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Sylvain Beucler: No to ACTA - Paris

Planet Debian - Fri, 20/11/2015 - 15:18

Today, there were events all around Europe to block ACTA.

In Paris, the protest started at Place de la Bastille :

APRIL was present, with in particular its president Lionel Allorge, and two members who wore the traditional anti-DRM suit :

Jérémie Zimmermann from La Quadrature du Net gave a speech and urged people to contact their legal representatives, in addition to protesting in the street :

The protest was cheerful and free of violence :

It got decent media coverage :

Notable places it crossed include Place des Victoires :

and Palais Royal, where it ended :

Next protest is in 2 weeks, on March 10th. Update your agenda!

Categories: Elsewhere

Sylvain Beucler: New free OpenGL ES documentation

Planet Debian - Fri, 20/11/2015 - 15:18

Great news!

The Learn OpenGL ES website recently switched its licensing to Creative Commons BY-SA 3.0


It provides tutorials for OpenGL ES using Java/Android and WebGL, and is focusing on a more community-oriented creative process. Give them cheers!

Categories: Elsewhere

Sylvain Beucler: Mini-sendmail... in bash

Planet Debian - Fri, 20/11/2015 - 15:18

I recently faced an environment where there is no MTA.

WTF? The reason is that people who work there get security audits on a regular basis, and the security people are usually mo...deratly skilled guys who blindly run a set of scripts, e.g. by ordering to disable Apache modules that "where seen enabled in /etc/apache2/mods-available/"...

To avoid spending days arguing with them and nitpicking with non-technical managers, the system is trimmed to the minimum - and there is no MTA. No MTA, so no cron output, so difficulty to understand why last night's cron job failed miserably.

Since it was not my role to reshape the whole business unit, I decided to hack a super-light, but functional way to get my cron output:

cat <<'EOF' > /usr/sbin/sendmail #!/bin/bash ( echo "From me $(LANG=C date)" cat echo ) >> /var/mail/all EOF chmod 755 /usr/sbin/sendmail

It works!

There is a companion logrotate script, to avoid filling the file system:

cat <<'EOF' > /etc/logrotate.d/mail-all /var/mail/all { daily rotate 10 compress delaycompress notifempty create 622 root mail } EOF

Bootstrap with:

touch /var/mail/all logrotate -f /var/mail/all

You now can check your sys-mails with:

mutt -f /var/mail/all

Categories: Elsewhere

Sylvain Beucler: Meritous: Free game ported on Android

Planet Debian - Fri, 20/11/2015 - 15:18

Meritous is a nice, addictive action-adventure dungeon crawl game. Each new game is unique since the dungeon is built in a semi-random fashion. Last but not least, the engine, graphics and sound effects are GPL'd

The game is based on SDL 1.2, which has an unofficial Android variant, so I decided to try and port it on my cell phone! The port was surprinsingly smooth and only non-SDL fixes (move big stack allocation to heap) were necessary. Who said it was difficult to program in C on Android?

It was also an opportunity to study the build system for F-Droid, an app market for free software apps, where APKs are rebuilt from source. The spec-like file is here.

The game packaging is also being ressurected for Debian but is being distressfully held hostage in the NEW queue for 2 weeks!

You can download the very first (aka beta) Android version:

  • for free at F-Droid
  • for 0.50€ at GPlay - because publishing at GPlay costs $25 (+30% of sells..)

Comments welcome!

Categories: Elsewhere

Timo Jyrinki: Converting an existing installation to LUKS using luksipc

Planet Debian - Fri, 20/11/2015 - 15:14
This is a burst of notes that I wrote in an e-mail in June when asked about it, and I'm not going to have any better steps since I don't remember even that amount as back then. I figured it's better to have it out than not.

