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Jeff Geerling's Blog: How to build your own Raspberry Pi Cluster

Sun, 08/05/2016 - 04:53


The banana is for scale.

When I originally built the Raspberry Pi Dramble 6-node Pi cluster in 2014 (for testing Ansible with bare metal hardware on the cheap), I compiled all the code, notes, etc. into a GitHub repository. In 2015, I decided to take it a step further, and I started hosting www.pidramble.com on the cluster, in my basement office!

Categories: Elsewhere

ARREA-Systems: Our business solution runs on Drupal 8.1

Sun, 08/05/2016 - 04:27
Our business solution runs on Drupal 8.1 Sun, 05/08/2016 - 10:27

 

Hello,

Our back-office management solution is now running on version Drupal 8.1. The live demo is updated with the latest version.

It has been a long run since the project was initiated while Drupal 8 was still under alpha stage. And there is still plenty of work to do.

One objective is to make a full distribution package including most of the current functionalities available in the demo version. Our main issue with this target is the lack of resources and time. Thus if any of Drupalists are enthusiastic about business process solutions and would like to contribute, they are welcome.

Categories: Elsewhere

DrupalEasy: Summertime, and the hiring is (Drupal)Easy

Sun, 08/05/2016 - 00:18

It’s almost summer, and at DrupalEasy, that means it is almost Intern Season! Our Spring Drupal Career Online class is three-fourths of the way to graduation, and we have just three budding Drupalists who are looking for work experience through internships (the others are already spoken for!)  If you’ve got too much to do, and not enough capacity to do it, an intern might be just the ticket through our (Work Experience) WE Drupal Program.

We love sowing the Drupal Community with well-trained new talent, all of whom have already devoted hundreds of hours, thousands of dollars, and more than three months of their lives to learning, practicing, engaging and developing their passions for Drupal in their quest to become professionals.  We’ve found that they have a lot to offer organizations who can use their eager new Drupal passion and help them build really great first Drupal Experience entries on their resumes.  If you need some extra bandwidth, or have some tasks or projects suited to a new site-builder type, why not engage an intern?

Hosting an intern is also a great way to test out talent and take some of the lower-level workload off of senior developers (like taking care of your own site, or those simpler tasks you need to get done for your clients.)  Here’s the deal: you bring on a graduate of our Drupal Career training program, either paid or unpaid in mid-June.  They devote their new Drupal enthusiasm and best-practice foundational skills to your projects for 2 to 3 months while you give them some guidance and experience.  You and the intern then decide if they move on, or continue on as an (already indoctrinated) contractor or employee.

If you’d like to learn more, you can check out how we approach WE Drupal, fill out a Host Application (no commitment, just a way for us to learn what you are looking for)  or email me.  

Summer is just around the corner, so WE hope you don’t delay.

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DrupalCon News: We are sprinting - come join!

Sat, 07/05/2016 - 16:17

Extended sprints have officially kicked off at Launch Pad.  We will be here all day, so stop by and join.

The Extended Sprints are located at 643 Magazine Street.  The front door is set back a little bit.  When you arrive, please send @joelpittet a text so that he can come let you in the front door.

We have breakfast, lots of sunlight and a rooftop deck, so come join!

Thank you for sprinting.

 

Categories: Elsewhere

Jay L.ee: Drupal Background Images Formatter Module Configuration Manual

Sat, 07/05/2016 - 04:51

Yesterday I wrote a blog post on how to configure a Drupal module called Background Images. Today I'll continue with part 2, and it's a simple one but essential as well, because this module doesn't even come with a README.txt file at all lol.

But before we begin, let's answer the million dollar question of why anyone would want to use this module:

A good example would be my use case where I run a membership website and want my members to be able to upload background images, because the Background Images module only allows people with admin access (specifically to admin/content/background-images) to enable background images at all.

Tags: Drupal 7Drupal Planet
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Darryl Norris's Blog: 4 New CKEditor Plugins For Drupal 8

Sat, 07/05/2016 - 04:40


About a month ago I was testing a pull request (#1999) for Drupal Console that will generate boilerplate code to integrate a button plugin from CKEditor to Drupal 8. So apparently the integration to integrate a CKEditor plugin for Drupal 8 is very simple thanks to the great CKEditor API in Drupal 8. While testing this pull request (#1999) I ended up with 4 plugins in my computer and I decide to share the code in Drupal.org so people can use it.

