35

This is morning. Time to fly. Two boys, happy to open the hangar door and get the plane ready.

It’s been a year since I passed the FAA exam and became a pilot. Memories like these are my favorite reminders why I did. It is such fun to see people’s faces light up with the joy of flying a few thousand feet above ground, of the beauty and freedom and peace of the skies.

I’ve flown 14 different passengers in that time; almost every flight I’ve taken has been with people, which I enjoy. I’ve heard “wow” or “beautiful” so many times, and said it myself even more times.

I’ve landed in two state parks, visited any number of wonderful small towns, seen historic sites and placid lakes, ascended magically over forests and plains. I’ve landed at 31 airports in 10 states, flying over 13,000 miles.

Not once have I encountered anyone other than friendly, kind, and outgoing. And why not? After all, we’re working around magic flying carpet machines, right?

(That’s my brother before a flight with me, by the way)

Some weeks it is easy to be glum. This week has been that way for many, myself included. But then, whether you are in the air or on the ground, if you pay attention, you realize we still live in a beautiful world with many wonderful people.

And, in fact, I got a reminder of that this week. Not long after the election, I got in a plane, pushed in the throttle, and started the takeoff roll down a runway in the midst of an Indiana forest. The skies were the best kind of clear blue, and pretty soon I lifted off and could see for miles. Off in the distance, I could see the last cottony remnants of the morning’s fog, lying still in the valleys, surrounding the little farms and houses as if to give them a loving hug. Wow.

Sometimes the flight is bumpy. Sometimes the weather doesn’t cooperate, and it doesn’t happen at all. Sometimes you can fly across four large states and it feels as smooth as glass the whole way.

Whatever happens, at the end of the day, the magic flying carpet machine gets locked up again. We go home, rest our heads on our soft pillows, and if we so choose, remember the beauty we experienced that day.

Really, this post is not about being a pilot. This post is a reminder to pay attention to all that is beautiful in this world. It surrounds us; the smell of pine trees in the forest, the delight in the faces of children, the gentle breeze in our hair, the kind word from a stranger, the very sunrise.

I hope that more of us will pay attention to the moments of clear skies and wind at our back. Even at those moments when we pull the hangar door shut.

Categories: Elsewhere

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