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Matthew Garrett: Your Ubuntu-based container image is probably a copyright violation

Planet Debian - Mon, 20/07/2015 - 21:33
Update: A Canonical employee responded here, but doesn't appear to actually contradict anything I say below.

I wrote about Canonical's Ubuntu IP policy here, but primarily in terms of its broader impact, but I mentioned a few specific cases. People seem to have picked up on the case of container images (especially Docker ones), so here's an unambiguous statement:

If you generate a container image that is not a 100% unmodified version of Ubuntu (ie, you have not removed or added anything), Canonical insist that you must ask them for permission to distribute it. The only alternative is to rebuild every binary package you wish to ship[1], removing all trademarks in the process. As I mentioned in my original post, the IP policy does not merely require you to remove trademarks that would cause infringement, it requires you to remove all trademarks - a strict reading would require you to remove every instance of the word "ubuntu" from the packages.

If you want to contact Canonical to request permission, you can do so here. Or you could just derive from Debian instead.

[1] Other than ones whose license explicitly grants permission to redistribute binaries and which do not permit any additional restrictions to be imposed upon the license grants - so any GPLed material is fine

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Categories: Elsewhere

Midwestern Mac, LLC: Tips for a better Vagrant-based development workflow

Planet Drupal - Mon, 20/07/2015 - 19:07

I build and destroy a lot of VMs using Vagrant in the course of the day. Between developing Drupal VM, writing Ansible for DevOps, and testing dozens of Ansible Galaxy roles, I probably run vagrant up and vagrant destroy -f at least a dozen times a day.

Building all these VMs would be a pain, and require much more user intervention, if it weren't for a few things I've done on my local workstation to help with the process. I thought I'd share these tips so you can enjoy a much more streamlined Vagrant workflow as well!

Categories: Elsewhere

Damien McKenna: My current Drupal contrib plans for the next month-or-two

Planet Drupal - Mon, 20/07/2015 - 18:03

While I blog about my various contributions at work, I thought it might be useful to mention what my current priorities are. My current plan looks like the following:

Tags: 
Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Watchdog: Drupal Taxonomy Tips and Tools

Planet Drupal - Mon, 20/07/2015 - 17:23
Article

When comparing the most commonly-used content management frameworks, web developers typically cite Drupal's robust support for taxonomies as one of its leading strengths. This should come as no surprise to anyone with even minimal experience in using taxonomy vocabularies and their terms in designing and building new websites, largely because they provide a proven way to categorize and make findable the content of any website, with relatively little effort.

Specifically, every piece of content can be tagged with zero or more terms defined within an unlimited number of vocabularies, and these tags can be used in myriad ways for grouping and sorting that content. In the case of a taxonomy term reference used by a view of one or more content types, the sort order and filtering can be specified by the developer using the Views interface or within a custom module, or that functionality can be exposed to the end-user.

The judicious use of taxonomies can be a powerful component of any content strategy that is intended to grow and change. This is true not just for on-page site visitors, but also for people consuming that content in RSS aggregators for whom only some of the content is of interest.

In this examination of some best practices, techniques, and useful contrib modules associated with taxonomies, it is assumed that the reader has a basic understanding of vocabularies and terms

Select Field Versus Taxonomy

When adding to a content type a new field that will contain a value from a predefined list of possibilities, you have the option of utilizing a field of type "List (text)" (or one of the two numeric variants of "List"), and setting the Allowed values list on the field settings page. Or you can employ a taxonomy term reference, which, as the name implies, refers to a term in the taxonomy vocabulary specified when creating the field. Here are some sensible guidelines:

If you want the client to be able to add, change, or remove the allowed values of the field in question, then taxonomy is definitely the right choice. Even if you will likely never alter the list, then a select list should work fine as the field type.

