Feed aggregator

Deeson Online: PHP 5.5 Generators and Drupal

Planet Drupal - Fri, 12/09/2014 - 16:00

PHP 5.5 introduces generator functions.  Generator functions return an object that can be iterated over - often to be used with a foreach loop, for example:

function gen_one_to_three() { for ($i = 1; $i <= 3; $i++) { // Note that $i is preserved between yields. yield $i; } }   $generator = gen_one_to_three(); foreach ($generator as $value) { echo "$value\n"; }

Which will output:

123

(Example taken from php.net).

PHP calls the generator function when it needs values - when the generator yields a value the state of the generator is saved, so it can then be resumed when the next value is required. This can lead to significant performance boosts over creating an array which only exists to be looped over as less memory is needed.

There is more detail on http://codingexplained.com/coding/php/introduction-to-php-generators.

So how can this apply to Drupal …

A render array might look like...

$wrapper = array( '#type' => 'container', '#attributes' => array( 'class' => array('class'), ), ‘item-one’ = array ( … ); ‘item-two’ = array ( … ); ‘item-three’ = array ( … ); );

The element_children function returns an array which contains the array keys of the children array elements. This breaks from the standard PHP foreach pattern where you perform operations directly on the value created by the foreach loops - I don’t think this is ideal - I had to look twice to see what was happening the first time I saw it.

Using generators, you can use a more typical php pattern - the following is equivalent to the above.

foreach(element_children_generator($variables) as $key => &$element) { ... $element[‘#example’] = ‘example’; dpm($element); ... }

As well as being a more typical PHP pattern, referencing the element within the loop is cleaner.

There are downsides to this approach too. A developer familiar with Drupal may have to look twice to see what is going on with the yield keyword. Obviously this can’t go into Drupal 7 Core (which supports php 5.2.5+), and I wouldn’t recommend it for Contrib either for the same reason. 

However since PHP 5.3 and below is EOL I think this pattern is well worth adopting in your own projects with low risk.

Read morePHP 5.5 Generators and DrupalBy Chris | 12th September 2014
Categories: Elsewhere

DrupalCon Amsterdam: Training spotlight: Introduction to Headless Drupal

Planet Drupal - Fri, 12/09/2014 - 14:47

We know Drupal is an amazing platform for making websites. But did you know it’s also a world-class content API that can easily be integrated with a other technologies?

In Introduction to Headless Drupal you'll write your first Node.js application(s) and learn how to integrate Node.js's real-time wizardry into Drupal's content management magic.

Meet the Trainers from Four Kitchens

Matt Grill (drpal) Engineer at Four Kitchens
Matt taught himself HTML in 1996 while making a fansite for The Simpsons, even though he’s never actually watched the show. Matt’s interests in technology range from Arduino to automation and deployment. Matt currently maintains Is It Shaking?, a Node.js powered app for tracking and analysing earthquakes worldwide, Is It Shaking?. He has been working with JavaScript for nearly 10 years.

Michal Minecki (mirzu) Director of Technology at Four Kitchens
Mike Minecki has been building websites since 1999, and has been working with Node.js and Drupal for about a year. He has worked on www.drupalpoetry.com, a responsive web game that mimics the experience of playing with magnetic poetry on the web. He has taught Node.js in Austin and San Francisco, and has been speaking at events around the country about how to integrate Node.js and Drupal.

Attend this Drupal Training

This training will be held on Monday, 29 September from 09:00-17:00 at the Amsterdam RAI during DrupalCon Amsterdam. The cost of attending this training is €400 and includes training materials, meals and coffee breaks.

Many of our training courses, including Introduction to Headless Drupal, are nearing capacity and we will not have waitlists, so if you are planning to attend, we strongly recommend you register this week.

Register today

Categories: Elsewhere

Code Karate: Drupal 7 Entity Registration Module

Planet Drupal - Fri, 12/09/2014 - 13:57
Episode Number: 167

The Drupal 7 Entity Registration Module makes it easy to host sign-ups or registration forms directly on your Drupal 7 website. This solution works great for event, conference, webinar, or training signup forms.

In this lesson you will learn:

Tags: DrupalDrupal 7Drupal Planet
Categories: Elsewhere

Elena 'valhalla' Grandi: Sometimes apologies are the worst part

Planet Debian - Fri, 12/09/2014 - 13:53
I am sick of hearing apologies directed to me just after a dirty joke.

Usually, I don't mind dirty jokes in themselves: I *do* have a dirty mind and make my share of those, or laugh for the ones my friends with even dirtier minds make.

There are of course times and places where they aren't appropriate, but I'd rather live in a world where they are the exception (although a common one) rather than the norm.

Then there is the kind of dirty jokes strongly based on the assumptions that women are sexual objects, a nuisance that must be tolerated because of sex or both: of course I don't really find them fun, but that's probably because I'm a nuisance and I don't even give them reason to tolerate me. :)

Even worse that those, however, is being singled out as the only women in the group with an empty apology for the joke (often of the latter kind): I know you are not really sorry, you probably only want to show that your parents taught you not to speak that way in front of women, but since I'm intruding in a male-only group I have to accept that you are going to talk as appropriate for it.

