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Ian Wienand: rstdiary

4 hours 13 min ago

I find it very useful to spend 5 minutes a day to keep a small log of what was worked on, major bugs or reviews and a general small status report. It makes rolling up into a bigger status report easier when required, or handy as a reference before you go into meetings etc.

I was happily using an etherpad page until I couldn't save any more revisions and the page got too long and started giving javascript timeouts. For a replacement I wanted a single file as input with no boilerplate to aid in back-referencing and adding entries quickly. It should be formatted to be future-proof, as well as being emacs, makefile and git friendly. Output should be web-based so I can refer to it easily and point people at it when required, but it just has to be rsynced to public_html with zero setup.

rstdiary will take a flat RST based input file and chunk it into some reasonable looking static-HTML that looks something like this. It's split by month with some minimal navigation. Copy the output directory somewhere and it is done.

It might also serve as a small example of parsing and converting RST nodes where it does the chunking; unfortunately the official documentation on that is "to be completed" and I couldn't find anything like a canonical example, so I gathered what I could from looking at the source of the transformation stuff. As the license says, the software is provided "as is" without warranty!

So if you've been thinking "I should keep a short daily journal in a flat-file and publish it to a web-server but I can't find any software to do just that" you now have one less excuse.

Categories: Elsewhere

Niels Thykier: Volume of debian-release mailing list

Thu, 27/11/2014 - 22:38

Page 1 of 5

To be honest, I do not know how many mails it shows “per page” (though I assume it is a fixed number).  So for comparison, I found the month on debian-devel@l.d.o with the  highest volume in the past two years:  May 2013 with “Page 1 of 4“.

I hope you will please forgive us, if we are a bit terse in our replies or slow to reply.  We simply got a lot to deal with.  :)

 


Categories: Elsewhere

Stefano Zacchiroli: CTTE nomination

Thu, 27/11/2014 - 21:43

Apparently, enough fellow developers have been foolish enough to nominate me as a prospective member of the Debian Technical Committee (CTTE), that I've been approached to formally accept/decline the nomination. (Accepted nominees would then go through a selection process and possibly proposed to the DPL for nomination.)

I'm honored by the nominations and I thank the fellow developers that have thrown my name in the hat. But I've respectfully declined the nomination. Given my current involvement in an ongoing attempt to introduce a maximum term limit for CTTE membership, it would have been highly inappropriate for me to accept the nomination at this time.

I have no doubt that the current CTTE and the DPL will fill the empty seats with worthy project members.

Categories: Elsewhere

Jonathan Dowland: PGP transition statement

Thu, 27/11/2014 - 14:48
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA512,SHA1

I'm transitioning from my old, 1024-bit DSA PGP key, FD35 0B0A C6DD 5D91 DB7A 83D1 168B 4E71 7032 F238, to my newer, 4096-bit RSA key, E037 CB2A 1A00 61B9 4336 3C8B 0907 4096 06AA AAAA.

If you have signed my old key, I'd be very grateful if you would consider signing my new key. (Thanks in advance!)

This is long overdue! I've had 06AAAAAA since 2009, but it took me a while to get enough signatures on it for me to consider a transition. I still have far more signatures on my older key, owing to attending more conferences when I was using it than since I switched.

This statement, available in plaintext at http://jmtd.net/log/pgp_transition/statement.txt, has been signed with both keys.

I've marked my old key as expiring in around 72 days time, which coincides with my change of job, and will be just short of ten years since I generated it.

