Feed aggregator

KnackForge: To check Caps lock is on/off status in jQuery

Planet Drupal - Mon, 27/10/2014 - 19:49
I'm sure that this script will help you in some of your projects that needs a username and password. Sometimes when we want access to a secure page that asks for a username and password and we submit the information but we didn't know that the password was submitted in upper case, we get an error.   Solution:  jQuery('#username').keypress(function(e) { var s = String.fromCharCode( e.which ); if ( s.toUpperCase() === s && s.toLowerCase() !== s && !e.shiftKey ) { jQuery('#capslockdiv').show(); } else { jQuery('#capslockdiv').hide(); } }); jQuery('#password').keypress(function(e) { var s = String.fromCharCode( e.which ); if ( s.toUpperCase() === s && s.toLowerCase() !== s && !e.shiftKey ) { jQuery('#capslockdiv').show(); } else { jQuery('#capslockdiv').hide(); } });

Sample HTML code

Categories: Elsewhere

a-fro.com: Keeping Compiled CSS Out of your Git Repository on Acquia

Planet Drupal - Mon, 27/10/2014 - 17:13
Keeping Compiled CSS Out of your Git Repository on Acquia

A couple of months ago, after a harrowing cascade of git merge conflicts involving compiled css, we decided it was time to subscribe to the philosophy that compiled CSS doesn't belong in a git repository.

Mon, 10/27/2014 - 12:13 aaron
Categories: Elsewhere

TimOnWeb.com: How To Force Search API To Reindex a Node / an Entity

Planet Drupal - Mon, 27/10/2014 - 17:00

By default Search API (Drupal 7) reindexes a node when the node gets updated. But what if you want to reindex a node / an entity on demand or via some other hook i.e. outside of update cycle?

Turned out it is a quite simple exercise. You just need to execute this function call whenever you want to reindex a node / an entity:

Drupal Tags  drupal 7, drupal planet Read on about How To Force Search API To Reindex a Node / an Entity
Categories: Elsewhere

KnackForge: Add class to image tags and panel titles

Planet Drupal - Mon, 27/10/2014 - 16:20

      Nowadays twitter bootstrap theme has become famous among Drupal world due to its flexibility for responsive websites. It is very easy to apply responsive css to the web page by adding appropriate bootstrap classes. If you are new to the twitter bootstrap theme, see here http://getbootstrap.com/css/ for more details about classes. Is it easy to add class to drupal site pages ? If yes, what to do to add class to panel title and image tags ? Lets come to the heart of the topic.

Adding class to panel title

      Eventhough it is easy to apply responsive css to the web page, when comes to drupal site we need to follow some standard approaches for adding classes. I need to add class to panel title in one of my requirements. By sticking with standard approach for this, I found this hook template_preprocess_panels_pane very useful to add class to panel title. Below code snippet will explain more detail about the usage.

function themename_preprocess_panels_pane(&$variables) { $variables['title_attributes_array']['class'][] = 'your class'; }

The above code snippet need to be written in theme's template.php file.

Adding class to img tags

      Then I need to add class to img tags to make the image responsive as one of my requirements. Similar to panel, I found this hook template_preprocess_image very useful to achieve this. See the below code snippet to know in detail

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupalize.Me: Using A Remote Debugger With CasperJS and PhantomJS

Planet Drupal - Mon, 27/10/2014 - 15:04

Earlier this year fellow Lullabot Juampy wrote about how we've started using CasperJS at Lullabot in order to do regression testing. I haven't had much chance to dig into it until recently, when we decided to implement some CasperJS tests for Drupalize.Me. So far, I'm really enjoying it—except for those occasions where something in my test is simply not working, and I end up spending hours asking CasperJS to take screenshots using console.log(), and trying to figure out what is going on. Fed up with this process I wanted a debugger.

Categories: Elsewhere

Patrick Matthäi: BASH fix Debian Lenny (5.0) CVE-2014-6271, CVE-2014-7169 aka Shellshock

Planet Debian - Mon, 27/10/2014 - 13:11

Hello,

I have decided to create fixed bash packages for Debian Lenny. I have applied the upstream patchsets from from 052 until 057, so some other issues are also addressed in it. :-)
And here they are:

Source .dsc: http://misc.linux-dev.org/bash_shellshock/bash_3.2-4.1.dsc
amd64 package: http://misc.linux-dev.org/bash_shellshock/bash_3.2-4.1_amd64.deb
i386 package: http://misc.linux-dev.org/bash_shellshock/bash_3.2-4.1_i386.deb

Much fun with it!

