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Drupal for Government: Path aliased restful services with restws & restws alias

Mon, 20/04/2015 - 19:23

Almost a year ago we started putting together a site that needed to integrate with our main librarie's search engine.  We used Drupal's restful services to expose our content, but ran in to a problem with getting aliased paths to link up correctly.  What this meant was that while http://www.bioconnector.virginia.edu/content/introduction-allen-mouse-brain-atlas-online-tutorial-suite worked fine, http://www.bioconnector.virginia.edu/content/introduction-allen-mouse-br... didn't... this became really problematic when we were trying to create linked data, and traversing was just obnoxious... https://www.bioconnector.virginia.edu/node/36.json just doesn't roll off the digital tongue... as a workaround we used views to do some wonkiness.... it worked, but certainly was not "the drupal way."

Categories: Elsewhere

SitePoint PHP Drupal: Drupal goes Social: Building a “Liking” Module in Drupal

Mon, 20/04/2015 - 18:00

In this article, we are going to look at how we can create a Drupal module which will allow your users to like your posts. The implementation will use jQuery to make AJAX calls and save this data asynchronously.

Creating your Drupal like module

Let’s start by creating the new Drupal module. To do that we should first create a folder called likepost in the sites\all\modules\custom directory of your Drupal installation as shown below:

Inside this folder, you should create a file called likepost.info with the following contents:

name = likepost description = This module allows the user to like posts in Drupal. core = 7.x

This file is responsible for providing metadata about your module. This allows Drupal to detect and load its contents.

Continue reading %Drupal goes Social: Building a “Liking” Module in Drupal%

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Drupal Association News: A great big thank you to our Members

Mon, 20/04/2015 - 17:50

I want to give a big thank you to all of our new and renewing members who gave funds to continue the work of the Drupal Association in the first quarter of this year. We couldn't do much without your support. Shout outs to all of you!

Membership Makes a Difference

We had several recap blog posts a few weeks ago, but just as a reminder, your membership is incredibly important not only to us, but to the project too! Dues from memberships go to fund intiaitves like our community cultivation grants, which help people around the world build their local Drupal communities and improve the project. For more information on how membership makes a difference, check out this infographic or see what changes are coming in 2015.

Thank You, Members!!

There are 845 fantastic members on our list of first quarter donors. You can find the list here. Let's give them a big thank you all together!

 

Personal blog tags: Membership
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Drupal Association News: Blink Reaction and Propeople Are Joining Forces

Mon, 20/04/2015 - 16:27

The following blog was written by Drupal Association Supporting Partner and DrupalCon Los Angeles Diamond Sponsor Blink Reaction and Propeople.

DrupalCons are a very important time of the year for the Drupal community. It is a time for us to come together and continue our collaboration that we share throughout the year in a virtual space and establish goals and plans to move forward in a way that is in the community’s best interest. It is also a time to take stock of our accomplishments, and who we are as a community. One of our favorite moments in DrupalCons is the group picture: it’s always amazing to see how the community stands together and continues to grow.

This year’s DrupalCon in Los Angeles is especially important to us because this is where we will unveil the name of the new Drupal agency that consists of the companies formerly known as Blink Reaction and Propeople. We have come together to create a new digital agency, the largest one in the world with a focus on Drupal, and we are very excited about what this means.

Our combined agency is part of the Intellecta Group (listed on the NASDAQ OMX) , and consists of 400+ employees in 19 offices in 11 countries on 4 continents. This is an amazing reach for an organization that is so passionate about Drupal! We’re excited for this unique opportunity to support the Drupal project and the community in ways that would have been impossible prior to the merger.

For example, we’re eager to begin promoting Drupal as a solution for the biggest enterprises on a global scale. Locally, we can influence awareness and excitement in our 19 local communities, helping the next generation find opportunity and excitement in Drupal.

We now have the ability to affect change in a multitude of cultures, in the many diverse communities where each of our offices are located. Where there aren’t yet camps, we can lead their initiation. Where there are Cons, we can help to inspire the next generation of Drupal leaders. We are committed to building up the next generation of talent via our orchestrated public and private training efforts, and look forward to beginning that work at DrupalCon Los Angeles.

So please, stop by booth 300 to say hello and learn more about the new company, and our future within the community. We look forward to seeing all of our friends in the Drupal community, old and new, and are even more excited to discuss how we’ll work with the community for many years to come.