Categories: Elsewhere

Daniel Pocock: RTC status on Debian, Ubuntu and Fedora

Planet Debian - Mon, 20/07/2015 - 16:04

Zoltan (Zoltanh721) recently blogged about WebRTC for the Fedora community and Fedora desktop.

https://fedrtc.org has been running for a while now and this has given many people a chance to get a taste of regular SIP and WebRTC-based SIP. As suggested in Zoltan's blog, it has convenient integration with Fedora SSO and as the source code is available, people are welcome to see how it was built and use it for other projects.

Issues with Chrome/Chromium on Linux

If you tried any of FedRTC.org, rtc.debian.org or meet.jit.si using Chrome/Chromium on Linux, you may have found that the call appears to be connected but there is no media. This is a bug and the Chromium developers are on to it. You can work around this by trying an older version of Chromium (it still works with v37 from Debian wheezy) or Firefox/Iceweasel.

WebRTC is not everything

WebRTC offers many great possibilities for people to quickly build and deploy RTC services to a large user base, especially when using components like JSCommunicator or the DruCall WebRTC plugin for Drupal.

However, it is not a silver bullet. For example, there remain concerns about how to receive incoming calls. How do you know which browser tab is ringing when you have many tabs open at once? This may require greater browser/desktop integration and that has security implications for JavaScript. Whether users on battery-powered devices can really leave JavaScript running for extended periods of time waiting for incoming calls is another issue, especially when you consider that many web sites contain some JavaScript that is less than efficient.

Native applications and mobile apps like Lumicall continue to offer the most optimized solution for each platform although WebRTC currently offers the most convenient way for people to place a Call me link on their web site or portal.

Deploy it yourself

The RTC Quick Start Guide offers step-by-step instructions and a thorough discussion of the architecture for people to start deploying RTC and WebRTC on their own servers using standard packages on many of the most popular Linux distributions, including Debian, Ubuntu, RHEL, CentOS and Fedora.

Categories: Elsewhere

Daniel Pocock: RTC status on Debian, Ubuntu and Fedora

Planet Drupal - Mon, 20/07/2015 - 16:04

Zoltan (Zoltanh721) recently blogged about WebRTC for the Fedora community and Fedora desktop.

https://fedrtc.org has been running for a while now and this has given many people a chance to get a taste of regular SIP and WebRTC-based SIP. As suggested in Zoltan's blog, it has convenient integration with Fedora SSO and as the source code is available, people are welcome to see how it was built and use it for other projects.

Issues with Chrome/Chromium on Linux

If you tried any of FedRTC.org, rtc.debian.org or meet.jit.si using Chrome/Chromium on Linux, you may have found that the call appears to be connected but there is no media. This is a bug and the Chromium developers are on to it. You can work around this by trying an older version of Chromium (it still works with v37 from Debian wheezy) or Firefox/Iceweasel.

WebRTC is not everything

WebRTC offers many great possibilities for people to quickly build and deploy RTC services to a large user base, especially when using components like JSCommunicator or the DruCall WebRTC plugin for Drupal.

However, it is not a silver bullet. For example, there remain concerns about how to receive incoming calls. How do you know which browser tab is ringing when you have many tabs open at once? This may require greater browser/desktop integration and that has security implications for JavaScript. Whether users on battery-powered devices can really leave JavaScript running for extended periods of time waiting for incoming calls is another issue, especially when you consider that many web sites contain some JavaScript that is less than efficient.

Native applications and mobile apps like Lumicall continue to offer the most optimized solution for each platform although WebRTC currently offers the most convenient way for people to place a Call me link on their web site or portal.

Deploy it yourself

The RTC Quick Start Guide offers step-by-step instructions and a thorough discussion of the architecture for people to start deploying RTC and WebRTC on their own servers using standard packages on many of the most popular Linux distributions, including Debian, Ubuntu, RHEL, CentOS and Fedora.

Categories: Elsewhere

Ritesh Raj Sarraf: Micro DD meetup

Planet Debian - Mon, 20/07/2015 - 13:26

A couple of us DDs met here on the weekend. It is always a fun time, being part of these meetings. We talked briefly about the status of Cross Compilation in Debian, on the tools that simplify the process.

