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Commerce Guys: The Revolution in eCommerce

Planet Drupal - Tue, 17/03/2015 - 18:53

You know It's coming - you can feel it, hear it, and see it - the low but powerful rumbling of change - the next big wave of innovation in ecommerce.

Buying and selling online has become second nature and a core part of our lives - yet there is fundamental change underway in how people are thinking about ecommerce and how transactions of all kinds should be woven into the fabric of an engaging online user experience.

Content Sells

The importance of content in creating online experiences that drive people to buy is becoming increasingly important to online merchants and brands. Is there any doubt that this next wave of innovation will in part be centered around a more fluid content driven commerce experience?

Companies who are using a traditional catalog based ecommerce solution are realizing the importance of content to online revenue growth and that simply integrating their ecommerce solution with a separate CMS solution is ultimately not a great solution and creates unnecessary complexity. As a result, many companies with mature online revenue channels are beginning to define their next generation systems.

Ingredients of a Revolution

Fundamental change and a common vision are key ingredients for any Revolution. Mix in a large and growing community of stakeholders who all stand to benefit from this change and you begin to see momentum shift.

But it all starts with needs that are not being met.

Talk to anyone who has been using or delivering ecommerce solutions over the past view years and you will hear a discontent with their current system and in general the future of ecommerce.

What is the source of this discontent and what do they want their ecommerce solution to do that it isn't doing now? Here is what we hear.

  • My current ecommerce solution doesn't provide me with powerful enough CMS functionality to deliver the type of experience that I need to attract and keep users on my site.
  • I have too many systems to manage and maintain - one for content, one for online transactions, one for orders, fulfillment, and inventory and it's hard to integrate them and expensive to support - and even harder to create a unified experience for my users.
  • I need to be much more agile and timely in adapting to changes in the market and responding to the changing behavior of my customers. My technology needs to support this iterative approach that is critical for my business.
  • Technology is way too complex so I really would like a service that insulates me from the complexities of technology so that I can focus on my business - BUT - I don't want to sacrifice flexibility and control over the functionality my business needs and I CAN'T be locked into a single vendor who doesn't have my interests in mind.
  • I need ecommerce functionality that is more modular - rather than an all-in-one solution that resides in a large and separate codebase - so that I have greater flexibility in how and where commerce exists on my site.
Drupal + Drupal Commerce

While Drupal + Drupal Commerce won't solve all of your problems, it will address many of these fundamental challenges, and it will solve them far better than most ecommerce solutions today.

Why? Because it is built, supported, and extended on a massive scale by the largest open source community to address the needs of users just like you.

Join the Revolution

Want to be part of this change? Join us for the first Commerce Revolution on Monday afternoon, May 11 right before the start of DrupalCon Los Angeles. This is a great opportunity to learn, engage, and hear how customers, integrators, and agencies are addressing the shifing needs in ecommerce with Drupal + Drupal Commerce. This is an exclusive, invitation only event. If you would like to receive more information when we officially announce the Commerce Revolution on March 30, please let us know by completing the form below.

Categories: Elsewhere

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, February 2015

Planet Debian - Tue, 17/03/2015 - 17:42

Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

Individual reports

In February, 58 work hours have been equally split among 4 paid contributors. Their reports are available:

Evolution of the situation

During the last month, we gained 3 paid work hours: we’re now at 61 hours per month sponsored by 28 organizations and we have one supplementary sponsor in the pipe that should bring 4 more hours.

The increase is not very quick but seems to be steady. Hopefully at some point, we will have enough resources to do a more exhaustive job. For now, the paid contributors handle in priority the most popular packages used by the sponsors and there are some packages in the end of the queue which have open security issues for months already (example: CVE-2012-6685 on libnokogiri-ruby).

So, as usual, we are looking for more sponsors.

In terms of security updates waiting to be handled, the situation looks a little bit worse than last month: the dla-needed.txt file lists 40 packages awaiting an update (3 more than last month), the list of open vulnerabilities in Squeeze shows about 58 affected packages in total (5 less than last month). We are getting a bit more effective with CVE triage.

A logo for the LTS project?

Every time that I write an LTS report, I remember that it would be nice if my LTS related articles could feature a nice picture/logo that reminds people of the LTS team/initiative. Is there anyone up for the challenge of creating that logo?

Thanks to our sponsors

The new sponsors of the month are in bold.

No comment | Liked this article? Click here. | My blog is Flattr-enabled.

