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Deeson Online: Part 2: Apache Solr - Manually Controlling a Custom Fields Bias

Planet Drupal - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 11:25

In part one of this post I showed you how to create a custom field to be added to Apache Solr index and altering the search based on this field. In this second part I will be showing you how you can define a custom field to be listed within the 'field bias' admin settings in the Apache Solr module.

Setting the field biases

Most of the time just setting a custom field to be added to your index is all you will need. But sometimes there is the need to be able to control the bias of your custom fields when Solr does the search.

Typically you would manage this in the Apache Solr admin pages by going to /admin/config/search/apachesolr/settings. This will show you a list of your Solr instances that you have configured for the site. To change the biases, click on the ‘bias’ link against the relevant instance.

Within this section if you choose the ‘Field Biases’ tab on the left hand site you can set the bias for fields within the site.  This will affect the what is more relevant when Apache Solr does a search.

This is fine if you just want to set the bias on the standard fields that are available, but what if you want to be able to control the bias of the new custom field that you have just created?

Allowing manual field biases control on your custom field

Looking at the Apachesolr module in more detail shows that this list of bias fields is made up of ‘default’ fields (e.g. content, h1, h2 etc.) and any fields that are ‘text’ fields.

If you have created a custom field and your field is a string (e.g. 'ss_my_field') then you would think that this would then show up as it is a string field which is text - right?

Well no ..... after looking at the field definitions in more details (as shown in part 1), string fields are different to text fields, which is why the custom string field wasn't showing in the list.

Therefore in order for your custom field to appear in the list of 'bias fields', you need to define your custom field as a 'text' field rather than a 'string' field (e.g. ‘ts_my_field’). Having done this, re-index the content and the custom field now shows in this list of field biases.

Hooray I hear you shout .... well almost.  The field shows in the list but the label of this custom field shows as the field name (e.g. ‘ts_my_field’) - not very readable or friendly.

Helpfully there is a hook provided by the ApacheSolr module to map fields to a label for display:

/** * Implements hook_apachesolr_field_name_map_alter(). */ function MY_MODULE_apachesolr_field_name_map_alter(&$map) { $map['ts_my_field'] = t('This is the label for my custom field'); }

Now your new custom field shows in the list of 'bias fields' and has a nice friendly label for it. So you can now set the relevant value you would like for it to alter your search - happy days!

Read morePart 2: Apache Solr - Manually Controlling a Custom Fields BiasBy Mike Davis | 9th September 2014
Categories: Elsewhere

Urban Insight: Building a Drupal Module for Research Papers in Economics (RePEc)

Planet Drupal - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 01:19

Working with the USC Lusk Center for Real Estate, we recently had the opportunity to automate how the Center's research papers are submitted to a popular repository of research about economics. This post discusses how we created a software module that others who use the open source Drupal web content management system can reuse and enhance.
 

Categories: Elsewhere

Ana Beatriz Guerrero Lopez: DebConf14 and ten years contributing to Debian

Planet Debian - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 22:59

It has been one week since I’m back from DebConf14 and I’m still recovering and catching up with things. DebConf14 has been amazing, it has been great to be back after missing it for two years. Thanks a lot to everybody who helped to make it real. On my side, I helped a bit in the talks team.

During DebConf14, I got the opportunity to discuss with Rene Mayorga about the MIA work-flow and we also got some feedback in the MIA BoF. We have plenty of ideas to implement and we’re aiming to improve things during this next year.

This summer has been also 10 years since I started contributing to Debian. It’s hard to believe. Ten years ago I barely knew where to start helping and now I have an endless TODO list of things I would like to do. And always during DebConf this list seems to grow ten times faster than usual. Thankfully, also motivation increases a lot :)

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Zivtech: Upcoming Zivtech Events, September 2014

Planet Drupal - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 19:10

September is a busy month over here at Zivtech as we embark on Drupaldelphia, a training on Panels and a handful of meetups. We will be out and about throughout the month, so be sure to catch up with us at some of our upcoming events:

Node.js Meetup at Zivtech HQ

Our Involvement: Hosting, Attending

What: This is an installment of the second-Tuesday Philly node.js meetup group. We start things out informally and anyone that has something to share shows off what they've been doing with node.js.

