Elsewhere

Hideki Yamane: ThinkPad X121e with UFEI boot

Planet Debian - Tue, 09/12/2014 - 14:09
I have ThinkPad X121e and recenly exchanged its HDD to SSD, then I've tried to boot from UEFI but I couldn't. And I considered its something wrong with this old BIOS verion but new one can improve the situation, tried to update it. Steps are below.
  1. get iso image file from Lenovo (Japanese site) (release note)
  2. put iso image into /boot
  3. add custom grub file as /etc/grub.d/99_bios (note: I don't separate /boot partition, maybe you should specify path for file if you don't do so). $ sudo sh -c "touch /etc/grub.d/99_bios; chmod +x /etc/grub.d/99_bios"and edit /etc/grub.d/99_bio file. #! /bin/sh
    menuentry "BIOS Update" {
    linux16 memdisk iso
    initrd16 xxxxxxxxxx.iso
    }
  4. update grub menu with and check /boot/grub/grub.cfg file $ sudo update-grub
    $ tail /boot/grub/grub.cfg
  5. make sure memdisk command is installed $ sudo apt-get install syslinux
  6. just reboot and select bios update menu
Looks okay, its firmware update was success but I cannot boot it (installation was okay). Hmm...

As Matthew Garrett blogged before, probably ThinkPad X121e's firmware doesn't allow to boot from any entries in UEFI except "Windows Boot Manager" :-(

 ...So I have to back to legacy BIOS. *sigh*
Categories: Elsewhere

Thorsten Glaser: The colon in the shell: corrigenda

Planet Debian - Tue, 09/12/2014 - 11:40

Bernhard’s article on Plänet Debian about the “colon” command in the shell could use a clarification and a security-relevant correcture.

There is, indeed, no difference between the : and true built-in commands.

Stéphane Chazelas points out that writing : ${VARNAME:=default} is bad, : "${VARNAME:=default}" is correct. Reason: someone could preset $VARNAME with, for example, /*/*/*/*/../../../../*/*/*/*/../../../../*/*/*/* which will exhaust during globbing.

Besides that, the article is good. Thanks Bernhard for posting it!

PS: I sometimes use the colon as comment leader in the last line of a script or function, because it, unlike the octothorpe, sets $? to 0, which can be useful.

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