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupalize.Me: Dependency Injection with Traits in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - Tue, 17/03/2015 - 14:04

Part of learning Drupal’s API is learning about “what’s in the pantry.” In Drupal 8, that pantry is configured quite a bit differently than before. Instead of getting the whole warehouse of Drupal functions on every page load, functions—well, now methods—are contained in objects which are defined by classes. Most, if not all, of these classes, which exist in their own PHP files, can be extended and many of them are specifically designed to be extended. These extensible classes are the pantries. They contain properties and methods that we can just use in the classes that extend them. When we extend these classes, we need to make sure we peek inside to see what’s available before we go elsewhere for something that might already be in the cupboard.

Categories: Elsewhere

ComputerMinds.co.uk: Drupal Queues

Planet Drupal - Tue, 17/03/2015 - 14:00

Queues are a wonderful way of separating different parts of a system. Once you have separated those parts you can do lots of interesting things, like be more fault tolerant or have a more responsive front end for your users.

For example, lets suppose that we have a website on which we can book a holiday. We can choose lots of different options and at the end of the process when we've booked the holiday we'd like to send the customer a nice PDF detailing all the options they've chosen.

Categories: Elsewhere

ComputerMinds.co.uk: Drupal Queues

Planet Drupal - Tue, 17/03/2015 - 14:00

Queues are a wonderful way of separating different parts of a system. Once you have separated those parts you can do lots of interesting things, like be more fault tolerant or have a more responsive front end for your users.

For example, lets suppose that we have a website on which we can book a holiday. We can choose lots of different options and at the end of the process when we've booked the holiday we'd like to send the customer a nice PDF detailing all the options they've chosen.

Categories: Elsewhere

Wunderkraut blog: A Medium like editor for Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - Tue, 17/03/2015 - 11:11

Ok, so now we have a wyysiwyg-editor in drupal 8 core, but if you want another editor, like something used on medium.com?

I have done som intial work to get the medium clone inside drupal 8, and have now setup a sandbox on d.o. Please test it out if you are interested. The further plan of the module is to get a working media solution working with it, and if you are skilled on js (I am not :-)), and you feel you want to contribute... 

Sandbox is over here: https://www.drupal.org/sandbox/mikkex/2453725

Categories: Elsewhere

Appnovation Technologies: BDD with Behat and Drupal

Planet Drupal - Tue, 17/03/2015 - 01:20

As a back-end developer, I had the chance to work on a project which required writing automated tests for a Drupal site using Behat.

Categories: Elsewhere

Daniel Kahn Gillmor: Bootable grub USB stick (EFI and BIOS for Intel)

Planet Debian - Tue, 17/03/2015 - 00:12

I'm using grub version 2.02~beta2-2.

I want to make a USB stick that's capable of booting Intel architecture EFI machines, both 64-bit (x86_64) and 32-bit (ia32). I'm starting from a USB stick which is attached to a running debian system as /dev/sdX. I have nothing that i care about on that USB stick, and all data on it will be destroyed by this process.

I'm also going to try to make it bootable for traditional Intel BIOS machines, since that seems handy.

I'm documenting what I did here, in case it's useful to other people.

Set up the USB stick's partition table:

parted /dev/sdX -- mktable gpt parted /dev/sdX -- mkpart biosgrub fat32 1MiB 4MiB parted /dev/sdX -- mkpart efi fat32 4MiB -1 parted /dev/sdX -- set 1 bios_grub on parted /dev/sdX -- set 2 esp on After this, my 1GiB USB stick looks like: 0 root@foo:~# parted /dev/sdX -- print Model: USB FLASH DRIVE (scsi) Disk /dev/sdX: 1032MB Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B Partition Table: gpt Disk Flags: Number Start End Size File system Name Flags 1 1049kB 4194kB 3146kB fat32 biosgrub bios_grub 2 4194kB 1031MB 1027MB efi boot, esp 0 root@foo:~# make a filesystem and mount it temporarily at /mnt: mkfs -t vfat -n GRUB /dev/sdX2 mount /dev/sdX2 /mnt ensure we have the binaries needed, and add three grub targets for the different platforms: apt install grub-efi-ia32-bin grub-efi-amd64-bin grub-pc-bin grub2-common grub-install --removable --no-nvram --no-uefi-secure-boot \ --efi-directory=/mnt --boot-directory=/mnt \ --target=i386-efi grub-install --removable --no-nvram --no-uefi-secure-boot \ --efi-directory=/mnt --boot-directory=/mnt \ --target=x86_64-efi grub-install --removable --boot-directory=/mnt \ --target=i386-pc /dev/sdX At this point, you should add anything else you want to /mnt here! For example: And don't forget to cleanup: umount /mnt sync

Tags: bios, efi, grub, tip

Categories: Elsewhere

Bits from Debian: Debian is now welcoming applicants for Outreachy and GSoC Summer 2015

Planet Debian - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 21:45

We'd like to reshare a post from Nicolas Dandrimont.