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: GnuPG/MacGPG2 v2.0.22 (Darwin) iQIcBAEBCgAGBQJUdysuAAoJEAkHQJYGqqqquQ0QALVGcn9Wbasg0oh8JeE8rN7h k7FeZjmGk+ZwfXwo4Eq4pjxKp+TN+r4xBCFSHDRmMaAm9q7aWF/RqkdNiEtioQfJ SmfzLsoEnSBmS9dr1LvAoxIlUzs/9Lt8EY2tB4NQne3QIu3VyRBjQDvqff6KJgkV 849+GsrJezkg/2VFZkZp1N9y0YwrmezV/1j0N6zR8Y20LlF4YuD3egUJYvbrQ1pA krJwhiHskXRinqviYMg4CuTZZ3m2wc4fM6uiY5t9taqK90KFgmg73KvW6Rx2L+XP BUzTlSYHnK+qI23Cng//DthFww2Wf9RofkfRgXk0zAe4+DcoMZzALKtZQA6GrT46 wzsmu459p5nUwwa6BzUvqBzyVtzbtHN5xaFwbjHCPlemsFlH/8LHackJLsBvr2Gp q292huYu/HNo+Q6OIslFX6rc5AR3HKdbU2DxYMPAfI+CEtW1XwetK8ADSZc1v54C +sc+Yb2kAleLX2xMIfS9JqvcKOP2Gbo7nTdRPnS2jZRWOv8JxVfFiSzHVODtlLfk AmRvms5rQ2nPnB21yOd+DP2sACVKY0MS7/UwMh2hoQLR/bSu/jRh24n3WHDfQWtF Jp4AD80ABFV2t/pSP1L70HlxwPmOzra8AVzCdXMOT/SdT387rSM9fvue4FY5goT+ /pResJSl9pAbBCtjOFJoiEYEARECAAYFAlR3Ky4ACgkQFotOcXAy8jiLawCgofsp ggze/iSpfkyeL0vhXi6N/WMAoLQogFQY+VaQrVP3lGl1VVh4jw0W =JBA4 -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
Categories: Elsewhere

Keith Packard: Black Friday 2014

Thu, 27/11/2014 - 08:47
Altus Metrum's 2014 Black Friday Event

BLACK FOREST, Colorado USA

Altus Metrum announces two special offers for "Black Friday" 2014.

We are pleased to announce that both TeleMetrum and TeleMega will be back in stock and available for shipment before the end of November. To celebrate this, any purchase of a TeleMetrum, TeleMega, or EasyMega board will include, free of charge, one each of our 160, 400, and 850 mAh Polymer Lithium Ion batteries and a free micro USB cable!

To celebrate NAR's addition of our 1.9 gram recording altimeter, MicroPeak, to the list of devices approved for use in contests and records, and help everyone get ready for NARAM 2015's altitude events, purchase 4 MicroPeak boards and we'll throw in a MicroPeak USB adapter for free!

These deals will be available from 00:00 Friday, 28 November 2014 through 23:59 Monday, 1 December, 2014. Only direct sales through our web store at http://shop.gag.com are included; no other discounts apply.

Find more information on all Altus Metrum products at http://altusmetrum.org.

Thank you for your continued support of Altus Metrum in 2014. We continue to work on more cool new products, and look forward to meeting many of you on various flight lines in 2015!

Categories: Elsewhere

Pau Garcia i Quiles: Reminder: Desktops DevRoom @ FOSDEM 2015

Thu, 27/11/2014 - 01:14

We are less than 10 days away from the deadline for the Desktops DevRoom at FOSDEM 2015, the largest Free and Open Source event in Europe.

Do you think you can fill a room with 200+ people out of 6,000+ geeks? Prove it!

Check the Call for Talks for details on how to submit your talk proposal about anything related to the desktop:

  • Development
  • Deployment
  • Community
  • SCM
  • Software distribution / package managers
  • Why a particular default desktop on a prominent Linux distribution
  • etc

http://www.elpauer.org/2014/10/fosdem-2015-desktops-devroom-call-for-talks/

Categories: Elsewhere

Gunnar Wolf: Guests in the classroom: @Rolman talks about persistent storage and filesystems

Wed, 26/11/2014 - 16:49

On November 14, as a great way to say goodbye to a semester, a good friend came to my class again to present a topic to the group; a good way to sum up the contents of this talk is "everything you ever wondered about persistent storage".

As people who follow my blog know, I like inviting my friends to present selected topics in my Operating Systems class. Many subjects will stick better if presented by more than a single viewpoint, and different experiences will surely enrich the group's learning.

So, here is Rolando Cedillo — A full gigabyte of him, spawning two hours (including two hiccups where my camera hit a per-file limit...).

Rolando is currently a RedHat Engineer, and in his long career, he has worked from so many trenches, it would be a crime not to have him! Of course, one day we should do a low-level hardware session with him, as his passion (and deep knowledge) for 8-bit arcades is beyond any other person I have met.

So, here is the full video on my server. Alternatively, you can get it from The Internet Archive.