When: Tuesday, September 9, 2014 from 6:00 - 8:00 pm

Where: 1315 Walnut St, Suite 1500, Philadelphia, PA 19107

PHIT Circle Presents: Aging in Place

Our Involvement: Sponsors, attending

What: Please join us on Thursday, September 11th  to learn about "Aging in Place". John Whitman, a Wharton Health Care Management faculty member and leading national consultant on aging and long-term care is assembling a panel of experts to discuss how innovation is enabling our seniors to receive the medical monitoring and care they need to safely continue living in their own homes. We will both define what it means to age in place and how it's different depending upon socioeconomic status, and what innovations and technologies are available and needed for aging in place to happen. Special emphasis will be placed on not just what is currently available, but also what is needed for the future.

When: Thursday, September 11, 2014 from 5:30 - 8:30 pm

Where: 4801 S. Broad St., Suite 100, Building 100 Innovation Center, Philadelphia, PA 19112

Drupaldelphia 2014

Our Involvement: Sponsors, presentors, attending

What: Drupaldelphia is an annual camp held in Philadelphia for the open source content management platform, Drupal. The event attracts developers, site-builders, content administrators, designers, and anyone interested in using Drupal in their organization or upcoming project. This year will again be hosted in the Pennsylvania Convention Center at 1101 Arch St  Philadelphia, PA 19107.

When: Friday, September 12, 2014 from 8:00 am - 4:30 pm

Where: The Philadelphia Convention Center, 1101 Arch St, Philadelphia, PA 19107

Philadelphia Drupal Meetup at Zivtech HQ

Our Involvement: Hosting, attending

What: We'll be talking Drupal, eating pizza, and drinking various beverages (some alcoholic, others not) from 6:30-9pm at Zivtech Headquarters in Old City. The pizza and drinks will be provided by the hosts (that's us!).

When: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 from 6:30 - 9:30 pm

Where: 1315 Walnut St, Suite 1500, Philadelphia, PA 19107

Drupal Training: Layout and Site Building with Panels

Our Involvement: Hosting, facilitating

What: Panels is a tool for creating advanced layouts and data displays in Drupal. In our day-long intermediate level training, we look at the full range of the Panels toolset and cover the following topics: understanding the Panels interface, tricks to make editing Panels easier, creating custom Panels layouts, styling techniques, building advanced data displays, helpful Panels features that many site builders miss.

When: Wednesday, September 17, 2014 from 10:00 am - 5:00 pm

Where: 1315 Walnut St, Suite 1500, Philadelphia, PA 19107

Comics are Magic: How Words and Images Create Content That Can’t Be Ignored

Our Involvement: Hosting, attending

What: Comic and cartoons aren't new, but it took the Internet to unlock their full potential. Find out how technology no more complicated than a jpeg can grab viewer's attention and deliver a message before they even realize they're receiving it.

When: Wednesday, September 17, 2014 from 6:00 - 8:00 pm

Where: 1315 Walnut St, Suite 1500, Philadelphia, PA 19107

PACT Thursday Networking Series

Our Involvement: Attending

What: Get back to basics and make new connections as PACT welcomes in summer. PACT invites its fellow members and guests from Technology and Healthcare Corporations, Entrepreneurs, Investors and Professional Advisors for an evening of networking. Come learn more about each others businesses & exchange business cards while enjoying cocktails and hors ‘d’ oeuvres.

When: Thursday, September 18, 2014 from 5:30- 7:30 pm

Where: Prime Stache, 110 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19107

These are just a handful of the events we will be attending, hosting, and sponsoring this September, so be sure to keep your eyes and ears open for more as we continue to update this list.

We can't wait to see you around!

Will you be attending any of our upcoming events? Let us know in the comments.