Categories: Elsewhere

Joey Hess: a programmable alarm clock using systemd

Planet Debian - Sun, 26/10/2014 - 23:00

I've taught my laptop to wake up at 7:30 in the morning. When it does, it will run whatever's in my ~/bin/goodmorning script. Then, if the lid is still closed, it will go back to sleep again.

So, it's a programmable alarm clock that doesn't need the laptop to be left turned on to work.

But it doesn't have to make noise and wake me up (I rarely want to be woken up by an alarm; the sun coming in the window is a much nicer method). It can handle other tasks like downloading my email, before I wake up. When I'm at home and on dialup, this tends to take an hour in the morning, so it's nice to let it happen before I get up.

This took some time to figure out, but it's surprisingly simple. Besides ~/bin/goodmorning, which can be any program/script, I needed just two files to configure systemd to do this.

First, /etc/systemd/system/goodmorning.timer

[Unit] Description=good morning [Timer] Unit=goodmorning.service OnCalendar=*-*-* 7:30 WakeSystem=true Persistent=false [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target

Second, /etc/systemd/system/goodmorning.service

[Unit] Description=good morning RefuseManualStart=true RefuseManualStop=true ConditionACPower=true [Service] Type=oneshot ExecStart=/bin/systemd-inhibit --what=handle-lid-switch --why=goodmorning /bin/su joey -c /home/joey/bin/goodmorning

After installing these files, run (as root): systemctl enable goodmorning.timer; systemctl start goodmorning.timer

Then, you'll also need to edit /etc/systemd/logind.conf, and set LidSwitchIgnoreInhibited=no -- this overrides the default, which is not to let systemd-inhibit block sleep on lid close.

The WakeSystem=true relies on some hardware support for waking from sleep; my laptop supported it with no trouble but I don't know how broadly available that is.

I don't think this would be anywhere near as easy to do without systemd, logind, etc. Especially the handling of waking the system at the right time, and the behavior around lid sleep inhibiting. Also, notice the ConditionACPower=true, which I added once I realized I don't want the job to run if I forgot to leave the laptop plugged in overnight. Quite a lot of nice peices of systemd all working together here!

(It would perhaps be better to use the per-user systemd, not the system wide one. Then I could change the time the alarm runs without using root. What's prevented me from doing this is that systemd-inhibit uses policykit, and policykit prevents it from being used in this situation. It's a lot easier to run it as root and use su, than it is to reconfigure policykit.)

Categories: Elsewhere

Hideki Yamane: Open Source Conference 2014 Tokyo/Fall

Planet Debian - Sun, 26/10/2014 - 23:00

18th and 19th October,  "Open Source Conference 2014 Tokyo/Fall" was held in Meisei University, Tokyo.  About 1,500 participates there. "Tokyo area Debian Study Meeting" booth was there, provided some flyers, DVDs and chat.

 

 
In our Debian community session, Nobuhiro Iwamatsu talked about status of Debian8 "Jessie". Thanks, Nobuhiro :)

It seems to be not a "conference" itself but a festival for FOSS and other IT community members, so they enjoyed a lot.





... and we also enjoyed beer after party (of course :)



see you - next event!
Categories: Elsewhere

Colin Watson: Moving on, but not too far

Planet Debian - Sun, 26/10/2014 - 22:55

The Ubuntu Code of Conduct says:

Step down considerately: When somebody leaves or disengages from the project, we ask that they do so in a way that minimises disruption to the project. They should tell people they are leaving and take the proper steps to ensure that others can pick up where they left off.