So... if you want to use LUKS In-Place Conversion Tool, the notes below on converting a shipped-with-Ubuntu Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition (2015 Intel Broadwell model) may help you. There were a couple of small learnings to be had...
The page http://www.johannes-bauer.com/linux/luksipc/ itself is good and without errors, although funnily uses reiserfs as an example. It was only a bit unclear why I did save the initial_keyfile.bin since it was then removed in the next step (I guess it's for the case you want to have a recovery file hidden somewhere in case you forget the passphrase).

For using the tool I booted from a 14.04.2 LTS USB live image and operated there, including downloading and compiling luksipc in the live session. The exact reason of resizing before luksipc was a bit unclear to me at first so I simply indeed resized the main rootfs partition and left unallocated space in the partition table.

Then finally I ran ./luksipc -d /dev/sda4 etc.

I realized I want /boot to be on an unencrypted partition to be able to load the kernel + initrd from grub before entering into LUKS unlocking. I couldn't resize the luks partition anymore since it was encrypted... So I resized what I think was the empty small DIAGS partition (maybe used for some system diagnostic or something, I don't know), or possibly the next one that is the actual recovery partition one can reinstall the pre-installed Ubuntu from. And naturally I had some problems because it seems vfatresize tool didn't do what I wanted it to do and gparted simply crashed when I tried to use it first to do the same. Anyway, when done with getting some extra free space somewhere, I used the remaining 350MB for /boot where I copied the rootfs's /boot contents to.

After adding the passphrase in luks I had everything encrypted etc and decryptable, but obviously I could only access it from a live session by manual cryptsetup luksOpen + mount /dev/mapper/myroot commands. I needed to configure GRUB, and I needed to do it with the grub-efi-amd64 which was a bit unfamiliar to me. There's also grub-efi-amd64-signed I have installed now but I'm not sure if it was required for the configuration. Secure boot is not enabled by default in BIOS so maybe it isn't needed.

I did GRUB installation – I think inside rootfs chroot where I also mounted /dev/sda6 as /boot (inside the rootfs chroot), ie mounted dev, sys with -o bind to under the chroot (from outside chroot) and mount -t proc proc proc too. I did a lot of trial and effort so I surely also tried from outside the chroot, in the live session, using some parameters to point to the mounted rootfs's directories...

I needed to definitely install cryptsetup etc inside the encrypted rootfs with apt, and I remember debugging for some time if they went to the initrd correctly after I executed mkinitramfs/update-initramfs inside the chroot.

At the end I had grub asking for the password correctly at bootup. Obviously I had edited the rootfs's /etc/fstab to include the new /boot partition, I changed / to be "UUID=/dev/mapper/myroot /     ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       ", kept /boot/efi as coming from the /dev/sda1 and so on. I had also added "myroot /dev/sda4 none luks" to /etc/crypttab. I seem to also have GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="cryptdevice=/dev/sda4:myroot root=/dev/mapper/myroot" in /etc/default/grub.

The only thing I did save from the live session was the original partition table if I want to revert.

So the original was:

Found valid GPT with protective MBR; using GPT.
Disk /dev/sda: 500118192 sectors, 238.5 GiB
Logical sector size: 512 bytes
First usable sector is 34, last usable sector is 500118158
Partitions will be aligned on 2048-sector boundaries
Total free space is 6765 sectors (3.3 MiB) 
Number  Start (sector)    End (sector)  Size       Code  Name
1            2048         1026047   500.0 MiB   EF00  EFI system partition
2         1026048         1107967   40.0 MiB    FFFF  Basic data partition
3         1107968         7399423   3.0 GiB     0700  Basic data partition
4         7399424       467013631   219.2 GiB   8300
5       467017728       500117503   15.8 GiB    8200

And I now have:

Number  Start (sector)    End (sector)  Size       Code  Name
1            2048         1026047   500.0 MiB   EF00  EFI system partition
2         1026048         1107967   40.0 MiB    FFFF  Basic data partition
3         1832960         7399423   2.7 GiB     0700  Basic data partition
4         7399424       467013631   219.2 GiB   8300
5       467017728       500117503   15.8 GiB    8200
6         1107968         1832959   354.0 MiB   8300

So it seems I did not edit DIAGS (and it was also originally just 40MB) but did something with the recovery partition while preserving its contents. It's a FAT partition so maybe I was able to somehow resize it after all.

