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Matthew Palmer: First Step with Clojure: Terror

Planet Debian - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 02:30
$ sudo apt-get install -y leiningen [...] $ lein new scratch [...] $ cd scratch $ lein repl Downloading: org/clojure/clojure/1.3.0/clojure-1.3.0.pom from repository central at http://repo1.maven.org/maven2 Transferring 5K from central Downloading: org/sonatype/oss/oss-parent/5/oss-parent-5.pom from repository central at http://repo1.maven.org/maven2 Transferring 4K from central Downloading: org/clojure/clojure/1.3.0/clojure-1.3.0.jar from repository central at http://repo1.maven.org/maven2 Transferring 3311K from central [...]

Wait… what? lein downloads some random JARs from a website over HTTP1, with, as far as far I can tell, no verification that what I’m asking for is what I’m getting (has nobody ever heard of Man-in-the-Middle attacks in Maven land?). It downloads a .sha1 file to (presumably) do integrity checking, but that’s no safety net – if I can serve you a dodgy .jar, I can serve you an equally-dodgy .sha1 file, too (also, SHA256 is where all the cool kids are at these days). Finally, jarsigner tells me that there’s no signature on the .jar itself, either.

It gets better, though. The repo1.maven.org site is served by the fastly.net2 pseudo-CDN3, which adds another set of points in the chain which can be subverted to hijack and spoof traffic. More routers, more DNS zones, and more servers.

I’ve seen Debian take a kicking more than once because packages aren’t individually signed, or because packages aren’t served over HTTPS. But at least Debian’s packages can be verified by chaining to a signature made by a well-known, widely-distributed key, signed by two Debian Developers with very well-connected keys.

This repository, on the other hand… oy gevalt. There are OpenPGP (GPG) signatures available for each package (tack .asc onto the end of the .jar URL), but no attempt was made to download the signatures for the .jar I downloaded. Even if the signature was downloaded and checked, there’s no way for me (or anyone) to trust the signature – the signature was made by a key that’s signed by one other key, which itself has no signatures. If I were an attacker, it wouldn’t be hard for me to replace that key chain with one of my own devising.

Even ignoring everyone living behind a government- or company-run intercepting proxy, and everyone using public wifi, it’s pretty well common knowledge by now (thanks to Edward Snowden) that playing silly-buggers with Internet traffic isn’t hard to do, and there’s no shortage of evidence that it is, in fact, done on a routine basis by all manner of people. Serving up executable code to a large number of people, in that threat environment, with no way for them to have any reasonable assurance that code is trustworthy, is very disappointing.

Please, for the good of the Internet, improve your act, Maven. Putting HTTPS on your distribution would be a bare minimum. There are attacks on SSL, sure, but they’re a lot harder to pull off than sitting on public wifi hijacking TCP connections. Far better would be to start mandating signatures, requiring signature checks to pass, and having all signatures chain to a well-known, widely-trusted, and properly secured trust root. Signing all keys that are allowed to upload to maven.org with a “maven.org distribution root” key (itself kept in hardware and only used offline), and then verifying that all signatures chain to that key, wouldn’t be insanely difficult, and would greatly improve the security of the software supply chain. Sure, it wouldn’t be perfect, but don’t make the perfect the enemy of the good. Cost-effective improvements are possible here.

Yes, security is hard. But you don’t get to ignore it just because of that, when you’re creating an attractive nuisance for anyone who wants to own up a whole passel of machines by slipping some dodgy code into a widely-used package.

  1. To add insult to injury, it appears to ignore my http_proxy environment variable, and the repo1.maven.org server returns plain-text error responses with Content-Type: text/xml. But at this point, that’s just icing on the shit cake.

  2. At one point in the past, my then-employer (a hosting provider) blocked Fastly’s caching servers from their network because they took down a customer site with a massive number of requests to a single resource, and the incoming request traffic was indistinguishable from a botnet-sourced DDoS attack. The requests were coming from IP space registered to a number of different ISPs, with no distinguishing rDNS (184-106-82-243.static.cloud-ips.com doesn’t help me to distinguish between “I’m a professionally-run distributed proxy” and “I’m a pwned box here to hammer your site into the ground”).