Next we touched upon licensing, discussing the benefits of particular licenses (BSD, Apache, GPL) from the point of view of the consumer. The consumer being an individual just wanting to use/improve software, to a consumer who's building a (free / non-free) product on top of it. I think the overall conclusion was that there are 2 major licenses at a high level: Ones those allow you take the code and not give back, and the others which allow you to take code only if you are ready to share the enhancements back and forward.

Next we briefly touched upon systemd. Given that I recently spent a good amount of time talking to the systemd maintainer while fixing bugs in my software, it was natural for me to steer that topic. At the end, more people are now enthused to learn the paradigm shift.

The other topic where we spent time was on Containers. It is impressive to see how quick, and how many, products have now spun out of cgroups. The topic moved to cgroups, thanks to systemd, one of the prime consumers of cgroups. While demonstrating the functionalities of Linux Containers (LXC), I realized that systemd has a tool in place to serve the same use case.

So, once back home, I spent some time figuring out the possibility to replace my lxc setup, with that of systemd-nspawn. Apart from a minor bug, almost everything else seems to work find with systemd-nspawn.

So, following is the config detail of my container, as used in lxc. And to replace lxc, I need to fill is almost all of it with systemd-nspawn.

rrs@learner:~$ sudo cat /var/lib/lxc/deb-template/config # Template used to create this container: /usr/share/lxc/templates/lxc-debian # Parameters passed to the template: # For additional config options, please look at lxc.container.conf(5) # CPU lxc.cgroup.cpuset.cpus = 0,1 lxc.cgroup.cpu.shares = 1234 # Mem lxc.cgroup.memory.limit_in_bytes = 2000M lxc.cgroup.memory.soft_limit_in_bytes = 1500M # Network lxc.network.type = veth lxc.network.hwaddr = 00:16:3e:0c:c5:d4 lxc.network.flags = up lxc.network.link = lxcbr0 # Root file system lxc.rootfs = /var/lib/lxc/deb-template/rootfs # Common configuration lxc.include = /usr/share/lxc/config/debian.common.conf # Container specific configuration lxc.mount = /var/lib/lxc/deb-template/fstab lxc.utsname = deb-template lxc.arch = amd64 # For apt lxc.mount.entry = /var/cache/apt/archives var/cache/apt/archives none defaults,bind 0 0 lxc.mount.entry = /var/tmp/lxc var/tmp/lxc none defaults,bind 0 0 2015-07-20 / 16:28:58 ♒♒♒ ☺

 

The equivalent of the above, in systemd-nspawn is:

sudo systemd-nspawn -n -b --machine deb-template --network-bridge=lxcbr0 --bind /var/cache/apt/archives/

The only missing bit is CPU and Memory, which I'm yet to try, is documented as doable with the systemctl --property= interface

--property= Set a unit property on the scope unit to register for the machine. This only applies if the machine is run in its own scope unit, i.e. if --keep-unit is not used. Takes unit property assignments in the same format as systemctl set-property. This is useful to set memory limits and similar for machines.

With all this in place, using containers under systemd is a breeze.

rrs@learner:~/Community/Packaging/multipath-tools (experimental)$ sudo machinectl list MACHINE CLASS SERVICE deb-template container nspawn 1 machines listed. 2015-07-20 / 16:44:07 ♒♒♒ ☺ rrs@learner:~/Community/Packaging/multipath-tools (experimental)$ sudo machinectl status deb-template deb-template Since: Mon 2015-07-20 16:13:58 IST; 30min ago Leader: 9064 (systemd) Service: nspawn; class container Root: /var/lib/lxc/deb-template/rootfs Iface: lxcbr0 Address: 172.16.10.12 fe80::706d:e4ff:fec5:bfc8%3 OS: Debian GNU/Linux stretch/sid Unit: machine-deb\x2dtemplate.scope ├─9064 /lib/systemd/systemd --system --deserialize 14 └─system.slice ├─systemd-journald.service │ └─9092 /lib/systemd/systemd-journald ├─ssh.service │ └─9160 /usr/sbin/sshd -D └─console-getty.service ├─9166 /bin/login -- ├─9171 -bash └─9226 dhclient host0 Jul 20 16:13:58 learner systemd[1]: Started Container deb-template. Jul 20 16:13:58 learner systemd[1]: Starting Container deb-template. 2015-07-20 / 16:44:15 ♒♒♒ ☺ Categories: Keywords: Like: 
Categories: Elsewhere