The 16GB partition is the default swap partition. I did not encrypt it at least yet, I tend to not run into swap anyway ever in my normal use with the 8GB RAM.

If you go this route, good luck! :D
Categories: Elsewhere

Pau Garcia i Quiles: Desktops DevRoom @ FOSDEM 2016: Have you submitted your talk yet?

Planet Debian - Fri, 20/11/2015 - 14:50

FOSDEM 2016 is going to be great (again!) and you still have the chance to be one of the stars.

Have you submitted your talk to the Desktops DevRoom yet?


Remember: we will only accept proposals until December 6th. After that, the Organization Team will get busy and vote and choose the talks.

Here is the full Call for Participation, in case you need to check the details on how to submit:

FOSDEM Desktops DevRoom 2016 Call for Participation

Topics include anything related to the Desktop: desktop environments, software development for desktop/cross-platform, applications, UI, etc

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Commerce: Commerce 2.x Stories: Products

Planet Drupal - Fri, 20/11/2015 - 12:57

Previously we talked about currencies and stores. This week we’ll focus on products.

Read on...

Categories: Elsewhere

Freelock : Content Management on the Web has changed. Today.

Planet Drupal - Fri, 20/11/2015 - 02:03
November 2015

Today marks the release of Drupal 8, and the birthday of its founder, Dries Buytaert. This release is more than just a new digit, it's an entirely new platform with something for everyone to love, but it's particularly big for web site owners.

What's the big deal? The biggest, most powerful, one of the most successful open source projects in the world has two major, fundamental changes that change everything you thought you knew about it.

Well, not everything. Lots of the things that people love about Drupal are getting some nice improvements:

  • Mobile, responsive support straight out of the box -- it's actually a nice experience administering a D8 site on your phone!
  • The information architecture is the same as always -- content types, vocabularies, comments, anything you've learned about how content is organized in Drupal is the same, but...
  • Lots of powerful modules like Views and CKEditor are now in core, and much less quirky than ever before
  • Deploying updates and configuration settings between multiple copies of the site is completely overhauled, and now very simple to do
  • Caching support is baked in, enabled by default, so in spite of doubling in code size it uses less computing resources and responds much faster, especially on busy sites
  • Loads of other improvements.

All of that is great, and we could go on for hours, days about how much of an improvement this is. And that is the stuff you will notice today, next week, next month. But that's not the big change, that's not the killer feature of this upgrade for site owners.

The killer feature is what happens in 6 months, in 1 year, in 5 years. And that is, the great big upgrade cost you don't have, when it's time to upgrade to 8.1.0, or 8.2.0, or even 9.0.0.

Two Fundamental Changes.

Ask any Drupal site owner where their biggest pain is. You'll run into two big complaints: How hard it is to find decent Drupal developer talent, and how painful it is to migrate to the next version. Those both change with Drupal 8.

The next version

The current version of Drupal 7 is 7.41. The new version of Drupal 8 is 8.0.0. The next version of Drupal 7 will be 7.42. The next version of Drupal 8 will be 8.0.1. Notice anything different? It's called "Semantic versioning," and yes, it's just one more number between the dots (or added to the end). But the change behind that simple little version number is enormous.

Drupal is changing its entire release process to have "minor" version releases every 6 months. That means 6 months from now will be 8.1.0, and in a year, 8.2.0. These are calendar-based releases that contain new functionality, AND maintain backwards compatibility with the previous minor version. Upgrades from 8.0.4 to 8.1.0 should be completely transparent, nothing breaking as a result -- but new stuff available.

