Planet Drupal

Subscribe to Planet Drupal feed
Drupal.org - aggregated feeds in category Planet Drupal
Updated: 26 min 57 sec ago

Mike Stiv - Drupal developer and consultant: Do you have a backup strategy? 3 tools to save your day

Tue, 07/10/2014 - 08:40

For drupal we have a number of different methods to backup the database. Having a backup strategy is one of the easiest things to do but is often overlooked. Perform regular backups to keep your sanity when disaster hits. Implement a backup strategy for daily weekly and monthly backups and look cool to the client.

I am going to discuss about 3 different tools to backup your database. Read on so you have no excuse.

Tags: drushbackup and migratebackupmysqlDrupal Planetautomysqlbackup
Categories: Elsewhere

PreviousNext: The future of functional testing in Drupal 8 - Drupalcon Amsterdam

Tue, 07/10/2014 - 04:49

Cameron Zemek (@grom358) and myself got the priviledge of speaking at DrupalCon Amsterdam as a part of the Core Conversation track. This was off the back of the work that we had been doing in core to swap out some of simpletest module with libraries. We were also joined by Konstantin Kudryashov (@everzet) creator/maintainer of the Behat, Mink and PHPSpec projects.

Categories: Elsewhere

Matthew Saunders: Drupal Association Board Retreat - Amsterdam

Tue, 07/10/2014 - 03:08

I've spent a good chunk of the last year working on and with the Association Board. I've poured over financials, talked through plans for expansion and diversification of the organization. I've been working with the Governance Committee and have taken on the role of Committee Chair. I'm a bit of policy wonk, having been heavily involved in policy in the Charter School and Arts Nonprofit/State Government world.

During our most recent retreat in Amsterdam, the board broke up into their committees and started sorting out what we want to accomplish for the year.

I'll be working with the Governance Committee to achieve a few goals.

drupalassociationretreatamsterdam
Categories: Elsewhere

Victor Kane: Historic DrupalCon Amsterdam 2014 - Let's get to the bottom of Headless Drupal

Tue, 07/10/2014 - 02:05
Let the Debates Begin - Part II

Other articles in this series:

Intro

Whatever it is, and in this article we are going to venture a proposal for a canonical definition, Headless Drupal seems to synthesis a heartfelt need in the context of the current Drupal problematic. It has been a hot subject for quite some time now, with an active group presence on Drupal Groups, and with a veritable avalanche of articles and presentations. Barring the obvious number one topic of Drupal 8 (which we'll debate in the next article in this series) and successfully competing with "the new PHP" itself as a center of interest, it was really the number one topic at DrupalCon Amsterdam 2014, with training, presentations and at least one very important BOF:

read more

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Easy: DrupalEasy Podcast 140: Oh *Beha*ve! (Matthew Grasmick, Behat)

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 23:38
Download Podcast 140

Matthew Grasmick (grasmash), Technical Consultant with Acquia, joins Mike and Ryan to talk about the Behat testing framework, Drupal 8 beta 1, and Dries' (super-interesting) DrupalCon Amsterdam keynote.

read more

Categories: Elsewhere

Cocomore: Q and A with Dries — All questions and answers summarized from Drupalcon Amsterdam 2014

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 20:31

One Drupalcon session of particular interest to many in the community, since the first of them, has been the “Q&A with Dries”, a core-conversation -track, where Dries is joined by a panel of his initiative leads and other major contributors to Drupal 8 core development. Since I'd wished, in the past, that sessions like these had a video recording to show who was talking, I brought my DSLR and a shotgun microphone this time, thinking I'd contribute the resulting video. I don't think the video I shot was technically perfect enough to share and I realized that one panel member also prefers to limit her exposure on the Web and respect that, of course; since it's much easier to blur or block out a face in a few images than in a video, and since you can read this summary in much less time than the hour+ -length session, too, I decided to provide stills from the video, along with a summary of the questions and answers, which ranged from the whimsical (a bet on how long it would be till Drupal 8 would be released as “stable” to various business and architecture questions and concerns.