Annertech: We're ready for Drupal 8. Are you?

Planet Drupal - Mon, 20/07/2015 - 12:00
We're ready for Drupal 8. Are you?

With only 5 critical issues marked as "needs work", Drupal 8 - the most brilliantly amazing responsive accessible version of Drupal to be released so far - is just around the corner (we're so excited, we forgot to put commas in that list of adjectives). Last week Acquia announced they now have Drupal 8 available on their platform for clients to start building their D8 sites on.

Categories: Elsewhere

Laura Arjona: Family games: Robots

Planet Debian - Mon, 20/07/2015 - 00:04

I play “Robots” with my kid. I’ve tested the game with other kids and it seems that for ages 5 to 7 they like it. I’ve talked about the game to several adults and it seems they like too, so I thought maybe writing about it here may be useful for somebody to enjoy some summer days.

Players

One player is the Robot. The other one is the programmer. If there are more players, it can be several robots and several programmers. If players are older, you can make the game more complicated making robots cooperate or programmers cooperate. If not, you make pairs 1-1 or 1 programmer – 2 robots if the number is odd.

The game

The programmer must turn on the robot, pressing the ON/OFF button (robot chooses where’s the button: nose, ear, belly, whatever).
Then, the robot say “hello”, and the programmer asks for the list of commands available (like “Hello, robot, give me the list of commands”). The robot says the list of commands available, for example “Run, stop, jump, sing a song, somersault, say something in a different language”. Then, the programmer thinks a program, and loads it to the robot (speaks the list of orders, loudly, to the robot). Then the programmer presses the START button (Robot choses where it is) and then the robot has to perform the program without errors.

If the robot performs correctly, wins one point. If it fails, looses one point. The programmer can design another program (maybe longer, maybe with some conditional expression) and tries the limits of the memory of robot.

If the robot is tired, needs to charge batteries, or whatever, the roles programmer/robot are interchanged, and the one with more points in a certain amount of time or rounds, wins.

Variants, tips…

If the programmer does not like the list, of commands, she can ask for updates, and maybe some new commands will be installed (and/or other uninstalled, who knows).

Please be creative with the list of commands, or the game will be very boring.

Depending on the operating system which runs the robot, it will give more or less options to the programmer, and the behaviour will be more evil or good. Robots shouldn’t behave too much evil, though, otherwise the programmer will erase their disk and install Debian on them to make them obedient ;)

You can play with a third person being the Robot manufacturer, who controls the robot, even sometimes overriding the programmer instructions (if the robot has an OS which is not free software). Robot will win one point obeying the manufacturer, but if there are more robots, will loose one round of playing because the programmer got angry and turned it off or reinstalled the software.

The manufacturer and the programmer cooperate if the robot runs free software, though. Together they can expand robot memory (for example, lend a piece of paper where to store the program), or create new commands, fix bugs, or whatever.

Comments?

You can comment about this post in Pump.io thread about this post.