About us.

Blink Reaction and Propeople are joining forces to create a new digital agency built on technology, driven by data, and focused on user experience. The two companies have delivered state-of-the-art Drupal solutions for a variety of the open-source platform’s largest customers. The agencies’ collective portfolio includes brands such as Pfizer, NBC, Stanford University, the City of Copenhagen and General Electric.

Blink Reaction and Propeople are a part of the Intelleca Group. The companies in the group are Blink Reaction LLC, Bysted AB, Bysted A/S, Hilanders AB, Intellecta Corporate AB, ISBIT GAMES AB, Propeople Group ApS, Rewir AB, River Cresco AB, Unreel AB and Wow Events AB. Intellecta AB is noted on NASDAQ OMX Stockholm and employs around 550 people in Sweden, Denmark, Austria, Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Bulgaria, Moldavia, Ukraine, Brazil, USA, Vietnam and China.

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TimOnWeb.com: Happy birthday to me and Devel form debug module to you all

Mon, 20/04/2015 - 14:36
I’m turning 32 today. People love birthdays, to me it’s just another line number in a messed stack trace output (philosophy mode enabled).   Two years ago I released a drupal module called Get form id (deprecated from now on) that does one small task - it tells you any form's id ...

Read now

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Annertech: Drupal: Creating Beans Programatically

Mon, 20/04/2015 - 12:59
Drupal: Creating Beans Programatically

Building great (Drupal) websites can often be made more difficult than it needs to be when your site builders, developers and themers haven't got the same content as each other.

Categories: Elsewhere

Web Omelette: Drupal 8: core javascript files for anonymous users

Mon, 20/04/2015 - 09:00

Drupal 8 comes with many performance improvements, one of which being that javascript is no longer indiscriminately loaded on every page. This means that for anonymous users, there are many pages where there is no jQuery or even javascript loaded.

Although this is a good thing, sometime you do need jQuery (for example to use Ajax, in which case you'd also need other scripts). So how do you load these files? Using hook_page_attachments() to #attach your own library to the page.

And if we look at the documentation page for assets, we'll see how we can add our own library. We need to create a my_module.libraries.yml or my_theme.libraries.yml file. And inside, we can add the following:

my_scripts: version: VERSION js: js/scripts.js: {} dependencies: - core/jquery - core/drupal.ajax - core/drupal - core/drupalSettings - core/jquery.once

Where my_scripts will be the name of the library we will reference when attaching.

As you can see, we are not including any javascript or css of our own, we are just making use of the dependency scripts provided by core.

Above, I mentioned the use of hook_page_attachments() as the way we can attach libraries. However, it's not the only one. You can attach to render arrays or even render elements. But here we want to see how we can make sure that anonymous users get the required core javascript files loaded on pages. So we can implement hook_page_attachments() like so:

function my_module_page_attachments(array &$attachments) { // Attach only for anonymous users. if (\Drupal::currentUser()->isAnonymous()) { $attachments ['#attached']['library'][] = 'my_module/my_scripts'; } }

In this hook, we check if the current user is anonymous and attach the library we created. We reference this with the construct module_name/library_name.

Hope this helps.

In Drupal 8 | Theming var switchTo5x = true;stLight.options({"publisher":"dr-8de6c3c4-3462-9715-caaf-ce2c161a50c"});
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Vardot: Hello Drupal: Free Training Session at PSUT

Mon, 20/04/2015 - 08:21
Events

In part of our joint educational initiative with Acquia, we’re back in 2015 with new training sessions at universities to educate students on the benefits and value of Drupal as a leading content management system. Students who are interested in Drupal and open source technologies, have the chance to learn more about Drupal from Vardot and Acquia, and experience first hand, installing and setting up Drupal.

The first event will take place in Princess Sumaya University for Technology (PSUT) on the 29th April 2015 at 12:30 PM. You can learn more about the event on Acquia’s Training Event Page

Tags:  Drupal Planet Drupal Training Acquia Drupal Title:  Hello Drupal: Free Training Session at PSUT
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Jim Birch: Drupal 7: Hide Sticky and Promote

Sat, 18/04/2015 - 03:35

Promoted to front page? Don't worry about that, we don't use it.

