Feed aggregator

Open Source Training: How to Use the Drupal Quiz Module

Planet Drupal - Thu, 13/11/2014 - 08:51

The Quiz module is a sophisticated and flexible way to create quizzes in Drupal.

To get started with Quiz, you need to install and enable the 2 core Quiz modules from http://drupal.org/project/quiz:

Categories: Elsewhere

PreviousNext: Lightning talk - Contributing to Drupal Core without losing your mind

Planet Drupal - Thu, 13/11/2014 - 06:14

During our weekly developers meeting I spoke about my approach to contributing to Drupal core, sharing some tips and tricks I've learnt along the way

This is a preview of a proposed session for DrupalSouth Melbourne 2015

Categories: Elsewhere

Midwestern Mac, LLC: Midwestern Mac's Vagrant Boxes - CentOS and Ubuntu

Planet Drupal - Thu, 13/11/2014 - 05:01

In support of my mission to make local development easier and faster, I've released boxes for four of the most popular Linux distributions I use and see used for Drupal sites: CentOS 6/7 and Ubuntu 12.04/14.04.

Categories: Elsewhere

John Goerzen: Computer Without a Case

Planet Debian - Thu, 13/11/2014 - 00:37

My desk today looks like this:

Yep, that’s a computer. Motherboard to the right, floppy drives and CD drive stacked on top of the power supply, hard drive to the left.

And it’s an OLD computer. (I had forgotten just how loud these old power supplies are; wow.)

The point of this exercise is to read data off the floppies that I have made starting nearly 30 years ago now (wow). Many were made with DOS, some were made on a TRS-80 Color Computer II (aka CoCo 2). There are 5.25″ disks, 3.25″ disks, and all sorts of formats. Most are DOS, but the TRS-80 ones use a different physical format. Some of the data was written by Central Point Backup (from PC Tools), which squeezed more data on the disk by adding an extra sector or something, if my vague memory is working.

Reading these disks requires low-level playing with controller timing, and sometimes the original software to extract the data. It doesn’t necessarily work under Linux, and certainly doesn’t work with USB floppies or under emulation. Hence this system.

It’s a bridge. Old enough to run DOS, new enough to use an IDE drive. I can then hook up the IDE drive to a IDE-to-USB converter and copy the data off it onto my Linux system.

But this was tricky. I started the project a few years ago, but life got in the way. Getting back to it now, with the same motherboard and drive, but I just couldn’t get it to boot. I eventually began to suspect some disk geometry settings, and with some detective work from fdisk in Linux plus some research into old BIOS disk size limitations, discovered the problem was a 2GB limit. Through some educated trial and error, I programmed the BOIS with a number of cylinders that worked, set it to LBA mode, and finally my 3-year-old DOS 6.2 installation booted.

I had also forgotten how finicky things were back then. Pop a floppy from a Debian install set into the drive, type dir b:, and the system hangs. I guess there was a reason the reset button was prominent on the front of the computer back then…

Categories: Elsewhere

Jonathan Wiltshire: A chilly week

Planet Debian - Thu, 13/11/2014 - 00:03

It’s finally become properly autumnal, in the real world and in Debian. One week ago, I announced (on behalf of the whole release team) that Debian 8 “Jessie” had successfully frozen on time.

At 18:00 that evening we had 310 release critical bugs – that is, the number that we must reduce to 0 before the release is ready. How does that number look now?

Well, there are now 315 bugs affecting Jessie, at various stages of progression. That sounds like it’s going in the wrong direction, but considering that over a hundred new bugs were filed just 8 hours after the freeze announcement, things are actually looking pretty good.

Out of those 315 bugs, 91 have been fixed and the packages affected have already been unblocked by the release team. The fixed packages will migrate to Jessie in the next few days, if they continue to be bug-free.

Thirty-four bugs are apparently fixed in unstable but are not cleared for migration yet. That means that the release team has not spotted the fix, or nobody has told us, or the fixed package is unsuitable for some other reason (like unrelated changes in the same upload). You can help by trying to find out which reason applies, and talking to us about it. Most likely nobody has asked us to unblock it yet.

Speaking of unblocks, we currently have twenty-four requests that need to be looked at, and a further 20 which are awaiting more information from the maintainer. We already investigated and resolved 260 requests.

Our response rate is currently pretty good, but it’s unclear whether we can sustain it indefinitely. We all have day jobs, for example. One way you could help is to review the list of unchecked unblocks and gather up missing information, or look at the ones tagged moreinfo and see whether that’s still the case (maybe the maintainer replied, but forgot to remove the tag). If you’re confident, you might even try triaging some of the obvious requests and give some feedback to the maintainer, though the final decision will be made by a release team member.

After all, the quicker this goes the sooner we can release and thaw up unstable again.

Footnote: the method used to determine RC bug counts last week and this week differ, and therefore so could the margin for error. Surprisingly enough, counting bugs is not an exact science. I’m confident these numbers are close enough for broad comparison, even if they’re out by one or two.

A chilly week is a post from: jwiltshire.org.uk | Flattr

Categories: Elsewhere

Pages

Subscribe to jfhovinne aggregator