Filed under: My experiences and opinion Tagged: Debian, Education, English, Free culture, Free Software, Games, kids
Categories: Elsewhere

Gregor Herrmann: RC bugs 2015/17-29

Planet Debian - Sun, 19/07/2015 - 23:23

after the release is before the release. – or: long time no RC bug report.

after the jessie release I spent most of my Debian time on work in the Debian Perl Group. we tried to get down the list of new upstream releases (from over 500 to currently 379; unfortunately the CPAN never sleeps), we were & still are busy preparing for the Perl 5.22 transition (e.g. we uploaded something between 300 & 400 packages to deal with Module::Build & CGI.pm being removed from perl core; only team-maintained packages so far), & we had a pleasant & productive sprint in Barcelona in May. – & I also tried to fix some of the RC bugs in our packages which popped up over the previous months.

yesterday & today I finally found some time to help with the GCC 5 transition, mostly by making QA or Non-Maintainer Uploads with patches that already were in the BTS. – a big thanks especially to the team at HP which provided a couple dozens patches!

& here's the list of RC bugs I've worked on in the last 3 months:

  • #752026 – libpdl-stats-perl: "libpdl-stats-perl: FTBFS on arm*"
    upload new upstream release (pkg-perl)
  • #755961 – autounit: "FTBFS with clang instead of gcc"
    apply patch from Alexander <sanek23994@gmail.com>, QA upload
  • #755963 – clearsilver: "FTBFS with clang instead of gcc"
    apply patch from Alexander <sanek23994@gmail.com>, upload to DELAYED/5
  • #777776 – src:apron: "apron: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    tag as unreproducible
  • #777780 – src:asmon: "asmon: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Martin Michlmayr, upload to DELAYED/5
  • #777783 – src:atftp: "atftp: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Martin Michlmayr, upload to DELAYED/5
  • #777797 – src:bbrun: "bbrun: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    add patch to build with "-std=gnu89", upload to DELAYED/5
  • #777806 – src:booth: "booth: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    tag as unreproducible
  • #777808 – src:bwm-ng: "bwm-ng: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    merge patch from Ubuntu, and build with "-std=gnu89", upload to DELAYED/5
  • #777831 – src:deborphan: "deborphan: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Jakub Wilk, upload to DELAYED/5, then rescheduled to 0-day with maintainer's permission
  • #777835 – src:dsbltesters: "dsbltesters: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    tag as unreproducible
  • #777853 – src:flow-tools: "flow-tools: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Alexander Balderson, upload to DELAYED/5
  • #777880 – src:gnac: "gnac: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Greg Pearson, upload to DELAYED/5
  • #777881 – src:gngb: "gngb: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Greg Pearson, upload to DELAYED/5
  • #777895 – src:haildb: "haildb: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    tag as unreproducible
  • #777902 – src:hfsplus: "hfsplus: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    merge patch from Ubuntu, QA upload
  • #777903 – src:hugs98: "hugs98: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Elizabeth J Dall, upload to DELAYED/5
  • #777965 – src:libpam-chroot: "libpam-chroot: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Linn Crosetto, upload to DELAYED/5
  • #777975 – src:libssh: "libssh: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Matthias Klose, upload to DELAYED/5
  • #778009 – src:mknbi: "mknbi: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Matthias Klose, QA upload
  • #778020 – src:mz: "mz: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Joshua Gadeken, upload to DELAYED/5
  • #778051 – src:overgod: "overgod: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Nicholas Luedtke, upload to DELAYED/5
  • #778056 – src:pads: "pads: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Andrew Patterson, upload to DELAYED/5
  • #778121 – src:sks-ecc: "sks-ecc: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Brett Johnson, QA upload
  • #778129 – src:squeak-plugins-scratch: "squeak-plugins-scratch: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Brett Johnson, upload to DELAYED/5
  • #778137 – src:tabble: "tabble: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from David S. Roth, QA upload