Drupal has never maintained backwards compatibility like this before -- this is a fundamental change in the project, and it represents the maturity the platform has reached.

There will only be a Drupal 9 when there's enough changes that are not backwards compatible that it's time for a new major release. But this "minor release" plan provides plenty of notice of functionality being deprecated to allow people to transition away from those things that are going away, long before 9 arrives.

That means an update to Drupal 9, will mostly be a matter of making sure you've either moved away from stuff being changed in Drupal 8, or have added an alternative. And then update, potentially like any other minor release.

No more completely rebuilding your site in the new version! For the first time ever, major version updates in Drupal should be relatively painless, as long as you keep your site relatively current and pay attention to changes as they develop.

"Drupal Developers"

Drupal has always come with a steep learning curve, particularly for developers. This is because it has developed out of procedural code, with a "hook" system and naming conventions that make a lot of things happen "automagically". It takes a couple years to get your head around the many Drupalisms, code patterns, hooks, conventions that are not seen or used in most other projects. You need to be very proficient in coding, using a debugger, and having an open mind to be a good Drupal developer... until now.

"Object Oriented" is a term that came in vogue in development circles... in the 1960s. It became the dominant way of programming in the 1990s, particularly with the rise of Java in popularity, and it's at the heart of .NET as well as many open source practices. And while Drupal uses a lot of object-oriented concepts in its information architecture, it has never been fully object-oriented in its code... until Drupal 8.

Why should a site owner care about this? Two huge benefits -- the same two I'm talking about here:

  • Drupal development now shares the same programming architecture as 90% of the rest of the industry, instead of being its own thing. Now you don't need to find a good "Drupal developer" -- a good developer should be able to pick it up and figure it out without years of learning the specific incantations and magic charms of all those Drupalisms.
  • Updates. Because we now encapsulate all this code into objects that extend other classes, this allows for upgrading smaller bits of functionality without affecting the rest of the site. This means that it should be possible to upgrade some modules to Drupal 9, before the site itself.

I think a lot of people in the Drupal community don't fully realize how huge a change this is (and it is interesting to see some backlash to the changes from those who may fear some of this change).

In other words, when Drupal 9 eventually arrives, it won't be such a big deal -- it should be possible to run exactly the same contributed modules for Drupal 8 and Drupal 9, with no changes whatsoever -- and even if something important does need to change, it can be changed by inserting a "shim" class that translates the API changes as appropriate -- it will almost certainly be possible to run Drupal 9 modules in Drupal 8, and vice versa. And you won't have to find a Drupal-specific developer to do this for you, either.

The new world of web applications

Drupal has long been a compelling platform in terms of functionality, the speed that new functionality becomes available, and the power built into the system. Drupal 8 is not just another release -- it is the maturing of this platform into something that is completely up-to-date and capable of staying that way for at least the next decade, if not more.

If you are looking for a new content management system, a new project management system, a new platform for managing all kinds of communications between groups of people, you can't pick a better base for doing so than Drupal 8. Give us a call, and let's discuss what you want to build!

Categories: Elsewhere

Out & About On The Third Rock: An Engagement Manager’s Guide To Site Building In Drupal 8 – Week 03

Planet Drupal - Fri, 20/11/2015 - 01:02
More a log than a guide, but you get the idea! its a lengthy log this week, a lot got undone, done and then some. Day 1 Backlog for the week: Fonts Contact Form (customise it) Translations (Lingotek)   Take the site online  Toy around with Drush Not part of the backlog, decided to update core, followed the instructions to the letter, used Drush and broke […]
Categories: Elsewhere

OSTraining: The Drupal 8 Beginner Class is Here and is Free

Planet Drupal - Fri, 20/11/2015 - 00:43

Congratulations to the Drupal community. Today, they released Drupal 8!