(You’ll find a more serious answer(s) to that question if you read on...). Of course, Dries began by asking each of his panelists to introduce themselves. Those present were:

read more

Categories: Elsewhere

Appnovation Technologies: Up and Running with Acquia Dev Desktop

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 20:12

Getting a Drupal site up and running is easier than ever with Acquia Dev Desktop.

var switchTo5x = false;stLight.options({"publisher":"dr-75626d0b-d9b4-2fdb-6d29-1a20f61d683"});
Categories: Elsewhere

Urban Insight: Tracking progress in embedded Vimeo videos

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 17:14

Urban Insight operates a highly successful on-demand video service, Planetizen Courses. The service keeps improving rapidly; it’s not uncommon for new features to appear on the site. One recent enhancement allows the system to keep track of progression in videos as they are being watched.

This enhancement allows for two new features:

Categories: Elsewhere

Phase2: Introducing DrupalCon Amsterdam Hackathon Champs!

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 17:03

Last Monday, Phase2 hosted a distribution hackathon at DrupalCon Amsterdam. While we were excited to see what our hackers would come up with, we were blown away by what was accomplished in an evening of hacking.  The winners of the hackathon developed a Drupal 8 distribution called Drupal Promo Kit. This distribution allows anyone to easily create presentations and landing pages using Drupal. Other hack projects included Open Atrium Apps, Panopoly apps, and more. I got to chat with the hackathon winners: Kate Marshalkina , Konstantin Komelin, John Ennew, and Mariano Barcia, to learn how they came up with their idea and how they did it:

Q: What was your inspiration for your hackathon project?

A: We wanted to test our skills in Drupal 8 and see if we could build our own distribution.  We also wanted to build a unique solution that was useful and meaningful.

Q: How did you prep for the hackathon?

A: About a week before the hackathon Kate and I (Konstantin) brainstormed potential hackathon ideas. Our goal was to decide on a project that we could complete by the end of the hackathon, so once we decided on our idea for the project, we decided on the scope of our project and the minimal and maximum viable product.  We then decided on the tools we would use including Bitbucket, Google docs, Slack, and Trello.

Q: And once you arrived at the hackathon, what was your experience working with other people?

A: When the hackathon kicked off, we announced our project and goals to everyone and found some new team members that were interested in what we wanted to do. John Ennew and Mariano Barcia joined us and it was amazing how easy it was to pick up and start developing with other Drupalers. We were able to start developing rapidly in just a couple of hours. It didn’t matter that we were all coming from different backgrounds, with different skill levels, we were all speaking Drupal, a universal language.

Q: What do you think is the value of hackathons?

A: Hackathons are a great opportunity to meet other Drupalers in the greater Drupal community and work together to solve problems. Hackathons at Drupalcon are special because your  team can come from all over the world, and you all have different cultures, different jokes, and new ideas.  Not only do you build friendships throughout the event, but all the different perspectives and experiences strengthen your project. Hackathons let you dive into something you are interested in and at the same time, it can help push Drupal forward.  We learned so much about Drupal 8 while working on this project, and we plan on taking our experience and feedback to the core team to help improve Drupal 8.

—————————-

Interested in learning more about Drupal Promo Kit? Check it out on Drupal.org! We want to thank all the hackers that participated in our hackathon, and can’t wait to hack with our brilliant community again soon!  See more images of the hackathon and other DrupalCon Amsterdam photos on our Flickr!

Categories: Elsewhere

Matt Farina: Find Security Holes With A Threat Analysis

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 16:00

It seems that every week we hear about a new high profile hacking. For example, it just came out that numerous financial institutions, in addition to JPMorgan Chase, were hacked. We live in an incredibly accessible world where those on the other side of the globe can easily knock on our digital front doors or even try to pick the locks. So, how can we try to figure out where the weak points are in our security? How can we find the tasks to work on to beef up security? One option is to perform a threat analysis.