  • #778146 – src:tinyscheme: "tinyscheme: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Nicholas Luedtke, upload to DELAYED/5
  • #778148 – src:trafficserver: "trafficserver: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    lower severity
  • #778151 – src:tuxonice-userui: "tuxonice-userui: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Nicholas Luedtke, upload to DELAYED/5, later sponsor maintainer upload
  • #778152 – src:uaputl: "uaputl: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Brett Johnson, upload to DELAYED/5
  • #778153 – src:udftools: "udftools: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Jakub Wilk, upload to DELAYED/5
  • #778159 – src:uswsusp: "uswsusp: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Andrew James, upload to DELAYED/5
  • #778167 – src:weplab: "weplab: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Elizabeth J Dall, QA upload
  • #778171 – src:wmmon: "wmmon: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    add patch to build with "-std=gnu89", upload to DELAYED/5
  • #778173 – src:wmressel: "wmressel: ftbfs with GCC-5"
    apply patch from Elizabeth J Dall, upload to DELAYED/5
  • #780199 – src:redhat-cluster: "redhat-cluster: FTBFS in unstable - error: conflicting types for 'int64_t'"
    apply patch from Michael Tautschnig, upload to DELAYED/2, then rescheduled by maintainer
  • #783899 – liblog-any-perl: "liblog-any-perl, liblog-any-adapter-perl: File conflict when being installed together"
    add Breaks/Replaces/Provides (pkg-perl)
  • #784844 – libmousex-getopt-perl: "libmousex-getopt-perl: FTBFS: test failures"
    upload new upstream release (pkg-perl)
  • #785020 – libmoosex-getopt-perl: "libmoosex-getopt-perl: FTBFS: test failures"
    upload new upstream release (pkg-perl)
  • #785158 – libnet-ssleay-perl: "libnet-ssleay-perl: FTBFS: Your vendor has not defined SSLeay macro LIBRESSL_VERSION_NUMBER"
    upload new upstream release (pkg-perl)
  • #785229 – sqitch: "sqitch: FTBFS: new warnings"
    upload new upstream release (pkg-perl)
  • #785232 – libdist-zilla-plugin-requiresexternal-perl: "libdist-zilla-plugin-requiresexternal-perl: FTBFS: More than one plan found in TAP output"
    make tests non-verbose (pkg-perl)
  • #785659 – libdist-zilla-perl: "libdist-zilla-perl: FTBFS: t/plugins/testrelease.t failure"
    make tests non-verbose (pkg-perl)
  • #786447 – libcgi-application-plugin-authentication-perl: "libcgi-application-plugin-authentication-perl FTBFS in unstable"
    add patch from Micah Gersten/Ubuntu (pkg-perl)
  • #786591 – libtext-quoted-perl: "libtext-quoted-perl: broken by libtext-autoformat-perl changes"
    upload new upstream release (pkg-perl)
  • #786667 – libcatalyst-plugin-authentication-credential-openid-perl: "libcatalyst-plugin-authentication-credential-openid-perl: FTBFS: Bareword "use_test_base" not allowed"
    patch Makefile.PL (pkg-perl)
  • #788350 – libhttp-proxy-perl: "FTBFS - proxy tests"
    add patch, improved from CPAN RT (pkg-perl)
  • #789141 – src:libdancer2-perl: "libdancer2-perl: FTBFS with Plack >= 1.0036: t/classes/Dancer2-Core-Response/new_from.t"
    upload new upstream release (pkg-perl)
  • #789669 – src:starlet: "starlet: FTBFS with Plack 1.0036"
    add patch for test compatibility with newer Plack (pkg-perl)
  • #789838 – src:starman: "starman: FTBFS with Plack 1.0036"
    upload new upstream release (pkg-perl)
  • #791493 – libpadre-plugin-datawalker-perl: "libpadre-plugin-datawalker-perl: missing dependency on padre"
    add missing dependency (pkg-perl)
  • #791510 – libcatalyst-authentication-credential-authen-simple-perl: "libcatalyst-authentication-credential-authen-simple-perl: FTBFS: Can't locate Test/Exception.pm in @INC"
    add missing build dependency (pkg-perl)
  • #791512 – libcatalyst-plugin-cache-store-fastmmap-perl: "libcatalyst-plugin-cache-store-fastmmap-perl: FTBFS: Can't locate Test/Exception.pm in @INC"
    add missing build dependency (pkg-perl)
  • #791709 – libjson-perl: "libjson-perl: FTBFS: Recursive inheritance detected"
    upload new upstream release (pkg-perl)
  • #792063 – src:libmath-mpfr-perl: "FTBFS: lngamma_bug.t and test1.t fail"
    upload new upstream release (pkg-perl)
  • #792844 – libatombus-perl: "libatombus-perl: ships usr/share/man/man3/README.3pm.gz"
    don't install README manpage (pkg-perl)
  • #792845 – libclang-perl: "libclang-perl: ships usr/share/man/man3/README.3pm.gz"
    don't install README POD/manpage (pkg-perl)
Categories: Elsewhere