CKEditor Smiley

CKEditor Loremipsum

  • Project Page: https://www.drupal.org/project/ckeditor_loremipsum
  • Plugin Description: This plugin allows to generate lorem ipsum sentence or paragraph easily, to use in your web content, for example, it can be very useful when you want to demonstrate a website or a portal.

CKEditor Video Detector

More
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ActiveLAMP: Adding CKEditor plugins to Drupal 8

Sat, 07/05/2016 - 04:00

Drupal 8 has greatly improved editor experience out-of-the-box. It comes shipped with CKEditor for WYSIWYG editing. Although, D8 ships with a custom build of CKEditor and it may not have the plugins that you would like to have or that your client wants to have. I will show you how to add new plugins into the CKEditor that comes with Drupal 8.

Read more...
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Drupal Bits at Web-Dev: Drupal: Enable or Disable a View in Deployment.

Sat, 07/05/2016 - 03:41

Drupal Hook Update Deploy Tools now (as of v 7.x-1.16) has the ability to enable or disable  a View from within a hook_update_N().  It handles validation to make sure that your request to enable or disable a View actually did what you asked it to do.

 

Add something like this to a hook_update_N in your custom deploy module.install
to enable some Views.

<?php
  $views = array(
    'some_view_machine_name',
    'another_view_machine_name'
  );
  $message =  HookUpdateDeployTools\Views::enable('$views');

  return $message;
?>

To disable some Views, it looks like this:

<?php
  $views = array(
    'some_view_machine_name',
    'another_view_machine_name'
  );
  $message =  HookUpdateDeployTools\Views::disable('$views');

  return $message;
?>

Here is an example of what your terminal would show after running the enable method above:

Categories: Elsewhere

DrupalCon News: Scholarship, grant, training proposals open for DrupalCon Dublin

Fri, 06/05/2016 - 21:16

DrupalCon Dublin will be here before you know it! Join us this 26-30 September in one of Europe's major centers for technology. We're looking for bright ideas from our amazing community when it comes to training proposals and other programmign content. While registration isn't open just yet, it's never too early to book your hotel room, make your travel plans, and send in your proposals for training, or to apply for a grants or scholarship. Consider it like an early RSVP!

Categories: Elsewhere

myDropWizard.com: myDropWizard is providing Drupal 6 Long-Term Support for 424 sites!

Fri, 06/05/2016 - 21:16

We've been pretty busy in the 11 weeks since Drupal 6's End-of-Life on February 24th.

Really, CRAZY busy, in fact!

We're currently responsible for providing Drupal 6 Long-Term Support for 424 sites in total!

For some of our bigger clients with large numbers of sites on a single code-base or those subject to regulation (for example, governments and universities) we had to compromise on not providing "security updates only" service - but some protection is certainly better than no protection.

Going through the sales process (which includes performing an in-depth site audit), on-boarding process and subsequently supporting and maintaining 424 sites in only 11 weeks has been enormously challenging for a small company like ours - but also an amazing learning experience.

Things are finally slowing a bit with regard to Drupal 6 LTS, we're heading out to DrupalCon New Orleans next week, and starting to look at the next phase for our business.

This feels like a good time to stop and reflect on the things we've learned from our experience with providing Drupal 6 LTS: what worked, what didn't and what we can improve for the future!

This isn't a marketing post (unlike most of our posts recently - sorry!) but a look Behind the Veil at our growing startup, what we do and why we do it. And it's about time! The last one I did was back in June, explaining why we we're launching myDropWizard.

So, if you're still interested in my meandering reflections, please read on!

Categories: Elsewhere

Aten Design Group: Drush Tools for Inspecting Configuration

Fri, 06/05/2016 - 19:50

I have a confession to make: I don't like clicking through the Drupal admin. Over the course of a project, beit one with content migrations, configuration in code, or just general site building, the information I need the most is field and taxonomy configuration. Typically, this means bouncing betweens tabs for content types and taxonomies which consumes time and precious clicks. Add in custom entities in our new Drupal 8 projects and there's even more time spent in the admin.