Categories: Elsewhere

Enrico Zini: calypso-davdroid

Wed, 26/11/2014 - 12:38
Calypso and DAVDroid

calypso and DAVdroid appeal to me. Let's try to make the whole thing work.

A self-signed SSL certificate

Generating the certificate:

$ openssl req -nodes -x509 -newkey rsa:2048 -keyout cal-key.pem -out cal-cert.pem -days 3650 [...] Country Name (2 letter code) [AU]:IT State or Province Name (full name) [Some-State]:Bologna Locality Name (eg, city) []: Organization Name (eg, company) [Internet Widgits Pty Ltd]:enricozini.org Organizational Unit Name (eg, section) []: Common Name (e.g. server FQDN or YOUR name) []:cal.enricozini.org Email Address []:postmaster@enricozini.org

Installing it on my phone:

$ openssl x509 -in cal-cert.pem -outform DER -out cal-cert.crt $ adb push cal-cert.crt /mnt/sdcard/ $ enrico --follow-instructions http://davdroid.bitfire.at/faq/entry/importing-a-certificate Installing calypso in my VPS

An updated calypso package:

$ git clone git://keithp.com/git/calypso $ git checkout debian -b enrico $ git remote add chrysn git://prometheus.amsuess.com/calypso-patches $ git fetch chrysn $ git merge chrysn/chrysn/integration $ dch -v 1.4+enrico "Merged with chrysn integration branch" $ debuild -us -uc -rfakeroot

Install the package:

# dpkg -i calypso_1.4+enrico_all.deb

Create a system user to run it:

# adduser --system --disabled-password calypso # chsh calypso # /bin/dash

Make it run at boot time (based on calypso-init from the git repo):

# cat /etc/default/calypso CALYPSO_OPTS="-d -P $PIDFILE" # diff -Nau calypso-init calypso-init.enrico --- calypso-init 2014-11-26 11:50:35.301001194 +0100 +++ calypso-init.enrico 2014-11-26 12:18:16.564138554 +0100 @@ -62,8 +62,8 @@ || return 1 mkdir -p $(dirname $PIDFILE) - chown calypso:calypso $(dirname $PIDFILE) - start-stop-daemon --start -c $NAME --quiet --pidfile $PIDFILE --exec $DAEMON -- \ + chown calypso:nogroup $(dirname $PIDFILE) + start-stop-daemon --start -c $NAME:nogroup --quiet --pidfile $PIDFILE --exec $DAEMON -- \ $CALYPSO_OPTS \ || return 2 # Add code here, if necessary, that waits for the process to be ready # cp calypso-init.enrico /etc/init.d/calypso # update-rc.d calypso defaults Setting up the database # su - calypso

Certificates and server setup:

$ mkdir .config/calypso/certs $ mv cal-key.pem .config/calypso/certs/cal.key $ mv cal-cert.pem .config/calypso/certs/cal.pem $ chmod 0600 .config/calypso/certs/* $ cat > .config/calypso/config << EOF [server] certificate=/home/calypso/.config/calypso/certs/cal.pem key=/home/calypso/.config/calypso/certs/cal.key [acl] type=htpasswd encryption=sha1 filename=/home/calypso/.config/calypso/htpasswd EOF

User passwords:

$ htpasswd -s .config/calypso/htpasswd enrico

Database initialization:

$ mkdir -p .config/calypso/calendars $ cd .config/calypso/calendars $ git init $ cat > .calypso-collection << EOF [collection] is-calendar = True is-addressbook = False displayname = Test description = Test calendar EOF $ git add .calypso-collection $ git commit --allow-empty -m'initialize new calendar' Start the server # /etc/init.d/calypso start DAVdroid configuration
  1. Add a new DAVdroid sync account
  2. Use server/username configuration
  3. For server, use https://:5233
  4. Add username and password

It should work.

Related links

http://keithp.com/blogs/calypso/ http://keithp.com/pipermail/calypso/2014-October/000052.html http://davdroid.bitfire.at/configuration#c122 https://fsfe.org/campaigns/android/liberate.en.html http://radicale.org/

Categories: Elsewhere

Charles Plessy: Browsing debian-private via SSH

Wed, 26/11/2014 - 11:35

I recently realised that one can browse the archives of debian-private via SSH. I find this a good compromise between subscription and ignorance. Here is for instance the command for November.

ssh -t master.debian.org mutt -f /home/debian/archive/debian-private/debian-private.201411
Categories: Elsewhere

Francois Marier: Hiding network disconnections using an IRC bouncer

Wed, 26/11/2014 - 11:30

A bouncer can be a useful tool if you rely on IRC for team communication and instant messaging. The most common use of such a server is to be permanently connected to IRC and to buffer messages while your client is disconnected.