P.S. no, the episode that triggered this post didn't happen in a Debian environment, it happened in Italy, in a tech-related environment (and not in a wanking club for penis owners, where they would have every right to consider me an intruder).
Categories: Elsewhere

John Goerzen: The Thrill and Stress of Too Many Hobbies

Planet Debian - Fri, 12/09/2014 - 05:10

Today, 4PM. Jacob and Oliver excitedly peer at the box in our kitchen – a really big box, taller than them. Inside is is the first model airplane I’d ever purchased. The three of us hunkered down on the kitchen floor, opened the box, unpacked the parts, examined the controller, and found the manual with cryptic assembly directions. Oliver turned some screws while Jacob checked out the levers on the controllers. Then they both left for a bit to play with their toy buses.

A little while later, the three of us went outside. It was too windy to fly. I had never flied an RC plane before — only RC quadcopters (much easier to fly), and some practice time on an RC simulator. But the excitement was too much. So out we went, and the plane took off perfectly, climbed, flew over the trees, and circled above our heads at my command. I even managed a good landing in the wind, despite about 5 aborted attempts due to coming in too high, wrong angle, too fast, or last-minute gusts of wind throwing everything off. I am not sure how I pulled that all off on my first flight, but somehow I did! It was thrilling!

I’ve had a lot of hobbies in my life. Computers have run through many of them; I learned Pascal (a programming language) at about the same time I learned cursive handwriting and started with C at around age 10. It was all fun. I’ve been a Debian developer for some 18 years now, and have written a lot of code, and even books about code, over the years.

Photography, music, literature, history, philosophy, and theology have been interests for quite some time as well. In the last few years, I’ve picked up amateur radio, model aircraft, etc. And last month, Laura led me into Ada’s Technical Books during our visit to Seattle, resulting in me getting interested in Arduino. (The boys and I have already built a light-activated crossing gate for their HO-gauge model trains, and Jacob can now say he’s edited a few characters of C!)

Sometimes I find ways to merge hobbies; I’ve set up all sorts of amateur radio systems on Linux, take aerial photographs, and set up systems to stream music in my house.

But I also have a lot less time for hobbies overall than I once did; other things in life, such as my children, are more important. Some of the code I once worked on actively I no longer use or maintain, and I feel guilty about that when people send bug reports that I have no interest in fixing anymore.

Sometimes I feel a need to cut down, and perhaps have; and then, I get an interest in RC aircraft and find an airplane that is great for a beginner and fairly inexpensive.

Perhaps it is the curse of being a curious person living in an interesting world. Do any of the rest of you have a large number of hobbies? How do you feel about that?

Categories: Elsewhere

Stefano Zacchiroli: debsources bugs and easy hacks

Planet Debian - Thu, 11/09/2014 - 19:31
debsources debbugs oh

My ongoing quest for lowering the barrier for contributing to Debsources continues.
In this chapter:

  • I've migrated bug reports from the previous ad-hoc text file in the Git repo to the Debian BTS, under the umbrella of the qa.debian.org pseudo-package.
    From now on this is the recommended (and documented) way of reporting bugs against http://sources.debian.net.

    Look ma, it also has one of those newfangled short URLs: http://deb.li/debsrcbugs!

  • While at it, I've also properly tagged the current easy hacks on Debsources using the gift tag. There are definitely opportunities for new contributors there, and there might be more if you submit your own Debsources' pet peeves to the BTS.

    Again, mandatory mnemonic/short URL: http://deb.li/debsrceasy.

What's your excuse for not contributing to Debsources, again?

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Watchdog: Cooking Up Sites With Open Outreach

Planet Drupal - Thu, 11/09/2014 - 19:25
Article

Drupal distributions can be a huge leg up in building a website, especially for those with little technical knowledge. The “ingredients” (modules) you need are already assembled, leaving you with just the task of stirring it up, and perhaps adding your own personalizing flavors. The Open Outreach distribution is specifically designed for nonprofit and grassroots groups. It comes with a wide range of apps — bundles of modules and configurations that are geared to the needs of groups, such as contact management or mapping. It also includes a number of helper features, such as a text editor, commenting, and social media handling.

For more detailed instructions on how to work with Open Outreach, see the complete user documentation.

Below you’ll find some recipes for whipping up a specific kind of Open Outreach site, giving you the apps you need: to enable; required configuration; suggested themes for the look and feel of your site; and tips on customizations to take your site further. Happy site building!

Environmental group focused on mining impacts

You’re a board member of this small but enthusiastic group. You’ve been tasked with creating a website that will serve as the public face, but more importantly also track membership contacts as well as your contacts with other groups, government bodies, and industry.

Categories: Elsewhere

Lullabot: Finding related content faster with Apache Solr

Planet Drupal - Thu, 11/09/2014 - 19:00

We recently fixed a performance issue at the MSNBC project: the More Like This list of content related to the current page was stressing our database servers with slow, complicated MySQL queries. Here is a screenshot of the block in question:

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Association News: Drupalaton 2014 in Hungary, at the largest lake in Central Europe

Planet Drupal - Thu, 11/09/2014 - 17:22

This post originally ran on Imagine Creativity, and has been reprinted with permission.

Wow my Hungarian friends - you have done it again! Two weeks ago, I spent a long weekend at Drupalaton, a Drupal camp in Hungary with the difference that it also served as a short relaxing break. It was the perfect combination of a holiday and work with the beautiful surroundings of Central Europe’s largest lake Balaton.

I was very excited to return to the country after the amazing Drupal Developer Days in Szeged event that I went to in March. It was also filled with meeting amazing people from all around the world, learning and sharing knowledge and connecting with so many inspiring people.

At both events the thing that really stood out for me was the great hospitality shown by the Hungarians I met there. I have really been humbled by how friendly and hospitable they have been, and all of the time they put into making the event so amazing for all the attendees.