After a few dozen repetitions of navigating between field and taxonomy screens, I was ready to build tools to make the pain points of this process go away. I’d like to introduce you to Drush TypeInfo, Drush TaxonomyInfo, and Migrate Inspect. Hopefully, you find these tools helpful in working on your projects. Besides helping with the initial setup of a project, I feel like these tools are excellent when you're dropped into a project later in the process. Even for project with a detailed architectural plan, things change, documentation goes stale, and the only real source of truth is the actual site being built.

Content Types and Entities

Born from the fire of massive migrations, Drush TypeInfo is a Drush command that can provide you with all the information you could want about your content types and entities. The examples below show the full command names, but everything also has short aliases which you can find by running drush --help.

First up, if you need to figure out the machine name of a content type or see if a content type exists, try:

drush typeinfo-list

This will list all the content types and entities on your site:

item_instruction item_instruction item_instruction_type - language_content_settings - menu - menu_link_content - node article node page node testlet node testlet_item taxonomy_term tags taxonomy_term trajectories taxonomy_vocabulary - user - user_role - view -

Pro tip for the list: if you only want a specific entity type, you can specify that as well: drush typeinfo-list node. Next, maybe you need to check out the fields on an article content type:

drush typeinfo article

If you're looking for information about the fields on an entity besides nodes, you can look that up too. For fields on a taxonomy term the command would be:

drush typeinfo tags taxonomy_term

Now we're in business, but what about even more information? Well, field_tags probably relates to a taxonomy, but let's make sure we know exactly which one:

drush typeinfo-field field_tags article

This will show us:

Field info for: field_tags Type: entity_reference Form displays: - node.article.default Widgets (node.article): default: entity_reference_autocomplete_tags Target type: taxonomy_term Target bundles: tags Cardinality: unlimited

We can see that the field is targeting the topic taxonomy and that it accepts unlimited values. If you want to see field instance info (like field widget settings), you can also pass the bundle/entity type:

drush typeinfo-field field_shared_topic event node

This example will show the field_shared_topic information as it relates to the event content type (I'm specifying the node entity type here, but Drush TypeInfo will also make this assumption for you by default if you want to be lazy).

If you want to see raw internal arrays that Drupal uses for a field, you can get extra in-depth details with the --field-info, --display-info, and --widget-info flags.

Drupal 8 note: this is mostly up-to-date with Drupal 8 functionality, but there are likely more things to load (including some of the display and form display information).

Taxonomy

Next up: taxonomies. It's common to have several vocabularies complete with their own terms. Accessing a list of vocabularies and their terms used to mean plenty of clicking and tabbing through the UI. Not anymore -- I created Drush TaxonomyInfo to display site-wide taxonomy information with a single command.

To list out the vocabularies on a site:

drush taxonomyinfo-vocab-list

To list terms within the topic taxonomy:

drush taxonomyinfo-term-list topic

Drupal 8 note: this should be updated and ready to go for Drupal 8 with the exception of nested terms, these will not show up as nested (yet).

Migrate

Several Drupal 7 projects I worked on last year included very large content migrations. The Migrate module has command line tools for core functionality (importing, rolling back, etc.) but what happens with the data once it is imported? Let's check it out with the help of a tool called Migrate Inspect.

If we've imported some legacy events with an Event migration, we may want to open the last node we imported in a browser:

drush migrate-inspect-last Event

Or even a random event we imported (useful when you want to spot check 30,000 nodes you imported!):

drush migrate-inspect-random Event

When you're reviewing your migration, you may notice a source node that didn't get pulled into the destination correctly. In a case where you know the source ID, but you don't know where that content ended up on the new site, you can find that with the command:

drush migrate-inspect-destination Event 100

Or if you know the destination ID on the new site, but want to know the legacy ID from the old site:

drush migrate-inspect-source Event 200

Sometimes you might know a source or destination ID but unsure which migration it came from. This usually happens for me in cases where there are multiple migrations that can put content into a destination node (for example, when the old site has blog posts and news, but they're being combined on the new site). Migrate Inspect comes with two commands to make this easier by searching for you. Again the commands are broken up into source or destination versions, depending on the ID you have at hand:

drush migrate-inspect-find-source 200 drush migrate-inspect-find-destination 100

Drupal 8 note: this has not been updated for Drupal 8 yet.