A threat analysis for computing systems is...

Systematic detection, identification, and evaluation of areas or spots of vulnerability of a facility, operation, or system.

Let's look at some ways we can dip out toes into a threat analysis. This is not all inclusive and you'll need to go well beyond these ideas but they are a place to get started.

You'll notice I suggest documenting many of the aspects discussed. Documenting them helps to communicate the system and details to others who can offer insight and it helps to visualize what's happening.

Diagram Your System Architecture

Above is a simple example of a CMS based website, such as a common Drupal site. In the diagram diagram document all the components, even elements that browsers download from 3rd parties or components that aren't user facing.

Once you have the diagram look at all the interconnects between the different parts. For example, you may serve your pages over https but the connection between the web server and the MySQL isn't over an encrypted connection. That could offer a route to peek in on data.

Also, look at who can access what ports on what servers. If Memcached is accessible to anyone who knows the IP of the server the data in it can be retrieved by anyone. In this picture private networks, cloud security groups, or some other protection should be in place to protect anyone from ever accessing Memcached or MySQL.

Looking at the system can help you identify places to secure communications. It's an easy place to start identifying tasks.

Data Storage

Many sites store information about customers. This ranges from mundane settings through personally identifiable information (PII). Imagine an e-commerce site where someone gets into the database or can even just monitor the traffic between the web server and the database. They'll know customer names, email address, home address, and more.

Type Where Encrypted? Products MySQL No Name MySQL No Address MySQL No ... ... ...

An easy way to get a view of the data you're storing is with an old fashioned table. List out everything from the content that's displayed to the private details (even those sent to web services like a credit card processor).

Once you have this information you can combine it with the accessibility of the system and start to get an idea how open data is for hackers. It's also an easy place to start finding tasks to make the data more secure. For example, can information like addresses be encrypted?

Security Update Plan

Software is insecure. The more complicated the software the more likely there are holes in it. The software powering the Internet has regular security updates to fix the problems as they are found. By regular I don't expect a week to go by without needing to update one thing or another.

How do you update software? Is it automated? Is it often? How often? For example, it's great to install updates to a CMS but what about the web server, the database, the operating system they are on, and everything else in the system?

Document how you handle updates and then look for ways to improve on and automate the updates.

Reviewing Logs

Hacking attempts happen. Some people will even scan the entire Internet to see what's open. It's not all the hard to scan the entire Internet and you can do it at a slow pace in under a day.

Part of handling threats isn't just handling them but identifying bad situations quickly and reacting. That's where good logging practices can come in. Look at the log review practices and automate as much as possible.

Make sure to log everything (minus information such as passwords) and review those logs. If an IP address keeps trying to access your systems but fails to authenticate you should know about it. If systems are accessed when you don't expect them to be or from locations you don't expect, you should know about it.

Just the beginning...

These few things are just the beginning but a good place to start. Initially, this can raise a number of places to improve the system while getting some of the security thinking more in place.

Continue Reading »

Categories: Elsewhere

Lullabot: DrupalCon Amsterdam

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 13:31

In this week's episode Addison Berry and Amber Himes Matz sit down together in a quiet room at DrupalCon Amsterdam to give a quick recap on their week at the largest European DrupalCon. We chat about other events outside of the DrupalCon sessions themselves, some cool sessions, and a bit about the new Drupal 8 beta.

Categories: Elsewhere

Blue Drop Shop: Contributing IRL

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 13:29

Let’s face facts: I am not a coder. With a lot of caffeine, much googling and more time than is reasonable, I *can* code my way out of a paper bag, but that’s about it.