This was the fifth year that large Drupal events have been taking place in the country, but the second where the language hasn’t been exclusively in Hungarian. Last year’s event brought people from Romania, Serbia and other neighbouring countries but this year we had a much more international event with people from Austria, Belgium, Finland, Germany, Spain, & the UK in attendance.

Patchy, the sprint whale. Unofficial @drupalaton mascot with @ChandeepKhosa @brynvertesi @rteijeiro pic.twitter.com/AxydLT3JiO

— Bryn Vertesi (@brynvertesi) August 9, 2014

The team that made it happen

Tamás ‘York’ Pintér, was the main organiser and lives in the area of the camp, Zsófi Major co-ordinated many aspects of the event including community outreach over social media & sponsorship management, István Csáki, helped to create the website and other support, Bálint Fekete, made some amazing design work (in particular the innovative scroll on the website where the boat moves across the page which I spent far too long playing with!).

Also on the team were Gábor Hojtsy, (Drupal 8 multilingual initiative lead) helping with event-marketing, István 'PP' Palócz who helped with finances (and helped me learning some basic Hungarian phrases) and last but not least Tamás ‘TeeCee’ Szügyi, the photographer who documented the great event.

Some numbers

In the recent newsletter to all attendees from the organisers the following statistics were disclosed.

"We are really proud of the following numbers, so let us share with you:
Our 79 attendees came from 13 countries from all over the world, and only a bit more than half of them were from Hungary. This lucky number is significant for us, as Drupalaton started as a local Drupalcamp, and now we can proudly say that we are on the big Drupalmap :)"

  • You spent more than 1420 minutes (almost 24 hours) on 8 workshops with learning.
  • The sprinters worked on 70+ issues during the 4 days. This a great number, you can find more thoughts about it in Gábor Hojtsy's blog post.
  • During the 4 days you consumed 134 pcs of Túró Rudis, 132 ps of Marzipan ladybugs, 260 cans of beer, 60 kilograms of different fruits and  7 kilograms of nuts."

Next year

If any of that sounds good you should attend next year, 6-9 August 2015, I'm very excited about returning. Even the founder of Drupal, Dries Buytaert, regrets not attending! Maybe he will join us too next year, that would be awesome!

Photos from Drupalaton: https://t.co/TP0ARVawzb Wish I could have been there!

— Dries Buytaert (@Dries) August 11, 2014

Check out the pictures from Flickr below, or on Twitter and the Facebook page!

Categories: Elsewhere

Dirk Eddelbuettel: pkgKitten 0.1.2: Still creating R Packages that purr

Planet Debian - Thu, 11/09/2014 - 16:41

A brown bag release 0.1.2 of pkgKitten is now on CRAN, following yesterday's 0.1.1 upload

Next time I'll try to remember that when I have parameters name and path, it won't work so well to call them as path and name ...

Changes in version 0.1.2 (2014-09-11)
  • Brown-bag fix of calling the new helper function with then correct order of arguments.

More details about the package are at the pkgKitten webpage and the pkgKitten GitHub repo.

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Categories: Elsewhere

Enrico Zini: suspend-i-really-mean-it

Planet Debian - Thu, 11/09/2014 - 14:32
Laptop, I demand that you suspend!

Dear Lazyweb,

Sometimes some application prevents suspend on my laptop. I want to disable that feature: how?

I understand that there may exist some people who like that feature. I, on the other hand, consider a scenario like this inconceivable:

  1. I'm on a plane working with my laptop, the captain announces preparations for landing, so I quickly hit the suspend button (or close the lid) on my laptop and stow it away.
  2. One connecting flight later, I pick up my backpack, I feel it unusually hot and realise that my laptop has been on all along, and is now dead from either running out of battery or thermal protection.
  3. I think things that, if spoken aloud in front of a pentacle, might invoke major lovecraftian horrors.

I do not want this scenario to ever be possible. I want my suspend button to suspend the laptop no matter what. If a process does not agree, I'm fine with suspending it anyway, or killing it.

If I want my laptop to suspend, I generally have a good enough real-world reason for it, and I cannot conceive that a software could ever be allowed to override my command.

How do I change this? I don't know if I should look into systemd, upowerd, pm-utils, the kernel, the display manager or something else entirely. I worry that I cannot even figure where to start looking for a solution.

This happened to me multiple times already, and I consider it ridiculous. I know that it can cause me data loss. I know that it can cause me serious trouble in case I was relying on having some battery or state left at my arrival. I know that depending on what is in my backpack, this could also be physically dangerous.

So, what knob do I tweak for this? How do I make suspend reliable?

Categories: Elsewhere

Sylvestre Ledru: Rebuild of Debian using Clang 3.5.0

Planet Debian - Thu, 11/09/2014 - 14:17

Clang 3.5.0 has just been released. A new rebuild has been done highlight the progress to get Debian built with clang.

tl;dr: Great progress. We decreased from 9.5% to 5.7% of failures. Full results are available on http://clang.debian.net

At time of the rebuild with 3.4.2, we had 2040 packages failing to build with clang. With 3.5.0, this dropped to 1261 packages.

Fixes

With Arthur Marble and Alexander Ovchinnikov, both GSoC students, we worked on various ways to decrease the number of errors.

Upstream fixes

First, the most obvious way, we fixed programming bugs/mistakes in upstream sources. Basically, we took categories of failure and fixed issues one after the other. We started with simple bugs like 'Wrong main declaration', 'non-void function should return a value' or 'Void function should not return a value'.