It has been an epic journey to get here. Back in March 2011, we sat in the audience at DrupalCon Chicago and listened to Dries' plans for Drupal 8. To get from Chicago to today has taken over 1770 days, 3000 contributors and 350,000 lines of code.

Drupal 8 is far larger, more powerful and more modern than anything Drupal has released before.

Categories: Elsewhere

Doug Vann: Drupal 8 launches today and here I sit thinking about BackdropCMS

Planet Drupal - Thu, 19/11/2015 - 23:52

Where I am:

  • Today [11/19/15] is the BIG day! Finally, Drupal 8 launches!
  • I have co-planned a party at my local Drupal group here in Indianapolis.
  • I just paid $12 for this giant, blue “8” balloon! [woot woot!]
  • At that party I will be delivering a show-n-tell of the new Drupal 8 back end.
  • I have shared/authored social media posts to push the BUZZ along.
  • Drupal 7 work still keeps me busy and pays the bills. 

Where I’m going

  • Tomorrow and the day after [11/20/15 & 11/21/15] I will be delivering 2 separate, free, 4hr Drupal 8 trainings for the Drupal Association’s Global Training Days
  • I’m happy to say I’m working on a D8 book for a major publisher! [more on that when allowed]
  • I still have a DEEP desire to work further on my BackdropCMS site which, to date, has served as a playground for exploring functionality.

The longer road ahead, as I see it

I have already stated that I’m a huge fan of what BackdropCMS represents. I believe in the the market viability of BackdropCMS. As you can tell, I’m also very excited at what Drupal 8 represents in the evolution of the web as we know it. I plan on using both as needed.

How do I reconcile the two? It’s quite easy. I have long felt that Drupal 8 is moving “Up Market.” No matter how you define that, it is true on many levels. I have no problem with this. It’s a natural evolution and I agree with those who said was long long long long overdue. I tend to agree. HOWEVER… I’m already on the record as saying that some of the changes in Drupal 8 can, will, and already have cost us some marketshare. This is where I believe BackdropCMS is a highly effective tool for keeping these existing sites from migrating to WP or some proprietary platform. Many clients around the world are super happy with their D7 sites, and they will remain happy for some time to come. It is a matter of time before we start seeing D7 sites move off of D7. Some will head to D8. Many will not. I want to be at the intersection when they change roads!

A few words about the “Ownership Society”

I have also bloviated at length about how Drupal promotes an ownership society where a team of non-CompSci grads can make amazing websites with Drupal. I keep saying that Drupal 8 raises the bar to the point that many of the current satisfied D7 users will need to rely on vendors to do the things that they currently do themselves. Then along comes BackdropCMS. Bringing balance to The Force BackdropCMS will once again empower those who are thriving in the Ownership Society that is, at least to some degree, no longer there in Drupal 8.

Drupal Planet

View the discussion thread.

Categories: Elsewhere

Matthew Garrett: If it's not practical to redistribute free software, it's not free software in practice

Planet Debian - Thu, 19/11/2015 - 23:16
I've previously written about Canonical's obnoxious IP policy and how Mark Shuttleworth admits it's deliberately vague. After spending some time discussing specific examples with Canonical, I've been explicitly told that while Canonical will gladly give me a cost-free trademark license permitting me to redistribute unmodified Ubuntu binaries, they will not tell me what Any redistribution of modified versions of Ubuntu must be approved, certified or provided by Canonical if you are going to associate it with the Trademarks. Otherwise you must remove and replace the Trademarks and will need to recompile the source code to create your own binaries actually means.

Why does this matter? The free software definition requires that you be able to redistribute software to other people in either unmodified or modified form without needing to ask for permission first. This makes it clear that Ubuntu itself isn't free software - distributing the individual binary packages without permission is forbidden, even if they wouldn't contain any infringing trademarks[1]. This is obnoxious, but not inherently toxic. The source packages for Ubuntu could still be free software, making it fairly straightforward to build a free software equivalent.