Hi all,

I am delighted to announce that Debian will be participating in the next round of Outreachy and GSoC, and that we are currently welcoming applications!

Outreachy helps people from groups underrepresented in free and open source software get involved. The current round of internships is open to women (cis and trans), trans men, genderqueer people, and all participants of the Ascend Project regardless of gender.

Google Summer of Code is a global program, sponsored by Google, that offers post-secondary student developers ages 18 and older stipends to write code for various open source software projects.

Interns for both programs are granted a $5500 stipend (in three installments) allowing them to dedicate their summer to working full-time on Debian.

Our amazing team of mentors has listed their project ideas on the Debian wiki, and we are now welcoming applicants for both programs.

If you want to apply for an internship with Debian this summer, please fill out the template for either Outreachy or GSoC. If you’re eligible to both programs, we’ll encourage you to apply to both (using the same application), as Debian only has funds for a single Outreachy intern this round.

Don’t wait up! The application period for Outreachy ends March 24th, and the GSoC application period ends March 27th. We really want applicants to start contributing to their project before making our selection, so that mentors can get a feel of how working with their intern will be like for three months. The small task is a requirement for Outreachy, and we’re strongly encouraging GSoC applicants to abide by that rule too. To contribute in the best conditions, you shouldn’t wait for the last minute to apply :-)

I hope we’ll work with a lot of great interns this summer. If you think you’re up for the challenge, it’s time to apply! If you have any doubts, or any question, drop us a line on the soc-coordination mailing list or come by on our IRC channel (#debian-soc on irc.debian.org) and we’ll do our best to guide you.

Categories: Elsewhere

Enrico Zini: screen-dependent-geometry

Planet Debian - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 21:29
Screen-dependent window geometry

I have an external monitor for my laptop in my work desk at home, and when I work I keep a few windows like IRC on my laptop screen, and everything else on the external monitor. Then maybe I transfer on the sofa to watch a movie or in the kitchen to cook, and I unplug from the external monitor to bring the laptop with me. Then maybe I go back to the external monitor to resume working.

The result of this (with openbox) is that when I disconnect the external monitor all the windows on my external monitor get moved to the right edge of the laptop monitor, and when I reconnect the external monitor I need to rearrange them all again.

I would like to implement something that does the following:

  1. it keeps a dictionary mapping screen geometry to window geometries
  2. every time a window geometry and virtual desktop number changes, it gets recorded in the hash for the current screen geometry
  3. every time the screen geometry changes, for each window, if there was a saved window geometry + wirtual desktop number for it for the new screen geometry, it gets restored.

Questions:

  1. Is anything like this already implemented? Where?
  2. If not, what would be a convenient way to implement it myself, ideally in a wmctrl-like way that does not depend on a specific WM?

Note: I am not interested in switching to a different WM unless it is openbox with this feature implemented in it.

Categories: Elsewhere

Phase2: Announcing New Release and Version Scheme For Open Atrium

Planet Drupal - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 21:17

For the last several months I’ve had the privilege of leading the new dedicated products team here at Phase2. Having a team solely focused on products does not mean we are shifting away from Open Source, but it does mean we are going to be changing our practices a bit to better support the community and our clients. We now have a more predictable development schedule for our products like Open Atrium, and we want to pass the benefits of that to the community and our clients. To that end, we will be working on regular releases with a more consistent version scheme.

Releases will have the following types:
  • Maintenance Releases –  these will happen regularly (approximately once a month) and will include bug fixes, security patches and minor feature improvements/tweaks. We’ll signal these with version numbers that end in 1-9 (e.g. the “1” in Open Atrium 2.31).

  • Feature Releases – these will happen once a quarter and will add major new functions. They will generally require a little more care in upgrade because they may include big updates. These releases will end in zero, like our recent Open Atrium 2.30 release.

  • Major Releases – we have big ideas and plans, and some of them will require that we break compatibility and/or force a migration. We will be working on these big ideas, and we’re aiming to have a new major release each year. Our next will be Open Atrium 3.0 in early 2016.