  3. Pretty much all of the new breed of so-called CDNs aren’t actually pro-actively distributing content, they’re just proxies. That isn’t a bad thing, per se, but I rather dislike the far-too-common practice of installing varnish (and perhaps mod_pagespeed, if they’re providing “advanced” capabilities) on a couple of AWS instances, and hanging out your shingle as a CDN. I prefer a bit of truth in my advertising.

Categories: Elsewhere

Russ Allbery: WebAuth 4.6.1

Planet Debian - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 00:59

This is a bug-fix release of the WebAuth site-wide web authentication system. As is typical, I accumulated a variety of minor bug fixes and improvements that I wanted to get into a release before starting larger work (in this case, adding JSON support for the user information service protocol).

The most severe bug fix is something that only folks at Stanford would notice: support for AuthType StanfordAuth was broken in the 4.6.0 release. This is for legacy compatibility with WebAuth 2.5. It has been fixed in this release.

In other, more minor bug fixes, build issues when remctl support is disabled have been fixed, expiring password warnings are shown in WebLogin after any POST-based authentication, the confirmation page is forced if authorization identity switching is available, the username field is verified before multifactor authentication to avoid subsequent warnings, newlines and tabs are allowed in the XML sent from the WebKDC for user messages, empty RT and ST parameters are correctly diagnosed, and there are some documentation improvements.

The main new feature in this release is support for using FAST armor during password authentication in mod_webkdc. A new WebKdcFastArmorCache directive can be set to point at a Kerberos ticket cache to use for FAST armor. If set, FAST is required, so the KDC must support it as well. This provides better wire security for the initial password authentication to protect against brute-force dictionary attacks against the password by a passive eavesdropper.

This release also adds a couple of new factor types, mp (mobile push) and v (voice), that Stanford will use as part of its Duo Security integration.

Note that, for the FAST armor feature, there is also an SONAME bump in the shared library in this release. Normally, I wouldn't bump the SONAME in a minor release, but in this case the feature was fairly minor and most people will not notice the change, so it didn't feel like it warranted a major release. I'm still of two minds about that, but oh well, it's done and built now. (At least I noticed that the SONAME bump was required prior to the release.)

You can get the latest release from the official WebAuth distribution site or from my WebAuth distribution pages.

Categories: Elsewhere

Metal Toad: Drupal Solr Search with Domain Access filtering

Planet Drupal - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 23:34

Metal Toad has had the privilege to work over the past two years with DC Comics. What makes this partnership even more exciting, is that the main dccomics.com site also includes sites for Vertigo Comics and Mad Magazine. Most recently Metal Toad was given the task of building the new search feature for all three sites. However, while its an awesome privilege to work with such a well known brand as DC, this does not come without a complex set of issues for the three sites when working with Apache Solr search and Drupal.

Categories: Elsewhere

Lior Kaplan: Testing PHPNG on Debian/Ubuntu

Planet Debian - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 23:01

We (at Zend) want to help people get more involved in testing PHPNG (PHP next generation), so we’re started to provide binaries for it, although it’s still a branch on top of PHP’s master branch. See more details about PHPNG on Zeev Suraski’s blog post.

The binaries (64bit) are compatible with Debian testing/unstable and Ubuntu Trusty (14.04) and up. The mod_php is built for Apache 2.4 which all three flavors have.

The repository is at http://repos.zend.com/zend-server/early-access/phpng/

Installation instructions:

# wget http://repos.zend.com/zend.key -O- 2> /dev/null | apt-key add -
# echo “deb http://repos.zend.com/zend-server/early-access/phpng/ trusty zend” > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/phpng.list
# apt-get update
# apt-get install php5

For the task of providing these binaries, I had a pleasure of combining my experience as a member of the Debian PHP team and a Debian Developer with stuff more internal to the PHP development process. Using the already existing Debian packaging enabled me to test more builds scenarios easily (and report problems accoredingly). Hopefully this could also be translated back into providing more experimental packages for Debian and making sure Debian packages are ready for the PHP released after PHP 5.6.