Unfortunately, while true in theory, this isn't true in practice. The issue here is the apparently simple phrase you must remove and replace the Trademarks and will need to recompile the source code. "Trademarks" is defined later as being the words "Ubuntu", "Kubuntu", "Juju", "Landscape", "Edubuntu" and "Xubuntu" in either textual or logo form. The naive interpretation of this is that you have to remove trademarks where they'd be infringing - for instance, shipping the Ubuntu bootsplash as part of a modified product would almost certainly be clear trademark infringement, so you shouldn't do that. But that's not what the policy actually says. It insists that all trademarks be removed, whether they would embody an infringement or not. If a README says "To build this software under Ubuntu, install the following packages", a literal reading of Canonical's policy would require you to remove or replace the word "Ubuntu" even though failing to do so wouldn't be a trademark infringement. If an @ubuntu.com email address is present in a changelog, you'd have to change it. You wouldn't be able to ship the juju-core package without renaming it and the application within. If this is what the policy means, it's so impractical to be able to rebuild Ubuntu that it's not free software in any meaningful way.

This seems like a pretty ludicrous interpretation, but it's one that Canonical refuse to explicitly rule out. Compare this to Red Hat's requirements around Fedora - if you replace the fedora-logos, fedora-release and fedora-release-notes packages with your own content, you're good. A policy like this satisfies the concerns that Dustin raised over people misrepresenting their products, but still makes it easy for users to distribute modified code to other users. There's nothing whatsoever stopping Canonical from adopting a similarly unambiguous policy.

Mark has repeatedly asserted that attempts to raise this issue are mere FUD, but he won't answer you if you ask him direct questions about this policy and will insist that it's necessary to protect Ubuntu's brand. The reality is that if Debian had had an identical policy in 2004, Ubuntu wouldn't exist. The effort required to strip all Debian trademarks from the source packages would have been immense[2], and this would have had to be repeated for every release. While this policy is in place, nobody's going to be able to take Ubuntu and build something better. It's grotesquely hypocritical, especially when the Ubuntu website still talks about their belief that people should be able to distribute modifications without licensing fees.

All that's required for Canonical to deal with this problem is to follow Fedora's lead and isolate their trademarks in a small set of packages, then tell users that those packages must be replaced if distributing a modified version of Ubuntu. If they're serious about this being a branding issue, they'll do it. And if I'm right that the policy is deliberately obfuscated so Canonical can encourage people to buy licenses, they won't. It's easy for them to prove me wrong, and I'll be delighted if they do. Let's see what happens.

[1] The policy is quite clear on this. If you want to distribute something other than an unmodified Ubuntu image, you have two choices:
  1. Gain approval or certification from Canonical
  2. Remove all trademarks and recompile the source code
Note that option 2 requires you to rebuild even if there are no trademarks to remove.

[2] Especially when every source package contains a directory called "debian"…

Categories: Elsewhere

Jay L.ee: How To Solve Drupal 8.0.0's Requirements Problem On WampServer

Planet Drupal - Thu, 19/11/2015 - 23:02

Today is a big day for Drupal, as Drupal 8.0.0 just got released a few hours ago. So since people from all over the world will be installing it today to build websites, I'll show you guys how to solve some unusual problems that you might encounter during the installation process. When you install it on your web server, you should be most likely just fine. However, you will undoubtedly encounter the following three problems if you decide to install it on a brand new installation of WampServer (current version: 2.5):

Drupal 8.0.0 Requirements Problem

Tags: Drupal Planet
Categories: Elsewhere

Palantir: Drupal 8 is here

Planet Drupal - Thu, 19/11/2015 - 20:34

Drupal 8 launched today, and with it comes a host of enhancements that benefit all of us – clients and partners alike. We're particularly excited because we – alongside thousands of others – helped architect, build, and troubleshoot Drupal 8 through its entire development process. A number of those key core contributors are on the Palantir staff, too (huge thanks to Larry, Ken, Bec, Andrea, Robin, Greg, Kelsey, Joe, and Arthur, among others!).