Gizra.com: Visually Monitoring Drupal.org

Planet Drupal - Sun, 19/07/2015 - 23:00

In recent months I've been demoing visual monitoring to many developers. The reaction was always positive, but I've realized that not enough people have taken the step from recognizing the need to actually implementing it on their own projects.

If you have been following my recent blog posts or tweets you've probably noticed we are trying to bring visual monitoring along with Shoov to the masses. To do so we're trying to reduce the complexity and codify our "lessons learned".

Drupal.org visually monitored by Shoov

Yeoman generators is one way to achieve this. With the new yo shoov - a single command makes sure all the files needed for visual monitoring are immediately scaffolded in your repository. In fact, it also sets up Behat tests along with a .shoov.yml that will allow Shoov to run your visual monitoring tests periodically.

Since visual monitoring might be new for a lot of people, the generator not only scaffolds the files but also attempts to check if your system is properly installed, and tells you how to fix it if not.

Shoov generator in action.

Continue reading…

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal.org frontpage posts for the Drupal planet: Secure your account: Two Factor authentication on Drupal.org

Planet Drupal - Sun, 19/07/2015 - 22:22

Drupal.org users* can now use Two factor authentication to increase the security of their accounts. It can be enabled via Security tab of your user profile page. Read the detailed instructions at Enabling TFA on Drupal.org.

This was made available to Drupal.org admins in May. It is now required for users who have advanced access on Drupal.org. However, every user can benefit from the security that two factor authentication offers.

If you want to make two factor authentication available on your own Drupal site, you can install the TFA module.

* Two factor authentication is available for all users with the 'confirmed user' role. If you don't see 'Security' tab on your profile page, you might be missing the role. Just keep posting content on Drupal.org and it will be granted soon. You can also apply to get the role.

Front page news: Planet Drupal
Categories: Elsewhere

ActiveLAMP: Docker with Vagrant - Part 2

Planet Drupal - Sun, 19/07/2015 - 20:30

This post is part 2 in a series of Docker posts hashing out a new docker workflow for our team. To gain background of what I want to accomplish with docker, checkout my previous post hashing out a docker workflow.

Categories: Elsewhere

Enrico Zini: quote

Planet Debian - Sun, 19/07/2015 - 18:53
Random quote

Be selfish when you ask, honest when you reply, and when others reply, take them seriously.

(me, late at night)

Categories: Elsewhere

Paragon-Blog: Testing Drupal projects with Behat in PhpStorm

Planet Drupal - Sun, 19/07/2015 - 18:32

Developers are known for their most famous topics to be testing and doumentation - not. And I'm no different. However, the bigger my projects tend to get and the longer they last, the more this becomes a real issue so that even the developer in me starts to promote the idea of proper testing and documentation. And to cut a long story short: BDD (behaviour driven development) can deliver a significant part in both of these areas.

Categories: Elsewhere

LookAlive: User preferences storage - another new module

Planet Drupal - Sun, 19/07/2015 - 13:42

https://www.drupal.org/project/user_preferences

What did you do! Whyy??

I made a small module which is just meant to store user preferences. There's the normal-ish approach of using a field on either the User entity or the Profile entity but in all honesty this can get messy when you add one ...then another one. Oh god the client wants more user options. Soo you get it.