 

Terms: Eventsupcoming eventsZivtechSponsorattendhostMeetupDrupal PlanetDrupalNode.jsPACTContent MarketingTrainingsdrupal trainingdrupaldelphiaDrupalCon
Categories: Elsewhere

DrupalCon Amsterdam: Training spotlight: Drupal 8 for Drupalistas

Planet Drupal - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 17:21

Are you a site builder, themer, or backend developer who is comfortable with Drupal 7 (or 6) and worried about gearing up for Drupal 8?

Want a headstart?

Drupal 8 for Drupalistas at DrupalCon Amsterdam will save you self-study time by walking you through D8 in a day. You'll build a site, getting a hands on experience of the anticipated Drupal 8 changes, and dive deeper into your own speciality.

At the end of the day, you will be ready to dive deeper into Drupal 8 and start building projects. Our goal is to make your transition as smooth as possible. While we won't dive too deeply into coding (Sorry, all ye who seek Symphony training!) we will break into small, specialty groups at the end of the day so you can focus on one area; site building, theming, or coding.

Meet the Trainers from Amazee Labs

Long-time DrupalCon trainer Diana Dupuis (dianadupis), Site Building track chair Michael Schmid (Schnitzel), and DevOps track chair Bastian Widmer (dasrecht) of Amazee Labs have presented this training three times, including once at DrupalCon Austin to a sold-out room.

Attend this Drupal Training

This training will be held on Monday, 29 September from 09:00-17:00 at the Amsterdam RAI during DrupalCon Amsterdam. The cost of attending this training is €400 and includes training materials, meals and coffee breaks. A DrupalCon ticket is not required to register to attend this event.

Register today

Categories: Elsewhere

Acquia: Perspectives on the future of PHP

Planet Drupal - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 16:38
Announcing the Future of PHP guest blog series

Categories: Elsewhere

Joey Hess: propellor is d-i 2.0

Planet Debian - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 11:32

I think I've been writing the second system to replace d-i with in my spare time for a couple months, and never noticed.

I'm as suprised as you are, but consider this design:

  • Installation system consists of debian live + haskell + propellor + web browser.

  • Entire installation UI consists of a web-based (and entirely pictographic and prompt based, so does not need to be translated) selection of the installation target.

  • Installation target can be local disk, remote system via ssh (wiping out crufty hacked-up pre-installed debian), local VM, live ISO, etc.

  • Really, no other questions. Not even user name/password! The installed system will only allow login via the same method that was used to install it. So a locally installed system will accept console/X login with no password and then a forced password change. Or a system installed via ssh will only allow login using the same ssh key that was used to install it.

  • The entire installation process consists of a disk format, followed by debootstrap, followed by running propellor in the target system. This also means that the installed system includes a propellor config file which now describes the properties of the system as installed (so can be edited to tweak the installation, or reused as starting point for next installation).

  • Users who want to configure installation in any way write down properties of system using a simple propellor config file. I suppose some people still use more than one partiton or gnome or some such customization, so they'd use:

main :: IO main = Installer.main & Installer.partition First "/boot" Ext3 (MiB 256) & Installer.partition Next "/" Ext4 (GiB 5) & Installer.partition Next "/home" Ext4 FreeSpace & Installer.grubBoots "hd0" & os (System (Debian Stable) "amd64") & Apt.stdSourcesList & Apt.installed ["task-gnome-desktop"]
  • The installation system is itself built using propellor. A free feature given the above design, so basically all it will take to build an installation iso is this code:
main :: IO main = Installer.main & Installer.target CdImage "installer.iso" & os (System (Debian Stable) "amd64") & Apt.stdSourcesList & Apt.installed ["task-xfce-desktop", "ghc", "propellor"] & User.autoLogin "root" & User.loginStarts "propellor --installer"
  • Propellor has a nice display of what it's doing so there is no freaking progress bar.

Well, now I know where propellor might end up if I felt like spending a month and adding a few thousand lines of code to it.