Filed under: Debian GNU/Linux, PHP
Categories: Elsewhere

Gizra.com: Headless Drupal - Form API, Drupal 9

Planet Drupal - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 23:00
Defining moment

A few months ago my DrupalCon Austin session was rejected. I was a bit upset, since presenting plays a big part in my trip to the states, and also surprised, as I mistakenly assumed my presentation repertoire would almost guarantee my session would be accepted. But the committee decided differently.

This has been an important moment for me. Two days later I told myself I don't care. I mean, I cared about the presentation, I just stopped caring that it was not selected, since I decided I was going to do it anyway. As an "unplugged" BoF.

The Gizra Way. I think this is probably the best presentation I've given so far, and quite ironically my rejected session is second only to Dries's keynote in YouTube.

You see - I had a "there is no spoon" moment. The second I realized it can be done differently, I was on my own track, perhaps even setting the path for others.

Form API, Drupal 9

I use Drupal because Form API is so great No one, ever

Continue reading…

Categories: Elsewhere

Petter Reinholdtsen: 98.6 percent done with the Norwegian draft translation of Free Culture

Planet Debian - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 22:40

This summer I finally had time to continue working on the Norwegian docbook version of the 2004 book Free Culture by Lawrence Lessig, to get a Norwegian text explaining the problems with todays copyright law. Yesterday, I finally completed translated the book text. There are still some foot/end notes left to translate, the colophon page need to be rewritten, and a few words and phrases still need to be translated, but the Norwegian text is ready for the first proof reading. :) More spell checking is needed, and several illustrations need to be cleaned up. The work stopped up because I had to give priority to other projects the last year, and the progress graph of the translation show this very well:

If you want to read the result, check out the github project pages and the PDF, EPUB and HTML version available in the archive directory.

Please report typos, bugs and improvements to the github project if you find any.

Categories: Elsewhere

Michael Prokop: Book Review: The Docker Book

Planet Debian - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 22:16

Docker is an open-source project that automates the deployment of applications inside software containers. I’m responsible for a docker setup with Jenkins integration and a private docker-registry setup at a customer and pre-ordered James Turnbull’s “The Docker Book” a few months ago.

Recently James – he’s working for Docker Inc – released the first version of the book and thanks to being on holidays I already had a few hours to read it AND blog about it. (Note: I’ve read the Kindle version 1.0.0 and all the issues I found and reported to James have been fixed in the current version already, jey.)

The book is very well written and covers all the basics to get familiar with Docker and in my opinion it does a better job at that than the official user guide because of the way the book is structured. The book is also a more approachable way for learning some best practices and commonly used command lines than going through the official reference (but reading the reference after reading the book is still worth it).

I like James’ approach with “ENV REFRESHED_AT $TIMESTAMP” for better controlling the cache behaviour and definitely consider using this in my own setups as well. What I wasn’t aware is that you can directly invoke “docker build $git_repos_url” and further noted a few command line switches I should get more comfortable with. I also plan to check out the Automated Builds on Docker Hub.

There are some references to further online resources, which is relevant especially for the more advanced use cases, so I’d recommend to have network access available while reading the book.

What I’m missing in the book are best practices for running a private docker-registry in a production environment (high availability, scaling options,…). The provided Jenkins use cases are also very basic and nothing I personally would use. I’d also love to see how other folks are using the Docker plugin, the Docker build step plugin or the Docker build publish plugin in production (the plugins aren’t covered in the book at all). But I’m aware that this are fast moving parts and specialised used cases – upcoming versions of the book are already supposed to cover orchestration with libswarm, developing Docker plugins and more advanced topics, so I’m looking forward to further updates of the book (which you get for free as existing customer, being another plus).

Conclusion: I enjoyed reading the Docker book and can recommend it, especially if you’re either new to Docker or want to get further ideas and inspirations what folks from Docker Inc consider best practices.

Categories: Elsewhere

Acquia: Search in Drupal 8 - Thomas Seidl & Nick Veenhof

Planet Drupal - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 17:57

Thomas Seidl and Nick Veenhof took a few minutes out of the Drupal 8 Search API code sprint at the Drupal DevDays in Szeged, Hungary to talk with me about the state-of-play and what's coming in terms of search in Drupal: one flexible, pluggable solution for search functionality with the whole community behind it.

