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Olivier Grégoire: Conclusion Google Summer of Code 2016

Fri, 19/08/2016 - 14:57

SmartInfo project with Debian

1. Me

Before getting into the thick of my project, let me present myself:
I am Olivier Grégoire (Gasuleg), and I study IT engineering at École de Technologie supérieure in Montreal.
I am an technician in electronics, and I began object-oriented programming just last year.
I applied to GSoC because I loved the concept of the project that I would work on and I really wanted to be part of it. I also wanted to discover the word of the free software.

2. My Project

During this GSoC, I worked on the Ring project.

“Ring is a free software for communication that allows its users to make audio or video calls, in pairs or groups, and to send messages, safely and freely, in confidence.

Savoir-faire Linux and a community of contributors worldwide develop Ring. It is available on GNU/Linux, Windows, Mac OSX and Android. It can be associated with a conventional phone service or integrated with any connected object.

Under this very easy to use software, there is a combination of technologies and innovations opening all kinds of perspectives to its users and developers.

Ring is a free software whose code is open. Therefore, it is not the software that controls you.

With Ring, you take control of your communication!

Ring is an open source software under the GPL v3 license. Everyone can verify the codes and propose new ones to improve the software’s performace. It is a guarantee of transparency and freedom for everyone!”
Source: ring.cx

The problem is about the typical user of Ring, the one who don’t use the terminal to launch Ring. He has no information about what has happened in the system. My goal is to create a tool that display statistics of Ring.

3. Quick Explanation of What My Program Can Do

The Code

Here are the links to the code I was working on all throughout the Google Summer of Code (You can see what I have done after the GSoC by clicking on the newest patchs):

Patch Status Daemon On Review Lib Ring Client (LRC) On Review Gnome client On review Remove unused code   Merged

!!!!!CHANGE LINK TO PUT THE LATEST PATCHES BEFORE THE END OF GSOC!!!!!

What Can Be Displayed?
This is the final list of information I can display and some ideas on what information we could display in the future:

Information     Details Done? Call ID The identification number of the call Yes Resolution Local and remote Yes Framerate Local and remote Yes Codec Audio and video in local and remote     Yes Bandwidth Download and upload No Performance use CPU, GPU, RAM No Security level In SIP call No Connection time   No Packets lost   No


To launch it you need to right click on the call and click on “Show advanced information”.

To stop it, same thing: right click on the call and click on “Hide advanced information”.

4. More Details About My Project

My program needs to retrieve information from the daemon (LibRing) and then display it in gnome client. So, I needed to create a patch for the daemon, the D-Bus layer (in the daemon patch), LibRingClient and the GNU/Linux (Gnome) client.

This is what the architecture of the project looks like.

source: ring.cx

And this is how I implemented my project.

5. Future of the Project

  • Gather more information, such as bandwidth, resource consumption, security level, connection time, number of packets lost and anything else that could be deemed interesting
  • Display information for every participant in a conference call. I began to implement it for the daemon on patch set 25 .

6. Thanks

I would like to thank the following:
- The Google Summer of Code organisation, for this wonderful experience.
- Debian, for accepting my project proposal and letting me embark on this fantastic adventure.
- My mentor, Mr Guillaume Roguez, and all his team, for being there to help me.

Categories: Elsewhere

Norbert Preining: Debian/TeX Live 2016.20160819-1

Fri, 19/08/2016 - 12:43

A new – and unplanned – release in quick succession. I have uploaded testing packages to experimental which incorporate tex4ht into the TeX Live packages, but somehow the tex4ht transitional updated slipped into sid, and made many packages uninstallable. Well, so after a bit more testing let’s ship the beast to sid, meaning that tex4ht will finally updated from the last 2009 version to what is the current status in TeX Live.

From the list of new packages I want to pick out the group of phf* packages that seem from a quick reading over the package documentations as very interesting.

But most important is the incorporation of tex4ht into the TeX Live packages, so please report bugs and shortcomings to the BTS. Thanks.

New packages

aurl, bxjalipsum, cormorantgaramond, notespages, phffullpagefigure, phfnote, phfparen, phfqit, phfquotetext, phfsvnwatermark, phfthm, table-fct, tocdata.