That was the phrase I heard from a developer on the first site I was tasked to theme. I had asked what the "Promoted to front page" check box on the admin screen of a content type was what put it in the queue on the home page. 

It turns out that most every home page our agency ever built in Drupal had more complex requirements than that sole checkbox allowed for. 

The same goes for Sticky at top of lists. No one ever uses those, just ignore them.

What makes sense for a developer to ignore, can cause confusion for an administrative user.  The admin doesn't know all of the hard work that went into the Panel that drives the home page, or the view that creates the pane for the home page.  They just see a simple checkbox.  And when that checkbox doesn't do what it says it does, the site seems "broken".

So, I started searching, and found a great post discussing this problem, and a great solution from user StudioZut, who has created a custom module called "Hide Sticky and Promote" as a Drupal Sandbox and a Github Repository.

Read more

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Code Karate: Drupal Views Module: Creating lists of content on your Drupal site

Fri, 17/04/2015 - 21:14
Episode Number: 203

In this episode we cover an overview of the Drupal 7 Views module. The Drupal Views module is probably the most popular Drupal module and is installed in almost every Drupal 7 website I build. It’s so popular in fact that it’s included in Drupal 8 by default.

Tags: DrupalViewsDrupal 7Site BuildingDrupal Planet
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Drupal.org Featured Case Studies: National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

Fri, 17/04/2015 - 20:30
Completed Drupal site or project URL: http://www.baseballhall.org/

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum (BHoF) is an American institution. For 75 years they have housed the archive of America's favorite game, welcoming new inductees each year and connecting generations with their huge love and knowledge of the sport.

BHoF has a large and dedicated audience, but their location in Central New York limits the number of physical visits to the museum. To reach a wider audience, they needed to unlock the full potential of their online presence.

Cogapp helps organizations use digital media, specializing in large-scale, mission-critical projects for prominent institutions.

BHoF appointed Cogapp to perform a discovery phase to research user engagement, the kinds of content that are of interest to users, and key value propositions of the website to its visitors. This work then fed into developing the site, with the central objective being to showcase the vast number of artifacts in the Hall's collection, creating connections that bring these objects to life for site visitors.

Key modules/theme/distribution used: Islandora Imagecache ExternalParagraphsEntity APIMetatagFeaturesStrongarmMasterVarnish HTTP Accelerator IntegrationOrganizations involved: CogappTeam members: alxbridgechapabutassos
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Drupal Watchdog: VIDEO: DrupalCon Amsterdam Interview: Angie Byron

Fri, 17/04/2015 - 18:59

Angie Byron is Director of Community Development at Acquia. For this interview, during the final day of DrupalCon Amsterdam, we were able to find an empty auditorium. Alas, filming with my brand-new GoPro camera, we got off to a topsy-turvy start...

RONNIE RAY: I’ve had you upside down.

ANGIE BYRON: Oh hahaha!

I go by Angie Byron or webchick, and more people know me as webchick than Angie Byron.

Today, what I love to do at DrupalCons, on the last day of the sprint days, is just walk around all the tables and see what everyone is working on, cause there’s hundreds of people here and they’re all sort of scratching their own itches on everything from Drupal-dot-org to, like, what is the newest coolest content staging thing gonna be?, to how are we going to get Drupal 8 done?

And everybody working together and collaborating with people they don’t get to see all the time, it’s a lot of fun for me.

I feel like we made a lot of really great decisions about the Drupal 8 release management stuff here that we’ll be able to put into practice, and help try and focus efforts on getting the critical issues resolved, trying to clean up the loose ends that we still have, and getting the release out the door faster.

And the other thing I’m going to work on for the next month is something called Drupal Module Upgrader, which is the script that can help contrib modules port their modules to Drupal 8. It automates a lot of that task.

Now that Beta is here it’s a great time for people to update their modules, so I want to work on tools to help facilitate that.

RR: What are you reading, besides books on Drupal?

AB: Not much. Although I love reading kids books, because I have a daughter who’s 16 months now and she loves to be read to. So my latest books I’ve been reading are Where is the Green Sheep? and Go, Dog, Go! and a bunch of Richard Scarry stuff and things like that because she loves to know what everything’s called. She loves books.

There’s a Dr. Seuss book called Oh, The Places You’ll Go! That book is dark, man, that is like a dark book. It’s entertaining. I remember it from when I was a kid but I don’t remember it like that!