Categories: Elsewhere

Clemens Tolboom: Interested in ReST and HAL?

Planet Drupal - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 16:42
  1. Checkout the issue queue for HAL and ReST.
  2. Use the quickstart tool: https://github.com/build2be/drupal-rest-test.
Need HAL?
  1. Install HAL Browser on your site to see what we got till now.
  2. cd drupal-root
Categories: Elsewhere

Acquia: Migration Tips and Tricks

Planet Drupal - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 15:18

Cross-posted with permission from nerdstein

The Migrate module is, hands down, the defacto way to migrate content in Drupal. The only knock against it, is the learning curve. All good things come to those who take the time and learn it.

Categories: Elsewhere

Tanguy Ortolo: GNU/Linux graphic sessions: suspending your computer

Planet Debian - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 14:45

Major desktop environments such as Xfce or KDE have a built-in computer suspend feature, but when you use a lighter alternative, things are a bit more complicated, because basically: only root can suspend the computer. There used to be a standard solution to that, using a D-Bus call to a running daemon upowerd. With recent updates, that solution first stopped working for obscure reasons, but it could still be configured back to be usable. With newer updates, it stopped working again, but this time it seems it is gone for good:

$ dbus-send --system --print-reply \ --dest='org.freedesktop.UPower' \ /org/freedesktop/UPower org.freedesktop.UPower.Suspend Error org.freedesktop.DBus.Error.UnknownMethod: Method "Suspend" with signature "" on interface "org.freedesktop.UPower" doesn't exist

The reason seems to be that upowerd is not running, because it no longer provides an init script, only a systemd service. So, if you do not use systemd, you are left with one simple and stable solution: defining a sudo rule to start the suspend or hibernation process as root. In /etc/sudoers.d/power:

%powerdev ALL=NOPASSWD: /usr/sbin/pm-suspend, \ /usr/sbin/pm-suspend-hybrid, \ /usr/sbin/pm-hibernate

That allows members of the powderdev group to run sudo pm-suspend, sudo pm-suspend-hybrid and sudo pm-hibernate, which can be used with a key binding manager such as your window manager's or xbindkeys. Simple, efficient, and contrary to all that ever-changing GizmoKit and whatsitd stuff, it has worked and will keep working for years.

Categories: Elsewhere

Code Karate: Drupal 7 Splashify

Planet Drupal - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 13:36
Episode Number: 158

In this episode we cover the Splashify module. This module is used to display splash pages or popups. There are multiple configuration options available to fit your site needs.

In this episode you will learn:

  • How to set up Splashify
  • How to configure Splashify
  • How to get Splashify to use the Mobile Detect plugin
  • How Splashify displays to the end user
  • How to be awesome
Tags: DrupalDrupal 7Drupal PlanetUI/DesignJavascriptResponsive Design
Categories: Elsewhere

Francesca Ciceri: Adventures in Mozillaland #3

Planet Debian - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 13:04

Yet another update from my internship at Mozilla, as part of the OPW.

A brief one, this time, sorry.

Bugs, Bugs, Bugs, Bacon and Bugs

I've continued with my triaging/verifying work and I feel now pretty confident when working on a bug.
On the other hand, I think I've learned more or less what was to be learned here, so I must think (and ask my mentor) where to go from now on.
Maybe focus on a specific Component?
Or steadily work on a specific channel for both triaging/poking and verifying?
Or try my hand at patches?
Not sure, yet.

Also, I'd like to point out that, while working on bug triaging, the developer's answers on the bug report are really important.
Comments like this help me as a triager to learn something new, and be a better triager for that component.
I do realize that developers cannot always take the time to put in comments basic information on how to better debug their component/product, but trust me: this will make you happy on the long run.
A wiki page with basic information on how debug problems for your component is also a good idea, as long as that page is easy to find ;).

So, big shout-out for MattN for a very useful comment!

Community

After much delaying, we finally managed to pick a date for the Bug Triage Workshop: it will be on July 25th. The workshop will be an online session focused on what is triaging, why is important, how to reproduce bugs and what information ask to the reporter to make a bug report the most complete and useful possible.
We will do it in two different time slots, to accomodate various timezones, and it will be held on #testday on irc.mozilla.org.
Take a look at the official announcement and subscribe on the event's etherpad!