However, that's not what got me interested in this tool. I'm not looking for another place where messages accumulate and wait to be processed later. I'm much happier if people email me when I'm not around.

Instead, I wanted to do to irssi what mosh did to ssh clients: transparently handle and hide temporary disconnections. Here's how I set everything up.

Server setup

The first step is to install znc:

apt-get install znc

Make sure you get the 1.0 series (in jessie or trusty, not wheezy or precise) since it has much better multi-network support.

Then, as a non-root user, generate a self-signed TLS certificate for it:

openssl req -x509 -sha256 -newkey rsa:2048 -keyout znc.pem -nodes -out znc.crt -days 365

and make sure you use something like irc.example.com as the subject name, that is the URL you will be connecting to from your IRC client.

Then install the certificate in the right place:

mkdir ~/.znc mv znc.pem ~/.znc/ cat znc.crt >> ~/.znc/znc.pem

Once that's done, you're ready to create a config file for znc using the znc --makeconf command, again as the same non-root user:

  • create separate znc users if you have separate nicks on different networks
  • use your nickserv password as the server password for each network
  • enable ssl
  • say no to the chansaver and nickserv plugins

Finally, open the IRC port (tcp port 6697 by default) in your firewall:

iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 6697 -j ACCEPT Client setup (irssi)

On the client side, the official documentation covers a number of IRC clients, but the irssi page was quite sparse.

Here's what I used for the two networks I connect to (irc.oftc.net and irc.mozilla.org):

servers = ( { address = "irc.example.com"; chatnet = "OFTC"; password = "fmarier/oftc:Passw0rd1!"; port = "6697"; use_ssl = "yes"; ssl_verify = "yes"; ssl_cafile = "~/.irssi/certs/znc.crt"; }, { address = "irc.example.com"; chatnet = "Mozilla"; password = "francois/mozilla:Passw0rd1!"; port = "6697"; use_ssl = "yes"; ssl_verify = "yes"; ssl_cafile = "~/.irssi/certs/znc.crt"; } );

Of course, you'll need to copy your znc.crt file from the server into ~/.irssi/certs/znc.crt.

Make sure that you're no longer authenticating with the nickserv from within irssi. That's znc's job now.

Wrapper scripts

So far, this is a pretty standard znc+irssi setup. What makes it work with my workflow is the wrapper script I wrote to enable znc before starting irssi and then prompt to turn it off after exiting:

#!/bin/bash ssh irc.example.com "pgrep znc || znc" irssi read -p "Terminate the bouncer? [y/N] " -n 1 -r echo if [[ $REPLY =~ ^[Yy]$ ]] then ssh irc.example.com killall -sSIGINT znc fi

Now, instead of typing irssi to start my IRC client, I use irc.

If I'm exiting irssi before commuting or because I need to reboot for a kernel update, I keep the bouncer running. At the end of the day, I say yes to killing the bouncer. That way, I don't have a backlog to go through when I wake up the next day.

Categories: Elsewhere

Sune Vuorela: QImage and QPixmap in a Qt Quick item

Tue, 25/11/2014 - 22:50

For reasons I don’t know, apparantly a Qt Quick Item that can show a QImage or a QPixmap is kind of missing. The current Image QML item only works with data that can be represented by a URL.

So I wrote one that kind of works. Comments most welcome.

It is found on git.kde.org: http://quickgit.kde.org/?p=scratch/sune/imageitem.git

Oh, and the KDE End of Year fundraiser is still running. https://www.kde.org/fundraisers/yearend2014/. Go support it if you haven’t already.

Categories: Elsewhere

Holger Levsen: 20141125-change

Tue, 25/11/2014 - 22:48
Change

Not many people adopt to fundamental changes easily, but at least people can change at all. I'm sure what looks funny now has also been a painful experience, but... - that's life. Sometimes it sucks. And suddenly...