In fact, Palantir team members have been deeply involved in Drupal 8’s development since its start, providing technical leadership for the Web Services and Context Core and Mobile initiatives, core development support, and sprint organization. We were also an anchor sponsor for the Drupal 8 Accelerate fund which raised over $250,000 for development work on Drupal 8 to get it to completion.

For our clients, this new version introduces hundreds of breakthrough features that will help you deliver the right experience and content for your users, regardless of their location or the device on which they are viewing your site (not to mention how your editors are publishing content).

  • Mobile-first: Allows content authors to publish content on any device. The entire Drupal 8 user interface has been made responsive.
  • Multichannel, Dynamic Content Delivery: Delivers content “as a service” to any site, device, native application, or emerging channel with RESTful APIs.
  • Front-end Flexibility: Embraces client-side frameworks like Ember.js, Angular, and Backbone so front-end developers can get creative with experience delivery.
  • Enhanced Usability: Offers a reimagined, easier-to-use authoring experience, with a new editor tool and streamlined in-line, in-context authoring.
  • Translation and Globalization: Designed to support global digital strategies, Drupal 8 transforms content management localization.
  • Faster Development: Introduces an object-oriented web development framework and includes built-in Symfony components, staged configuration management, and improved unit testing support.
  • Faster Dynamic Content: Accelerates content delivery with dynamic caching for personalized, data-driven user experiences.

We've shared a great deal on Drupal 8 in the past with Larry "Crell" Garfield's D8FTW! blog series and subsequent world tour, other keynotes and presentations, and CEO Tiffany Farriss' keynote for Chicago-based Midcamp, not to mention our Founder and CEO George DeMet's recent post on what Drupal 8 means for sites of the future.

We truly look forward to sharing our vast Drupal 8 knowledge and expertise for our clients, and continuing to act as mentors and thought leaders in our Drupal development community.

For partners like Palantir, Drupal 8 provides us a powerful object-oriented, API-based architecture that enables us to do what we do best with custom PHP code, and makes it even easier for us to create code that makes Drupal play nice with countless PHP technologies and third-party integrations that so many of our clients rely on. We love this flexibility, and the fact that it modernizes the platform in a really important way.

Dries Buytaert, creator and project lead of Drupal and co-founder of Acquia says Drupal 8, “...provides a modern development framework, a reimagined user experience, and tools that empower builders to create digital experiences that are multilingual, mobile and highly personalized."

This is important for our clients since it enables them to meet their business goals more quickly. And we can use our strategy, design, and development expertise combined with our decade of Drupal experience to provide you and your audience a world-class, truly sustainable solution for years to come.

Curious about Drupal 8, and what it means for your organization?
Get in touch today, and we'll be happy to provide even more reasons why this modern, open source solution is not only an incredibly compelling choice for you, but the right one.

Let's all raise our a glass to toast Drupal 8's release, and what it means for all of us. Cheers!

Categories: Elsewhere

Chapter Three: 8 Months of Drupal 8 On Production

Planet Drupal - Thu, 19/11/2015 - 19:21

As we get ready for our Drupal 8 release party today, over here at Chapter Three, Drupal 8 is starting to feel a lot more like business as usual. We launched our first Drupal 8 production site on 4/11/2015. In the intervening 8 months, we've built a few other Drupal 8 projects, and our team has learned a whole lot about what it means to do continuous development on this new version of Drupal.

Categories: Elsewhere

Lullabot: The Lullabot Podcast is back! Drupal 8! The Past! The Future!