Updated packages

acmart, acro, biblatex-abnt, biblatex-publist, bxdpx-beamer, bxjscls, bxnewfont, bxpdfver, dccpaper, etex-pkg, europasscv, exsheets, glossaries-extra, graphics-def, graphics-pln, guitarchordschemes, ijsra, kpathsea, latexpand, latex-veryshortguide, ledmac, libertinust1math, markdown, mcf2graph, menukeys, mfirstuc, mhchem, mweights, newpx, newtx, optidef, paralist, parnotes, pdflatexpicscale, pgfplots, philosophersimprint, pstricks-add, showexpl, tasks, tetex, tex4ht, texlive-docindex, udesoftec, xcolor-solarized.

Categories: Elsewhere

Guido Günther: Foreman's Ansible integration

Fri, 19/08/2016 - 11:16

Gathering from some recent discussions it seems to be not that well known that Foreman (a lifecycle tool for your virtual machines) does not only integrate well with Puppet but also with ansible. This is a list of tools I find useful in this regard:

  • The ansible-module-foreman ansible module allows you to setup all kinds of resources like images, compute resources, hostgroups, subnets, domains within Foreman itself via ansible using Foreman's REST API. E.g. creating a hostgroup looks like:

    - foreman_hostgroup: name: AHostGroup architecture: x86_64 domain: a.domain.example.com foreman_host: "{{ foreman_host }}" foreman_user: "{{ foreman_user }}" foreman_pass: "{{ foreman_pw }}"
  • The foreman_ansible plugin for Foreman allows you to collect reports and facts from ansible provisioned hosts. This requires an additional hook in your ansible config like:

    [defaults] callback_plugins = path/to/foreman_ansible/extras/

    The hook will report to Foreman back after a playbook finished.

  • There are several options for creating hosts in Foreman via the ansible API. I'm currently using ansible_foreman_module tailored for image based installs. This looks in a playbook like:

    - name: Build 10 hosts foremanhost: name: "{{ item }}" hostgroup: "a/host/group" compute_resource: "hopefully_not_esx" subnet: "webservernet" environment: "{{ env|default(omit) }}" ipv4addr: {{ from_ipam|default(omit) }}" # Additional params to tag on the host params: app: varnish tier: web color: green api_user: "{{ foreman_user }}" api_password: "{{ foreman_pw }}" api_url: "{{ foreman_url }}" with_sequence: start=1 end=10 format="newhost%02d"
  • The foreman_ansible_inventory is a dynamic inventory script for ansible that fetches all your hosts and groups via the Foreman REST APIs. It automatically groups hosts in ansible from Foreman's hostgroups, environments, organizations and locations and allows you to build additional groups based on any available host parameter (and combinations thereof). So using the above example and this configuration:

    [ansible] group_patterns = ["{app}-{tier}", "{color}"]

    it would build the additional ansible groups varnish-web, green and put the above hosts into them. This way you can easily select the hosts for e.g. blue green deployments. You don't have to pass the parameters during host creation, if you have parameters on e.g. domains or hostgroups these are available too for grouping via group_patterns.

  • If you're grouping your hosts via the above inventory script and you use lots of parameters than having these displayed in the detail page can be useful. You can use the foreman_params_tab plugin for that.

There's also support for triggering ansible runs from within Foreman itself but I've not used that so far.

Categories: Elsewhere

Michal Čihař: Wammu 0.42

Fri, 19/08/2016 - 06:00

Yesterday, I've released Wammu 0.42. There are no major updates, more likely it's usual localization and minor bugfixes release.

As usual up to date packages are now available in Debian sid, Gammu PPA for Ubuntu or openSUSE buildservice for various RPM based distros.

Want to support further Wammu development? Check our donation options or support Gammu team on BountySource Salt.

Filed under: Debian English Gammu | 0 comments

Categories: Elsewhere

Eriberto Mota: Debian: GnuPG 2, chroot and debsign

Fri, 19/08/2016 - 03:38

Since GPG 2 was set as default for Debian (Sid, August 2016), an error message appeared inside jails triggered by chroot, when using debuild/debsign commands:

clearsign failed: Inappropriate ioctl for device

The problem is that GPG 2 uses a dialog window to ask for a passphrase. This dialog window needs a tty (from /dev/pts/ directory). To solve the problem, you can use the following command (inside the jail):

# mount devpts -t devpts /dev/pts

Alternatively, you can add to /etc/fstab file in jail:

devpts /dev/pts devpts defaults 0 0

and use the command:

# mount /dev/pts

Enjoy!