So it is highly unlikely you will ever see my username tied to a module or on a list of contributors. Sure, I created the occasional new issue on a module’s issue queue or provided feedback for a patch I needed, which in itself is a form of contributing. But messing around with core? Funny. Me writing a patch? Nope. Sprinting? I only run when being chased.

According to d.o then, I am not a contributor. 

The outward problem with this is that the language around contributing back to Drupal is code-centric. The current system places emphasis on how many commits you have and how many projects you maintain. But there is hope for those of you who, like me, won't be contributing back code anytime soon. 

I am a co-organizer for the Fox Valley Drupal Meetup Group in the western suburbs of Chicago. We held our first camp in 2013 and I was part of the team that helped pull it off, and we recently wrapped our 2014 camp.

When the idea of the inaugural MidCamp was getting kicked around, I offered up my logistics help for that as well. And I'm on deck as the logistics lead 2015.

Through my non-Drupal day job, I have extensive print experience and do a fair amount of video production work tied to the annual conference we host. So I was all over session records for all three camps, and I'm working on a rebooted session recording kit that the Drupal Association is very interested in learning more about. 

My print skills have been tapped by the core mentor team, mostly because I was hanging around a bunch of them at Drupalcon Austin and they needed materials printed for the mentored sprints at Drupalcon Amsterdam. 

Hell, I even got roped into catering the extended sprints at Austin mainly because I am passionate about food, especially when it comes from something with four wheels and an engine.

My point: there are many opportunities to give back to the community and the project as a whole in real life. It took me a while before I realized that yes, I am a contributor. Just not in a way that is currently measured. But that's not why I do it. I am forever indebted to all the heavy code lifters that I depend on for my work. It just feels good to be able to give back.

So while it’s highly unlikely you’ll ever see any kind of percentage powered by kthull on a Drupal site, I’ll continue to lend my time and talents where I can. You should too.

Tags:
Categories: Elsewhere

Nuez Web Blog: Top 5 talks at the DrupalCon Amsterdam

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 12:30
Last week I attended another very enlightening DrupalCon - this time in Amsterdam - with a wide variety of talks about Drupal ranging from hardcore computer science to business strategies and design. Also with a wide range of levels, which, to be honest, didn’t always match the difficulty mentioned on the official programme. So which ones were the best speeches for an all-round Drupal professional like me? 

Photo taken at the Druplicon with Drupal professional Marcel Ritsema and the team of Dutch Drupal shop Merge.

So what is an all-round Drupal professional like me? That's someone who mainly uses Drupal as a tool to build websites and web apps, knows how to build a module and a theme (sometimes shares them with the community), but does not necessarily understand all the nuts and bolts of core, especially of the Drupal 8 core.

This blog post is about the 5 most valuable talks I’ve...Read more

Categories: Elsewhere

ERPAL: Two important Drupal facts resulting from Drupalcon Amsterdam 2014

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 10:05
Two important Drupal facts resulting from Drupalcon Amsterdam 2014

This year was our first as a silver sponsor with an ERPAL booth at a Drupalcon. As we had lots of BOFs and interesting talks with other Drupal developers and sponsors from various companies, I’d like to share my thoughts and conclusions in this blog post. It became obvious that the community agrees about two very important facts:

Fact 1: Drupal is not a CMS

You might exclaim, "But this is written everywhere!" – and you would be entirely right. When companies are looking for a CMS, what do they want? Mostly a ready-to-use system to manage their content. In general, they expect to start adding their content quickly and easily. Responsiveness is required straightaway and no content site works without media management. However, when we install Drupal, we don’t get a CMS that works for end users right out of the box: we get a clean and slim Drupal installation that takes quite a bit of modification before it’ll work for a content site, but it’s much more powerful! Nonetheless, it can also be a little disappointing. With all the contrib modules available, you can build almost any web application you want, but to create a full-featured content site, you need to be an experienced Drupal site builder. You need to know how entities/nodes work, how rules and panels do their job, why and how to use features for deployment and why you won’t find a ready-to-use "image gallery" module – instead, you have to build it yourself. This can be problem when, after installation, Drupal doesn’t live up to these unwarranted expectations. If you need an easy-to-use CMS that works immediately after installation, WordPress may be a better choice, as it does what people expect. Install and use for your content management, done!

