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Midwestern Mac, LLC: St. Louis Drupal Group - Hackathon on Headless Drupal 8 & AngularJS

Planet Drupal - Mon, 13/10/2014 - 00:00

Now that Drupal 8.0.0-beta1 is out, and the headless Drupal craze is in full-swing, the Drupal St. Louis meetup this month will focus on using Drupal 8 with AngularJS to build a demo pizza ordering app. (The meetup is on Thurs. Oct. 23, starting at 6:30 p.m.; see even more info in this Zero to Drupal post).

We'll be hacking away and seeing how far we can get, and hopefully we'll be able to leave with at least an MVP-quality product! I'll be at the event, mostly helping people get a Drupal 8 development environment up and running. For some, this alone will hopefully be a huge help, and maybe motivation to adopt Drupal 8 more quickly!

If you're in or around the St. Louis area, consider joining us; especially if you would like to learn something about either Drupal 8 or AngularJS!

Categories: Elsewhere

Jonathan Wiltshire: Clean builds for the win

Planet Debian - Sun, 12/10/2014 - 22:50

I’ve just spent a little time squashing several bugs on the trot, all the same: insufficient build-dependencies when built in a clean environment. Typically this means that the package was uploaded after being built on a developer’s normal machine, which already has everything required installed.

It’s long been the case that we have several ways to build packages in a clean chroot before upload, which reveals these sorts of errors and more. There’s not really any excuse for uploading packages that fail to build in this way.

Please, for the sanity of everyone working with the archive, don’t upload packages that haven’t been built in a clean environment. It’s such a waste of everybody’s time if you don’t do this most basic of checks.

Clean builds for the win is a post from: jwiltshire.org.uk | Flattr

Categories: Elsewhere

Steinar H. Gunderson: Short SSH keys

Planet Debian - Sun, 12/10/2014 - 21:00

I'm sure this is useful for something beyond being neat:

klump:~> cat .ssh/id_ed25519.pub ssh-ed25519 AAAAC3NzaC1lZDI1NTE5AAAAIFePWUlZmVbCZ9KHa4pOOMBXHaMFeuuIZDw0uHHEY2/m sesse@klump

I hope OpenSSH doesn't eventually grow a sort-of single point of failure in “djb ALL the algorithms!” by default, though.

Categories: Elsewhere

Iustin Pop: Day trip on the Olympic Peninsula

Planet Debian - Sun, 12/10/2014 - 19:53
Day trip on the Olympic Peninsula

TL;DR: drove many kilometres on very nice roads, took lots of pictures, saw sunshine and fog and clouds, an angry ocean and a calm one, a quiet lake and lots and lots of trees: a very well spent day. Pictures at http://photos.k1024.org/Daytrips/Olympic-Peninsula-2014/.

Sometimes I travel to the US on business, and as such I've been a few times in the Seattle area. Until this summer, when I had my last trip there, I was content to spend any extra days (weekend or such) just visiting Seattle itself, or shopping (I can spend hours in the REI store!), or working on my laptop in the hotel.

This summer though, I thought - I should do something a bit different. Not too much, but still - no sense in wasting both days of the weekend. So I thought maybe driving to Mount Rainier, or something like that.

On the Wednesday of my first week in Kirkland, as I was preparing my drive to the mountain, I made the mistake of scrolling the map westwards, and I saw for the first time the Olympic Peninsula; furthermore, I was zoomed in enough that I saw there was a small road right up to the north-west corner. Intrigued, I zoomed further and learned about Cape Flattery (“the northwestern-most point of the contiguous United States!”), so after spending a bit time reading about it, I was determined to go there.

Easier said than done - from Kirkland, it's a 4h 40m drive (according to Google Maps), so it would be a full day on the road. I was thinking of maybe spending the night somewhere on the peninsula then, in order to actually explore the area a bit, but from Wednesday to Saturday it was a too short notice - all hotels that seemed OK-ish were fully booked. I spent some time trying to find something, even not directly on my way, but I failed to find any room.