Categories: Elsewhere

Zlatan Todorić: Defcon24

Fri, 19/08/2016 - 03:15

I went to Defcon24 as Purism representative. It was (as usual) held in Las Vegas, the city of sin. In the same module as with DebConf, here we go with good, bad and ugly.

Good

Badges are really cool. You can find good hackers here and there (but very small number compared to total number). Some talks are good and workshop + village idea looks good (although I didn't manage to attend any workshop as there was place for 1100 and there were 22000 attendees). The movie night idea is cool and Arcade space (where you can play old arcade games, relax and hack and also listen to some cool music) is really lovely. Also you have a camp/village for kids learning things such as electronics, soldering etc but you need to pay attention that they don't see too much of twisted folks that also gather on this con. And that's it. Oh, yea, Dark Tangent appears actually to be cool dude.

Bad

One does not simply hold a so-called hacker conference in Las Vegas. Having a conference inside hotel/casino where you mix with gamblers and casino workes (for good or for bad) is simply not in hacker spirit and certainly brings all kind of people to the same place. Also, there were simply not enough space for 22000 Defcon attendees, and you don't get proud of having on average ONLY 40min lines. You get proud if you don't have lines! Organization is not the strongest part of Defcon.

Huge majority of attendees are not hackers. They are script kiddies, hacker wannabes, comic con people, few totally lost souls etc etc. That simply brings the quality of a conference down. Yes it is cool to have mix of many diverse people but not for the sake of just having people.

Ugly

They lack Code of Conduct (everyone knows I am not in favor of any writens rules how people should behave but after Defcon I clearly see need for it). Actually, tbh, they do have it but no one gives a damn about it. And you should report to Goons, more about them below. Sexism is huge here. I remember and hear about stories of sexual harassment in IT industry, but Debian somehow mitigated that before me entering its domains, so I never experienced it. The sheer number of sexist behavior on Defcon is tremendous. It appears to me that those people had lonely childhood and now they act as a spoiled 6 year old: they're spoiled, they need to yell to show their point, they have low and stupid sexist jokes and they simply think that is cool.

Majority of Goons (their coordinators or whatever) are simply idiots. I don't know do they feel they have some superpowers, or are drunk or just stupid but yelling on people, throwing low jokes on people, more yelling, cursing all the time, more yelling - simply doesn't work for me. So now you can see the irony of CoC on Defcon. They even like to say, hey we are old farts, let us our con be as we want it to be. So no real diversity there. Either it is their way, and god forsaken if you try to change something for better and make them stop cursing or throwing sexist jokes ("squeeze, people. together, touch each other, trust me it will feel good"), or highway.

Also it appears that to huge number of vocal people, word "fuck" has some fetish meaning. Either it needs to show how "fucking awesome this con or they are" or to "fucking tell few things about random fucking stuff". Thank you, but no thank you.

So what did I do during con. I attended few talks, had some discussion with people, went to one party (great DJs, again people doing stupid things, like breaking invertory to name just one of them) and had so much time (read "I was bored") that I bought domain, brough up server on which I configured nginx and cp'ed this blog to blog.zlatan.tech (yes, recently I added letsencrypt because it is, let me be in Defcon mood, FUCKING AWESOME GRRR UGH) and now I even made .onion domain for it. What can boredom do to people, right?

So the ultimate question is - would I go again to Defcon. I am strongly leaning to no, but in my nature is to give second chance and now I have more experience (and I also have thick skin so I guess I can play calm for one more round).

Categories: Elsewhere

Simon Désaulniers: [GSOC] Week 10&11&12 Report

Thu, 18/08/2016 - 17:09
Week 10 & 11

During these two weeks, I’ve worked hard on paginating values on the DHT.

Value pagination

As explained on my post on data persistence, we’ve had network traffic issues. The solution we have found for this is to use the queries (see also this) to filter data on the remote peer we’re communicating with. The queries let us select fields of a value instead of fetching whole values. This way, we can fetch values with unique ids. The pagination is the process of first selecting all value ids for a given hash, then making a separate “get” request packet for each of the values.

This feature makes the DHT more friendly with UDP. In fact, UDP packets can be dropped when of size greater than the UDP MTU. Paginating values will help this as all UDP packets will now contain only one value.