Categories: Elsewhere

PreviousNext: DrupalGov Canberra 2014: The new Front-end work-flow from ticketing to building

Planet Drupal - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 09:26

John Albin Wilkins recently gave a session on The new Front-end work-flow from ticketing to building at DrupalGov Canberra. 

This session will outline our current mistakes and then introduce the basic techniques for CSS layering and using design components, the heart of any front-end CSS project. We will also discuss ticket structure, project organization, and tricks to implement components when you can't change Drupal's classes.

Categories: Elsewhere

PreviousNext: DrupalGov Canberra 2014: Drupal 8 for Sitebuilders

Planet Drupal - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 09:16

Find out what's install for Site Builders in Drupal 8 from my recent DrupalGov Canberra session.

Categories: Elsewhere

Web Omelette: How to remove all the Voting API results for a given node type

Planet Drupal - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 09:00

Have you ever needed to remove in bulk a bunch of voting results for, let's say, a given content type? There is no option in the UI but you can find in the votingapi.module some handy functions that will allow you to write a customized update hook.

So let's say that we need to remove all the results for the article content type. If we look in the votingapi_vote table, we don't see any bundle or content type column, but we see an entity_id. So we need to get all the ids of our article nodes:

$query = db_query("SELECT nid FROM node WHERE type = 'article'"); foreach ($query as $res) { $nids[] = $res->nid; }

Now we have the $nids array containing all of our node IDs. Next, let's load all the votes for these IDs:

module_load_include('module', 'votingapi', 'votingapi.module'); $votes = votingapi_select_votes(array('entity_id' => $nids));

First we include the right module file and then we use one of its functions to select all the votes that match some criteria (in our case an array of IDs). Next, we need to worry also about the votingapi_cache table which contains the results of the voting per entity. We need to remove that as well. So we'll use another helper function from Voting API:

$results = votingapi_select_results(array('entity_id' => $nids));

Now we have also the result objects we need to delete so we can proceed with the actual removal. For this, we can use two more handy methods from the Voting API module:

votingapi_delete_votes($votes); votingapi_delete_results($results);

And that's it. This will remove all the votes and their aggregated results from both tables. It may take some time so make sure you have enough server resources to perform this task.

To use this code, I recommend creating an update hook in a custom module that you run once. But make sure you properly test it on your test environment before deploying and running the code on production servers. Always keep in mind the possibility of the server running out of resources depending on how many votes you have in the database.

Do you have any better way of batch deleting votes/results? This is what I found and I'm curious if you know of any better ways. Let me know.

var switchTo5x = true;stLight.options({"publisher":"dr-8de6c3c4-3462-9715-caaf-ce2c161a50c"});
Categories: Elsewhere

KYbest: Applying node access on a non-node based view

Planet Drupal - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 08:45

The Views module automatically joins the node_access table only for node based views. In any other case we need to take care of the proper access handling ourselves.

Categories: Elsewhere

Jaldhar Vyas

Planet Debian - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 05:47
Categories: Elsewhere

PreviousNext: Talk to the CMS end users: content editors

Planet Drupal - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 02:58

Have you ever delivered a project that was met by the content team with a collective sigh? There's a simple way to avoid that - talk to them!

Categories: Elsewhere

Craig Small: How not to get Galaxy Tab into Safe Mode

Planet Debian - Sun, 07/09/2014 - 14:31

For weeks my Galaxy Tab 10.1 has reasonably consistently gone into safe mode. Not booting into it but I’d use it fine then put it away and next time I looked at it, Safe Mode was there. It wasn’t every time, but averaged to be about every second time.

So the first thing was a bit of googling to see what this Safe Mode was. Most of the suggestions were around how to put it into safe mode during the boot process but my problem was opposite; it wasn’t during booting and I wanted something to stop safe mode, not put the device into it. The closest I got to it was there was some misbehaving program that kicked the thing into safe mode.

The problem was, I checked several times and there were no running programs. I really did start to worry I had a hardware fault or something wrong deep within the OS.