Categories: Elsewhere

Enrico Zini: mock-webserver

Tue, 25/11/2014 - 18:22
A mock webserver to use for unit testing HTTP clients

With python -m SimpleHTTPServer it's easy to bring up an HTTP server to use to test HTTP client code, however it only supports GET requests, and I needed to test an HTTP client that needs to perform a file upload.

It took way more than I originally expected to put this together, so here it is, hopefully saving other people (including future me) some time:

#!/usr/bin/python3 import http.server import cgi import socketserver import hashlib import json PORT = 8081 class Handler(http.server.SimpleHTTPRequestHandler): def do_POST(self): info = { "method": "POST", "headers": { k: v for k, v in self.headers.items() }, } form = cgi.FieldStorage( fp=self.rfile, headers=self.headers, environ={'REQUEST_METHOD':'POST', 'CONTENT_TYPE':self.headers['Content-Type'], }) postdata = {} for k in form.keys(): if form[k].file: buf = form.getvalue(k) postdata[k] = { "type": "file", "name": form[k].filename, "size": len(buf), # json.dumps will not serialize a byte() object, so we # return the shasum instead of the file body "sha256": hashlib.sha256(buf).hexdigest(), } else: vals = form.getlist(k) if len(vals) == 1: postdata[k] = { "type": "field", "val": vals[0], } else: postdata[k] = { "type": "multifield", "vals": vals, } info["postdata"] = postdata resbody = json.dumps(info, indent=1) print(resbody) resbody = resbody.encode("utf-8") self.send_response(200) self.send_header("Content-type", "application/json") self.send_header("Content-Length", str(len(resbody))) self.end_headers() self.wfile.write(resbody) class TCPServer(socketserver.TCPServer): # Allow to restart the mock server without needing to wait for the socket # to end TIME_WAIT: we only listen locally, and we may restart often in # some workflows allow_reuse_address = True httpd = TCPServer(("", PORT), Handler) print("serving at port", PORT) httpd.serve_forever()
Categories: Elsewhere

Thorsten Glaser: d-i preseeding is not the answer

Tue, 25/11/2014 - 18:00

This post details what the d-i team currently shows as the only way.

It has several shortcomings and one missing documentation part.

Shortcoming: --purge is missing from the apt-get invocation. This leaves packages in “rc” state (requiring a manual dpkg --purge to completely remove them later, as they are then invisible to apt).

Worse shortcoming: this still leaves all dependencies pulled in by systemd around on the system, because packages installed by debootstrap are not eligible for “apt-get --purge autoremove”. Additionally, it does not influence debootstrap’s (nōn-existent, see #557322, #668001, #768062) dependency resolver, leading to possibly pessimistic package selections.

Missing: you can just hit Alt-F2 and enter the command…

in-target apt-get --purge -y install sysvinit-core

… there, no need to preseed. But this does not eliminate the aforementioned shortcomings, of course.

Categories: Elsewhere

Scott Kitterman: On being excellent to each other

Tue, 25/11/2014 - 17:47

There has been a lot of discussion recently where there is strong disagreement, even about how to discuss the disagreement. Here’s a few thoughts on the matter.

The thing I personally find the most annoying is when someone thinks what someone else says is inappropriate and says so, it seems like the inevitable response is to scream censorship. When people do that, I’m pretty sure they don’t know what the word censorship actually means. Debian/Ubuntu/Insert Project Name Here resources are not public spaces and no government is telling people what they can and can’t say.

When you engage in speech and people respond to that speech, even if you don’t feel all warm and fuzzy after reading the response, it’s not censorship. It’s called discussion.

When someone calls out speech that they think is inappropriate, the proper response is not to blame a Code of Conduct or some other set of rules. Projects that have a code, also have a process for dealing with claims the code has been violated. Unless someone invokes that process (which almost never happens), the code is irrelevant. What’s relevant is that someone is having a problem with what or how you are saying something and are in some way hurt by it.

Let’s focus on that. The rules are irrelevant, what matters is working together in a collegial way. I really don’t think project members actively want other project members to feel bad/unsafe, but it’s hard to get outside ones own defensive reaction to being called out. So please pay less attention to how you’re feeling about things and try to see things from the other side. If we can all do a bit more of that, then things can be better for all of us.

Final note: If you’ve gotten this far and thought “Oh, that other person is doing this to me”, I have news for you – it’s not just them.