What I did manage to do though, is to learn a bit about the area, and to realise that there's a nice loop around the whole peninsula - the 104 from Kirkland up to where it meets the 101N on the eastern side, then take the 101 all the way to Port Angeles, Lake Crescent, near Lake Pleasant, then south toward Forks, crossing the Hoh river, down to Ruby Beach, down along the coast, crossing the Queets River, east toward Lake Quinault, south toward Aberdeen, then east towards Olympia and back out of the wilderness, into the highway network and back to Kirkland. This looked like an awesome road trip, but it is as long as it sounds - around 8 hours (continuous) drive, though skipping Cape Flattery. Well, I said to myself, something to keep in mind for a future trip to this area, with a night in between. I was still planning to go just to Cape Flattery and back, without realising at that point that this trip was actually longer (as you drive on smaller, lower-speed roads).

Preparing my route, I read about the queues at the Edmonds-Kingston ferry, so I was planning to wake up early on the weekend, go to Cape Flattery, and go right back (maybe stop by Lake Crescent).

Saturday comes, I - of course - sleep longer than my trip schedule said, and start the day in a somewhat cloudy weather, driving north from my hotel on Simonds Road, which was quite nicer than the usual East-West or North-South roads in this area. The weather was becoming nicer, however as I was nearing the ferry terminal and the traffic was getting denser, I started suspecting that I'll spend a quite a bit of time waiting to board the ferry.

And unfortunately so it was (photo altered to hide some personal information):

.

The weather at least was nice, so I tried to enjoy it and simply observe the crowd - people were looking forward to a weekend relaxing, so nobody seemed annoyed by the wait. After almost half an hour, time to get on the ferry - my first time on a ferry in US, yay! But it was quite the same as in Europe, just that the ship was much larger.

Once I secured the car, I went up deck, and was very surprised to be treated with some excellent views:

The crossing was not very short, but it seemed so, because of the view, the sun, the water and the wind. Soon we were nearing the other shore; also, see how well panorama software deals with waves :P!

And I was finally on the "real" part of the trip.

The road was quite interesting. Taking the 104 North, crossing the "Hood Canal Floating Bridge" (my, what a boring name), then finally joining the 101 North. The environment was quite varied, from bare plains and hills, to wooded areas, to quite dense forests, then into inhabited areas - quite a long stretch of human presence, from the Sequim Bay to Port Angeles.

Port Angeles surprised me: it had nice views of the ocean, and an interesting port (a few big ships), but it was much smaller than I expected. The 101 crosses it, and in less than 10 minutes or so it was already over. I expected something nicer, based on the name, but… Anyway, onwards!

Soon I was at a crossroads and had to decide: I could either follow the 101, crossing the Elwha River and then to Lake Crescent, then go north on the 113/112, or go right off 101 onto 112, and follow it until close to my goal. I took the 112, because on the map it looked "nicer", and closer to the shore.

Well, the road itself was nice, but quite narrow and twisty here and there, and there was some annoying traffic, so I didn't enjoy this segment very much. At least it had the very interesting property (to me) that whenever I got closer to the ocean, the sun suddenly disappeared, and I was finding myself in the fog:

So my plan to drive nicely along the coast failed. At one point, there was even heavy smoke (not fog!), and I wondered for a moment how safe was to drive out there in the wilderness (there were other cars though, so I was not alone).

Only quite a bit later, close to Neah Bay, did I finally see the ocean: I saw a small parking spot, stopped, and crossing a small line of trees I found myself in a small cove? bay? In any case, I had the impression I stepped out of the daily life in the city and out into the far far wilderness:

There was a couple, sitting on chairs, just enjoying the view. I felt very much intruding, behaving like I did as a tourist: running in, taking pictures, etc., so I tried at least to be quiet ☺. I then quickly moved on, since I still had some road ahead of me.

Soon I entered Neah Bay, and was surprised to see once more blue, and even more blue. I'm a sucker for blue, whether sky blue or sea blue ☺, so I took a few more pictures (watch out for the evil fog in the second one):

Well, the town had some event, and there were lots of people, so I just drove on, now on the last stretch towards the cape. The road here was also very interesting, yet another environment - I was driving on Cape Flattery Road, which cuts across the tip of the peninsula (quite narrow here) along the Waatch River and through its flooding plains (at least this is how it looked to me). Then it finally starts going up through the dense forest, until it reaches the parking lot, and from there, one goes on foot towards the cape. It's a very easy and nice walk (not a hike), and the sun was shining very nicely through the trees:

But as I reached the peak of the walk, and started descending towards the coast, I was surprised, yet again, by fog:

I realised that probably this means the cape is fully in fog, so I won't have any chance to enjoy the view.