They are trivial to fix. We continued with harder fixes like ' Undefined reference' or 'Variable length array for a non POD (plain old data) element'.

So, besides these one, we worked on:


In total, we reported 295 bugs with patches. 85 of them have been fixed (meaning that the Debian maintainer uploaded a new version with the fix).

In parallel, I think that the switch by FreeBSD and Mac OS X to Clang also helped to fix various issues by upstreams.

Hacking in clang

As a parallel approach, we started to implement a suggestion from Linus Torvalds and a few others. Instead of trying to fix all upstream, where we can, we tried to update clang to improve the gcc compatibility.

gcc has many flags to disable or enable optimizations. Some of them are legacy, others have no sense in clang, etc. Instead of failing in clang with an error, we create a new category of warnings (showing optimization flag '%0' is not supported) and moved all relevant flags into it. Some examples, r212805, r213365, r214906 or r214907

We also updated clang to silent some useless arguments like -finput_charset=UTF-8 (r212110), clang being UTF-8 compliant.

Finally, we worked on the forwarding of linker flags. Clang and gcc have a very different behavior: when gcc does not know an argument, it is going to forward the argument to the linker. Clang, in this case, is going to reject the argument and fail with an error. In clang, we have to explicitly declare which arguments are going to be transfer to the linker. Of course, the correct way to pass arguments to the linker is to use -Xlinker or -Wl but the Debian rebuild proved that these shortcuts are used. Two of these arguments are now forwarded:

  • -z keyword - r213198
  • -u Force symbol to be entered in the output file as an undefined symbol - r211756. This one fixed most of the haskell build failures. It fixed the most common issue that we had (701 occurrences but this does not mean that all these packages build fine now, some haskell-based package are failing later in the process)
New errors

Just like in other releases, new warnings are added in clang. With (bad) usage of -Werror by upstream software, this causes new build failures:

I also took the opportunity to add some further categorizations in the list of errors. Some examples:

Next steps

The Debile project being close to ready with Clément Schreiner's GSoC, we will now have an automatic and transparent way to rebuild packages using clang.

Conclusion

As stated, we can see a huge drop in term of number of failures over time:

Hopefully, Clang getting better and better, more and more projects adopting it as the default compiler or as a base for plugin/extension developments, this percentage will continue to decrease.
Having some kind of release goal with clang for Jessie+1 can now be considered as potentially reachable.

Want to help?

There are several things which can be done to help:

  • Point me common error patterns in the Not categorized list of errors to create new categories
  • Report and fix packages
  • As an upstream, integrate clang as part of your continuous integration system
  • Hack on cqa-scanlogs, the error detection tool to detect error patterns (example: Undetected error). This tool is used also for the regular rebuilds of the archive.
  • Improve clang.debian.net website
Acknowledgments

Thanks to David Suarez for the rebuilds of the archive, Arthur Marble and Alexander Ovchinnikov for their GSoC works and Nicolas Sévelin-Radiguet for the few fixes.

Original post blogged on b2evolution.

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal 8 Rules: #d8rules updates, BoF & sprints at DrupalCon Amsterdam

Planet Drupal - Thu, 11/09/2014 - 13:05

Hello everyone!

DrupalCon Amsterdam is coming close and we are working hard to get Milestone 1 for porting the Rules module to Drupal 8 done. Here's an outline where you can join fago, klausi, nico and many others for updates on the initiative, discussions and hands-on during the sprints!

Drupal 8 Contrib Module Update (shared session)

Tuesday · 14:15 - 15:15, Room: Auditorium (Wunderkraut)
https://amsterdam2014.drupal.org/session/drupal-8-contrib-module-update

A quick, 12-minutes update on the status of Rules for Drupal 8 together with Webform (quicksketch), Display Suite (by aspilicious), Media (by daveried/slashrsm), Search API (by drunken monkey), Commerce (by bojanz), Redirect, Global Redirect, Token, Pathauto (by berdir), Panels (by japerry) & Simplenews (by miro_dietiker/ifux).

#d8rules initiative meeting (BoF)

Thursday 13:00 - 14:00, Room: Emerald Lounge E
https://amsterdam2014.drupal.org/bof/d8rules-initiative-meeting

Let's get into a deeper discussion about the #d8rules initiative in this birds-of-a-feather session. We'll inform you about the current state of funding & development and prepare you well for the sprints on Friday.

#d8rules sprints

Friday 9:00 - 18:00, Coder lounge in the venue
https://groups.drupal.org/node/427578

Sprinting at DrupalCon is THE way to learn about contributing to Drupal in general. With our training experience from DrupalCamp Alpe-Adria and Drupalaton we know that working on Rules 8.x is a great way to get started with the new programming paradigmes of Drupal 8. Join fago, klausi to port actions, fix integrations for Drupal 8 core and get Milestone 1 done in general.

#d8rules sprints are focused mainly on Friday, but we will also be around for extended sprints prior and after the conference. Check out the information about all the sprints at and around DrupalCon Amsterdam by gabor. And please don't forget: thank you for helping us estimate the number of people attending and sign-up using the sprints spreadsheet.


#d8rules trainings & sprints at DrupalCamp Alpe-Adria, Slovenia, May 2014

We are looking forward meeting everyone there. As always, you can find us on irc: #drupal-rules and don't forget to use the twitter hashtag #d8rules.

dasjo on behalf of the #d8rules team

Categories: Elsewhere

Matthias Klumpp: Listaller: Back to the future!