Categories: Elsewhere

Chris Lamb: Validating Django model attribute assignment

Tue, 25/11/2014 - 15:54

Ever done the following?

>>> user = User.objects.get(pk=102) >>> user.superuser = True >>> user.save() # Argh, why is this user now not a superuser...

Here's a dirty hack to validate these:

import sys from django.db import models from django.conf import settings FIELDS = {} EXCEPTIONS = { 'auth.User': ('backend',), } def setattr_validate(self, name, value): super(models.Model, self).__setattr__(name, value) # Real field names cannot start with underscores if name.startswith('_'): return # Magic if name == 'pk': return k = '%s.%s' % (self._meta.app_label, self._meta.object_name) try: fields = FIELDS[k] except KeyError: fields = FIELDS[k] = set( getattr(x, y) for x in self._meta.fields for y in ('attname', 'name') ) # Field is in allowed list if name in fields: return # Field is in known exceptions if name in EXCEPTIONS.get(k, ()): return # Always allow Django internals to set values (eg. aggregates) if 'django/db/models' in sys._getframe().f_back.f_code.co_filename: return raise ValueError( "Refusing to set unknown attribute '%s' on %s instance. " "(Did you misspell %s?)" % (name, k, ', '.join(fields)) ) # Let's assume we have good test coverage if settings.DEBUG: models.Model.__setattr__ = setattr_validate

Now:

>>> user = User.objects.get(pk=102) >>> user.superuser = True ... ValueError: Refusing to set unknown attribute 'superuser' on auth.User instance. (Did you misspell 'username', 'first_name', 'last_name', 'is_active', 'email', 'is_superuser', 'is_staff', 'last_login', 'password', 'id', 'date_joined')

(Django can be a little schizophrenic on this — Model.save()'s update_fields keyword argument validates its fields, as does prefetch_related, but it's taking select_related a little while to land.)

Categories: Elsewhere

Dirk Eddelbuettel: Rcpp now used by 300 CRAN packages

Tue, 25/11/2014 - 13:14

This morning, Rcpp reached another round milestone: 300 packages on CRAN now depend on it (as measured by Depends, Imports and LinkingTo declarations). The graph is on the left depicts the growth of Rcpp usage over time. There are 41 more on BioConductor (which is not included in the chart).

The first and less detailed part uses manually save entries, the second half of the data set was generated semi-automatically via a short script appending updates to a small file-based backend. A list of user package is kept on this page.

Also displayed in the graph is the relative proportion of CRAN packages using Rcpp. The four per-cent hurdle was cleared just before useR! 2014 where I showed a similar graph (as two distinct graphs) in my invited talk. We may well hit five per-cent before the end of the year.

300 is a pretty humbling and staggering number. Also interesting that we we cleared 200 only at the end of April, and 250 in early August.

So from everybody behind Rcpp, a heartfelt Thank You! to all the users and of course other contributors.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Categories: Elsewhere

DebConf team: DebConf14 final report (Posted by Uli Scholler, and the DebConf Team)

Tue, 25/11/2014 - 09:48

The Final Report for DebConf14 is complete and the DebConf team proudly presents it to the world.

DebConf14, which was held in Portland, Oregon, USA, in August 2014, was a big success. Our final report captures the essence of this year’s conference in pictures and words:

  • talks and how we selected them
  • face-to-face meetings and their effect on building trust
  • events such as the day trip or the infamous cheese & wine party
  • the university venue
  • a selection of attendee’s impressions

And of course there are numbers, budget, and statistics.

Read, enjoy, and share!