I've been working on Ubuntu for over ten years now, almost right from the very start; I'm Canonical's employee #17 due to working out a notice period in my previous job, but I was one of the founding group of developers. I occasionally tell the story that Mark originally hired me mainly to work on what later became Launchpad Bugs due to my experience maintaining the Debian bug tracking system, but then not long afterwards Jeff Waugh got in touch and said "hey Colin, would you mind just sorting out some installable CD images for us?". This is where you imagine one of those movie time-lapse clocks ... At some point it became fairly clear that I was working on Ubuntu, and the bug system work fell to other people. Then, when Matt Zimmerman could no longer manage the entire Ubuntu team in Canonical by himself, Scott James Remnant and I stepped up to help him out. I did that for a couple of years, starting the Foundations team in the process. As the team grew I found that my interests really lay in hands-on development rather than in management, so I switched over to being the technical lead for Foundations, and have made my home there ever since. Over the years this has given me the opportunity to do all sorts of things, particularly working on our installers and on the GRUB boot loader, leading the development work on many of our archive maintenance tools, instituting the +1 maintenance effort and proposed-migration, and developing the Click package manager, and I've had the great pleasure of working with many exceptionally talented people.

However. In recent months I've been feeling a general sense of malaise and what I've come to recognise with hindsight as the symptoms of approaching burnout. I've been working long hours for a long time, and while I can draw on a lot of experience by now, it's been getting harder to summon the enthusiasm and creativity to go with that. I have a wonderful wife, amazing children, and lovely friends, and I want to be able to spend a bit more time with them. After ten years doing the same kinds of things, I've accreted history with and responsibility for a lot of projects. One of the things I always loved about Foundations was that it's a broad church, covering a wide range of software and with a correspondingly wide range of opportunities; but, over time, this has made it difficult for me to focus on things that are important because there are so many areas where I might be called upon to help. I thought about simply stepping down from the technical lead position and remaining in the same team, but I decided that that wouldn't make enough of a difference to what matters to me. I need a clean break and an opportunity to reset my habits before I burn out for real.

One of the things that has consistently held my interest through all of this has been making sure that the infrastructure for Ubuntu keeps running reliably and that other developers can work efficiently. As part of this, I've been able to do a lot of work over the years on Launchpad where it was a good fit with my remit: this has included significant performance improvements to archive publishing, moving most archive administration operations from excessively-privileged command-line operations to the webservice, making build cancellation reliable across the board, and moving live filesystem building from an unscalable ad-hoc collection of machines into the Launchpad build farm. The Launchpad development team has generally welcomed help with open arms, and in fact I joined the ~launchpad team last year.

So, the logical next step for me is to make this informal involvement permanent. As such, at the end of this year I will be moving from Ubuntu Foundations to the Launchpad engineering team.

This doesn't mean me leaving Ubuntu. Within Canonical, Launchpad development is currently organised under the Continuous Integration team, which is part of Ubuntu Engineering. I'll still be around in more or less the usual places and available for people to ask me questions. But I will in general be trying to reduce my involvement in Ubuntu proper to things that are closely related to the operation of Launchpad, and a small number of low-effort things that I'm interested enough in to find free time for them. I still need to sort out a lot of details, but it'll very likely involve me handing over project leadership of Click, drastically reducing my involvement in the installer, and looking for at least some help with boot loader work, among others. I don't expect my Debian involvement to change, and I may well find myself more motivated there now that it won't be so closely linked with my day job, although it's possible that I will pare some things back that I was mostly doing on Ubuntu's behalf. If you ask me for help with something over the next few months, expect me to be more likely to direct you to other people or suggest ways you can help yourself out, so that I can start disentangling myself from my current web of projects.

Please contact me sooner or later if you're interested in helping out with any of the things I'm visible in right now, and we can see what makes sense. I'm looking forward to this!

Categories: Elsewhere

Gregor Herrmann: RC bugs 2014/38-43

Planet Debian - Sun, 26/10/2014 - 22:47

it's this time of the year^Wrelease cycle again – almost. in ten days (& roughly two hours), the freeze for the next debian release, codenamed jessie, will start. by this time packages must be in testing in order to be candidates for the release, as explained in the release team's detailed freeze policy. this also means, with the regular testing migration time set to ten days, that tonight's dinstall run closed the regular upload window.

& this also means that we should all concentrate on fixing RC bugs to make the freeze as short as possible & jessie yet another great release. before I head over to the UDD bugs page, I'd like to summarize my work on RC bugs in the last weeks, which was again focussed on packages in the Debian Perl Group.