Planet Debian - Thu, 11/09/2014 - 10:14

It is time for another report on Listaller, the cross-distro 3rd-party package installer, which is now in development for – depending how you count – 5-6 years. This will become a longer post, so you might grab some coffee or tea

The original idea

The Listaller project was initially started with the goal to make application deployment on Linux distributions as simple as possible, by providing a unified package installation format and tools which make building apps for multiple distributions easier and deployment of updates simple. The key ideas were:

  • Seamless integration of all installation steps into the system – users shouldn’t care about the origin of their application, they just handle all installed apps with the same tool and update all apps with the same interface they use for updating the system.
  • Out-of-the-boy sandboxing for all 3rd-party apps
  • Easy signing and key-validation for Listaller packages
  • Simple creation of updates for developers
  • Resource-sharing: It should always be clear which application uses which library, duplicates should be avoided. The distribution-provided software should take priority, since it is often well-maintained and receives security updates.
The current state

The current release of Listaller handles all of this with a plugin for PackageKit, the cross-distro package-management abstraction layer. It hooks into PackageKit and reads information passing through to the native distributor backend, and if it encounters Listaller software, it handles it appropriately. It can also inject update information. This results in all Listaller software being shown in any PackageKit frontends, and people can work with it just like if the packages were native packages. Listaller package installations are controlled by a machine policy, so the administrator can decide that e.g. only packages from a trusted source (= GPG signature in trusted database) can be installed. Dependencies can be pulled from the distributor’s repositories, or optionally from external sources, like the PyPI.

This sounds good on paper, but the current implementation has various problems.

The issues

The current Listaller approach has some problems. The biggest one lies in the future: Soon, there will be no PackageKit plugins anymore! PackageKit 1.0 will remove support for them, because they appear to be a major source for crashes, even the in-tree plugins cause problems. Also, the PackageKit service itself is currently being trimmed of unneeded features and less-used code. These changes in PackageKit are great and needed for the project (and I support these efforts), but they cause a pretty huge problem for Listaller: The project relies on the PackageKit plugin – if used without it, you loose the system-integration part, which is one of the key concepts of Listaller, and a primary goal.

But this issue is not the only one. There are more. One huge problem for Listaller is dependency-solving: It needs to know where to get software from in case it isn’t installed already. And that has to be done in a cross-distributional way. This is an incredibly complex task, and Listaller contains lots of workarounds for various quirks. It contains so much hacks for distro-specific stuff, that it became really hard to understand. The Listaller dependency model also became very complex, because it tried to handle many corner-cases. This is bad, of course. But the workarounds weren’t added for fun, but because it was assumed to be easier than to fixing the root cause, which would have required collaboration between distributors and some changes on the stack, which seemed unlikely to happen at the time the code was written.

The systemd effort

Also a thing which affects Listaller, is the latest push from the systemd team to allow cross-distro 3rd-party installations to happen. I definitively recommend reading the linked blogpost from Lennart, if you have some spare time! The identified problems are the same as for Listaller, but the solution they propose is completely different, and about three orders of magnitude more invasive than whatever the Listaller project had in mind (I make these numbers up, so don’t ask!). There are also a few issues I see with Lennarts approach, I will probably go into detail about that in another blogpost (e.g. it requires multiple copies of a library lying around, where one version might have a security vulnerability, and another one doesn’t – it’s hard to ensure everything is up to date and secure that way, even if you have a top-notch sandbox). I have great respect for the systemd crew and especially Lennart, and I hope them to succeed with their efforts. However, I also think Listaller can achieve a similar things with a less-invasive solution, at least for the 3rd-party app-installations (Listaller is one of the partial-fix solutions with strict focus, so not a direct competitor to the holistic systemd approach. Both solutions could happily live together.)

A step into the future

Some might have guessed it already: There are some bigger changes coming to Listaller! The most important one is that there will be no Listaller anymore, at least not in its old form.

Since the current code relies heavily on the PackageKit plugin, and contains some ugly workarounds, it doesn’t make much sense to continue working on it.

Instead, I started the Listaller.NEXT project, which is a rewrite of Listaller in C. There are a some goals for the rewrite:

  • No stupid hacks and workarounds: We will not add any workaround. If there is a problem, we will fix it at its source, even if that might be more invasive.
  • Trimmed down project: The new incarnation of Listaller will only support installations of statically linked software at the beginning. We will start with a very small, robust core, and then add more features (like dependency-solving) gradually, but only if they are useful. There will be no feature-creep like in the previous version.
  • Faster development cycle: Releases will happen much faster, not only two or three times a year
  • Integration: Since there is no PackageKit plugin anymore, but integration is still one of Listaller’s key concepts, we will integrate Listaller into downstream tools, ranging from Apper to GNOME-Software. Richard Hughes will help with the integration and user interfaces, so Listaller applications get displayed properly.
  • AppStream-first: AppStream is the ultimate tool for Listaller to detect dependencies. With the 0.6 release, the Listaller component-concept was merged into it, which makes it a very powerful and non-hackish solution for dependency-detection. We will advance the use of its metadata, and probably use it exclusively, which would restrict Listaller to only work properly on distributions which ship AppStream metadata.
  • No desktop-only focus: The previous Listaller was focused only on desktop GUI apps. The new version will be developed with a much larger target audience in mind, including server deployments (“Can I use it to deploy my server app” is one very frequently asked questions about Listaller – with the new version, the answer is yes)
  • We will continue to improve the static-linking and cross-distro development toolchain (libuild, with ligcc, lig++ and binreloc), to make building portable apps easier.