See you on Friday! :)

Categories: Elsewhere

Steinar H. Gunderson: The sad state of Linux Wi-Fi

Planet Debian - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 12:45

I've been using 802.11 on Linux now for over a decade, and to be honest, it's still a pretty sad experience. It works well enough that I mostly don't care... but when I care, and try to dig deeper, it always ends up in the answer “this is just crap”.

I can't say exactly why this is; between the Intel cards I've always been using, the Linux drivers, the firmware, the mac80211 layer, wpa_supplicant and NetworkManager, I have no idea who are supposed to get all these things right, and I have no idea how hard or easy they actually are to pull off. But there are still things annoying me frequently that we should really have gotten right after ten years or more:

  • Why does my Intel card consistently pick 2.4 GHz over 5 GHz? The 5 GHz signal is just as strong, and it gives a less crowded 40 MHz channel (twice the bandwidth, yay!) instead of the busy 20 MHz channel the 2.4 GHz one has to share. The worst part is, if I use an access point with band-select (essentially forcing the initial connection to be to 5 GHz—this is of course extra fun when the driver sees ten APs and tries to connect to all of them over 2.4 in turn before trying 5 GHz), the driver still swaps onto 2.4 GHz a few minutes later!
  • Rate selection. I can sit literally right next to an AP and get a connection on the lowest basic rate (which I've set to 11 Mbit/sec for the occasion). OK, maybe I shouldn't trust the output of iwconfig too much, since rate is selected per-packet, but then again, when Linux supposedly has a really good rate selection algorithm (minstrel), why are so many drivers using their own instead? (Yes, hello “iwl-agn-rs”, I'm looking at you.)
  • Connection time. I dislike OS X pretty deeply and think that many of its technical merits are way overblown, but it's got one thing going for it; it connects to an AP fast. RFC4436 describes some of the tricks they're using, but Linux uses none of them. In any case, even the WPA2 setup is slow for some reason, it's not just DHCP.
  • Scanning/roaming seems to be pretty random; I have no idea how much thought really went into this, and I know it is a hard problem, but it's not unusual at all to be stuck at some low-speed AP when a higher-speed one is available. (See also 2.4 vs. 5 above.) I'd love to get proper support for CCX (Cisco Client Extensions) here, which makes this tons better in a larger Wi-Fi setting (since the access point can give the client a lot of information that's useful for roaming, e.g. “there's an access point on thannel 52 that sends its beacons every 100 ms with offset 54 from mine”, which means you only need to swap channel for a few milliseconds to listen instead of a full beacon period), but I suppose that's covered by licensing or patents or something. Who knows.

With now a billion mobile devices running Linux and using Wi-Fi all the time, maybe we should have solved this a while ago. But alas. Instead we get access points trying to layer hacks upon hacks to try to force clients into making the right decisions. And separate ESSIDs for 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz.

Augh.

Categories: Elsewhere

Andrew Pollock: [tech] Going solar

Planet Debian - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 07:36

With electricity prices in Australia seeming to be only going up, and solar being surprisingly cheap, I decided it was a no-brainer to invest in a solar installation to reduce my ongoing electricity bills. It also paves the way for getting an electric car in the future. I'm also a greenie, so having some renewable energy happening gives me the warm and fuzzies.

So today I got solar installed. I've gone for a 2 kWh system, consisting of 8 250 watt Seraphim panels (I'm not entirely sure which model) and an Aurora UNO-2.0-I-OUTD inverter.

It was totally a case of decision fatigue when it came to shopping around. Everyone claims the particular panels they want to sell at the best. It's pretty much impossible to make a decent assessment of their claims. In the end, I went with the Seraphim panels because they scored well on the PHOTON tests. That said, I've had other solar companies tell me the PHOTON tests aren't indicative of Australian conditions. It's hard to know who to believe. In the end, I chose Seraphim because of the PHOTON test results, and they're also apparently one of the few panels that pass the Thresher test, which tests for durability.