The DebConf team

Categories: Elsewhere

Erich Schubert: Installing Debian with sysvinit

Tue, 25/11/2014 - 09:24
First let me note that I am using systemd, so these things here are untested by me. See e.g. Petter's and Simon's blog entries on the same overall topic. According to the Debian installer maintainers, the only accepted way to install Debian with sysvinit is to use preseeding. This can either be done at the installer boot prompt by manually typing the magic spell: preseed/late_command="in-target apt-get install -y sysvinit-core" or by using a preseeding file (which is a really nice feature I used for installing my Hadoop nodes) to do the same: d-i preseed/late_command string in-target apt-get install -y sysvinit-core If you are a sysadmin, using preseeding can save you a lot of typing. Put all your desired configuration into preseeding files, put them on a webserver (best with a short name resolvable by local DNS). Let's assume you have set up the DNS name d-i.example.com, and your DHCP is configured such that example.com is on the DNS search list. You can also add a vendor extension to DHCP to serve a full URL. Manually enabling preseeding then means adding auto url=d-i to the installer boot command line (d-i is the hostname I suggested to set up in your DNS before, and the full URL would then be http://d-i.example.com/d-i/jessie/./preseed.cfg. Preseeding is well documented in Appendix B of the installer manual, but nevertheless will require a number of iterations to get everything work as desired for a fully automatic install like I used for my Hadoop nodes. There might be an easier option.
I have filed a wishlist bug suggesting to use the tasksel mechanism to allow the user to choose sysvinit at installation time. However, it got turned down by the Debian installer maintainers quire rudely in a "No." - essentially this is a "shut the f... up and go away", which is in my opinion an inappropriate to discard a reasonable user wishlist request. Since I don't intend to use sysvinit anymore, I will not be pursuing this option further. It is, as far as I can tell, still untested. If it works, it might be the least-effort, least-invasive option to allow the installation of sysvinit Jessie (except for above command line magic). If you have interest in sysvinit, you (because I don't use sysvinit) should now test if this approach works.
  1. Get the patch proposed to add a task-sysvinit package.
  2. Build an installer CD with this tasksel (maybe this documentation is helpful for this step).
  3. Test whether the patch works. Report results to above bug report, so that others interested in sysvinit can find them easily.
  4. Find and fix bugs if it didn't work. Repeat.
  5. Publish the modified ("forked") installer, and get user feedback.
If you are then still up for a fight, you can try to convince the maintainers (or go the nasty way, and ask the CTTE for their opinion, to start another flamewar and make more maintainers give up) that this option should be added to the mainline installer. And hurry up, or you may at best get this into Jessie reloaded, 8.1. - chance are that the release manager will not accept such patches this late anymore. The sysvinit supporters should have investigated this option much, much earlier instead of losing time on the GR. Again, I won't be doing this job for you. I'm happy with systemd. But patches and proof-of-concept is what makes open source work, not GRs and MikeeUSA's crap videos spammed to the LKML... (And yes, I am quite annoyed by the way the Debian installer maintainers handled the bug report. This is not how open-source collaboration is supposed to work. I tried to file a proper wishlist bug reporting, suggesting a solution that I could not find discussed anywhere before and got back just this "No. Shut up." answer. I'm not sure if I will be reporting a bug in debian-installer ever again, if this is the way they handle bug reports ...) I do care about our users, though. If you look at popcon "vote" results, we have 4179 votes for sysvinit-core and 16918 votes for systemd-sysv (graph) indicating that of those already testing jessie and beyond - neglecting 65 upstart votes, and assuming that there is no bias to not-upgrade if you prefer sysvinit - about 20% appear to prefer sysvinit (in fact, they may even have manually switched back to sysvinit after being upgraded to systemd unintentionally?). These are users that we should listen to, and that we should consider adding an installer option for, too.
Categories: Elsewhere

Gunnar Wolf: 10 PRINT CHR$(205.5+RND(1)); : GOTO 10 (also known as #10print )

Tue, 25/11/2014 - 06:41

The line of BASIC code that appears as the subject for this post is the title for a book I just finished reading — And enjoyed thoroughly. The book is available online for download under a CC-BY-NC-SA 3.0 License, so you can take a good look at it before (or instead of) buying it. Although it's among the books I will enjoy having on my shelf; the printing is of a very enjoyable good quality.

And what is this book about? Well, of course, it analizes that very simple line of code, as it ran on the Commodore 64 thirty years ago.

And the analysis is made from every possible angle: What do mazes mean in culture? What have they meant in cultures through history? What about regularity in art (mainly 20th century art)? How would this code look (or how it would be adapted) on contemporary non-C64 computers? And in other languages more popular today? What does randomness mean? And what does random() mean? What is BASIC, and how it came to the C64? What is the C64, and where did it come from? And several other beautiful chapters.

The book was collaboratively written by ten different authors, in a Wiki-like fashion. And... Well, what else is there to say? I enjoyed so much reading through long chapters of my childhood, of what attracted me to computers, of my cultural traits and values... I really hope that, in due time, I can be a part of such a beautiful project!

Categories: Elsewhere

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