Categories: Elsewhere

Acquia Developer Center Blog: Faceted Search in Drupal 8: Using Search API Solr and Facets

Fri, 06/05/2016 - 15:20

When module authors decide to port their modules to a new major version of Drupal (e.g. 6 to 7, or 7 to 8), they often take the time to rearchitect the module (and sometimes an entire related ecosystem of modules) to make development more efficient, clean up cruft, and improve current features.

Tags: acquia drupal planetsolracquia searchSearch API
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Tim Millwood: Drupal Deploy demos

Fri, 06/05/2016 - 09:32
Single site content staging with Deploy This demo shows creating content on a stage workspace then...
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Jay L.ee: Drupal Background Images Module Configuration Manual

Fri, 06/05/2016 - 08:06

During my San Diego Drupal Users Group lightning talk on March 8, I showed a brief demo of how background images can be made to be clickable via CSS, something that many people consider to be impossible. But as I'll show you over the next few days, it actually is 100% possible, and I had a LOT of fun getting it to finally work exactly the way I want it. Today's tutorial will be part 1 of 3. My next two blog posts will cover the rest of the steps for creating clickable background takeover ads.

Tags: Drupal 7Drupal Planet
Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal.org blog: What’s new on Drupal.org? - April 2016

Thu, 05/05/2016 - 23:44

Read our Roadmap to understand how this work falls into priorities set by the Drupal Association with direction and collaboration from the Board and community.

We'll see you at DrupalCon!

DrupalCon New Orleans is about to get underway next week, and the Drupal Association will be there to talk about some of our recent work, to collaborate with the community, and to present some exciting things that are coming soon. We'll be giving a variety of presentations as part of the Drupal.org track, so if you'll be attending DrupalCon in New Orleans, please join us!

Laissez les bon temps roulez!

Drupal 8.1.0 released

On April 20th, the Drupal core maintainers released Drupal 8.1.0. This is the first release of the new Drupal release cycle in which new features of Drupal will be released much more rapidly than during the Drupal 7 cycle. The Drupal 8.1 release includes: an experimental UI for the Migration module for migrating from Drupal 6 or 7, BigPipe for improving the perceived rendering time of Drupal 8 sites, support for JavaScript automated testing, improved support for Composer, and much more.

The Drupal Association supported the release in several ways. We updated Drupal.org to use Composer to package Drupal Core's dependencies. We updated api.drupal.org to reflect the new point release, and the development branch for 8.2.x. We also bulk updated issues opened against Drupal Core 8.1.x to be open against 8.2.x moving forward. Finally, we updated DrupalCI to support JavaScript testing with PhantomJS. As this new, faster Drupal release cycle continues, we'll continue to refine the process and tools that the core developers use to make this process more efficient.

Drupal.org updates Composer repository alpha

We're very happy to announce the alpha release of Drupal.org's Composer repositories. One of our Community Initiatives for 2016, adding Composer repositories to Drupal.org, has been a concerted effort here at the Association for the past several months. Composer is the tool for dependency management in PHP, and by using Drupal.org's Composer endpoints you can use Composer to manage Drupal modules and themes.

The Drupal.org Composer façade also handles the translation of Drupal.org versioning into the semver format that Composer needs, which should also allow the community to move forward choosing a semver format for contrib. For example, we could now fairly easily support a Platform.Major.Minor.Patch versioning scheme until the semver standard itself supports the same.

As the current release is an alpha, we don’t recommend relying on the Drupal.org Composer repositories in a production environment quite yet. If you would like to help us test the system, you can start with our documentation for the Drupal.org Composer repositories, and then leave us feedback in the Project Composer issue queue.

Our work on Composer specifically, like many of the initiatives we undertake, was made possible through the support of our generous sponsors. If you would like to sponsor our work on Drupal.org, please consider our Supporting Partner Program.

PhantomJS testing in DrupalCI

A key milestone for core developers in Drupal 8.1 was adding the ability to test the front end, by using PhantomJS for JavaScript testing. After some concerted work by dawehner, pfrenssen, alexpott, and several others on the Drupal core side, isntall here at the Drupal Association was able to get PhantomJS properly running on the DrupalCI testbots.

More work will continue to improve our ability to test the front-end, and Drupal 8 continues to be among the most thoroughly tested open source projects in the ecosystem today.

Visual design system for Drupal.org

In April, our lead designer, DyanneNova, outlined the new design system and principles we’re using in all of our work to improve Drupal.org. Our most significant undertaking is the long term restructuring of Drupal.org, which will be implemented in an iterative way as we work through the many different content areas of Drupal.org. The next area of Drupal.org to receive updates, as previewed in the post above, will be Documentation.