Drupal can do content management as well, but it needs to be built manually. In all our conversations we prefer to call Drupal an “application framework”. And many of the people I talked to at Drupalcon seemed to agree with that.

So you can use Drupal to build a full-featured CMS if you’re an experienced site builder and know all the modules and how they interact with each other. Or you can use a ready-built Drupal installation specialized for content management (if there is one). These vertical use cases are called “distributions” and there are already lots of them out there at Drupal.org. A Drupal distribution is a collection of preconfigured modules that provide features for a specific purpose, say, content management. Drupal is a framework, as Linux Magazine wrote in a previous blogpost: Drupal provides the horizontal "infrastructure modules" like fields and entities for building a data model, views for data queries and lists, rules for business logic, feeds and webservice clients for interaction with external systems and their APIs, panels and display suite as well as other formatters for layouting and display control. Everything we need to build powerful web applications is available as a module.

Since many Drupalistas see Drupal in the same way, I want to plead with everybody to allow Drupal to meet the expectations of its users. Let’s show the world the power of Drupal to build web applications, and show it with vertical distributions and use cases that are different from your typical CMS. Give end users a functional and full-featured distribution for content management but don't hide Drupal for other purposes like collaboration platforms, e-commerce systems, CRM systems, business applications, or planning tools. I guess the list is almost endless and content management is just one item: Drupal can be used to build all of them, nearly without coding, but out-of-the-box it is not.

Fact 2: Integration really matters

Another important fact I realized at Drupalcon is that many people are looking for examples of integration use cases. Drupal integrates with other systems very well – we’re often asked to integrate it with the “big players” in the software industry. And even better: it can extend the functionality of other system's data to integrate it with new workflows. Sharepoint and SAP integration requests show that Drupal has matured and that it’s now being viewed as an enterprise application framework. It only lacks public success stories that showcase these integrations. When I presented the Drupal cross-enterprise integration on an example of Sharepoint at the Drupalcamp in Frankfurt, I was asked "Why should one even do this?" The question is legitimate, of course. Why indeed should a Drupal developer use Drupal and Sharepoint together? The answer is to be found in the enterprise. Whenever you use Drupal in the enterprise for an intranet, a workflow management system, a CMS or a collaboration platform, the first thing you’re asked is: “Can we integrate with LDAP to avoid duplicate user accounts and permission duplication? Can we have a single sign-on? Can we see documents stored in Sharepoint in our Drupal instance? What about integrating SAP applications and can we reuse data from Drupal in Sharepoint or SAP?” The answer is: yes, yes and yes we can! But only a few will actually believe that, since they won’t find (m)any use cases in Google or Drupal.org.

So what we should foster in the Drupal community is the publication of stories of successful integration scenarios with other enterprise systems. Of course, these use cases won’t be as shiny as beautifully designed content sites, but they will help Drupal grow. Compared with other web applications systems Drupal is one of the most flexible: nobody argues this. It’s flexible and open to "talk" to other systems. In many of my conversations at Drupalcon it became clear that there are many niche use cases in the enterprise that would be expensive to build with other commercial systems, since code changes are always time-consuming and risky. From our daily work with Drupal we know that they’re much easier to build with Drupal, mostly by configuration. But almost none of the decision makers know this, which leads us back to "Fact 1 - Drupal is not a CMS". So whenever you build applications with Drupal that are integrated with other enterprise systems like SAP or Sharepoint, PLEASE publish and promote them! This will help Drupal grow in the enterprise, where we all want to see it settled in the future.