As we build our solutions, we want to be able to move fast and make lots of improvements, but we need to balance that with a strong testing/review cycle. Rather than keep our activities behind the curtain, we will still be working in public git repositories so that anyone can see where we are going. And, for folks that do not want to follow the day-to-day of development but want to be more involved, we’ll be following a release candidate strategy. Before new feature releases, as soon as we feel we’re feature complete, we’ll publish a release candidate (e.g. 2.30-rc1). We’ll then put the RC through its paces and if things go well and we get no reports of issues from the community, that will become the final release.

So, future releases will have versions that look like this:

By both developing in the open and putting our releases out for review before they are final, we hope to strike the right balance between being visible and collaborative in the community, and offering our clients access to well reviewed and tested releases. As we work to bring more solutions to market, rest assured that we’ll keep “open” as a strong part of our DNA.

Personally, I’m really excited to be working with a great group of folks, both on my team and in the community. Lets push it, and do something great together! If you would like to stay informed about Open Atrium developments, be sure to sign up for the Phase2 newsletter!

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Easy: Last Chance to Register for the Spring Semester of Drupal Career Online

Planet Drupal - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 17:28

There are a lot of ways to train people to become Drupal site-builders, developers, and themers: books, blog posts, screencasts, 1-day trainings, and mentors - just to name a few. Drupal Career Online is different; we provide more than just one learning vector into our students brains. Our live, online, Drupal training program provides an expert instructor, professional tried-and-true curriculum, a full library of screencasts supporting the curriculum, and access to dedicated community mentors. Furthermore, this isn't bootcamp-style training; Drupal Career Online is a sanely-paced 12-week program that meets just 3 times per week. The goal of the Drupal Career Online program is simple: to create talented, well-rounded, community-minded Drupal site-builders, developers, and themers with a real-world knowledge of Drupal and the various satellite technologies that Drupal professionals use every day. Our next session starts on March 24.

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read more

Categories: Elsewhere

Liran Tal's Enginx: Prevent clickjacking on Drupal and other Apache web applications

Planet Drupal - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 14:23

Security is an important aspect to keep an eye for, and this time it’s about preventing clickjacking on Drupal and other Apache web applications.

Edit apache’s configuration file, which may be your declared vhost or such, usually at a location like /etc/httpd/conf.d/default.conf and make sure the  following

 

<IfModule mod_headers.c>
Header always append X-Frame-Options SAMEORIGIN
</IfModule>

 

This will disable embedding your website as an iFrame.

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

The post Prevent clickjacking on Drupal and other Apache web applications appeared first on Liran Tal's Enginx.

Categories: Elsewhere

Annertech: Design Wars (or, Designing Web Projects)

Planet Drupal - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 11:42
Design Wars (or, Designing Web Projects)

Design means different things to different people. What a UX designer thinks will be quite different from what a mechanical engineer thinks, which will be worlds away from what an artist thinks.

For example,

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal core announcements: Drupal core security release window on Wednesday, March 18

Planet Drupal - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 05:12
Start:  2015-03-18 (All day) America/New_York Online meeting (eg. IRC meeting) Organizers:  David_Rothstein

The monthly security release window for Drupal 6 and Drupal 7 core will take place on Wednesday, March 18.

This does not mean that a Drupal core security release will necessarily take place on that date for either the Drupal 6 or Drupal 7 branches, only that you should prepare to look out for one (and be ready to update your Drupal sites in the event that the Drupal security team decides to make a release).

There will be no bug fix/feature release on this date; the next window for a Drupal core bug fix/feature release is Wednesday, April 1.

For more information on Drupal core release windows, see the documentation on release timing and security releases, and the discussion that led to this policy being implemented.

Categories: Elsewhere

Russ Allbery: Another haul post

Planet Debian - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 03:58

Wow, it's been quite a long time since I've posted something here.

Everything is going well -- I'm just very, very engrossed with the new job, since I'm still in exponential ramp-up mode. It's lasting for longer than I expected, although my expectations didn't have much basis since this is the first time I've started a new job in 17 years. I'm feeling more and more capable every day, but the combination of a very heavily social learning process, a lot of new technical areas to learn, and not having taken a vacation since last June means that my weekends are spent just passively watching things and zoning.

Not sure yet how long that will last, and I don't want to make any predictions, although I do have my first significant vacation coming up next month.

Anyway, book reading and buying has continued, although I'm again far behind on writing reviews. With luck, I'll be writing one of those (for posting later) right after writing this post.

