DrupalCon News: Drupal Business Summit: The Next Generation

Planet Drupal - Sun, 09/08/2015 - 07:00

What do the businesses in the Drupal community need to do to survive and grow in the next three years?

Drupal 8 will attract a new wave of agencies to compete in the market, and will also enable Drupal businesses to compete at a higher level. A time of big change and competition is coming, and it will no longer be enough just to say you 'do Drupal' and then sit back and watch sales roll in.

Categories: Elsewhere

Chen Hui Jing: Drupal 101: Starting Drupal development

Planet Drupal - Sun, 09/08/2015 - 02:00

I recently moved from an agency specialising in building Drupal sites to one which is platform-agnostic, and uses all variety of technologies. As my team was not very familiar with Drupal, I started writing some documentation on setting up locally, installing Drush and commonly used modules, and some other stuff so everyone could get up and running quickly. I’ve modified it to be even more beginner-friendly, for people who’ve never built websites before. This is sort of opinionated so feel free not to follow along exactly.

The basic technology stack

As with most content management systems, Drupal has some system requirements in order to run, commonly known as a technology stack. This simply means you have to install...

Categories: Elsewhere

Dirk Eddelbuettel: drat 0.1.0: Even more repository support

Planet Debian - Sat, 08/08/2015 - 22:41

A new version 0.1.0 of the drat package arrived on CRAN today. Its name stands for drat R Archive Template, and it helps with easy-to-create and easy-to-use repositories for R packages, and is finding increasing by other projects.

This version 0.1.0 builds on the previous releases and now adds complete support for binaries for both Windows and OS X. This builds on what had been added in the previous release 0.0.4.

This and other new features are listed below:

  • updated vignettes
  • more complete support for binaries thanks to work by Jan Schulz, Matt Jones and myself
  • new support to (optionally) archive existing packages thanks to Thomas Leeper
  • various smaller fixes.

Also of note: The rOpenSci project now uses drat to distribute their code, and Carl Boettiger has written a nice blog post about it.

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release. More detailed information is on the drat page.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Categories: Elsewhere

Matthew Garrett: Difficult social problems are still difficult problems

Planet Debian - Sat, 08/08/2015 - 22:01
After less than a week of complaints, the TODO group have decided to pause development of their code of conduct. This seems to have been triggered by the public response to the changes I talked about here, which TODO appear to have been completely unprepared for.

While disappointing in a bunch of ways, this is probably the correct decision. TODO stumbled into this space with a poor understanding of the problems that they were trying to solve. Nikki Murray pointed out that the initial draft lacked several of the key components that help ensure less privileged groups can feel that their concerns are taken seriously. This was mostly rectified last week, but nobody involved appeared to be willing to stand behind those changes in a convincing way. This wasn't helped by almost all of this appearing to land on Github's plate, with the rest of the TODO group largely missing in action[1]. Where were Google in this? Yahoo? Facebook? Left facing an angry mob with nobody willing to make explicit statements of support, it's unsurprising that Github would try to back away from the situation.

But that doesn't remove their blame for being in the situation in the first place. The statement claims
We are consulting with stakeholders, community leaders, and legal professionals, which is great. It's also far too late. If an industry body wrote a new kernel from scratch and deployed it without any external review, then discovered that it didn't work and only then consulted any of the existing experts in the field, we'd never take them seriously again. But when an industry body turns up with a new social policy, fucks up spectacularly and then goes back to consult experts, it's expected that we give them a pass.

Why? Because we don't perceive social problems as difficult problems, and we assume that anybody can solve them by simply sitting down and talking for a few hours. When we find out that we've screwed up we throw our hands in the air and admit that this is all more difficult than we imagined, and we give up. We ignore the lessons that people have learned in the past. We ignore the existing work that's been done in the field. We ignore the people who work full time on helping solve these problems.

We wouldn't let an industry body with no experience of engineering build a bridge. We need to accept that social problems are outside our realm of expertise and defer to the people who are experts.

[1] The repository history shows the majority of substantive changes were from Github, with the initial work appearing to be mostly from Twitter.

Categories: Elsewhere

Christoph Egger: What's wrong with the web? -- authentication

Planet Debian - Sat, 08/08/2015 - 19:27
The problem

One problem to solve when doing web authentication has always been one identity provider, so you don't have to remember which username (or email address) you used for that bugtracker you used three years ago or that website. And tie it to one login ideally. Five years ago this problem seemed to be basically solved. There was OpenID and while it may not have been great it worked. You could have your own provider, your institution (university, company, foss project, ..) could have one and you could use your university-provided ID for all university stuff.

Today's state

Looking at the problem again today and the situation seems to have changed. To the worse. A lot. People are actively removing OpenID support. There seemed to be a replacement with, at least, proper design goals: Mozilla's persona. However this seems to be a dead end, no-one (almost) actually supports it.

Then there is what people call OAuth2. However there does not seem to be such a thing as OAuth2 at all, at least not for logging into websites. So for example phabricator supports 12 different OAuth2 systems. That includes Google, Facebook, Twitter, Amazon Github and a whole bunch of other services. Each with a different implementation in the webapp of course. And of course you can not just have your university/company/.. provide an OAuth2 service for you to use -- you would need to write yet another adapter on the (foreign) website to talk to your implementation and your provider.

And the strange thing, people seem to still consider OAuth2 a replacement for OpenID while it does not even provide the core functionality of the older system. Plus there does not seem to be any awareness of that all together.

Other features

Now of course, OpenID is not (and never was) the ultimate answer to the web authentication problem. The most obvious problem being user tracking. Your identity provider will see every website you log into, will see when you log into it and even be able to log into that website with your credentials.

Of course, this problem is fully inherited by OAuth2. And in contrast to OpenID you can no longer run your own provider whom you can fully trust and who already knows about your surfing habits (because it's actually you already). Mozilla's persona might have solved that, they at least intended to. But, again, persona seems quite dead.

Categories: Elsewhere


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