  • #736739 – src:lemonldap-ng: "[src:lemonldap-ng] Sourceless file"
    upload new upstream release prepared by Xavier Guimard (pkg-perl)
  • #736807 – src:lemonldap-ng: "[src:lemonldap-ng] Non free file"
    upload new upstream release prepared by Xavier Guimard (pkg-perl)
  • #742409 – libsereal-encoder-perl: "libsereal-encoder-perl: FTBFS on some architectures"
    upload new upstream release, with patch from ntyni (pkg-perl)
  • #755317 – src:libnet-bonjour-perl: "libnet-bonjour-perl: FTBFS: Tests failures"
    lower severity (pkg-perl)
  • #755328 – src:libgraph-writer-graphviz-perl: "libgraph-writer-graphviz-perl: FTBFS: Tests failures"
    update patches for test suite (pkg-perl)
  • #759966 – src:libvideo-fourcc-info-perl: "libvideo-fourcc-info-perl: FTBFS: dh_auto_test: perl Build test returned exit code 255"
    close bug, fixed in #762334 (pkg-perl)
  • #762333 – libcgi-application-plugin-ajaxupload-perl: "libcgi-application-plugin-ajaxupload-perl: FTBFS with libjson-any-perl 1.36-1: test failures"
    close, as the bug is fixed in libpackage-stash-perl, cf. #762334 (pkg-perl)
  • #763254 – src:libcrypt-gcrypt-perl: "libcrypt-gcrypt-perl: FTBFS: GCrypt.xs:59:5: error: unknown type name 'gcry_ac_handle_t'"
    add patch from CPAN RT (pkg-perl)
  • #765053 – libapache-dbilogger-perl: "libapache-dbilogger-perl: FTBFS - undefined symbol: modperl_is_running"
    close, as the bug is fixed in libapache2-mod-perl2, cf. #765174 (pkg-perl)
  • #765137 – src:libcgi-fast-perl: "libcgi-fast-perl: FTBFS: Tests failures"
    upload new upstream release (pkg-perl)
  • #765150 – src:libhtml-formfu-perl: "libhtml-formfu-perl: FTBFS: Tests failures"
    lower severity (pkg-perl)
  • #765165 – liblog-dispatch-perl: "liblog-dispatch-perl: missing dependency/recommendation on libdevel-globaldestruction-perl"
    add missing (build) dependency (pkg-perl)
Categories: Elsewhere

Sune Vuorela: KDE makes Qt

Planet Debian - Sun, 26/10/2014 - 22:36

Recently I was trying some statistics on the qtbase-module (where QtCore, QtGui, QtWidgets and so on lives) and was wondering who made them.
Not based on their current paid affilation, like Thiago’s graphs, but if each commit was made by a person coming from KDE.

So, I got hold of Thiago’s scripts, a lovely mix of perl and zsh, and a QtBase git repository. First steps was to try to classify people as person coming from KDE or not. Of course, I’m a KDE person. Thiago is a KDE person. David Faure is a KDE person. Olivier Goffart is a KDE person. Lars Knoll is a KDE person.

By the help of the KDE accounts file, and some of the long time KDE contributors, I got after a half day of work a good list of it. Then next steps was trying to put it into Thiago’s perlscripts

All of it kind of succeeded:

So, KDE people makes up for 40-60% of the weekly commits to QtBase. This is again shows that KDE is important to Qt, just as the reverse is. So, let’s keep KDE healthy.

KDE is running a end-of-year fundraiser over here https://www.kde.org/fundraisers/yearend2014/. Go ahead and donate, and help KDE stay healthy. For your own sake. And for Qt’s.

Categories: Elsewhere

Pau Garcia i Quiles: FOSDEM 2015 Desktops DevRoom Call for Talks

Planet Debian - Sun, 26/10/2014 - 21:38

FOSDEM is one of the largest gatherings of Free Software contributors in the world and happens each February in Brussels (Belgium). One of the tracks will be the Desktops DevRoom (formerly known as “CrossDesktop DevRoom”), which will host Desktop-related talks.

We are now inviting proposals for talks about Free/Libre/Open-source Software on the topics of Desktop development, Desktop applications and interoperability amongst Desktop Environments. This is a unique opportunity to show novel ideas and developments to a wide technical audience.