Boy, was I wrong! There are three viewpoints on the cape, and at each one I was just "wow" and "aah" at the view. Even thought it was not a sunny summer view, and there was no blue in sight, the combination between the fog (which was hiding the horizon and even the closer islands), the angry ocean which was throwing wave after wave at the shore, making a loud noise, and the fact that even this seemingly inhospitable area was just teeming with life, was both unexpected and awesome. I took here waay to many pictures, here are just a couple inlined:

I spent around half an hour here, just enjoying the rawness of nature. It was so amazing to see life encroaching on each bit of land, even though it was not what I would consider a nice place. Ah, how we see everything through our own eyes!

The walk back was through fog again, and at one point it switched over back to sunny. Driving back on the same road was quite different, knowing what lies at its end. On this side, the road had some parking spots, so I managed to stop and take a picture - even though this area was much less wild, it still has that “outdoors” flavour, at least for me:

Back in Neah Bay, I stopped to eat. I had a place in mind from TripAdvisor, and indeed - I was able to get a custom order pizza at "Linda's Woodfired Kitchen". Quite good, and I ate without hurry, looking at the people walking outside, as they were coming back from the fair or event that was taking place.

While eating, a somewhat disturbing thought was going through my mind. It was still early, around two to half past two, so if I went straight back to Kirkland I would be early at the hotel. But it was also early enough that I could - in theory at least - still do the "big round-trip". I was still rummaging the thought as I left…

On the drive back I passed once more near Sekiu, Washington, which is a very small place but the map tells me it even has an airport! Fun, and the view was quite nice (a bit of blue before the sea is swallowed by the fog):

After passing Sekiu and Clallam Bay, the 112 curves inland and goes on a bit until you are at the crossroads: to the left the 112 continues, back the same way I came; to the right, it's the 113, going south until it meets the 101. I looked left - remembering the not-so-nice road back, I looked south - where a very appealing, early afternoon sun was beckoning - so I said, let's take the long way home!

It's just a short stretch on the 113, and then you're on the 101. The 101 is a very nice road, wide enough, and it goes through very very nice areas. Here, west to south-west of the Olympic Mountains, it's a very different atmosphere from the 112/101 that I drove on in the morning; much warmer colours, a bit different tree types (I think), and more flat. I soon passed through Forks, which is one of the places I looked at when searching for hotels. I did so without any knowledge of the town itself (its wikipedia page is quite drab), so imagine my surprise when a month later I learned from a colleague that this is actually a very important place for vampire-book fans. Oh my, and I didn't even stop! This town also had some event, so I just drove on, enjoying the (mostly empty) road.

My next planned waypoint was Ruby Beach, and I was looking forward to relaxing a bit under the warm sun - the drive was excellent, weather perfect, so I was watching the distance countdown on my Garmin. At two miles out, the "Near waypoint Ruby Beach" message appeared, and two seconds later the sun went out. What the… I was hoping this is something temporary, but as I slowly drove the remaining mile I couldn't believe my eyes that I was, yet again, finding myself in the fog…

I park the car, thinking that asking for a refund would at least allow me to feel better - but it was I who planned the trip! So I resigned myself, thinking that possibly this beach is another special location that is always in the fog. However, getting near the beach it was clear that it was not so - some people were still in their bathing suits, just getting dressed, so… it seems I was just unlucky with regards to timing. However, I the beach itself was nice, even in the fog (I later saw online sunny pictures, and it is quite beautiful), the the lush trees reach almost to the shore, and the way the rocks are “sitting” on the beach:

Since the weather was not that nice, I took a few more pictures, then headed back and started driving again. I was soo happy that the weather didn't clear at the 2 mile mark (it was not just Ruby Beach!), but alas - it cleared as soon as the 101 turns left and leaves the shore, as it crosses the Queets river. Driving towards my next planned stop was again a nice drive in the afternoon sun, so I think it simply was not a sunny day on the Pacific shore. Maybe seas and oceans have something to do with fog and clouds ☺! In Switzerland, I'm very happy when I see fog, since it's a somewhat rare event (and seeing mountains disappearing in the fog is nice, since it gives the impression of a wider space). After this day, I was a bit fed up with fog for a while ☺…

Along the 101 one reaches Lake Quinault, which seemed pretty nice on the map, and driving a bit along the lake - a local symbol, the "World's largest spruce tree". I don't know what a spruce tree is, but I like trees, so I was planning to go there, weather allowing. And the weather did cooperate, except that the tree was not so imposing as I thought! In any case, I was glad to stretch my legs a bit:

However, the most interesting thing here in Quinault was not this tree, but rather - the quiet little town and the view on the lake, in the late afternoon sun:

The entire town was very very quiet, and the sun shining down on the lake gave an even stronger sense of tranquillity. No wind, not many noises that tell of human presence, just a few, and an overall sense of peace. It was quite the opposite of the Cape Flattery… and a very nice way to end the trip.