Conclusion: Let’s do it together

So if you agree and want to see Drupal as a world-leading application framework someday, share this information and help us with the next steps. If you’re interested in further discussion, use the comment function. If there are enough people interested in this movement, let’s put our heads together and plan how we can better meet the requirements of Drupal users. Perhaps you even have some use cases that represent Drupal as mentioned in Fact 1 and Fact 2? Don't hesitate to go public with them. If you DON'T agree with this opinion and we didn’t meet at Drupalcon, you’re most welcome to share your thoughts here as well.

Categories: Elsewhere

Freelock : Ask Freelock: Upgrade D6 to Drupal 7, or wait for 8?

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 07:11

Apparently there's some FUD (Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt) being sown by a few Drupal shops who are spreading downright wrong information about Drupal 8, trying to encourage people to upgrade to 7 now. One of our clients called in a panic unsure whether she needed to act, after getting approached by Drupal Geeks pitching this misleading content, which they've now posted in a highly inaccurate blog page, here:

6 Reasons to Upgrade to Drupal 7 Right Now

DrupalDrupal PlanetDrupal 8FUD
Categories: Elsewhere

Robert Douglass: The DrupalCon Amsterdam Prenote : Drupal Memories

Sun, 05/10/2014 - 23:28

Rob, Jam, and guests tell the history of DrupalCon, from Antwerp to Amsterdam, from the point of view of those whose lives were changed by them. This video includes "Oh, and one time, at Drupal Camp", "The Drupal 8 Bug Elimination Challenge", a guest appearance by Captain Drupal, a performance of "The Drupal Song", a re-enactment of the genesis of Acquia, a "Never Marry Me" proposal, and a stunning performance of "Memories" by Bryn and Campbell Vertesi.

It also concludes with the inaugural instance of "Selfieception", the culmination of the underlying metaphor behind this show. Inspired by Daniel Kahneman's TED Talk about "the future as anticipated memories", Rob and Jam set about to create a show that ties our collective experience to "the experiencing self that lives in the present, the remembering self that maintains the story of your life", and to use "storytelling as a function of what we remember from our experiences".

As we tell the stories of our DrupalCons, and how they defined us (remembering self), we engage in a dialog with the audience, who has to pay close attention to capture every moment (experiencing self), as indeed we'll have to do through the coming days of sessions, meetings, chance encounters, and business opportunities. But in a tip-of-the-hat to our remembering selves, we decide to take selfies to remember the moment by. However, to frame the shot in an optimal way, we must all turn our backs on each other, and thus the conflict between experiencing self and remembering self is embodied: the remembering self demands that the experiencing self sacrifices the performer-audience dialog, and turns the back to the present in anticipation of a future memory.

Thanks to the Drupal Association for supporting our ongoing tradition of the DrupalCon Prenote, thanks to the 1,500 people who got out of bed to be at our show at 8:00 in the morning, and thanks to everyone who stood up to tell their story.

Tags: Drupal PlanetDrupalDrupalConSelfieception
Categories: Elsewhere

Frederic Marand: Drupal 8 tip of the day : check menu links consistency

Sun, 05/10/2014 - 14:16

One of the interesting aspects of the revamped menu/links system in Drupal 8 is the fact that menu links are now in easily parseable YAML files, the "(module).links.menu.yml" in each module, in which each menu link can be bound to its parent link, hopefully producing a tree-like structure.

read more

Categories: Elsewhere

Triquanta Web Solutions: DrupalCon Amsterdam, 2014

Sun, 05/10/2014 - 11:43

Come to think of it, I almost decided not to go to the RAI in the morning! All the official sessions are over since thursday and yesterday there was only ‘codesprinting’ left. This is where you can help contributing to the Drupal community in an informal setting with other Drupal users.

Since I’d never taken part before I was wondering what I could possibly add, next to the most imposing names always circulating on drupal.org, that were also present at DrupalCon. But when I heard all my colleagues were going also (except for our hardworking guards left at the office) I couldn’t let them down of course and stay behind. 