Documentation

In our March update, we teased some of the upcoming Documentation features, and talked about the usability testing we performed at DrupalCamp London, and in the Drupal Association office here in Portland. In April, we took our observations from the usability testing, and began implementing these new features. We'll be previewing these upcoming changes in more detail at DrupalCon New Orleans next week, so stay tuned!

Sustaining support and maintenance Infrastructure

In April, we began the build-out of a new staging infrastructure for Drupal.org, part of the continual process of upgrading and refining the tools we use to develop Drupal.org. At the same time, we've updated several of our management and automation tools to keep our stack running smoothly. Work refining our pre-production environments will continue into May.

Maintenance and Bug Fixes

No month is complete without a bit of time spent on maintenance and bug fixes. In April, we spent some time cleaning up spam on archived sites of past DrupalCons, removed unneeded comment render cache code, fixed some bugs with featured job credits on Drupal Jobs, and worked on our payment processor implementation for our European DrupalCons.

———

As always, we’d like to say thanks to all the volunteers who work with us, and to the Drupal Association Supporters, who made it possible for us to work on these projects.

Follow us on Twitter for regular updates: @drupal_org, @drupal_infra

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Lullabot: DrupalCon New Orleans Session Extravaganza!

Thu, 05/05/2016 - 22:00
Matt and Mike talk with a plethora of Lullabots about their sessions at DrupalCon New Orleans, what their favorite all-time DrupalCon experience was, and what sessions they’re looking forward to seeing this year.
Categories: Elsewhere

Greg Boggs: Drupal 8 Theming Best Practices

Thu, 05/05/2016 - 21:43

The theming guide for Drupal 8 will get you started in the basics for theming a Drupal site. But, once you’ve learned the basics, what best practices should you be applying to Drupal 8 themes? There are lots of popular methods for writing and organizing CSS. The basics of CSS, of course, apply to Drupal.

  • Don’t get too specific
  • Place your CSS in the header and JavaScript in the footer
  • Organize your CSS well
  • Theme by patterns, don’t go top down
  • Preprocess your styles
Use configuration first

When it comes to Drupal, there are some common mistakes that happen when a front end developer doesn’t know Drupal. In general, apply your classes in configuration. Do not fill your Drupal theme with custom templates like you would for WordPress. Template files, especially with Twig, have their place. But, configuration should be your primary tool. My favoriate tool for applying classes is Display Suite and Block class. Panels is also good. And, fences isn’t terrible.

By applying your classes in configuration allows you to easily edit, reuse, and apply classes across every type of thing in Drupal. If you apply your classes with templates, it’s difficult to apply them across different types of content without cutting and pasting your code. However, don’t be afraid to use some presentational logic in your Twig templates.

Be careful what you target

In Drupal, there are many times where the only selector you have that will work is an ID. If you have this problem, Don’t use it! Never, ever, ever, apply your CSS with ids in Drupal. This is true for every framework, but in Drupal it’s a bigger problem because IDs are not reusable, they are hard to set, and they often change. A backend developer will not be able to apply your styles to other items without fixing your CSS for you. Don’t write CSS that you know a PHP programmer will have to rewrite because you don’t want your PHP programmer writing CSS.

Use view modes

Make sure to target your styles to reusable elements. So, avoid node types because those aren’t reusable on other nodes. Instead, use view modes and configuration to apply selectors as you need them.

Avoid machine names

This relates back to avoiding IDs. Machine names in Drupal sometimes need to change, and they are not reusable. So, don’t target them. Instead use view css, block class and configuration to apply classes to your content.

Don’t get too specific

Drupal 8 markup is better, but Drupal is still very verbose. Don’t get sucked in by Drupal’s divs. Only get as specific as you need to be. Don’t replicate Drupal’s HTML in your CSS.

Apply a grid to Drupal

Choose a grid system that allows you to apply the grid to any markup like Singularity or Neat. While you certainly can Bootstrap Drupal. Using Bootstrap on Drupal requires a heavy rewrite of the HTML which will break contributed modules like Drupal Commerce in obscure, hard to fix ways.