Well, almost end - I still had a bit of driving ahead. Starting from Quinault, driving back and entering the 101, driving down to Aberdeen:

then turning east towards Olympia, and back onto the highways.

As to Aberdeen and Olympia, I just drove through, so I couldn't make any impression of them. The old harbour and the rusted things in Aberdeen were a bit interesting, but the day was late so I didn't stop.

And since the day shouldn't end without any surprises, during the last profile change between walking and driving in Quinault, my GPS decided to reset its active maps list and I ended up with all maps activated. This usually is not a problem, at least if you follow a pre-calculated route, but I did trigger recalculation as I restarted my driving, so the Montana was trying to decide on which map to route me - between the Garmin North America map and the Open StreeMap one, the result was that it never understood which road I was on. It always said "Drive to I5", even though I was on I5. Anyway, thanks to road signs, and no thanks to "just this evening ramp closures", I was able to arrive safely at my hotel.

Overall, a very successful, if long trip: around 725 kilometres, 10h:30m moving, 13h:30m total:

There were many individual good parts, but the overall think about this road trip was that I was able to experience lots of different environments of the peninsula on the same day, and that overall it's a very very nice area.

The downside was that I was in a rush, without being able to actually stop and enjoy the locations I visited. And there's still so much to see! A two nights trip sound just about right, with some long hikes in the rain forest, and afternoons spent on a lake somewhere.

Another not so optimal part was that I only had my "travel" camera (a Nikon 1 series camera, with a small sensor), which was a bit overwhelmed here and there by the situation. It was fortunate that the light was more or less good, but looking back at the pictures, how I wish that I had my "serious" DSLR…

So, that means I have two reasons to go back! Not too soon though, since Mount Rainier is also a good location to visit ☺.

If the pictures didn't bore you yet, the entire gallery is on my smugmug site. In any case, thanks for reading!

Categories: Elsewhere

Giuseppe Iuculano: apt-get purge chromium

Planet Debian - Sun, 12/10/2014 - 18:10

As you may know, I was the Debian chromium maintainer for many years. Some week ago, I decided to stop working  in the chromium package because it is not possible anymore to contribute and work in the team. In fact, Michael Gilbert started to work in a manner that prevent people to help maintain the package.

In the last period the git repository rarely was updated, and my requests were systematically  ignored. Having an updated git repository is mandatory in a big package like Chromium,  and if you don’t push your changes, other people will lost their time

Now, after deciding to stop maintaining Chromium, I also decided to purge it and switch to the Google Chrome binary. Why? Chromium is a pain. Huge commits not documented in changelog that caused stupid bugs because no one can double check them.

In this moment we have an unusable [1] [2] [3] version of Chromium in testing because maintainer demoted grave bugs with the recommendation to rm -rf ./config/chromium … and nobody can understand the sense of latest commits.

Categories: Elsewhere

Mario Lang: soundCLI works again

Planet Debian - Sun, 12/10/2014 - 15:30

I recently ranted about my frustration with GStreamer in a SoundCloud command-line client written in Ruby.

Well, it turns out that there was quite a bit confusion going on. I still haven't figured out why my initial tries resulted in an error regarding $DISPLAY not being set. But now that I have played a bit with gst-launch-1.0, I can positively confirm that this was very likely not the fault of GStreamer.

THe actual issue is, that ruby-gstreamer is assuming gstreamer-1.0, while soundCLI was still written against the gstreamer-0.10 API.

Since the ruby gst module doesn't have the Gstreamer API version in its name, and since Ruby is a dynamic language that only detects most errors at runtime, this led to all sorts of cascaded errors.

It turns out I only had to correct the use of query_position, query_duration, and get_state, as well as switching from playbin2 to playbin.

soundCLI is now running in the background and playing my SoundCloud stream. A pull request against soundCLI has also been opened.