When you have problems in IT, you’re usually asked “What’s new? What’s changed?”. The answer is generally “Nothing” which gets a switch “No really, what did change”. The only answer I could come up with was a hardware keyboard. This slim aluminum uses bluetooth to communicate to the tablet and clips onto the front screen to protect it when not in use. Could this be the change I was looking for?

The clue was that sometimes when you boot Android, if you hold down some keys it boots into safemode. It seems that holding down some combination of keys (volume up/down, power) puts into safe mode. The keyboard can clip onto the tablet in two ways, one long edge has some raised edges while one doesn’t. If the raised edge was connected to the same side as the buttons, I’d get safe mode sometimes as the edge pushed some of those buttons. More importantly, putting the raised edge on the side with no buttons meant no more safe mode.

Not really a software or electrical fault, more one of just mechanics.

 

Categories: Elsewhere

Joachim Breitner: ICFP 2014

Planet Debian - Sun, 07/09/2014 - 00:15

Another on-my-the-journey-back blog post; this time from the Frankfurt Airport Train Station – my flight was delayed (if I knew that I could have watched the remaining Lightning Talks), and so was my train, but despite 5min of running through the Airport just not enough. And now that the free 30 Minutes of Railway Station Internet are used up, I have nothing else to do but blog...

Last week I was attending ICFP 2014 in Gothenburg, followed by the Haskell Symposium and the Haskell Implementors Workshop. The justification to attend was the paper on Safe Coercions (joint work with Richard Eisenberg, Simon Peyton Jones and Stephanie Weirich), although Richard got to hold the talk, and did so quite well. So I got to leisurely attend the talks, while fighting the jet-lag that I brought from Portland.

There were – as expected – quite a few interesting talks. Among them the first keynote, Kathleen Fisher on the need for formal methods in cars and toy-quadcopters and unmanned battle helicopters, which made me conclude that my Isabelle skills might eventually become relevant in practical applications. And did you know that if someone gains access to your car’s electronics, they can make the seat belt pull you back hard?

Stefanie Weirich’s keynote (and the subsequent related talks by Jan Stolarek and Richard Eisenberg) on what a dependently typed Haskell would look like and what we could use it for was mouth-watering. I am a bit worried that Haskell will be become a bit obscure for newcomers and people that simply don’t want to think about types too much, on the other hand it seems that Haskell as we know it will always stay there, just as a subset of the language.

Similarly interesting were refinement types for Haskell (talks by Niki Vazou and by Eric Seidel), in the form of LiquidTypes, something that I have not paid attention to yet. It seems to be a good way for more high assurance in Haskell code.

Finally, the Haskell Implementors Workshop had a truckload of exciting developments in and around Haskell: More on GHCJS, Partial type signatures, interactive type-driven development like we know it from Agda, the new Haskell module system and amazing user-defined error messages – the latter unfortunately only in Helium, at least for now.

But it’s not the case that I only sat and listened. During the Haskell Implementors Workshop I held a talk “Contributing to GHC” with a live demo of me fixing a (tiny) bug in GHC, with the aim of getting more people to hack on GHC. The main message here is that it is not that big of deal. And despite me not actually saying much interesting in the talk, I got good feedback afterwards. So if it now actually motivates someone to contribute to GHC, I’m even more happier.

And then there is of course the Hallway Track. I discussed the issues with fusing a left fold (unfortunately, without a great solution). In order to tackle this problem more systematically, John Wiegley and I created the beginning of a “List Fusion Lab”, i.e. a bunch of list benchmark and the possibility to compare various implementations (e.g. with different RULES) and various compilers. With that we can hopefully better assess the effect of a change to the list functions.

PS: The next train is now also delayed, so I’ll likely miss my tram and arrive home even later...

PPS: I really have to update my 10 year old picture on my homepage (or redesign it completely). Quite a few people knew my name, but expected someone with shoulder-long hair...