Planet Drupal - Thu, 19/11/2015 - 18:21
Drupal 8 is here! The Lullabot Podcast is back! It's an exciting time to be alive. We talk about where we've been, before we look ahead to see where we're going. Oh, and we want to hear from you. Leave us listener feedback at 1-877-LULLABOT x789.
Categories: Elsewhere

Wim Leers: Drupal 8: BigPipe module ready

Planet Drupal - Thu, 19/11/2015 - 15:55

I’m happy to announce that Fabian Franz and I managed to get a first release of BigPipe published today, coinciding with the Drupal 8.0.0 release!

Rather than explaining what it does, see for yourself:

(That’s with 2 slow blocks that take 3 s to render. Only one is cacheable. Hence the page load takes ~6 s with cold caches, ~3 s with warm caches.)

Go download BigPipe 8.x-1.0-beta1!1

Fastest Drupal yet!

After Drupal 8 already shipping with both the Page Cache and Dynamic Page Cache enabled by default earlier, this is the third and final step in our quest to make the entire web fast.

  • Fast anonymous user page loads: Page Cache — entire page is cached.
  • Fast authenticated user page loads: BigPipe — majority of page including main content is cached (thanks to Dynamic Page Cache) and sent first, the rest is rendered later and streamed.

Go and enjoy the fastest Drupal yet!2

P.S.: none of this would have been possible without my employer Acquia, whom sponsored both my time and Fabian’s to make BigPipe a reality.

  1. We were able to release it today because the code was ready: it was developed over the course of several months in a Drupal core issue and “just” moved into a module, with every commit matching a comment in the issue, to make it easier to understand how the code base got to this point. 

  2. And please report any issues you encounter at d.o/project/issues/big_pipe — depending on how well BigPipe works in the real world during Drupal 8.0.x, we should be able to get it into Drupal 8.1.x core! 

  • Acquia
  • Drupal
  • performance
Categories: Elsewhere

Dries Buytaert: Drupal 8.0.0 released

Planet Drupal - Thu, 19/11/2015 - 15:54

We just released Drupal 8.0.0! Today really marks the beginning of a new era for Drupal. Over the course of almost five years, we've brought the work of more than 3,000 contributors together to make something that is more flexible, more innovative, more easy to use, and more scalable.

Drupal 8 has been a big transformation for our community. This particular reboot has taken one-third of Drupal's lifespan to complete. In the process we've learned that reinvention doesn't come easily or quickly. There are huge market forces happening around us, and we can't exactly look away. Mobile is moving our society to near-universal, global internet access. Most companies have begun to transform themselves digitally, leaving established business models and old business processes in the dust. Digital experience builders are turning to platforms that give them greater flexibility, better usability, better integrations, and faster innovation. The pace of change in the digital world has become dizzying. If we were to ignore these market forces, Drupal would be caught flat-footed and quickly become irrelevant.

But we didn't. I'm proud to see that we've responded to these market forces with Drupal 8, and delivered a robust, solid product that can be used to build next-generation websites, web applications and digital experiences. We've implemented a more modern development framework, reimagined the usability and authoring experience, and made technical improvements that will help us build for the multilingual, mobile and highly personalized experiences of the future. From how we model content and get content in and out the system, to how we build and assemble experiences on various devices, to how we scale that to millions and millions of pageviews -- it all got much better with Drupal 8.

I'm personally incredibly proud of this release. Drupal 8 is the result of years of hard work and innovation by thousands of people, with lots of attention to detail at every level. Congratulations to everyone who stepped up to contribute; this was only possible thanks to your persistence and tireless hard work. It took a lot of learning, our best thinking and our best people to create Drupal 8, and I'm very, very proud of what we have accomplished together.

For 15 years, I have believed that Open Source offers significant advantages to proprietary solutions through superior innovation. Today, I believe that more than ever. Drupal 8 is another key milestone in helping us win and doing what is best for an open web. Of course, our job is not done but now is the time to have fun and celebrate this monumental milestone. Tonight, we'll be hosting more than 200 parties around the world! (It's also my 37th birthday today and the release of Drupal 8 along with all those parties is pretty much the best present ever!)

Categories: Elsewhere


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