Topics accepted include, but are not limited to: Enlightenment, Gnome, KDE, Unity, XFCE, LXQt, Windows, Mac OS X, software development for the desktop, general desktop matters, applications that enhance desktops and web (when related to desktop).

Talks can be very specific, such as the advantages/disadvantages of development with Qt on Wayland over X11/Mir; or as general as predictions for the fusion of Desktop and web in 5 years time. Topics that are of interest to the users and developers of all desktop environments are especially welcome. The FOSDEM 2014 schedule might give you some inspiration.

Please include the following information when submitting a proposal:

  • Your name
  • The title of your talk (please be descriptive, as titles will be listed with around 250 from other projects)
  • Short abstract of one or two paragraphs
  • Short bio (with photo)
  • Requested time: from 15 to 45 minutes. Normal duration is 30 minutes. Longer duration requests must be properly justified. You may be assigned LESS time than you request.

The deadline for submissions is December 7th 2014. FOSDEM will be held on the weekend of January 31st-February 1st 2015 and the Desktops DevRoom will take place on Sunday, February 1st 2015. Please use the following website to submit your proposals: https://penta.fosdem.org/submission/FOSDEM15 (you do not need to create a new Pentabarf account if you already have one from past years).

You can also join the devroom’s mailing list, which is the official communication channel for the DevRoom: desktops-devroom@lists.fosdem.org (subscription page for the mailing list)

– The Desktops DevRoom 2015 Organization Team

Categories: Elsewhere

Russ Allbery: California general election

Planet Debian - Sun, 26/10/2014 - 21:20

Probably only of interest to California residents.

Time again for the general election voting. This is probably too late to be helpful for a lot of people voting permanent absentee, but may as well write this down anyway. (Hm, I apparently didn't do this in 2012.)

Propositions:

Proposition 1: YES. Now is one of the best times in history to borrow money for infrastructure improvements, and our water infrastructure in the state can certainly use it.

Proposition 2: YES. I have somewhat mixed feelings about this, since I hate passing complex legislation like this via proposition, but this already went through the legislature. It would be dumb for the federal government, which can more easily borrow money, but given how the finances of state governments work in the US, this sort of rainy day fund is probably prudent. This one seems reasonably well-designed, and the opposition is panic about a secondary effect on how school reserves are managed that can be changed with later legislative action and which is rather unconvincing.

Proposition 45: YES. I can't get very enthused about yet more bandaids on top of our completely broken health care system, but forcing insurance companies to justify rate increases results in some public pressure against profit-taking by insurance companies. Single payer is what we actually need, but this might be mildly helpful. Plus, the argument against is more incoherent nonsense. So, I'm voting yes, but I don't think it's important and I won't mind if it loses.

Proposition 46: NO. There are a lot of things that we should do about preventable medical errors, starting with funding our health care system properly, testing drugs properly, and investing in proper inspections and medical licensing investigations. Drug testing doctors is not among those things. This is a well-meaning but horrible idea pushed by a victim's advocacy group that won't do anything to improve our health care system. The fear-mongering of the opponents about malpractice lawsuits is a bit much, but there are essentially no positive benefits here.

Proposition 47: YES. Requires that misdemeanor crimes actually be misdemeanors, rather than giving prosecutors discretion to charge them as felonies if the person charged happens to be black-- er, I mean, if the prosecutor doesn't like them for some reason. Obviously a good idea on all fronts: stop over-charging crimes, stop giving prosecutors discretion to choose the impact of laws on particular people (since they rarely use it appropriately), and further try to decriminalize our completely worthless "war on drugs."

Proposition 48: YES. I'm opposed to the Indian gaming system in general, but this proposition appears to be a rather cynical attempt to block new casino development by tribes that already have casinos. My general feeling is that if we're going to have casinos, they should generally be legal; the bizarre system where each casino is subject to public approval seems designed to create political cronyism.

State offices:

I'm not going to comment on the partisan offices, since no one interesting survived the primaries. Across the board, it's basically the Democratic incumbants against various Republicans. The state Republican party in California is dominated science denialists, Randian objectivists, and people who think the solution to all problems is ensuring rich people don't pay taxes, so it takes rather a lot to get me to vote for any of them. At the moment, the Democrats are doing a reasonably good job running the state, so while I'd vote for challengers from the left against several of them, given the boring candidate slate, I'm just voting Democrat down the line.