PPPS: Haskell is really becoming mainstream: I just talked to a randomly chosen person (the boy sitting next to me in the train), and he is a Haskell enthusiast, building a structured editor for Haskell together with his brother. And all that as a 12th-grader...

Categories: Elsewhere

Jonathan McDowell: Breaking up with America

Planet Debian - Sun, 07/09/2014 - 00:00

Back in January I changed jobs. This took me longer to decide to do than it should have. My US visa (an L-1B) was tied to the old job, and not transferable, so leaving the old job also meant leaving the US. That was hard to do; I'd had a mostly fun 3 and a half years in the SF Bay Area.

The new job had an office in Belfast, and HQ in the Bay Area. I went to work in Belfast, and got sent out to the US to meet coworkers and generally get up to speed. During that visit the company applied for an H-1B visa for me. This would have let me return to the US in October 2014 and start working in the US office; up until that point I'd have continued to work from Belfast. Unfortunately there were 172,500 applications for 85,000 available visas and mine was not selected for processing.

I'm disappointed by this. I've enjoyed my time in the US. I had a green card application in process, but after nearly 2 years it still hadn't completed the initial hurdle of the labor certification stage (a combination of a number of factors, human, organizational and governmental). However the effort of returning to live here seems too great for the benefits gained. I can work for a US company with a non-US office and return on an L-1B after a year. And once again have to leave should I grow out of the job, or the job change in some way that doesn't suit me, or the company hit problems and have to lay me off. Or I can try again for an H-1B next year, aiming for an October 2015 return, and hope that this time my application gets selected for processing.

Neither really appeals. Both involve putting things on hold in the hope longer terms pans out as I hope. And to be honest I'm bored of that. I've loved living in America, but I ended up spending at least 6 months longer in the job I left in January than I'd have done if I'd been freely able to change employer without having to change continent. So it seems the time has come to accept that America and I must part ways, sad as that is. Which is why I'm currently sitting in SFO waiting for a flight back to Belfast and for the first time in 5 years not having any idea when I might be back in the US.

Categories: Elsewhere

Thomas Goirand: Debconf 14 activity

Planet Debian - Sat, 06/09/2014 - 19:42

Before I start a short listing of (some of) the stuff I did during Debconf 14, I’d like to say how much I enjoyed everyone there. You guys (all of you, really!) are just awesome, and it’s always a real pleasure to see you all, each time.

Anyway, here’s a bits of the stuff I did.

1/ packaging of Google Cloud Engine client tools.

Thanks to the presence of Eric and Jimmy, I was able to finish the work I started at Debconf 13 last year. All python modules are packaged and uploaded. Only the final client (the “gcloud” command line utility) isn’t uploaded, even though it’s already packaged. The reason is that this client downloads “stuff” from internet, so I need to get the full, bundled, version of it, to avoid this. Eric gave me the link, I just didn’t have time to finish it yet. Though the (unfinished) package is already in the Git in Alioth.

2/ Tasksel talks

We discussed improvements in Tasksel both during the conference, and later (in front of beers…). I was able to add a custom task on a modified version of the Tasksel package for my own use. I volunteered myself for adding a “more task” option in Tasksel for Jessie+1 because I really would like to see this feature, and nobody raised hand, but honestly, I have no idea how to do it, and therefore, I’m not sure I’ll be able to do so. We’ll see… Anyway, before this happen, we must make sure that we know what kind of tasks we want in this “more tasks” screen, otherwise it’d be useless work for nothing. Therefore, I have setup a wiki page. Please edit the page and drop your ideas there. I’ve already added entries for desktops and Debian blends, but I’m sure there’s more that we could add.

3/ Custom Debian CD

I started experimentation on building my own Debian Wheezy CD image (well, DVD, since the resulting image is nearly 2GB). This was fun, but I am still having the issue that the installer fails to install Dash, so the CD is still unusable. I’ll try to debug it. Oh…  I nearly forgot… “of course”, the ISO image aims at including all OpenStack Icehouce packages backported to Wheezy, and the goal was to include the above custom Tasksel task, with an “OpenStack proxy node” task, and a “OpenStack compute” task. Let’s hope I can figure out what the issue is, and finally release it.