Drupal 6 veterans, remember the fun times of $user->data, the mad grab wild west of "here's an array, do what you will" which also exists in D7.

User preferences was created to solve this problem, taking a proper approach at storing user preferences which don't require you to regret slapping another field on an entity or crying in the shower scrubbing yourself after using $user->data.

There's work to do around the schema and looking at how to best store different types of values in the Database (currently just string), but this module is a first good step. Some tests need writing too, patches welcome!

Anyway, that's it for now. Stable release coming soon after some testing.

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal @ Penn State: One liner to install php 7, mysql 5.6, apache 2.4, drush and drupal on centos 7

Planet Drupal - Sun, 19/07/2015 - 07:06

It was a nice little saturday in happy valley. Since my son is forcing us to watch the Sponge Bob Square Pants movie over and over, I decided to multi-task. Bryan Ollendyke has been talking about PHP 7 a tad bit lately so I decided to whip up an instance. 

Granted this is not ready for prime-time just yet, however, it is extremely fast and everything that I have tested so far works fine. Turn on authcache and it is REALLY fast!

Categories: Elsewhere

Tyler Frankenstein: Headless Drupal Web App with Angular JS and DrupalGap

Planet Drupal - Sat, 18/07/2015 - 22:20

In this tutorial (for NYC CAMP 2015) we'll explore how to use Drupal 7 and DrupalGap 2 (powered by Angular JS) to build a decoupled ("headless") web application for Drupal. In a nutshell, here is what the app will do:

  1. A user runs the app in their browser
  2. The browser asks the user for access to their current location
  3. The app passes their location to Drupal
  4. Drupal will return nearby content (if any) to the app
  5. The app will display the locations on a map and let the user click on them to see more details

Ready? Let's rock and roll, no time to fiddle...

Categories: Elsewhere

Niels Thykier: Performance tuning of lintian

Planet Debian - Sat, 18/07/2015 - 15:01

For quite a while, Lintian has been able to create performance logs (--perf-debug --perf-output perf.log) that help diagnose where lintian spends most of its runtime.  I decided to make lintian output these logs on lintian.debian.org to help us spot performance issues, though I have not been very good at analysing them regularly.

At the beginning of the month, I finally got around to look a bit into one of them.  My findings on IRC triggered Mattia Rizzolo to create this following graph.  It shows the accumulated runtime of each check/collection measured in seconds.  Find these findings, we set out to solve some of the issues.  This lead to the following changes in 2.5.33 (in no particular order):

  • Increased buffer size in check/cruft.pm to reduce overhead [bc8b3e5] (S)
  • Reduced overhead in strings(1) extraction [b058fef] (P)
  • Reduced overhead in spell-checking [b824170] (S)
    • Also improves the performance of spellintian!
  • Removed a high overhead check that did not work [2c7b922] (P)

Legend: S: run single threaded (1:1 performance improvement).  P: run in parallel.

Overall, I doubt the changes will give a revolutionary change in speed, but it should improve the 3rd, 4th and 5th slowest parts in Lintian.

Beyond runtime performance, we got a few memory optimisations in the pipeline for Lintian 2.5.34:

  • Remove member from “non-dir” nodes in the Lintian path graph (2%) [6365635]
  • Remove two fields at the price of computing them as needed (~5%) [a696197 + 8dacc8e]
  • Merge 4 fields into 1 (~8%) [5d49cd2 + fb074e4]
  • Share some memory between package-based caches (18%) [ffc7174]

Combined these 6 commits reduce memory consumption in caches by ~33% compared to 2.5.33, when lintian processes itself.  In absolute numbers, we are talking about a drop from 12.53MB to 8.48MB.  The mileages can certainly vary depending on the package (mscgen “only” saw an ~25% improvement).  Nevertheless, I was happy to list #715035 as being closed in 2.5.34. :)


Filed under: Debian, Lintian
Categories: Elsewhere

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