Michelle Alexander — The New Jim Crow (non-fiction)
Elizabeth Bear — Karen Memory (sff)
Becky Chambers — The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet (sff)
Fred Clark — The Anti-Christ Handbook (non-fiction)
Charles de Lint — The Very Best of Charles de Lint (sff)
S.L. Huang — A Neurological Study on the Effects... (sff)
S.L. Huang — Half Life (sff)
Kameron Hurley — The Mirror Empire (sff)
Sophie Lack — Dissonance (sff)
Sophie Lack — Imbalance (sff)
Susan R. Matthews — An Exchange of Hostages (sff)
Kaoru Mori — A Bride's Story #1 (graphic novel)
Donald Shoup — The High Cost of Free Parking (non-fiction)
Jo Walton — The Just City (sff)

Pretty nice variety of different stuff from a huge variety of recommendation sources. I've already read the Chambers (and can recommend it). A review will be forthcoming.

Categories: Elsewhere

Dimitri John Ledkov: My IDE needs a makeover

Planet Debian - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 00:30
Current SetupI am a Linux Distribution Engineer and work on arbitrary open source projects. Mostly I'm patching/packaging existing things, and sometimes start fresh projects.

My "IDE", or rather I shall say "toolbox" is rather sparse:

  • GNOME Terminal
  • Google Chrome
  • GNU Emacs
  • GCC toolcahin with GDB
  • Python3 - iPython, iPdb, pyflakes
  • git, GNU bazaar
There are a few things that annoy me, and should be done better these days.DocumentationI lookup documentation mostly with Google Chrome. This includes the texinfo renderings of the docs. There are a few reasons for that. First of all my developer machine is not polluted with all the dev packages under the sun, instead I compile practically everything in a chroot. And most of the time chroots have much newer versions of everything (from gcc & automake, to boost and whatever other dependencies are in use). However I would like to have easy generic lookup builtin for common things that I lookup in the references and which have not changed for a long time:
  • gcc builtins & defines
  • glibc functions
  • automake/autoconf functions definitions
Given that my preferred editor is Emacs, it should be natural to use `info' mode to look things up. However, the rendering there is archaic and is really hard to read. At least when visiting the HTML renderings, the function names are in bold and stand out from the rest of the description.
Ideally I would have unified place to lookup docs, instead of using Google Chrome and navigating: gnu.org, gnome.org, readthedocs.org, freedesktop.org.Project ManagementI really hate "traditional" IDEs that create and pollute the working directories with random extra files. My project management tool is VCS, thus .git should be automatically recognized as a "project". I should be able to navigate repository files, have them scanned for tab-completion and jumping to symbols and the like. At the moment, I exit the editor and use git grep to find things and open those files in the editor again. I don't use any tagging systems at the moment, ideally git repository would be scanned and Exuberant Tags (this seems to be the latest hotness in tagging space) stored inside the .git directory automatically."SDK" aware aka chroot supportThe IDE should be aware of chroots, how to compile things in a chroot and ideally how to compile packages with sbuild, mock or obs build (these are apt, yum and zypper preferred solutions for package compilation). Most importantly to use those chroots to tag includes headers for tab completion.ShellGnome Terminal is good enough for my needs. I do have a problem of too many terminal windows... I have tried Terminator (a tiling single-window / multiple-tabs terminal). However during development the things I use shell for, should be part of the IDE directly: changing projects, opening/closing/navigating/creating files, invoking build, invoking debug, "refactoring" (sed). I think I do want to try out a pull-down terminal for temporal look-ups together with a tiling "main" terminal. Or ideally ditch it all together. Emacs does provide multiple terminals, but when I did that I ended up with "inception" -> launching an instance of emacs, inside the terminal, inside emacs...ConclusionIf anybody has tips or suggestions do share. I will investigate and experiment with all of the above, and see if I can experiment and find new cool things that work better than my current setup.

Categories: Elsewhere

Gunnar Wolf: Crowdfunding call: "Natura" short film

Planet Debian - Sun, 15/03/2015 - 23:49

My good friend Felipe Esquivel is driving a crowdfunded project: the first part of the "Natura" short film. I urge every reader of my blog to support Felipe's work!

Felipe, the director for this project, is a very talented Chilean-Mexican animator. He has produced short animated films such as A duel and One fine day.

Not only that: It might be interesting for my blog's readers that a good deal of the work of Chamán Animation's work (of course, I am not qualified to state that "all of" their work — But it might well be the case) is done using Free Software, specifically, using Blender.

So, people: Go look at their work. And try to be part of their work!

Categories: Elsewhere

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