4/ OpenStack talk

Nothing special to say, just watch the video. I hope my talk was interesting enough. Of course, after watching myself, I hate everything I see, and would like to correct so many mistakes, but that’s the usual, I guess.

5/ Some RC fixing

Thanks to the nice work of our DPL rebuilding all the archive, I had to fix a couple of FTBFS issues on my own packages. 3 of them have been easy to fix (2 missing build-dependencies which I missed because my automated build environment has them by default, and a unit test failure), I still don’t understand what’s going on with Ceilometer. I also NMU-ed transmission (switching from 2.82 to 2.84, as upstream had the bugfix, and current maintainer was not responsive) which was the last blocker for the miniupnpc transition to Jessie. After the 5 days delay of the upload, it went in Sid, then migrated to Jessie, together with the miniupnpc library. I also fixed a trivial RC bug with python3-webob.

6/ Python team meeting

It was nice to see everyone, and hopefully, we’ll soon implement what we discussed. I hope to start migrating some of my OpenStack dependencies to the team once we move to Git (though please don’t expect this to happen before the Juno release, which keeps me very busy these days).

There’s probably more stuff which I did during Debconf 14 (hacking or otherwise), but either it’s not worth sharing, or I can’t remember… :)

Categories: Elsewhere

Robert Douglass: How did DrupalCon change your life?

Planet Drupal - Sat, 06/09/2014 - 18:54

DrupalCon is the heart and soul of the Drupal Community. Thousands of us have attended over the past 9 years. Many of us, myself included, have had life-changing experiences at DrupalCon. How did DrupalCon change your life? Now is the time to share your story with thousands of your closest friends! ... or the Drupal community.

What is this for? It's for the "Prenote" session at DrupalCon Amsterdam. Every DrupalCon, Jam and I collaborate to show some aspect of the Drupal experience through humor, drama, song, cheesy costumes, and famous Drupal guest stars. We'd like to include some of these stories in Amsterdam!

Thanks for sharing!

Which DrupalCon? * Austin, 2014 Prague, 2013 Portland, 2013 Sydney, 2013 Munich, 2012 Denver, 2012 London, 2011 Chicago, 2011 Copenhagen, 2010 San Francisco, 2010 Paris, 2009 Washington, D.C., 2009 Szeged, 2008 Boston, 2008 Barcelona, 2007 Sunnyvale, 2007 Brussels, 2006 Vancouver, 2006 Amsterdam, 2005 Portland, 2005 Antwerp, 2005 Which DrupalCon changed your life? Tell your story * What happened that changed your life? Was it meeting a specific person? Attending a session? Being in the right place at the right time? What aspect of your life now would not have been the same if you hadn't attended DruaplCon. Will you be attending DrupalCon Amsterdam? * Yes No E-mail * Skype or phone How can we contact you? What's your Skype ID or phone number?
Categories: Elsewhere

Russ Allbery: Accumulated hauls

Planet Debian - Sat, 06/09/2014 - 06:38

I haven't made one of these in a long time, so I have some catching from random purchases to do, which includes a (repurposed) nice parting gift from my previous employer and a trip to Powell's since I was in the area for DebConf14. This also includes the contents of the Hugo voter's packet, which contained a wide variety of random stuff even if some of the novels were represented only by excerpts.