Week 12

I’ve been working on making the “put” request lighter, again using queries. This is a key feature which will make it possible to enable data persistence. In fact, it enables us to send values to a peer only if it doesn’t already have the value we’re announcing. This will substantially reduce the overall traffic. This feature is still being tested. The last thing I have to do is to demonstrate the reduction of network traffic.

Categories: Elsewhere

Zlatan Todorić: DebConf16 - new age in Debian community gathering

Thu, 18/08/2016 - 11:19

DebConf16

Finally got some time to write this blog post. DebConf for me is always something special, a family gathering of weird combination of geeks (or is weird a default geek state?). To be honest, I finally can compare Debian as hacker conference to other so-called hacker conferences. With that hat on, I can say that Debian is by far the most organized and highest quality conference. Maybe I am biased, but I don't care too much about that. I simply love Debian and that is no secret. So lets dive into my view on DebConf16 which was held in Cape Town, South Africa.

Cape Town

This was the first time we had conference on African continent (and I now see for the first time DebConf bid for Asia, which leaves only Australia and beautiful Pacific islands to start a bid). Cape Town by itself, is pretty much Europe-like city. That was kinda a bum for me on first day, especially as we were hosted at University of Cape Town (which is quite beautiful uni) and the surrounding neighborhood was very European. Almost right after the first day I was fine because I started exploring the huge city. Cape Town is really huge, it has by stats ~4mil people, and unofficially it has ~6mil. Certainly a lot to explore and I hope one day to be back there (I actually hope as soon as possible).

The good, bad and ugly

I will start with bad and ugly as I want to finish with good notes.

Racism down there is still HUGE. You don't have signs on the road saying that, but there is clearly separation between white and black people. The houses near uni all had fences on walls (most of them even electrical ones with sharp blades on it) with bars on windows. That just bring tensions and certainly doesn't improve anything. To be honest, if someone wants to break in they still can do easily so the fences maybe need to bring intimidation but they actually only bring tension (my personal view). Also many houses have sign of Armed Force Response (something in those lines) where in case someone would start breaking in, armed forces would come to protect the home.

Also compared to workforce, white appear to hold most of profit/big business positions and fields, while black are street workers, bar workers etc etc. On the street you can feel from time to time the tension between people. Going out to bars also showed the separation - they were either almost exclusively white or exclusively black. Very sad state to see. Sharing love and mixing is something that pushes us forward and here I saw clear blockades for such things.

The bad part of Cape Town is, and this is not only special to Cape Town but to almost all major cities, is that small crime is on wide scale. Pickpocketing here is something you must pay attention to it. To me, personally, nothing happened but I heard a lot of stories from my friends on whom were such activities attempted (although I am not sure did the criminals succeed).

Enough of bad as my blog post will not change this and it is a topic for debate and active involvement which I can't unfortunately do at this moment.

THE GOOD!

There are so many great local people I met! As I mentioned, I want to visit that city again and again and again. If you don't fear of those bad things, this city has great local cuisine, a lot of great people, awesome art soul and they dance with heart (I guess when you live in rough times, you try to use free time at your best). There were difference between white and black bars/clubs - white were almost like standard European, a lot of drinking and not much dancing, and black were a lot of dancing and not much drinking (maybe the economical power has something to do with it but I certainly felt more love in black bars).

Cape Town has awesome mountain, the Table Mountain. I went on hiking with my friends, and I must say (again to myself) - do the damn hiking as much as possible. After every hike I feel so inspired, that I will start thinking that I hate myself for not doing it more often! The view from Table mountain is just majestic (you can even see the Cape of Good Hope). The WOW moments are just firing up in you.

Now lets transfer to DebConf itself. As always, organization was on quite high level. I loved the badge design, it had a map and nice amount of information on it. The place we stayed was kinda not that good but if you take it into account that those a old student dorms (in we all were in female student dorm :D ) it is pretty fancy by its own account. Talks were near which is always good. The general layout of talks and front desk position was perfect in my opinion. All in one place basically.

Wine and Cheese this year was kinda funny story because of the cheese restrictions but Cheese cabal managed to pull out things. It was actually very well organized. Met some new people during the party/ceremony which always makes me grow as a person. Cultural mix on DebConf is just fantastic. Not only you learn a lot about Debian, hacking on it, but sheer cultural diversity makes this small con such a vibrant place and home to a lot.