On a somewhat related note, I found a GCC bug (ICE SIGSEGV) this weekend. My first one. It is related to C++11 bracketed initializers. Given that I have heard GCC 5.0 aims to remove the experimental nature of C++11 (and maybe also C++14), this seems like a good time to hit this one. I guess that means I should finally isolate the C++ regex (runtime) segfault I recently stumbled across.

Categories: Elsewhere

Guido Günther: Testing a NetworkManager VPN plugin password dialog

Planet Debian - Sun, 12/10/2014 - 13:55

Testing the password dialog of a NetworkManager VPN plugin is as simple as:

echo -e 'DATA_KEY=foo\nDATA_VAL=bar\nDONE\nQUIT\n' | ./auth-dialog/nm-iodine-auth-dialog -n test -u $(uuid) -i

The above is for the iodine plugin when run from the built source tree. This allows one to test these dialogs although one didn't see them since ages since GNOME shell uses the external UI mode to query for the password.

This blog is flattr enabled.

Categories: Elsewhere

John Goerzen: First impressions of systemd, and they’re not good

Planet Debian - Sun, 12/10/2014 - 05:18

Well, I finally bit the bullet. My laptop, which runs jessie, got dist-upgraded for the first time in a few months. My brightness keys stopped working, and it no longer would suspend to RAM when the lid was closed, and upon chasing things down from XFCE to policykit, eventually it appears that suddenly major parts of the desktop breaks without systemd in jessie. Sigh.

So apt-get install systemd-sysv (and watch sysvinit-core get uninstalled) and reboot.

Only, my system doesn’t come back up. In fact, over several hours of trying to make it boot with systemd, it failed in numerous spectacular and hilarious (or, would be hilarious if my laptop would boot) ways. I had text obliterating the cryptsetup password prompt almost every time. Sometimes there were two processes trying to read a cryptsetup password at once. Sometimes a process was trying to read that while another one was trying to read an emergency shell password. Many times it tried to write to /var and /tmp before they were mounted, meaning they *wouldn’t* mount because there was stuff there.

I noticed it not doing much with ZFS, complaining of a dependency loop between zfs-mount and $local-fs. I fixed that, but it still wouldn’t boot. In fact, it simply hung after writing something about wall passwords.

I’ve dug into systemd, finding a “unit generator for fstab” (whatever the hack that is, it’s not at all made clear by systemd-fstab-generator(8)).

In some cases, there’s info in journalctl, but if I can’t even get to an emergency mode prompt, the practice of hiding all stdout and stderr output is not all that pleasant.

I remember thinking “what’s all the flaming about?” systemd wasn’t my first choice (I always thought “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” about sysvinit), but basically ignored the thousands of messages, thinking whatever happens, jessie will still boot.

Now I’m not so sure. Even if the thing boots out of the box, it seems like the boot process with systemd is colossally fragile.

For now, at least zfs rollback can undo upgrades to 800 packages in about 2 seconds. But I can’t stay at some early jessie checkpoint forever.

Have we made a vast mistake that can’t be undone? (If things like even *brightness keys* now require systemd…)

Categories: Elsewhere

Zero to Drupal: Headless Drupal & AngularJS Hackathon - St. Louis

Planet Drupal - Sun, 12/10/2014 - 01:14
What do you get

When you cross Drupal, AngularJS, and a room full of folks eager to learn more about Drupal 8, api's, rest services, and front-end frameworks? You get St. Louis' first Headless Drupal Hackathon...that's what!

When

Thursday, October 23rd - 6:30p - 9:00p

Where

The Journey - Reber Place 4900 Reber Place St. Louis, MO

Details

For the first time in our beloved history as a Drupal User's Group, we will be hosting our first interactive meetup. Our goal is to collectively build a faux pizza ordering app using Drupal 8 as a backend, and AngularJS as the front end.

For more information, see our Meetup event page for more info.

Hope to see you there!

Tags
Categories: Elsewhere

SitePoint PHP Drupal: DrupalCon Amsterdam 2014 Report

Planet Drupal - Sat, 11/10/2014 - 18:00

As has been the pattern of many recent DrupalCons and Camps, DrupalCon Amsterdam 2014 was all about Drupal 8 and the changes that it’s bringing to the platform and community.