De last few days were (visually) exhausting and it cost me great effort to step out of bed and pack myself together to get started.

In the RAI they were buzzing already! When I tried spotting someone I’d know, I was helped by the so-called ‘Mentors’ (which Marc and Bart were also part of!) and they were trying to give me helping hand.

The new Drupal 8-beta release was freshly installed and intact, waiting for me on my laptop, to be tackled. And since I had nothing else to do I thought: ‘let me try some exercises to find out how it works’.

The first thing that immediately struck me was that I sometimes could and sometimes could not navigate to the homepage. I found that noteworthy and it also felt inconsistent. Each time I was intuitively hovering in the upper left corner of my screen trying to find a home link.

Well let me see what was causing the problem? I found out that when you opened a new tab and surfed directly to an admin page the home link didn’t show up.

Strange! Would this already have been discussed? I could hardly imagine I would be the first one to complain. Quick: let’s see if the ‘issue cue’ could clarify. No! It wasn’t mentioned before!

And so, after only five minutes of work, I found a job that kept me busy all day. Marc explained to me how I should handle this and introduced me to the right people. First I had to create an issue, I had to define the problem, and suggest a solution. It wasn’t real rocket science by the way: it only cost me three lines of code, but to get them reviewed and accepted by the right maintainers was a whole other story… well let me spare you, I won’t go into detail. The good news is: at the end of the day I stood there, shining happily ever after, next to my colleague Daniël, and suddenly we were just ‘Core Contributors’! Everyone was applauding, we were filmed and a live commit of the patches we created was done by ‘Webchick’.

Also Patrick, my other colleague had discovered a bug en managed to get this reviewed, fixed and committed the same day.

So only one day of codesprinting on DrupalCon had passed, but Triquanta gained three new Core contributors: Well done!

And I haven’t yet mentioned the important work that has been done by Jur (on Facet API) and my colleague Elibert who discovered a bug in CKEditor.

As I said before: this DrupalCon was the best ever. For example, I enjoyed so much the visit to photomuseum FOAM where Drupalists could get in for free on Wednesday night, during the ‘cultural evening’ which I also helped organizing. And the musical event subsequently in café the Prael, where Peter en Jur gave a great concert was every bit as successful. Thursday night I was invited by the Drupal association to have dinner with the other volunteers and afterwards I took part in a very funny group to answer the most hilarious questions at the big Trivia night in café Panama.

Next year DrupalCon will be held in Barcelona. Whilst everyone wants to go there, this might turn into a huge battle! At least I know where to focus: I will, if necessary use my newly acquired status as a Drupal contributor to win this game!

Categories: Elsewhere

Victor Kane: Historic DrupalCon Amsterdam 2014 - Let the Debates Begin - Part I

Sat, 04/10/2014 - 23:29

I really think that a debate needs to continue around Keynote: Dries Buytaert for the purpose of understanding the forces at work competing for the future of Drupal and indeed all open source projects. Leaving to one side without comment the really weird Dries doppelganger designed somehow to elevate the image of one of the sponsors, it was indeed saluted by many as being very special. A glance at the tweets feed for the keynote, for example, (or this one) were by and large ecstatic, and many interpreted the talk as exceedingly progressive. "The power of the people"... #digitaldisruption... "This is @Dries most socialist #Driesnote ever." "Applause even in the overflow room..." "Most relevant and interesting #DriesNote in a long time. Well done..." "Exciting. The best Dries keynote ever."

read more

Categories: Elsewhere

Triquanta Web Solutions: From Rookie to Drupal core contributor in one day

Sat, 04/10/2014 - 14:25

Picture: Thomas Ricker

A thick fog had settled in Amsterdam. Moist was gathering in my beard and a nice drupal was forming. I had a clear goal in mind and a blurry world around me. As a tourist in my own country I biked among thousands of spoked wheels. I passed hipster parents with children in carts throwing clouds at each other. And soon the Amsterdam RAI showed up. My first community sprint was about to start.