The harder choice was the inverter. I'm told that yield varies wildly by inverter, and narrowed it down to Aurora or SunnyBoy. Jason's got a SunnyBoy, and the appeal with it was that it supported Bluetooth for data gathering, although I don't much care for the aesthetics of it. Then I learned that there was a WiFi card coming out soon for the Aurora inverter, and that struck me as better than Bluetooth, so I went with the Aurora inverter. I discovered at the eleventh hour that the model of Aurora inverter that was going to be supplied wasn't supported by the WiFi card, but was able to switch models to the one that was. I'm glad I did, because the newer model looks really nice on the wall.

The whole system was up at running just in time to catch the setting sun, so I'm looking forward to seeing it in action tomorrow.

Apparently the next step is Energex has to come out to replace my analog power meter with a digital one.

I'm grateful that I was able to get Body Corporate approval to use some of the roof. Being on the top floor helped make the installation more feasible too, I think.

Categories: Elsewhere

Matthew Palmer: Per-repo update hooks with gitolite

Planet Debian - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 06:45

Gitolite is a popular way to manage collections of git repositories entirely from the command line – it’s configured using configuration stored in a git repo, which is nicely self-referential. Providing per-branch access control and a wide range of addons, it’s quite a valuable system.

In recent versions (3.6), it added support for configuring per-repository git hooks from within the gitolite-admin repo itself – something which previously required directly jiggering around with the repo metadata on the filesystem. It allows you to “chain” multiple hooks together, too, which is a nice touch. You can, for example, define hooks for “validate style guidelines”, “submit patch to code review” and “push to the CI server”. Then for each repo you can pick which of those hooks to execute. It’s neat.

There’s one glaring problem, though – you can only use these chained, per-repo hooks on the pre-receive, post-receive, and post-update hooks. The update hook is special, and gitolite wants to make sure you never, ever forget it. You can hook into the update processing chain by using something called a “virtual ref”; they’re stored in a separate configuration directory, use a different syntax in the config file, and if you’re trying to learn what they do, you’ll spend a fair bit of time on them. The documentation describes VREFs as “a mechanism to add additional constraints to a push”. The association between that and the update hook is one you get to make for yourself.

The interesting thing is that there’s no need for this gratuitous difference in configuration methods between the different hooks. I wrote a very small and simple patch that makes the update hook configurable in exactly the same way as the other server-side hooks, with no loss of existing functionality.

The reason I’m posting it here is that I tried to submit it to the primary gitolite developer, and was told “I’m not touching the update hook […] I’m not discussing this […] take it or leave it”. So instead, I’m publicising this patch for anyone who wants to locally patch their gitolite installation to have a consistent per-repo hook UI. Share and enjoy!

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Association News: Building the Drupal Community in Vietnam: Seeds for Empowerment and Opportunities

Planet Drupal - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 06:38

With almost 90 million people, Vietnam has the 13th largest population of any nation in the world. It's home to a young generation that is very active in adopting innovative technologies, and in the last decade, the country has been steadily emerging as an attractive IT outsourcing and staffing location for many Western software companies.

Yet amidst this clear trend, Drupal has emerged very slowly in Vietnam and all of Asia as a leading, enterprise-ready Framework (CMF). However, this is changing as one Drupalista works hard to grow the regional user base.

How it all started

Tom Tran, a German with Hanoian roots, discovered Drupal in 2008. He was overwhelmed by the technological power and flexibility that makes Drupal such a highly competitive platform, and was amazed by the friendliness and vibrancy of the global community. He realized that introducing the framework and the Drupal community to Vietnam would help local people the opportunity to access the following three benefits:

  • Steady Income: Drupal won’t make you an overnight millionaire, however if you become a Drupal expert and commit to helping clients to achieve their goals, you will never be short of work. Quality Drupal specialists are in huge demand across the world and this demand won’t stop any time soon as Drupal adoption grows.
  • Better Lifestyle: You are free and able to design a work/lifestyle balance on your terms. You can work from home or contribute remotely while traveling, as long as you continue to deliver sustainable value to your client. Many professionals in less developed countries like Vietnam have never imagined this opportunity-- and learning about this lifestyle can be very empowering and inspirational.
  • Cross Cultural Friendships: In spite of national borders and cultural differences, Tom has established fruitful partnerships between his development team from Vietnam and clients from across the globe. Whether clients are based in California, Berlin, Melbourne or Tokyo, his team has successfully collaborated on many projects and often became good friends beyond just project mates. These relationships can only grow thanks to the open Drupal community spirit and the way it connects peoples from all regions and cultures from around the world.