This has coincided with an increase in attendance at Drupal events (2300 in Amsterdam) and an increasing professionalism to DrupalCons. Drupal 8 has pulled us (sometimes forcibly) from out of our comfort zone and into the wider PHP and developer community. This has resulted in more talks covering a variety of non-Drupal topics, which, in my opinion, is a great thing.

The big news of the conference came on day 2, with Drupal 8 finally making it into beta. You can now effectively build basic sites in Drupal 8. In fact, a few brave souls already have, and I intend to do so too with my next site.

Dries Keynote

The regular ‘Driesnote’ was a thought provoking academic discussion on a current hot topic in the Open Source world, sustainability of projects and funding models. He started by stating that there are actually few good Open Source examples we could be following. In Dries’ opinion, the prevalent model of one company funding development is not a good one. Instead he suggested we look to other models, especially the concept of how Open Source software could be treated as a public good, or to coin a British term, ‘The Commons’. He used the example of public roads to show how community desire and amateur implementation can grow. Firstly via business investment (and sometimes privatization) and often resulting in Government control and management. To summarize:

Continue reading %DrupalCon Amsterdam 2014 Report%

Categories: Elsewhere

jfhovinne commented on issue composer/composer#3335

Devel - Sat, 11/10/2014 - 13:55
Oct 11, 2014 jfhovinne commented on issue composer/composer#3335

Looks like this is the PHP_EXTRA_VERSION constant, which is part of PHP Core since 5.2.7. PHP_EXTRA_VERSION (string) The current PHP "extra" versi…

Categories: Networks

Dirk Eddelbuettel: RPushbullet 0.1.0 with a lot more awesome

Planet Debian - Sat, 11/10/2014 - 05:29

A new release 0.1.0 of the RPushbullet package (interfacing the neat Pushbullet service) landed on CRAN today.

It brings a number of goodies relative to the first release 0.0.2 of a few months ago:

  • pushing of files is now supported thanks to a nice pull request bu Mike Birdgeneau
  • a default device can be designated in the ~/.rpushbullet.json file or options
  • initialization has been rewritten to use recpients which can be indices, device names or, if missing entirely, the (new) default device
  • alternatively, email is supported as another recipient option in which case the Pushbullet service will send an email to the give address
  • pbGetDevices() now returns a proper S3 object with corresponding print() and summary() methods
  • the documentation regarding package initialization, and setting of key, devices, etc has been expanded
  • more examples has been added to the documentation
  • various minor cleanups, fixes, corrections throughout

There is a whole boat load of more wickedness in the Pushbullet API so if anybody feels compelled to add it, fire off pull requests at GitHub.

More details about the package are at the RPushbullet webpage and the RPushbullet GitHub repo.

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Categories: Elsewhere

CiviCRM Blog: Improved permissions for activities and cases

Planet Drupal - Fri, 10/10/2014 - 20:39
A little background.

Established in 1972, we are a non-profit human services organization that serves many diverse populations in the Greater Pittsburgh area.

A large part of our focus is on homeless services, but we also do some mental and physical health programming, early childhood development, community integration and host a large food pantry near the University of Pittsburgh campus. 

Because of our disparate clientele and locations, we have been using multiple Access databases to track participant information.  For many years we wanted to move it online so staff in people's homes, could enter updates from the field.  However, the cost to implement was prohibitive to say the least.

Our Drupal and CiviCRM experience

When we rebuilt our website using Drupal, I stumbled upon CiviCRM as an alternate to Constant Contact.  For two years, we have used Civi on the backend of our site to register for events, make online contributions and send out bulk mails.

Civi has helped us raise a lot of dough.

After working in Civi and Drupal, we realized the combination could effectively be used to consolidate our program and human resources data as well as make it available online.

So we set off on the challenge of implementing a database to track all of our program's data, but repeatedly were having to reinvent the wheel to avoid staff seeing information that had nothing to do with their program.  Since the site was not for the public, we wanted to limit all work in Drupal (i.e: creating views and webforms), and instead focus on streamlining the database.  In essence, Drupal became the backend and Civi the front.

However, the Drupal permissions for CiviCRM were too general to control access to Activities and Cases and while the ACLs in Civi do provide more granular security, they don't cover Activities and Cases.

Make it Happen

We began rolling out our shiny new database in July 2014.

During the roll-out, I began investigating the cost of adding security to Activities and Cases and stumbled upon some threads discussing it.