It was the last day of Drupalcon and we had built up a routine. And as one of the human beings we are, I picked the wrong building. Luckily one of the mentors (our own @marcvangend) was helpful enough to show me the way. I entered the building early in the morning and a wall of orange shirts greeted me, a full fledged team of volunteer mentors in the colors of our beautiful hosting country. Armed with name tags, stickers, sprint task cards, a lot of energy and patience they were fully equipped to guide us rookies through the day.

So, what am I? According to the relatively new system of sprint task cards (pdf) I could be an Explorer, Community Contributor, Issue Mover, Developer or Mentor. Since I already had Drupal 8 installed, and played with it during, for example, the Drupal 8 Multilingual Hands-on of @gaborhojtsy and Aimee Degnan, I was up to some community contributing.

Sprint stickers

We, the mentored, were seated upstairs while the more experienced once worked more focussed in teams on certain projects at ground level. During the day some of us would descend for some specialized guidance. But first we had to set our teeth in "something". The theme of the day was: get "something" done and get ready to teach others. So, if you didn't know what to do, you where presented an issue to work on or you could search for an issue tagged "novice".

Among the tasks we undertook where: testing and reviewing patches, making screenshots (so helpful, as Angie would show later) or creating a solution on your own. Wait, no, not on your own. You weren't seated alone and the mentors were all over the place to step in at your earliest convenience.

In my case I wanted to see if a core 7 bug I had found earlier was present in 8. So I set out to create a little module for my scenario. But, where to start, which files are needed and how do I name them? Jesus Manuel Olivas @jmolivas and Larry Garfield (@crell) to the rescue, with respectively the nice console module to generate D8 modules from the CLI and the session recording of the Drupal 8 Crash Course.

Ok, ready to test some hook_form_alter. Result: failure one. It's so simple, but why doesn't it work? Mentor @BartFeenstra to the rescue: it seems you checked out branch 8.x instead of 8.0.x, d'oh stupid me. Luckily, after some testing the D7 bug seemed to be gone in D8. However, during my testing I found another new problem.

Because drupal.org was under such a pressure and the issue search didn't really work any more, I descended the stairs in search of a core fields maintainer with the simple question: is this a bug and is there an issue for this problem? And it was a bug, empty multiple field items should be deleted after a node search, and there was no issue for it. Using the dreditor, a nice browser helper plugin for people working in the issue queue I was able to create my issue in no-time.

In the meantime upstairs the temperature had risen while the ground floor was still comfortable cool, outside it had become a nice early autumn day (meteorologic speaking), and my table neighbour and colleague, Valerie Valkenburg Gibson (@valvalg), had created her first core issue and patch.

Since it apparently isn't allowed to get a patch in core without at least 20 comments and multiple people working at it I was offered the opportunity to help improving the patch. So mentored by @marcvangend and Théodore Biadala (@nod_) I checked if the patch was confirm the coding standards and got rid of some duplicate functionality. Next I did some finger exercises and create a diff, another diff of two diffs, uploaded the new diff and interdiff and licked my chupachup. Then it was time to go to the live core commit session hosted by Angie (@webchick).

Everybody gathered in front of the big screen while the necessary group pictures where taken and we waited in anticipation. Then Angie showed us how a core committer reviews, tests and finally commits. She even almost mistakenly used branch 8.x instead of 8.0.x, but was quickly corrected by the crowd. And I didn’t feel so stupid anymore.
Finally, as the closure of the day, we were treated with two live commits and, like my collegue Gerben Spil (@gerbenspil) always says: there was much rejoicing!

Picture: Patrick van Efferen

Of course so much more happened, there were fun, food, facts and many friends.

And by the way: can I have my new sticker now?


Daniël Smidt (@dmsmidt)

Categories: Elsewhere

Pages