Debian Dinner happened in Aquarium were I had nice dinner and chat with my old friends. Aquarium by itself is a thing where you can visit and see a lot of strange creatures that live on this third rock from Sun.

Speaking of old friends - I love that I Apollo again rejoined us (by missing the DebConf15), seeing Joel again (and he finally visited Banja Luka as aftermath!), mbiebl, ah, moray, Milan, santiago and tons of others. Of course we always miss a few such as zack and vorlon this year (but they had pretty okay-ish reasons I would say).

Speaking of new friends, I made few local friends which makes me happy and at least one Indian/Hindu friend. Why did I mention this separately - well we had an accident during Group Photo (btw, where is our Lithuanian, German based nowdays, photographer?!) where 3 laptops of our GSoC students were stolen :( . I was luckily enough to, on behalf of Purism, donate Librem11 prototype to one of them, which ended up being the Indian friend. She is working on real time communications which is of interest also to Purism for our future projects.

Regarding Debian Day Trip, Joel and me opted out and we went on our own adventure through Cape Town in pursue of meeting and talking to local people, finding out interesting things which proved to be a great decision. We found about their first Thursday of month festival and we found about Mama Africa restaurant. That restaurant is going into special memories (me playing drums with local band must always be a special memory, right?!).

Huh, to be honest writing about DebConf would probably need a book by itself and I always try to keep my posts as short as possible so I will try to stop here (maybe I write few bits in future more about it but hardly).

Now the notes. Although I saw the racial segregation, I also saw the hope. These things need time. I come from country that is torn apart in nationalism and religious hate so I understand this issues is hard and deep on so many levels. While the tensions are high, I see people try to talk about it, try to find solution and I feel it is slowly transforming into open society, where we will realize that there is only one race on this planet and it is called - HUMAN RACE. We are all earthlings, and as sooner we realize that, sooner we will be on path to really build society up and not fake things that actually are enslaving our minds.

I just want in the end to say thank you DebConf, thank you Debian and everyone could learn from this community as a model (which can be improved!) for future societies.

Categories: Elsewhere

Norbert Tretkowski: No MariaDB MaxScale in Debian

Thu, 18/08/2016 - 08:00

Last weekend I started working on a MariaDB MaxScale package for Debian, of course with the intention to upload it into the official Debian repository.

Today I got pointed to an article by Michael "Monty" Widenius he published two days ago. It explains the recent license change of MaxScale from GPL so BSL with the release of MaxScale 2.0 beta. Justin Swanhart summarized the situation, and I could not agree more.

Looks like we will not see MaxScale 2.0 in Debian any time soon...

Categories: Elsewhere

Gunnar Wolf: Talking about the Debian keyring in Investigaciones Nucleares, UNAM

Wed, 17/08/2016 - 20:47

For the readers of my blog that happen to be in Mexico City, I was invited to give a talk at Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Ciudad Universitaria, UNAM.

I will be at Auditorio Marcos Moshinsky, on August 26 starting at 13:00. Auditorio Marcos Moshinsky is where we met for the early (~1996-1997) Mexico Linux User Group meetings. And... Wow. I'm amazed to realize it's been twenty years that I arrived there, young and innocent, the newest of what looked like a sect obsessed with world domination and a penguin fetish.

AttachmentSize llavero_chico.png220.84 KB llavero_orig.png1.64 MB
Categories: Elsewhere

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, July 2016

Wed, 17/08/2016 - 16:45

Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

Individual reports

In July, 136.6 work hours have been dispatched among 11 paid contributors. Their reports are available:

  • Antoine Beaupré has been allocated 4 hours again but in the end he put back his 8 pending hours in the pool for the next months.
  • Balint Reczey did 18 hours (out of 7 hours allocated + 2 remaining, thus keeping 2 extra hours for August).
  • Ben Hutchings did 15 hours (out of 14.7 hours allocated + 1 remaining, keeping 0.7 extra hour for August).
  • Brian May did 14.7 hours.
  • Chris Lamb did 14 hours (out of 14.7 hours, thus keeping 0.7 hours for next month).
  • Emilio Pozuelo Monfort did 13 hours (out of 14.7 hours allocated, thus keeping 1.7 hours extra hours for August).
  • Guido Günther did 8 hours.
  • Markus Koschany did 14.7 hours.
  • Ola Lundqvist did 14 hours (out of 14.7 hours assigned, thus keeping 0.7 extra hours for August).
  • Santiago Ruano Rincón did 14 hours (out of 14.7h allocated + 11.25 remaining, the 11.95 extra hours will be put back in the global pool as Santiago is stepping down).
  • Thorsten Alteholz did 14.7 hours.
Evolution of the situation