I made a last release of the 0.5.x series of Listaller, to work with PackageKit 0.9.x – the future lies in the C port.

If you are using Listaller (and I know of people who do, for example some deploy statically-linked stuff on internal test-setups with it), stay tuned. The packaging format will stay mostly compatible with the current version, so you will not see many changes there (the plan is to freeze it very soon, so no backwards-incompatible changes are made anymore). The o.5.x series will receive critical bugfixes if necessary.

Help needed!

As always, there is help needed! Writing C is not that difficult But user feedback is welcome as well, in case you have an idea. The new code will be hosted on Github in the new listaller-next branch (currently not that much to find there). Long-term, we will completely migrate away from Launchpad.

You can expect more blogposts about the Listaller concepts and progress in the next months (as soon as I am done with some AppStream-related things, which take priority).

Categories: Elsewhere

Steve Kemp: A small email utility and other updates.

Planet Debian - Thu, 11/09/2014 - 09:09

Last night I was looking for an image I knew a model had mailed me a few months ago, as we were talking about rescheduling a shoot at the weekend. I couldn't find it, even with my awesome mail client and filing system.

With some free time I figured I could write a little utility to dump all attachments from email folders, and find it that way.

It did cross my mind that there is the simple mail-utility for dumping headers, etc, called formail, which is distributed alongside procmail, but it doesn't handle attachments ..

I was tempted to write a general purpose script to dump attachments, email header values, etc, etc but given the lack of time I merely solved my own problem.

I suspect there is room for a "mail utilities" package, similar to Joey's "moreutils" and my "". However I note that there is a GNU Mailutils which does things differently than I'd expect - i.e. it contains a POP3 server.

Still if you want to dump attachments from emails, have GMIME installed, and want to filter by attachment-name, or MIME-type, you might look at my trivial attachment-dump program.

Related to that I spent some time last night updating my photography site, so the animals & pets section has updated images at least.

During the course of that I found a bug in my static-site generator, templer which stopped it from automatically populating image height/widths when called in a glob:

Title: Pets &amp; Animals Images: file_glob( "*.jpg" ) --- This is the page body, it now has access to a variable called 'images' which is a HTML::Template loop-structure containing name/height/width/etc for each image in the current directory.

That should now be resolved, and life should once again be good.

Categories: Elsewhere

InternetDevels: Thanks for the great time at Lviv Euro DrupalCamp 2014!

Planet Drupal - Thu, 11/09/2014 - 08:55

Four months of preparation. Three golden sponsors. Two days. One Lviv Euro Drupal Camp 2014.

Ladies and gentleman, we can proudly announce — we did it! Our camp became the biggest Drupal-evet taking place in Ukrane this year, which got together the most cheerful and friendly drupalers. We hope, that all those 150 people have got a huge pile of positive emotions and impressions. But let’s get in details inch by inch :).

Read more
Categories: Elsewhere

Dirk Eddelbuettel: pkgKitten 0.1.1: Still creating R Packages that purr

Planet Debian - Thu, 11/09/2014 - 03:12

A maintenance release 0.1.1 of pkgKitten is now on CRAN.

It has only one small change: the function playWithPerPackageHelpPage() was factored out of the main function kitten() as I happened to be needing something just like playWithPerPackageHelpPage() to make packages created by the Rcpp function Rcpp.package.skeleton() a little nicer.

We also added a NEWS.Rd file which restates major release features. As it is so short, we include it in its entirety.

Changes in version 0.1.1 (2014-09-09)
  • New (exported) function playWithPerPackageHelpPage() which lets other packages create a non-complaint-generating package help page

Changes in version 0.1.0 (2014-06-13)
  • Initial public version and CRAN upload

More details about the package are at the pkgKitten webpage and the pkgKitten GitHub repo.

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Categories: Elsewhere

Dcycle: An approach to code-driven development in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - Wed, 10/09/2014 - 22:28
What is code-driven development and why is it done?

Code-driven development is the practice of placing all development in code. How can development not be in code?, you ask.

In Drupal, what makes your site unique is often configuration which resides in the database: the current theme, active modules, module-specific configuration, content types, and so on.

For the purpose of this article, our goal will be for all configuration (the current theme, the content types, module-specific config, the active module list...) to be in code, and only content to be in the database. There are several advantages to this approach:

  • Because all our configuration is in code, we can package all of it into a single module, which we'll call a site deployment module. When enabled, this module should provide a fully workable site without any content.
  • When a site deployment module is combined with generated content, it becomes possible to create new instances of a website without cloning the database. Devel's devel_generate module, and Realistic Dummy Content can be used to create realistic dummy content. This makes on-ramping new developers easy and consistent.
  • Because unversioned databases are not required to be cloned to set up new environments, your continuous integration server can set up new instances of your site based on a known good starting point, making tests more robust.
Code-driven development for Drupal 7

Before moving on to D8, let's look at a typical D7 workflow: The technique I use for developing in Drupal 7 is making sure I have one or more features with my content types, views, contexts, and so on; as well as a site deployment module which contains, in its .install file, update hooks which revert my features when needed, enable new modules, and programmatically set configuration which can't be exported via features. That way,

  • incrementally deploying sites is as simple as calling drush updb -y (to run new update hooks).
  • deploying a site for the first time (or redeploying it from scratch) requires creating the database, enabling our site deployment module (which runs all or update hooks), and optionally generating dummy content if required. For example: drush si -y && drush en mysite_deploy -y && drush en devel_generate && drush generate-content 50.