RR: Music?

AB: I listen to a lot of old music cause I’m one of those curmudgeonly people who thinks the best music was already made. So, like I’ve been having like a ‘70s rock, ‘80s pop, ‘90s punk rock, like – that’s sort of what’s in my chain all the time. Hair metal, junk like that. How to relive my kid-age stuff.

I think the community has grown to such an enormous size now that I guess one thing I wonder about, – not really worry about– but am curious about, is if can we still maintain that small-knit community feel that we had back when I started, when we were 70 people at a DrupalCon – not the 2,500 people we have now.

It’s cool to kind of walk around DrupalCon, especially on a sprint day, especially because I feel we have retained that – and people are finding people to connect with and cool things to work on and stuff like that.

I think it’s something we all need to collectively be intentional about is, you know, it’s not just enough that Drupal is just a great software project, it’s also about the people and trying to maintain that welcome feeling – that got us all in the door – for generations to come.

So that’s something I would leave as a parting note.

Tags:  DrupalCon DrupalCon Amsterdam Video Video: 
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Chapter Three: Presentation: Drupal 8 Module Development

Fri, 17/04/2015 - 18:15

This session was presented at Bay Area Drupal Camp, San Diego Drupal Camp, Phoenix Drupal Camp, and Stanford Drupal Camp.



Have you written a few simple modules for Drupal 7, and are a little bit nervous to find out the changes you'll be facing in Drupal 8?

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Aten Design Group: Speeding up Complex Drupal Data Loads with Custom Caches

Fri, 17/04/2015 - 17:27

Recently we had the task of loading data from a content type with 350 fields. Each node is a University’s enrollment data for one year by major, gender, minority, and a number of other categories. CSV exports of this data obviously became problematic. Even before we got to 350 fields, with the overhead of the Views module we would hit PHP timeouts when exporting all the nodes. If you’re not familiar with Drupal's database structure, each field’s data is stored in a table named ‘field_data_FIELDNAME’. Loading an entire node means JOINing the node table by entity_id with each related field table. When a node only has a handful of fields, those JOINs work fine, but at 350 fields the query runs slow.

On this site we’re also plotting some of the data using highcharts.js. We really hit a wall when trying to generate aggregate data to plot alongside a single university's. This meant loading every node of this content type to calculate the averages, which turned our slow query into a very slow query. We even hit a limit on the number of database JOINs that can be done at one time.

In retrospect this is a perfect case for a custom entity, but we already had thousands of nodes in the existing content type. Migrating them and implementing a custom entity was no longer a good use of time. Instead, we added a custom table that keeps all the single value fields in a serialized string.

The table gets defined with a hook_schema in our module's .install file:

function ncwit_charts_schema() {   $schema['ncwit_charts_inst_data'] = array( 'description' => 'Table for serialized institution data.', 'fields' => array( 'nid' => array( 'type' => 'int', 'default' => 0, 'not null' => TRUE, 'description' => 'node id for this row', ), 'tid' => array( 'type' => 'int', 'default' => 0, 'not null' => TRUE, 'description' => 'intitution term id that this data belongs to', ), 'year' => array( 'type' => 'int', 'default' => 0, 'not null' => TRUE, 'description' => 'school year for this node', ), 'data' => array( 'type' => 'blob', 'not null' => FALSE, 'size' => 'big', 'serialize' => TRUE, 'description' => 'A serialized array of name value pairs that store the field data for a survey data node.', ), ), 'primary key' => array('nid'), );   return $schema; }

The most important part of the array is 'data' with type 'blob', which can be up to 65kB. Not shown is another array to create a table for our aggregate data.

When a new node is saved hook_node_insert() is invoked. hook_node_update() fires both when a new node is saved and when it's updated.