This one that started in 2009 got me going and we haven't looked back since.

With these changes, it becomes dramatically easier for non-profits like us to implement CiviCRM as a total solution.

Thanks to Donald Lobo and Michael McAndrew for their guidance.

Please share your thoughts.

Categories: Elsewhere

Last Call Media: DrupalCamp LA: Manage the Gap

Planet Drupal - Fri, 10/10/2014 - 18:19
DrupalCamp LA: Manage the Gap

Usually when I travel anywhere outside of the Northeast, I tell people I am from Massachusetts or “outside of Boston” and people smile and nod. In rare instances granularity increases in the conversation and I eventually reveal that it’s actually  “a hip little town in the western part of the state called Northampton”.  Well, at DCLA, ~3000 miles from home, before 8:30am, I was 5 for 5 with people from California that not only know where Northampton is, but had visited before and had a favorite hotspot to share. Way to go Noho, you have officially been nationally recognized as geographically relevant.

Everyone was so friendly, and greeted us by name as we walked through the Campus Center. It was incredible that in the land of Hollywood, two folks from Massachusetts, could feel like celebrities. I am not sure it was only because we were the cool kids that had traveled the longest distance, this stardom and warm welcome may have been derived from the early recognition we received for IT mastery.  I basically spent the first morning of the camp traveling from table to table, helping all the sponsors connect to the wifi. I know that doesn’t sound like a big deal to you, but considering the internet prowess in the room, the fact that this marketing manager type found a way to be technically useful and wave a magic connectivity wand to save the people, was pure bliss. People were genuinely super grateful and relieved to have access to the magical interwebs, I realized for techies, having internet was as important to them as my morning coffee is to me.

I learned a ton at the conference, and attended one session in particular that really resonated with me.  James Smith from Image X not only brought his Project Management A-game to the podium, but did so while sporting a sweet mustache.

Development & Profit in Project Management - James Smith, ImageX

The project manager is at the service of the team, not the other way around. James suggested that a daily check in with the team should sound like this:  “Have I met your expectations today? Did you get what you need from me? Did that do what you needed it to do? What do you want or think you need next? When do you need it by?"  

We all know that in the end, a happy team = a happy client. This is very much in line with one piece of our implementation of the Maker's Schedule within our Task-Driven Teamwork model whereby a dynamic hierarchy works, appropriately and effectively, to treat each the client, the project, and team members as the top priority. This DCLA presentation was very fitting: as we are growing our team at every position, we are especially looking for people to join our Project Management team.

If you have excellent communication skills and really advocate for both your clients and team, please consider joining us!

Categories: Elsewhere

IXIS: First time at DrupalCon

Planet Drupal - Fri, 10/10/2014 - 16:17

I'm Andy, a developer at Ixis and having just settled back in after my first DrupalCon I thought I’d wrap up my thoughts after attending the annual European conference for the first time.

Initially - wow - DrupalCon is big! I’ve only been to some smaller PHP conferences so to see over 2000 people in one place was quite something. What struck me was how well it was organised - everything was on time with very few technical hiccups. I found the number of sessions quite overwhelming - there was so much to choose from, so having the videos of the sessions online with in an hour or so after it finished was really helpful. I’m still ploughing through the ones I’m interested in.

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Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal core announcements: Drupal 7 core security release on Wednesday, October 15 (and release window for Drupal 6)

Planet Drupal - Fri, 10/10/2014 - 15:48
Start:  2014-10-15 (All day) America/New_York Sprint Organizers:  David_Rothstein

There will be a security release of Drupal 7 core on Wednesday, October 15.

Although we normally only announce security release windows (rather than definite plans for a release), this month we are confident that a release will happen, so please be prepared to update your Drupal 7 sites on Wednesday.

A security release window for Drupal 6 core will be on the same date; this does not mean that a Drupal 6 core security release will necessarily take place on that date, only that you should prepare to look out for one (and be ready to update your Drupal 6 sites in the event that the Drupal security team decides to make a release).

There will be no bug fix release on this date; the next window for a Drupal core bug fix release is Wednesday, November 5.

For more information on Drupal core release windows, see the documentation on release timing and security releases, and the discussion that led to this policy being implemented.