I have been using this technique for a few years on all my D7 projects and, in this article, I will explore how something similar can be done in D8.

New in Drupal 8: configuration management

If, like me, you are using features to deploy websites (not to bundle generic functionality), config management will replace features in D8. In D7, context is used to provide the ability to export block placement to features, and strongarm exports variables. In D8, variables no longer exist, and block placement is now exportable. All of these modules are thus no longer needed.

They are replaced by the concept of configuration management, a central API for importing and exporting configuration as yml files.

Configuration management and site UUIDs

In Drupal 8, sites are now assigned a UUID on install and configuration can only be synchronized between sites having the same UUID. This is fine if the site has been cloned at some point from one environment to another, but as mentioned above, we are avoiding database cloning: we want it to be possible to install a brand new instance of a site at any time.

We thus need a mechanism to assign the same UUID to all instances of our site, but still allow us to reinstall it without cloning the database.

The solution I am using is to assign a site UUID in the site deployment module. Thus, in Drupal 8, my site deployment module's .module file looks like this:

/** * @file * site deployment functions */ use Drupal\Core\Extension\InfoParser; /** * Updates dependencies based on the site deployment's info file. * * If during the course of development, you add a dependency to your * site deployment module's .info file, increment the update hook * (see the .install module) and this function will be called, making * sure dependencies are enabled. */ function mysite_deploy_update_dependencies() { $parser = new InfoParser; $info_file = $parser->parse(drupal_get_path('module', 'mysite_deploy') . '/mysite_deploy.info.yml'); if (isset($info_file['dependencies'])) { \Drupal::moduleHandler()->install($info_file['dependencies'], TRUE); } } /** * Set the UUID of this website. * * By default, reinstalling a site will assign it a new random UUID, making * it impossible to sync configuration with other instances. This function * is called by site deployment module's .install hook. * * @param $uuid * A uuid string, for example 'e732b460-add4-47a7-8c00-e4dedbb42900'. */ function mysite_deploy_set_uuid($uuid) { \Drupal::config('system.site') ->set('uuid', $uuid) ->save(); }

And the site deployment module's .install file looks like this:

/** * @file * site deployment install functions */ /** * Implements hook_install(). */ function mysite_deploy_install() { // This module is designed to be enabled on a brand new instance of // Drupal. Settings its uuid here will tell this instance that it is // in fact the same site as any other instance. Therefore, all local // instances, continuous integration, testing, dev, and production // instances of a codebase will have the same uuid, enabling us to // sync these instances via the config management system. // See also https://www.drupal.org/node/2133325 mysite_deploy_set_uuid('e732b460-add4-47a7-8c00-e4dedbb42900'); for ($i = 7001; $i < 8000; $i++) { $candidate = 'mysite_deploy_update_' . $i; if (function_exists($candidate)) { $candidate(); } } } /** * Update dependencies and revert features */ function mysite_deploy_update_7003() { // If you add a new dependency during your development: // (1) add your dependency to your .info file // (2) increment the number in this function name (example: change // change 7003 to 7004) // (3) now, on each target environment, running drush updb -y // will call the mysite_deploy_update_dependencies() function // which in turn will enable all new dependencies. mysite_deploy_update_dependencies(); }

The only real difference between a site deployment module for D7 and D8, thus, is that the D8 version must define a UUID common to all instances of a website (local, dev, prod, testing...).

Configuration management directories: active, staging, deploy

Out of the box, there are two directories which can contain config management yml files:

  • The active directory, which is always empty and unused. It used store your active configuration, and it is still possible to do so, but I'm not sure how. We can ignore this directory for our purposes.
  • The staging directory, which can contain .yml files to be imported into a target site. (For this to work, as mentioned above, the .yml files will need to have been generated by a site having the same UUID as the target site, or else you will get an error message -- on the GUI the error message makes sense, but on the command line you will get the cryptic "There were errors validating the config synchronization.").

I will propose a workflow which ignores the staging directory as well, for the following reasons:

  • First, the staging directory is placed in sites/default/files/, a directory which contains user data and is explicitly ignored in Drupal's example.gitignore file (which makes sense). In our case, we want this information to reside in our git directory.
  • Second, my team has come to rely heavily on reinstalling Drupal and our site deployment module when things get corrupted locally. When you reinstall Drupal using drush si, the staging directory is deleted, so even if we did have the staging directory in git, we would be prevented from running drush si -y && drush en mysite_deploy -y, which we don't want.
  • Finally, you might want your config directory to be outside of your Drupal root, for security reasons.

For all of these reasons, we will add a new "deploy" configuration directory and put it in our git repo, but outside of our Drupal root.

Our directory hierarchy will now look like this:

mysite .git deploy README.txt ... drupal_root CHANGELOG.txt core ...

You can also have your deploy directory inside your Drupal root, but keep in mind that certain configuration information are sensitive, containing email addresses and the like. We'll see later on how to tell Drupal how it can find your "deploy" directory.