Tom started by organizing a Drupal 7 release party in Hanoi in January 2011. Afterwards, he reached out to Drupal enthusiasts in the region and organized informal coffee sessions, which have contributed to the growth of a solid, cohesive community in Vietnam.

Drupal Vietnam College Tour

With help from a Community Cultivation Grant, Tom put on workshops every three months at Vietnamese universities and colleges in 2012. By showcasing the big brands and institutions using Drupal, a diverse series of use cases demonstrate that the demand for Drupal is high, and that the Drupal industry is a great place to be. A three hour hands-on session walks students through the basics of sitebuilding with Drupal-- and it's at this point that most students get hooked.

March 2012
First ever Drupal Hanoi Conference at VTC Academy, with 120 visitors (facebook gallery)

June 2012
Hello Drupal workshop @ Tech University Danang (gallery)

 

July 2012
Drupal Workshop @ FTP-Aptech (fb gallery, fpt aptech news)

 

September 2012
Drupal Workshop @ NUCE (gallery, Nuce news)

 

November 2012
Drupal Workshop @ FTP University (gallery)

 

December 2012
Drupal Workshop @ Aiti-Aptech (gallery)

 

December 2012
Drupal talk & sponsorship for PHPDay.vn 2012 (local images 2x)

The results was an overall increase in members and growing everyday. Stats in 2014:

What’s next?

Tom is currently planning to organize the first DrupalCamp in Hanoi / Vietnam in late 2014. Today Drupal Vietnam has only roughly 1300 members, (less than LA DUG) but with a growing pool of software engineers graduating each year, this country is set to become a relevant resource of highly skilled developers, provided high quality training is affordable and access to jobs can be facilitated. Things look very bright in Vietnam!

Supporters About

Tom is founder of Geekpolis, a software company with a development center based in Hanoi, Vietnam. Geekpolis focuses on high-quality managed Drupal development services for bigger consultancy agencies. Currently the team is comprised of 25 engineers.

To get involved, contact Tom at:
Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal core announcements: Drupal 7.30 release this week to fix regressions in the Drupal 7.29 security release

Planet Drupal - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 06:06
Start:  2014-07-23 (All day) - 2014-07-25 (All day) America/New_York Sprint Organizers:  David_Rothstein

The Drupal 7.29 security release contained a security fix to the File module which caused some regressions in Drupal's file handling, particularly for files or images attached to taxonomy terms.

I am planning to release Drupal 7.30 this week to fix as many of these regressions as possible and allow more sites to upgrade past Drupal 7.28. The release could come as early as today (Wednesday July 23).

However, to do this we need more testing and reviews of the proposed patches to make sure they are solid. Please see #2305017: Regression: Files or images attached to certain core and non-core entities are lost when the entity is edited and saved for more details and for the patches to test, and leave a comment on that issue if you have reviewed or tested them.

Thank you!

Categories: Elsewhere

Mediacurrent: Understanding the Role of the Enterprise in Drupal

Planet Drupal - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 03:53

There is a trending topic I am seeing being discussed a lot more in the open-source software and Drupal community. The point of conversation focuses on what the role should be of enterprise organizations?  Especially, those that are or have already adopted Drupal as their web platform of choice.

Categories: Elsewhere

Jonathan McCrohan: Git remote helpers

Planet Debian - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 03:19

If you follow upstream Git development closely, you may have noticed that the Mercurial and Bazaar remote helpers (use git to interact with hg and bzr repos) no longer live in the main Git tree. They have been split out into their own repositories, here and here.

git-remote-bzr had been packaged (as git-bzr) for Debian since March 2013, but was removed in May 2014 when the remote helpers were removed upstream. There had been a wishlist bug report open since Mar 2013 to get git-remote-hg packaged, and I had submitted a patch, but it was never applied.

Split out of these remote helpers upstream has allowed Vagrant Cascadian and myself to pick up these packages and both are now available in Debian.

apt-get install git-remote-hg git-remote-bzr
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