The number of sponsored hours jumped to 159 hours per month thanks to GitHub joining as our second platinum sponsor (funding 3 days of work per month)! Our funding goal is getting closer but it’s not there yet.

The security tracker currently lists 22 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file likewise. That’s a sharp decline compared to last month.

Thanks to our sponsors

New sponsors are in bold.

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Categories: Elsewhere

Jamie McClelland: Nice Work Apertium

Wed, 17/08/2016 - 16:07

For the last few years I have been periodically testing out apertium and today I did again and was pleasantly surprised with the quality of the english-spanish and spanish-english translations (and also their nifty web site translator).

So, I dusted off some of my geeky code to make it easier to use and continue testing.

For starters...

sudo apt-get install apertium-en-es xclip coreutils

Then, I added the following to my .muttrc file:

macro pager <F2> "<enter-command>set pipe_decode<enter><pipe-entry> sed '1,/^$/d' | apertium es-en | less<enter><enter-command>unset pipe_decode<enter>" "translate from spanish"

If you press F2 while reading a message in spanish it will print out the English translation.

If you use vim, you can create ~/.vim/plugins/apertium.vim with:

function s:Translate() silent !clear execute "! apertium en-es " . bufname("%") . " | tee >(xclip)" endfunction command Translate :call <SID>Translate()

Then, you can type the command:

:Translate

And it will display the English to Spanish translation of the file you are editing and copy the translation into your clip board so you can paste it into your document.

Categories: Elsewhere

Rapha&#235;l Hertzog: My Free Software Activities in July 2016

Wed, 17/08/2016 - 12:53

My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donators (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

DebConf 16

I was in South Africa for the whole week of DebConf 16 and gave 3 talks/BoF. You can find the slides and the videos in the links of their corresponding page:

I was a bit nervous about the third BoF (on using Debian money to fund Debian projects) but discussed with many persons during the week and it looks like the project evolved quite a bit in the last 10 years and while it’s still a sensitive topic (and rightfully so given the possible impacts) people are willing to discuss the issues and to experiment. You can have a look at the gobby notes that resulted from the live discussion.

I spent most of the time discussing with people and I did not do much technical work besides trying (and failing) to fix accessibility issues with tracker.debian.org (help from knowledgeable people is welcome, see #830213).

Debian Packaging

I uploaded a new version of zim to fix a reproducibility issue (and forwarded the patch upstream).

I uploaded Django 1.8.14 to jessie-backports and had to fix a failing test (pull request).

I uploaded python-django-jsonfield 1.0.1 a new upstream version integrating the patches I prepared in June.

I managed the (small) ftplib library transition. I prepared the new version in experimental, ensured reverse build dependencies do still build and coordinated the transition with the release team. This was all triggered by a reproducible build bug that I got and that made me look at the package… last time upstream had disappeared (upstream URL was even gone) but it looks like he became active again and he pushed a new release.

I filed wishlist bug #832053 to request a new deblog command in devscripts. It should make it easier to display current and former build logs.

Kali related Debian work

I worked on many issues that were affecting Kali (and Debian Testing) users:

  • I made an open-vm-tools NMU to get the package back into testing.
  • I filed #830795 on nautilus and #831737 on pbnj to forward Kali bugs to Debian.
  • I wrote a fontconfig patch to make it ignore .dpkg-tmp files. I also forwarded that patch upstream and filed a related bug in gnome-settings-daemon which is actually causing the problem by running fc-cache at the wrong times.
  • I started a discussion to see how we could fix the synaptics touchpad problem in GNOME 3.20. In the end, we have a new version of xserver-xorg-input-all which only depends on xserver-xorg-input-libinput and not on xserver-xorg-input-synaptics (no longer supported by GNOME). This is after upstream refused to reintroduce synaptics support.
  • I filed #831730 on desktop-base because KDE’s plasma-desktop is no longer using the Debian background by default. I had to seek upstream help to find out a possible solution (deployed in Kali only for now).
  • I filed #832503 because the way dpkg and APT manages foo:any dependencies when foo is not marked “Multi-Arch: allowed” is counter-productive… I discovered this while trying to use a firefox-esr:any dependency. And I filed #832501 to get the desired “Multi-Arch: allowed” marker on firefox-esr.
Thanks

See you next month for a new summary of my activities.