Getting started: creating your Drupal instance

Let's get started. Make sure you have version 7.x of Drush (compatible with Drupal 8), and create your git repo:

mkdir mysite cd mysite mkdir deploy echo "Contains config meant to be deployed, see http://dcycleproject.org/blog/68" >> deploy/README.txt drush dl drupal-8.0.x mv drupal* drupal_root cp drupal_root/example.gitignore drupal_root/.gitignore git init git add . git commit -am 'initial commit'

Now let's install our first instance of the site:

cd drupal_root echo 'create database mysite'|mysql -uroot -proot drush si --db-url=mysql://root:root@localhost/mysite -y

Now create a site deployment module: here is the code that works for me. We'll set the correct site UUID in mysite_deploy.install later. Add this to git:

git add drupal_root/modules/custom git commit -am 'added site deployment module'

Now let's tell Drupal where our "deploy" config directory is:

  • Open sites/default/settings.php
  • Find the lines beginning with $config_directories
  • Add $config_directories['deploy'] = '../deploy';

We can now perform our first export of our site configuration:

cd drupal_root drush config-export deploy -y

You will now notice that your "deploy" directory is filled with your site's configuration files, and you can add them to git.

git add . git commit -am 'added config files'

Now we need to sync the site UUID from the database to the code, to make sure all subsequent instances of this site have the same UUID. Open deploy/system.site.yml and find UUID property, for example:

uuid: 03821007-701a-4231-8107-7abac53907b1 ...

Now add this same value to your site deployment module's .install file, for example:

... function mysite_deploy_install() { mysite_deploy_set_uuid('03821007-701a-4231-8107-7abac53907b1'); ... Let's create a view! A content type! Position a block!

To see how to export configuration, create some views and content types, position some blocks, and change the default theme.

Now let's export our changes

cd drupal_root drush config-export deploy -y

Your git repo will be changed accordingly

cd .. git status git add . git commit -am 'changed theme, blocks, content types, views' Deploying your Drupal 8 site

At this point you can push your code to a git server, and clone it to a dev server. For testing purposes, we will simply clone it directly

cd ../ git clone mysite mysite_destination cd mysite_destination/drupal_root echo 'create database mysite_destination'|mysql -uroot -proot drush si --db-url=mysql://root:root@localhost/mysite_destination -y

If you visit mysite_destination/drupal_root with a browser, you will see a plain new Drupal 8 site.

Before continuing, we need to open sites/default/settings.php on mysite_destination and add $config_directories['deploy'] = '../deploy';, as we did on the source site.

Now let the magic happen. Let's enable our site deployment module (to make sure our instance UUID is synched with our source site), and import our configuration from our "deploy" directory:

drush en mysite_deploy -y drush config-import deploy -y

Now, on your destination site, you will see all your views, content types, block placements, and the default theme.

This deployment technique, which can be combined with generated dummy content, allows one to create new instances very quickly for new developers, testing, demos, continuous integration, and for production.

Incrementally deploying your Drupal 8 site

What about changes you make to the codebase once everything is already deployed. Let's change a view and run:

cd drupal_root drush config-export deploy -y cd .. git commit -am 'more fields in view'

Let's deploy this now:

cd ../mysite_destination git pull origin master cd drupal_root drush config-import deploy -y

As you can see, incremental deployments are as easy and standardized as initial deployments, reducing the risk of errors, and allowing incremental deployments to be run automatically by a continuous integration server.

Next steps and conclusion

Some aspects of your site's configuration (what makes your site unique) still can't be exported via the config management system, for example enabling new modules; for that we'll use update hooks as in Drupal 7. I'm still having some errors doing this in D8, but I'm working on it!

Also, although a great GUI exists for importing and exporting configuration, I chose to do it on the command line so that I could easily create a Jenkins continuous integration job to deploy code to dev and run tests on each push.

For Drupal projects developed with a dev-stage-prod continuous integration workflow, the new config management system is a great productivity boost.

Tags: blogplanet
Categories: Elsewhere

Lucas Nussbaum: Will the packages you rely on be part of Debian Jessie?

Planet Debian - Wed, 10/09/2014 - 21:28

The start of the jessie freeze is quickly approaching, so now is a good time to ensure that packages you rely on will the part of the upcoming release. Thanks to automated removals, the number of release critical bugs has been kept low, but this was achieved by removing many packages from jessie: 841 packages from unstable are not part of jessie, and won’t be part of the release if things don’t change.

It is actually simple to check if you have packages installed locally that are part of those 841 packages:

  1. apt-get install how-can-i-help (available in backports if you don’t use testing or unstable)
  2. how-can-i-help --old
  3. Look at packages listed under Packages removed from Debian ‘testing’ and Packages going to be removed from Debian ‘testing’

Then, please fix all the bugs :-) Seriously, not all RC bugs are hard to fix. A good starting point to understand why a package is not part of jessie is tracker.d.o.

On my laptop, the two packages that are not part of jessie are the geeqie image viewer (which looks likely to be fixed in time), and josm, the OpenStreetMap editor, due to three RC bugs. It seems much harder to fix… If you fix it in time for jessie, I’ll offer you a $drink!

Categories: Elsewhere

Acquia: Mike Meyers explains – Help Drupal and it will help you: contribute!

Planet Drupal - Wed, 10/09/2014 - 21:20

Michael E. Meyers, VP Large Scale Drupal at Acquia, knows better than most how contributing to the open source project you are relying on to build or improve your business will pay off. He and his team did just that when they successfully built and sold NowPublic.com – the first venture capital funded, Drupal-based startup – while making massive contributions to the Drupal project along the way.

He and I invite you not only to use Drupal, but also to make it better and to get involved with its community. If you're only using it without giving back, you're not getting the full benefit it could be giving you. Come to DrupalCon Amsterdam or an event near you and make a difference!

Categories: Elsewhere

Pages

Subscribe to jfhovinne aggregator