California has a system that requires voter approval for various state judicial offices. In general, I don't agree with voter approval for judges, since voters are rarely in a position to make reasonable choices about justices. Since there's a Democratic administration in power at the moment, these are probably the best judges that we're going to get (the few I've heard of are good choices), and I don't think the yes/no approval voting is useful anyway. So I'm voting to approve across the board.

Superintendent of Public Instruction: Tom Torlakson. I'm not a huge fan of Torlakson, but Tuck is a Harvard MBA who ran charter schools and then a school privatization initiative. Everyone always claims that they want to reduce bureaucracy and empower teachers, but Tuck has a past track record of trying to do so by taking public education private, something that I am passionately opposed to. So Torlakson it is.

Local measures:

Measure B: YES. Increases the local hotel tax and uses it for local infrastructure. I'm generally in favor of raising taxes, and the amount certainly won't be significant in the ridiculous Palo Alto hotel market. The arguments feature one of my favorite stupid right-wing talking points: the tax is unfair because it isn't earmarked to benefit the people paying it.

Measure C: YES. Reasonable, small reform of the local utility tax, opposed by the Libertarian Party and "taxpayer associations" using an "all taxation is theft" argument. What's not to like?

Measure D: NO. Reduces the size of the city council for no clear reason. The stated reasons are saving money (not credible given how little money is involved) and making city meetings not take as long. I'm going to need something better than that to vote for this.

Local offices:

Judge of the Superior Court, Office #24: Matthew S. Harris. I'm making one exception for my normal rule against voting for former prosecutors for judges because the incumbant, Diane Ritchie, is apparently a train wreck. All it takes is a quick Google search to reveal multiple news stories about strange behavior, clear conflicts of interest, and other serious problems, including a rebuke by the local bar association. Even if not all of that information is true, judges should be above reproach, or at least farther above reproach than this.

Palo Alto City Council: I have an agenda here: I think housing density is about the best thing that the local community could support. Housing density enables better mass transit options, makes housing more affordable and brings more housing under possible rent control, and simply makes more sense given the cost of housing in the area. A lot of the city council members run on low-density or anti-growth platforms; I vote against those and for people who support development. And, of course, I'll filter out candidates who believe stupid things, like claiming a minimum wage is un-American (Seelam-Sea Reddy). The best seem to be Greg Scharff, A.C. Johnston, Nancy Shepherd, Cory Wolbach, and Wayne Douglass.

Palo Alto Unified School District: The Democratic party has endorsed four out of the five candidates, so it probably doesn't matter too much. Gina Dalma and Ken Dauber sound like the best of the candidates to me, so I will probably vote for them.

Santa Clara Valley Water District #7: I voted for Brian Schmidt last time, and I don't see a reason to change my mind. His opponent is a Silicon Valley millionaire who is spending a surprisingly large amount of money on this race and is involved with a business that sells software to water boards, which raises some eyebrows.

Categories: Elsewhere

Ben Armstrong: Eleventh hour upload of tuxpaint

Planet Debian - Sun, 26/10/2014 - 19:51

I have just made an eleventh hour upload of tuxpaint, tuxpaint-config and tuxpaint-stamps. With luck, this will make it in time for the Nov. 5 Jessie freeze deadline so it goes in as an unassisted migration. Coming soon to a mirror near you!

Categories: Elsewhere

Larry Garfield: On Drupal's Leadership

Planet Drupal - Sun, 26/10/2014 - 03:20

My DrupalCon Amsterdam Core Conversation on Managing Complexity has generated quite a bit of follow-up discussion. That's good; it's a conversation we as a community really need to be having.

There are a few points, though, that I feel bear clarification and further explanation as I fear the point of the talk has gotten lost in the details.

Before continuing, if you haven't yet I urge you to watch the session video as well as the background resources linked from the session page. This is not a new conversation; it's the latest chapter in a very long-running discussion that is larger than the Drupal project, and it behooves us all to be aware of the history and context around it.

read more

Categories: Elsewhere

Blink Reaction: Two Drupal 8 Core Bugs: Found and Fixed

Planet Drupal - Sun, 26/10/2014 - 00:15

While working on the console project I have found (so far) two Drupal 8 core bugs. In this blog post I will explain how I found these bugs and what I have done to fix them.