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Categories: Elsewhere

Michal &#268;iha&#345;: Weekly phpMyAdmin contributions 2016-W32

Wed, 17/08/2016 - 12:00

Tonight phpMyAdmin 4.0.10.17, 4.4.15.8, and 4.6.4 were released and you can probably see that there are quite some security issues fixed. Most of them are not really exploitable unless your PHP and webserver are poorly configured, but still it's good idea to upgrade.

If you are running Debian unstable, use our phpMyAdmin PPA for Ubuntu or use phpMyAdmin Docker image upgrading should be as simple as pulling new version.

Besides fixing security issues, we're generally hardening our infrastructure. I'm really grateful that Emanuel Bronshtein (@e3amn2l) is doing great review of all of our code and helps us in this area. This will really make our code and infrastructure much better.

Handled issues:

Filed under: Debian English phpMyAdmin | 0 comments

Categories: Elsewhere

Michal &#268;iha&#345;: Revoking old PGP key

Wed, 17/08/2016 - 10:00

It has been already six years since I've moved to using RSA4096 PGP key. For various reasons, the old DSA key was still kept valid till today. This is no longer true and it has been revoked now.

The revoked key is DC3552E836E75604 and new one is 9C27B31342B7511D. In case you've signed the old one and not the new one (quite unlikely if you did not sign it more than six years ago), there has been migration document, where you can verify my new key being signed by the old one.

Filed under: Debian English | 0 comments

Categories: Elsewhere

Charles Plessy: Who finished DEP 5?

Wed, 17/08/2016 - 06:08

Many people worked on finishing DEP 5. I think that the blog of Lars does not show enough how collective the effort was.

Looking in the specification's text, one finds:

The following alphabetical list is incomplete; please suggest missing people: Russ Allbery, Ben Finney, Sam Hocevar, Steve Langasek, Charles Plessy, Noah Slater, Jonas Smedegaard, Lars Wirzenius.

The Policy's changelog mentions:

* Include the new (optional) copyright format that was drafted as DEP-5. This is not yet a final version; that's expected to come in the 3.9.3.0 release. Thanks to all the DEP-5 contributors and to Lars Wirzenius and Charles Plessy for the integration into the Policy package. (Closes: #609160) -- Russ Allbery <rra@debian.org> Wed, 06 Apr 2011 22:48:55 -0700

and

debian-policy (3.9.3.0) unstable; urgency=low [ Russ Allbery ] * Update the copyright format document to the version of DEP-5 from the DEP web site and apply additional changes from subsequent discussion in debian-devel and debian-project. Revise for clarity, to add more examples, and to update the GFDL license versions. Thanks, Steve Langasek, Charles Plessy, Justin B Rye, and Jonathan Nieder. (Closes: #658209, #648387)

On my side, I am very grateful to Bill Alombert for having committed the document in the Git repository, which ended the debates.

Categories: Elsewhere

Sean Whitton: Tucson monsoon rains

Wed, 17/08/2016 - 05:28

When it rains in Tucson, people are able to take an unusually carefree attitude towards it. Although the storm is dramatic, and the amount of water means that the streets turn to rivers, everyone knows that it will be over in a few hours and the heat will return (and indeed, that’s why drain provision is so paltry).

In other words, despite the arresting thunderclaps, the weather is not threatening. By contrast, when there is a storm in Britain, one feels a faint primordial fear that one won’t be able to find shelter after the storm, in the cold and sodden woods and fields. Here, that threat just isn’t present. I think that’s what makes us feel so free to move around in the rain.

I rode my bike back from the gym in my $5 plastic shoes. The rain hitting my body was cold, but the water splashing up my legs and feet was warm thanks of the surface of the road—except for one area where the road was steep enough that the running water had already taken away all lingering heat.