John Joseph Adams (ed.) — The Mad Scientist's Guide to World Domination (sff anthology)
Roger McBride Allen — The Ring of Charon (sff)
Roger McBride Allen — The Shattered Sphere (sff)
Iain M. Banks — The Hydrogen Sonata (sff)
Julian Barnes — The Sense of an Ending (mainstream)
M. David Blake (ed.) — 2014 Campbellian Anthology (sff anthology)
Algis Budrys — Benchmarks Continued (non-fiction)
Algis Budrys — Benchmarks Revisited (non-fiction)
Algis Budrys — Benchmarks Concluded (non-fiction)
Edgar Rice Burroughs — Carson of Venus (sff)
Wesley Chu — The Lives of Tao (sff)
Ernest Cline — Ready Player One (sff)
Larry Correia — Hard Magic (sff)
Larry Correia — Spellbound (sff)
Larry Correia — Warbound (sff)
Sigrid Ellis & Michael Damien Thomas (ed.) — Queer Chicks Dig Time Lords (non-fiction)
Neil Gaiman — The Ocean at the End of the Lane (sff)
Max Gladstone — Three Parts Dead (sff)
Max Gladstone — Two Serpents Rise (sff)
S.L. Huang — Zero Sum Game (sff)
Robert Jordan & Brandon Sanderson — The Wheel of Time (sff)
Drew Karpyshyn — Mass Effect: Revelation (sff)
Justin Landon & Jared Shurin (ed.) — Speculative Fiction 2012 (non-fiction)
John J. Lumpkin — Through Struggle, the Stars (sff)
L. David Marquet — Turn the Ship Around! (non-fiction)
George R.R. Martin & Raya Golden — Meathouse Man (graphic novel)
Ramez Naam — Nexus (sff)
Eiichiro Oda — One Piece Volume 1 (manga)
Eiichiro Oda — One Piece Volume 2 (manga)
Eiichiro Oda — One Piece Volume 3 (manga)
Eiichiro Oda — One Piece Volume 4 (manga)
Alexei Panshin — New Celebrations (sff)
K.J. Parker — Devices and Desires (sff)
K.J. Parker — Evil for Evil (sff)
Sofia Samatar — A Stranger in Olondria (sff)
John Scalzi — The Human Division (sff)
Jonathan Straham (ed.) — Fearsome Journeys (sff anthology)
Vernor Vinge — The Children of the Sky (sff)
Brian Wood & Becky Cloonan — Demo (graphic novel)
Charles Yu — How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe (sff)

A whole bunch of this is from the Hugo voter's packet, and since the Hugos are over, much of that probably won't get prioritized. (I was very happy with the results of the voting, though.)

Other than that, it's a very random collection of stuff, including a few things that I picked up based on James Nicoll's reviews. Now that I have a daily train commute, I should pick up the pace of reading, and as long as I can find enough time in my schedule to also write reviews, hopefully there will be more content in this blog shortly.

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Watchdog: Decoupling Drupal

Planet Drupal - Sat, 06/09/2014 - 02:01
Feature

The latest rage in the Content Management world is the idea of a “decoupled CMS.” That is, rather than having a single monolithic system that handles everything from content entry to management to display and theming in one program spread, that responsibility is assigned to different systems: one that is really really good at content storage, one that's really really good at content management, one that's really really good at display and theming, etc.

At the same time, there has been a huge push for web services in almost every market. If you want content to be available anywhere besides an HTML page, then your answer is web services.

Drupal 8 will make huge strides in this area, but alas it's not out yet. Fortunately the answer to the second problem is the first; it is entirely possible to build a solid, scalable, performant RESTful web service with Drupal 7 by decoupling Drupal from the web service.

Recently, Palantir.net did exactly that for a major media client, video hosting service Ooyala, and it really drove home both the power of web services and the potential of a decoupled architecture.

The Problem

Ooyala wanted us to build a video curation service for one of their customers.

The first part of the problem was that the customer had data that was regularly updated, but this existing data source was incomplete, occasionally unreliable, and could be enriched with additional metadata, so human management was required before it could be used in the desired context (to describe video content in end-user-facing video-on-demand applications). The solution to this particular problem was the CMS.
The second part of the problem was getting the data in the desired context: highly interactive video-on-demand applications where users could purchase access to individual movies or episodes, collections of movies, seasons of a show, or other arbitrary groupings. The solution here was a REST API separated from the CMS.

Not complex enough? Add in a requirement to merge in data from a third-party video service to compensate for incomplete data.

Categories: Elsewhere

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