First bug - Wrong service definition

I found the first one when adding a command for debugging registered services within the container.

Using the console command:

$ bin/console container:debug

Problem

Categories: Elsewhere

Károly Négyesi: Drupal 8 critical issues office hours Oct 24, 2014

Planet Drupal - Sat, 25/10/2014 - 22:46

This was our first critical office hours. webflo have forward ported a Views SA (turned out that Twig autoescape made short work of the security hole -- yay! so now it's just a test) and even past the office hours followed up with a patch that now passes. I will monitor the issue further and make sure it gets reviewed and committed. ksenzee started on decoupling cache tags from cache bins -- there's no patch yet, I need to follow up on this one however from our discussion it was clear she was making a lot of progress. I was trying to help penyaskito with the language.settings config is not scalable issue but turned out his problems went away with a fresh install so that issue is now progressing well even without the office hours. So as far as I am concerned, that's two down and one moving (and as a bonus, webflo rerolled fix common HTML escaped render #key values due to Twig autoescape which is major I am not sure why it's not critical). I think critical issues office hours was off to a good start, more people would of course be better. I count 123 critical issues.

Categories: Elsewhere

Miriam Ruiz: Video game players and Gamers are different things

Planet Debian - Sat, 25/10/2014 - 22:41

Even though the Wikipedia defines “gamer” as “someone who partakes in interactive gaming, such as (predominantly) video games or board games”, this doesn’t really gets close to that term means socially at the moment. Going back to Wikipedia, we find that the video game subculture is “a form of new media subculture that has been influenced by video games”, so it might be quite accurate to define gamers as members of that subculture. You will find that most of the uses of the term “gamer” in the social networks and in the blogosphere refer to that. Please notice that, even though it is quite likely that most of the gamers play video games, the other way round does not need to be true and, in fact, it isn’t. Not everyone who plays video games belongs to the video game subculture, shares their point of view, their values and aesthetics, or even know about it. Kind of like what happens with the word “hacker”. Not everyone who hacks around with a computer belongs to the hacker subculture.

Mostly everyone who has access to the technology plays video games now. From babies and kids to grandparents. And people play them in every possible technological system around, not only on video game consoles or personal computers, but alse on mobile phones, tablets, web browsers. And many of those people who use different kind of technologies to play video games are not gamers. Not in the sense of belonging to the video game subculture. It is important to acknowledge that: that the video game subculture does not have the monopoly over video games or the video game developing industry anymore.

As you can imagine, all this rand doesn’t come from nowhere. During the last months, we have been witnessing a fight between some conservative core members of the video game subculture and people who want to bring some fresh air into the sociocultural elements of that subculture. Namely, that women shouldn’t be discriminated inside it. As every time that a women raises her voice to complain about anything in the Internet, they have been subjected to insults, attacks, rape and death threats, etc. I’m talking about something called #GamerGate, and even though I’m not going to get into it, I will provide some URLs in case someone might be interested. Please acknowledge that not all the points of view might be represented in this list (in fact, they are not, as I won’t be promoting in my blog things that I severely disagree with), so search the web for more information if you want to get that.

I’ve never been a gamer myself, meaning part of the subculture I mentioned. At some point I was probably closer tho the core values they had then than I am now. In any case, video games have already consolidated themselves as an important part of current culture, entertainment, education and socialization, and are definitely here to stay. That will probably mean that the percentage of gamers (members of the video game subculture) will become smaller. as the number of non-gamer video game players keeps raising.

Categories: Elsewhere

IXIS: Strengthening our Relationship with the British Council

Planet Drupal - Sat, 25/10/2014 - 12:56

We are delighted to be working with the British Council on a new Drupal hosting and infrastructure support project. The British Council are valued clients, and we have worked with them for more than 6 years managing both the global suite of 150 country sites, and the prestigious suite of Drupal teaching and learning sites.

We will be working to to create four individual platforms for hosting key Drupal websites on, moving away from just one main infrastructure, to improve resilience, efficiency and increase availability to the sites which generate more than 35 million page impressions per month and are used by more than 65 million people each year alone.

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