Categories: Elsewhere

Ben Hutchings: Debian LTS work, July 2016

Wed, 17/08/2016 - 02:12

I was assigned another 14.7 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and carried over 1 from last month. I worked a total of 15 hours, carrying over a fraction of an hour.

I spent another week in the Front Desk role and triaged various new CVEs for wheezy.

I spent the remainder of the time working on the next Linux stable updates (3.2.82 and Debian 3.2.81-2), but didn't release them - that will be done in the next few days.

Categories: Elsewhere

Lars Wirzenius: 20 years ago I became a Debian developer

Tue, 16/08/2016 - 17:47

Today it is 23 years ago since Ian Murdock published his intention to develop a new Linux distribution, Debian. It also about 20 years since I became a Debian developer and made my first package upload.

In the time since:

  • I've retired a couple of times, to pursue other interests, and then un-retired.

  • I've maintained a bunch of different packages, most importantly the PGP2 software in the 90s. (I now only maintain software for which I'm also upstream, in order to make jokes about my upstream being an unco-operative jerk, and my packager being unhelpful in the extreme.)

  • Got kicked out from the Debian mailing lists for insulting another developer. Not my proudest moment. I was allowed back later, and I've tried to be polite ever since. (See also rules 6.)

  • I've been to a few Debconfs (3, 5, 6, 9, 10, 15). I'm looking forward to going to many more in the future. It's clear that seeing many project members at least every now and then has a very big impact on project cohesion.

  • I had a gig where I was paid to improve the technical quality of Debian. After a few months of bug fixing (which isn't my favourite pastime), I wrote piuparts in order to find new bugs. (I gave that project away many years ago, but it seems to still be going strong.)

  • I've almost ran for DPL twice, but I'm glad I didn't actually. I've carefully avoided any positions of power or responsibility in the project. (I live in fear that someone decides to nominate me for something where I'd actually have make important decisions.)

    Not being responsible means I can just ignore the project for a while when something annoying happens. (Or retire again.) With such a large project, eventually something really annoying does happen.

  • Came up with the DEP process with Zack and Dato. I also ran the second half of the DEP5 process to get the debian/copyright machine readable format accepted. (I'm no longer involved, though, and I don't think DEP is much now.)

  • I've taught several workshops about Debian packaging, including online for Debian-Women. It's always fun when others "get" how easy packaging really is, despite all the efforts of the larger variety in tooling and random web pages go to to obscure the fundamental simplicity.

  • Over the years Í've enjoyed many of the things developed within Debian (without claiming any credit for myself):

    • the policy manual, perhaps the most important technical achievement of the project

    • the social contract and Debian free software guidelines, unarguably the most important non-technical achievements of the project

    • the whole package management system, but especially apt

    • debhelper's dh, which made the work of packaging simple cases so easy it's nearly a no-brainer

    • d-i made me not hate installing Debian (although I think time is getting ripe to replace d-i with something new; catch me in a talkative mood at party to hear more)

    • Debian-Women made an almost immediate improvement to the culture of the larger project (even if there's still much too few women developers)

    • the diversity statement made me a lot happier about being a project member.

    I'd like to thank everyone who's worked on these and made them happen. These are important milestones in Debian.

  • I've opened my mount in a lot of places over the years, which means a lot of people know of me, but nobody can actually point at anything useful I've actually done. Which is why when I've given talks at, say, FOSDEM, I get introduced as "the guy who shared an office with Linus Torvalds a long time ago".

  • I've made a number of friends via participation in Debian. I've found jobs via contacts in Debian, and have even started a side business with someone.

It's been a good twenty years. And the fun ain't over yet.

Categories: Elsewhere

Bits from Debian: Debian turns 23!

Tue, 16/08/2016 - 14:30

Today is Debian's 23rd anniversary. If you are close to any of the cities celebrating Debian Day 2016, you're very welcome to join the party!

If not, there's still time for you to organize a little celebration or contribution to Debian. For example, you can have a look at the Debian timeline and learn about the history of the project. If you notice that some piece of information is still missing, feel free to add it to the timeline.

Or you can scratch your creative itch and suggest a wallpaper to be part of the artwork for the next release.

Our favorite operating system is the result of all the work we have done together. Thanks to everybody who has contributed in these 23 years, and happy birthday Debian!

Categories: Elsewhere

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