/** * Implements hook_node_insert(). * save serialized field data to inst_data table for a new node * For a new node, have to use this */ function ncwit_charts_node_insert($node) { ncwit_charts_serialize_save($node); }     /** * Implements hook_node_update(). * save serialized field data to inst_data table */ function ncwit_charts_node_update($node) { if (isset($node->nid)) { // we're also calling this function from hook_node_insert // because hook_node_update doesn't have the nid if is a new node ncwit_charts_serialize_save($node); } else { return; } }

Now we actually process the fields to be serialized and store. This section will vary greatly depending on your fields.

function ncwit_charts_serialize_save($node) { // save each value as a simple key => value item foreach ($node as $key => $value) { $data[$key] = $value[LANGUAGE_NONE][0]['value']; }   $fields = array(); $fields['nid'] = $node->nid; $fields['tid'] = $node->field_institution_term[LANGUAGE_NONE][0]['tid']; $fields['year'] = $node->field_school_year[LANGUAGE_NONE][0]['value']; $fields['data'] = serialize($data);   db_merge('ncwit_charts_inst_data') ->key(array( 'nid' => $node->nid, )) ->fields($fields) ->execute();

When a node is deleted we have some clean-up to do.

/** * Implements hook_node_delete(). * Also remove node's data from inst_data */ function ncwit_charts_node_delete($node) { if ($node->type !== 'data_survey') { //only care about data_survey nodes return; }   $query = db_select('ncwit_charts_inst_data', 'i'); $query->fields('i')->condition('i.nid', $node->nid); $result = $query->execute(); $data = $result->fetchAssoc(); if ($data > 0) { db_delete('ncwit_charts_inst_data')->condition('nid', $node->nid)->execute(); } }

When first installed or when fields get changed, we added a batch process that re-saves the serialized strings. Aggregate data is calculated during cron and saved in another table. Rather than loading every node with JOINs, the data comes from a simple query of this custom table.

Pulling the data out of the database and calling unserialize() gives us a simple associative array of the data. To pass this data to highcharts.js we have a callback defined that returns the arrays encoded as JSON. Obviously this gets more complicated when dealing with multiple languages or multi-value fields. But in our case almost everything is a simple integer.

This process of caching our nodes as serialized data changed our loading speed from painfully slow to almost instant. If you run into similar challenges, hopefully this approach will help you too.

Categories: Elsewhere

Midwestern Mac, LLC: Thoughts on the Acquia Certified Developer - Front End Specialist Exam

Thu, 16/04/2015 - 22:34

Previously, I posted my thoughts on the Acquia Certified Developer - Back End Specialist exam as well as my thoughts on the Certified Developer exam. To round out the trifecta of developer-oriented exams, I took the Front End Specialist exam this morning, and am posting some observations for those interested in taking the exam.

My Theming Background

I started my Drupal journey working on design/theme-related work, and the first few Drupal themes I built were in the Drupal 5 days (I inherited some 4.7 sites, but I only really started learning how Drupal's front end worked in Drupal 5+). Luckily for me, a lot of the basics have remained the same (or at least similar) from 5-7.

For the past couple years, though, I have shied away from front end work, only doing as much as I need to keep building out features on sites like Hosted Apache Solr and Server Check.in, and making all my older Drupal sites responsive (and sometimes, mobile-first) to avoid penalization in Google's search rankings... and to build a more usable web :)

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Acquia: Sites that Cannot Fail -- Forecasting the Big Storm

Thu, 16/04/2015 - 21:04

Sometimes we can’t plan for it. Sometimes we have a moment’s notice. Other times it’s our most anticipated day of the year. No matter the situation, every organization has experienced a time when their digital properties could not fail—or the business impact would be devastating.

In this blog series, we’re showcasing what it meant for three of our largest customers to have a site that could not fail. We’ll highlight both business and technical preparation, continuous improvements, platform insights, and the importance of always listening to those providing feedback on the experience.

The Story

The Weather Channel’s weather.com, one of the top 20 most trafficked sites in the US, provides millions of people every day with the world's best weather forecasts, content, and data. On average, it serves 15 million page views per day to 30 million unique visitors per month. But when major weather events loom, like a hurricane or nor’easter, the site will serve up to a billion requests a week.

These requests include delivering hundreds of dynamic maps and streaming video to users in over three million forecast locations. The site has to remain stable with instantaneous page loads and 100 percent uptime, despite these bad weather traffic bumps of up to 300 percent.

The Weather Channel’s legacy platform was groaning under this pressure. It was using approximately 144 servers across three data centers to deliver more than 17,000 articles updated on a minute-by-minute basis.
So in November 2014, weather.com moved its entire website, which serves more than 20 million pages of content, to Drupal and the Acquia Platform, facilitated by the experts at Acquia partner MediaCurrent.