Use a breadcrumb module

Do not write advanced business logic into your theme templates. If your theme is programming complex features, move that code to a module. Or, install modules like Current Page Crumb, or Advanced Agg to handle more complex functions. This isn’t WordPress, your theme shouldn’t ship with a custom version of Panels.

Don’t hard code layouts

Use {{ content }} in your templates and let the View Modes, Display Suite, or Panels handle your layouts.

Don’t use template.php

If you need some ‘glue’, write or find a module meant for it. Drupal is built by many, many tiny modules. Learn to love it because well-written modules are reusable, maintained for free and always improving. Custom code dropped into your theme makes for hard to maintain code.

Categories: Elsewhere

Four Kitchens: DrupalCon New Orleans 2016

Thu, 05/05/2016 - 21:00

We’re packing up our green gear and heading to the Big Easy for DrupalCon 2016! …

Categories: Elsewhere

Palantir: It's here: Workbench for Drupal 8

Thu, 05/05/2016 - 18:00

In Dries’ latest blog post about the state of Drupal 8 adoption, he mentions the results of a survey of 1,800 people. The number one reason that people haven’t upgraded to Drupal 8 yet is availability of modules.

Feature readiness is a critical topic for agencies and clients alike. At Palantir, it particularly affects the Workbench series of modules. We developed Workbench for Drupal 7 to address a set of common editorial problems:

  • An editorial workspace customized for each editor, which shows what work needs to be done next.
  • A draft-revision-published workflow.
  • Review states that require permission to publish content.
  • The ability to create a new “forward revision” waiting for approval while retaining the published version.
  • An extensible, consistent workflow system.
  • Access controls that grant access to specific sections of a website using a hierarchy that maps to an organization chart.

The modules are a cornerstone of every site we build in Drupal 7 – and many that we don’t.

We're happy to report that Workbench is available for Drupal 8.

We receive emails and calls often inquiring about the state of Workbench in Drupal 8; folks in government, higher education, nonprofits, and media all use Workbench. It's a testament to the module suite, and how vital it has been to countless organizations over the years, regardless of industry. In fact, our own Director of Production Scott DiPerna used to run digital at our client Barnard College, and used Workbench extensively:

"Another difficult, though probably common, requirement dealt with access and permissions. With 40-plus academic departments and roughly 200 regular editors of the overall website, Barnard's permissions needs don't fall neatly along the lines of traditional Drupal publishing rights.

For this reason, we needed a system that could handle granular levels of access to particular pieces of content, such that an editor could have access to edit one sibling and its children, but not all siblings of the first.

The Workbench module developed by Palantir handles these needs well by using a hierarchical vocabulary to set levels of access for each piece of content."

Scott is right: the module addresses a common need. So common, in fact, that our partner Acquia has included Workbench as part of its new author-focused Lightning distribution for Drupal 8.

Want to learn more about Workbench for Drupal 8? We're hosting a free webinar on May 24th at 1:00pm CDT, and would love for you to join us. What is Workbench?

Workbench is made up of three essential modules, which provide the functionality listed above. Here’s is an update on the current status of each.

Workbench Moderation
Thanks to a grant from the Module Acceleration Program at Acquia, and the work of the content staging group, Workbench Moderation has a stable release. We’ll be talking about that process at DrupalCON, too. The work we’ve been doing in this space also factors in to Dries’ call for better content authoring tools, so expect to see more from us in this space.

Workbench Access
We’ve been working on access controls for a very long time. (Over 10 years.) Our priority for Drupal 8 has been on moderation, so access is a bit of a side project. You can download pre-alpha code from https://github.com/agentrickard/workbench_access and see the list of required features at https://github.com/agentrickard/workbench_access/issues. The good news, however, is that we’re actively testing the module on a client project, so we expect a stable release by midsummer.

Workbench
The core Workbench module is largely a collection of custom Views that create dashboards for content editors. With Views in core, this module is less critical now, and we’ve made sure that both Workbench Moderation and Workbench Access provide Views support. So you can roll your own dashboards for now while we decide on the architecture for how to provide these as a default module.

Ken Rickard is the product owner and one of the original architects of the Workbench module suite. He’ll be at DrupalCON next week, so drop us a line or come by booth 222 if you’d like to chat.

We're closer than ever on the remaining modules, so if you'd like to play an integral part in the development of these important modules as a funding partner, let's talk.
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