Categories: Elsewhere

Matthias Klumpp: Listaller + Glick: Some new ideas

Planet Debian - Fri, 10/10/2014 - 14:59

As you might know, due to invasive changes in PackageKit, I am currently rewriting the 3rd-party application installer Listaller. Since I am not the only one looking at the 3rd-party app-installation issue (there is a larger effort going on at GNOME, based on Lennarts ideas), it makes sense to redesign some concepts of Listaller.

Currently, dependencies and applications are installed into directories in /opt, and Listaller contains some logic to make applications find dependencies, and to talk to the package manager to install missing things. This has some drawbacks, like the need to install an application before using it, the need for applications to be relocatable, and application-installations being non-atomic.

Glick2

There is/was another 3rd-party app installer approach on the GNOME side, by Alexander Larsson, called Glick2. Glick uses application bundles (do you remember Klik from back in the days?) mounted via FUSE. This allows some neat features, like atomic installations and software upgrades, no need for relocatable apps and no need to install the application.

However, it also has disadvantages. Quoting the introduction document for Glick2:

“Bundling isn’t perfect, there are some well known disadvantages. Increased disk footprint is one, although current storage space size makes this not such a big issues. Another problem is with security (or bugfix) updates in bundled libraries. With bundled libraries its much harder to upgrade a single library, as you need to find and upgrade each app that uses it. Better tooling and upgrader support can lessen the impact of this, but not completely eliminate it.”

This is what Listaller does better, since it was designed to do a large effort to avoid duplication of code.

Also, currently Glick doesn’t have support for updates and software-repositories, which Listaller had.

Combining Listaller and Glick ideas

So, why not combine the ideas of Listaller and Glick? In order to have Glick share resources, the system needs to know which shared resources are available. This is not possible if there is one huge Glick bundle containing all of the application’s dependencies. So I modularized Glick bundles to contain just one software component, which is e.g. GTK+ or Qt, GStreamer or could even be a larger framework (e.g. “GNOME 3.14 Platform”). These components are identified using AppStream XML metadata, which allows them to be installed from the distributor’s software repositories as well, if that is wanted.

If you now want to deploy your application, you first create a Glick bundle for it. Then, in a second step, you bundle your application bundle with it’s dependencies in one larger tarball, which can also be GPG signed and can contain additional metadata.

The resulting “metabundle” will look like this:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This doesn’t look like we share resources yet, right? The dependencies are still bundled with the application requiring them. The trick lies in the “installation” step: While the application above can be executed right away without installing it, there will also be an option to install it. For the user, this will mean that the application shows up in GNOME-Shell’s overview or KDEs Plasma launcher, gets properly registered with mimetypes and is – if installed for all users – available system-wide.

Technically, this will mean that the application’s main bundle is extracted and moved to a special location on the file system, so are the dependency-bundles. If bundles already exist, they will not be installed again, and the new application will simply use the existing software. Since the bundles contain information about their dependencies, the system is able to determine which software is needed and which can simply be deleted from the installation directories.

If the application is started now, the bundles are combined and mounted, so the application can see the libraries it depends on.

Additionally, this concept allows secure updates of applications and shared resources. The bundle metadata contains an URL which points to a bundle repository. If new versions are released, the system’s auto-updater can automatically pick these up and install them – this means e.g. the Qt bundle will receive security updates, even if the developer who shipped it with his/her app didn’t think of updating it.

Conclusion

So far, no productive code exists for this – I just have a proof-of-concept here. But I pretty much like the idea, and I am thinking about going further in that direction, since it allows deploying applications on the Linux desktop as well as deploying software on servers in a way which plays nice with the native package manager, and which does not duplicate much code (less risk of having not-updated libraries with security flaws around).

However, there might be issues I haven’t thought about yet. Also, it makes sense to look at GNOME to see how the whole “3rd-party app deployment” issue develops. In case I go further with Listaller-NEXT, it is highly likely that it will make use of the ideas sketched above (comments and feedback are more than welcome!).

Categories: Elsewhere

Code Karate: Creating a Drupal 7 Entity Reference View

Planet Drupal - Fri, 10/10/2014 - 14:26
Episode Number: 172

The Entity Reference module not only allows you to reference entities within your Drupal site, it also allows you to do so using a custom created entity reference view. This allows you to leverage the power of the views module to control how the entity reference selection field is displayed.

Tags: DrupalEntity ReferenceViewsDrupal 7Site BuildingDrupal Planet
Categories: Elsewhere

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