Within weeks, one of the nastiest winters on record began moving into the Midwest and Northeastern part of the US. Prodigious web traffic followed.

The new site, now the busiest Drupal site in the world, never buckled. In fact, it thrived, delivering faster, more efficiently cached pages to customers.

“weather.com is thinking ahead to a future where up-to-the-minute weather information requires an open delivery platform that adapts to fast changes in technology,” Tom Erickson, CEO, Acquia, said at the time. “The Weather Channel is leading the transformation of how we interact with weather news; people expect accurate weather forecasts on-demand, and they want to be alerted to events that may impact their life, work, travel, and leisure. weather.com is gaining the agility to deliver on customers’ increasing expectations. It’s leading the charge with contextual weather insight that anticipates every user’s needs.”

A recent global survey of more than 500 businesses for the Reducing Customer Struggle report found that companies are losing nearly a quarter of their annual online revenue due to a bad website experience. That’s billions of dollars lost and customers who won’t come back because of a digital experience that left a bad impression.

Whether you’re a weather site watching traffic rise with the barometric pressure, an enterprise facing transformation in an industry where digital transformation is lacking, or a smaller brand on the cusp of breaking into a new market, your digital presence can’t fail.

Dave Terry, co-founder and partner of client services at Mediacurrent, said, “Acquia opens up all kinds of opportunities for weather.com. The site relies heavily on the ability to quickly create and distribute massive amounts of content, and with Drupal, weather.com gains editorial agility and the ability to innovate and bring the latest applications and features to the user experience.”

Behind the Scenes

When it comes to capacity planning, some organizations plan for a worst-case scenario. They purchase larger-than-necessary capacity to be permanently available. But this is wasted money. Conversely, some organizations under-plan for traffic. Without the means to increase capacity on demand, they suffer outages and, ultimately, loss of revenue.

With Acquia Cloud, the guesswork is eliminated. You only pay for what you need. Acquia Cloud scales with burstable and elastic resources, which can be added quickly and easily on demand. Our operations team can scale up resources for any period of time, and then return resources back to normal levels when traffic subsides.

We know that scaling is complex, so we do the work for you. We add resources in real time to address changing traffic conditions seamlessly when a site needs it most. Scaling on Acquia Cloud does not require risky architectural changes like migrations and resizing. But we do scale the ecosystem, not just the hardware. We scale across all layers of the environment––web servers, file systems, databases, and load balancers. The architecture scales across the MySQL database layer using data replication and the file system layer utilizing GlusterFS to ensure syncing. The web server layer is scaled up by running active web servers in multiple availability zones. We run dedicated Memcached servers for sites with high workloads and multiple load balancers to ensure traffic is distributed. This level of Drupal-aware customization doesn't exist outside of Acquia.

As part of the scaling enablement strategy, it is important for customers to have a site insulation strategy so that visitors are not aware of traffic increases. Acquia uses Varnish caching in front of all traffic to speed up sites. Additional features such as geolocation, mobile redirection, and CDN implementation can be enabled. Acquia has over 25 personnel across our Professional Services, Technical Account Management, and Support organizations who specialize in performance, focusing load testing, database query rewriting, stack tracing, and more.

At Acquia, our passion is customer success. Because of that, your site doesn’t become the next headline. Your best day doesn’t become your worst; your biggest events are uneventful behind the scenes. In essence, we don’t sleep, so you can. Our team of experts is on hand 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year so that you don’t fail. You get a true partnership with Acquia.

No matter the time of day, or the size of the traffic spike, we have your back. So instead of downtime, your traffic spikes yield growth and success.

photo: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Tags:  web platform drupal acquia drupal planet
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Achieve Internet Blog: Is Your Site Ready For Google’s New Search Ranking Algorithm?

Thu, 16/04/2015 - 20:35
How does mobile-friendliness affect Google search rankings? Google reports:
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Acquia: Drupal is fun to use - meet Karen Grey

Thu, 16/04/2015 - 18:49
Language Undefined Drupal is more fun - meet Karen Grey

I sat down with Karen Grey at Drupal Camp Brighton 2015 to find out more about who she is and what she does with Drupal. I apologize for taking her out of the code sprints for that time! Since we spoke, Karen has taken on a position as Senior Drupal Developer at i-KOS in their Brighton office.

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