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Drupal Easy: Professionally-Trained, Community-Oriented, Drupal Career Online Students Ready for Work

Planet Drupal - Mon, 13/10/2014 - 20:10

The fifth class of our Drupal career training program is just about at the halfway mark, and our students are eager to put their new skills to work. The six Drupal Career Online students will be ready for junior-developer-level work in mid-November, and we're looking for forward-thinking organizations willing to help our graduates on the next leg of their Drupal career journey.

As we've done for the past five classes, (we've had more than 60 graduates so far) we're looking to make introductions between our upcoming graduates and organizations looking for people with Drupal site-building and development skills. Our Work Experience Drupal (WE Drupal) program is designed to provide students with valuble experience in internship-type settings. WE Drupal host companies are asked to make a 6-10 week commitment to one or more of our students, provide them with guidance, mentoring, and the professional experience that is so difficult to come by for new Drupal site builders and developers. In return, you get the efforts of a well-prepared, super-eager Drupal novice to help you lighten the task-load for your staff.

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Categories: Elsewhere

John Goerzen: Update on the systemd issue

Planet Debian - Mon, 13/10/2014 - 19:46

The other day, I wrote about my poor first impressions of systemd in jessie. Here’s an update.

I’d like to start with the things that are good. I found the systemd community to be one of the most helpful in Debian, and #debian-systemd IRC channel to be especially helpful. I was in there for quite some time yesterday, and appreciated the help from many people, especially Michael. This is a nontechnical factor, but is extremely important; this has significantly allayed my concerns about systemd right there.

There are things about the systemd design that impress. The dependency system and configuration system is a lot more flexible than sysvinit. It is also a lot more complicated, and difficult to figure out what’s happening. I am unconvinced of the utility of parallelization of boot to begin with; I rarely reboot any of my Linux systems, desktops or servers, and it seems to introduce needless complexity.

Anyhow, on to the filesystem problem, and a bit of a background. My laptop runs ZFS, which is somewhat similar to btrfs in that it’s a volume manager (like LVM), RAID manager (like md), and filesystem in one. My system runs LVM, and inside LVM, I have two ZFS “pools” (volume groups): one, called rpool, that is unencrypted and holds mainly the operating system; and the other, called crypt, that is stacked atop LUKS. ZFS on Linux doesn’t yet have built-in crypto, which is why LVM is even in the picture here (to separate out the SSD at a level above ZFS to permit parts of it to be encrypted). This is a bit of an antiquated setup for me; as more systems have AES-NI, I’m going to everything except /boot being encrypted.

Anyhow, inside rpool is the / filesystem, /var, and /usr. Inside /crypt is /tmp and /home.

Initially, I tried to just boot it, knowing that systemd is supposed to work with LSB init scripts, and ZFS has init scripts with carefully-planned dependencies. This was evidently not working, perhaps because /lib/systemd/systemd/ It turns out that systemd has a few assumptions that turn out to be less true with ZFS than otherwise. ZFS filesystems are normally not mounted via /etc/fstab; a ZFS pool has internal properties about which dataset gets mounted where (similar to LVM’s actions after a vgscan and vgchange -ay). Even though there are ordering constraints in the units, systemd is writing files to /var before /var gets mounted, resulting in the mount failing (unlike ext4, ZFS by default will reject an attempt to mount over a non-empty directory). Partly this due to the debian-fixup.service, and partly it is due to systemd reacting to udev items like backlight.

This problem was eventually worked around by doing zfs set mountpoint=legacy rpool/var, and then adding a line to fstab (“rpool/var /var zfs defaults 0 2″) for /var and its descendent filesystems.

This left the problem of /tmp; again, it wasn’t getting mounted soon enough. In this case, it required crypttab to be processed first, and there seem to be a lot of bugs in the crypttab processing in systemd (more on that below). I eventually worked around that by adding After=cryptsetup.target to the zfs-import-cache.service file. For /tmp, it did NOT work to put it in /etc/fstab, because then it tried to mount it before starting cryptsetup for some reason. It probably didn’t help that the system’s cryptdisks.service is a symlink to /dev/null, a fact I didn’t realize until after a lot of needless reboots.

Anyhow, one thing I stumbled across was poor console control with systemd. On numerous occasions, I had things like two cryptsetup processes trying to read a password, plus an emergency mode console trying to do so. I had this memorable line of text at one point:

(or type Control-D to continue): Please enter passphrase for disk athena-crypttank (crypt)! [ OK ] Stopped Emergency Shell.

And here we venture into unsatisfying territory with systemd. One answer to this in IRC was to install plymouth, which apparently serializes console I/O. However, plymouth is “an attractive boot animation in place of the text messages that normally get shown.” I don’t want an “attractive boot animation”. Nevertheless, neither systemd-sysv nor cryptsetup depends on plymouth, so by default, the prompt for a password at boot is obscured by various other text.

Worse, plymouth doesn’t support serial consoles, so at the moment booting a system that uses LUKS with systemd over a serial console is a matter of blind luck of typing the right password at the right time.

In the end, though, the system booted and after a few more tweaks, the backlight buttons do their thing again. Whew!

Categories: Elsewhere

Steve McIntyre: Successful Summer of Code in Linaro

Planet Debian - Mon, 13/10/2014 - 19:06

It's past time I wrote about how Linaro's students fared in this year's Google Summer of Code. You might remember me posting earlier in the year when we welcomed our students. We started with 3 student projects at the beginning of the summer. One of the students unfortunately didn't work out, but the other two were hugely successful.

Gaurav Minocha was a graduate student at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. He worked on Linux Flattened Device Tree Self-checking, mentored by Grant Likely from Linaro's Office of the CTO. Gaurav achieved all of his project's goals, and he was invited to Linaro's recent Linaro Connect USAConnect conference in California to meet people and and talk about his project. He and Grant presented a session on their work; it was filmed, and video is online. Grant said he was very happy with Gaurav's "strong, solid performance" during the project.

Varad Gautam was a student at Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani, India. He succeeded in porting UEFI to the BeagleBone Black. Leif Lindholm from the Linaro Enterprise Group was his mentor for the summer. At the end of the summer, Varad delivered a UEFI port ready for booting Linux and his code was included in Linaro's September UEFI release. Leif said that he was "very pleased with Varad's self sufficiency and ability to pick up an entirely new software project very quickly". We were hoping to invite Gaurad to Connect in California also, but travel document delays got in the way. With luck we'll see him at the next Connect in Hong Kong in February 2015.

Well done, guys! It was great to work with these young developers for the summer, and we wish them lots more success in their future endeavours.

Google have also just confirmed that they will be running the Summer of Code program again in 2015. I'm hoping that Linaro will be accepted again next year as a mentoring organisation. I'll post more about that early next year.

Categories: Elsewhere

Stanford Web Services Blog: Module of the Day: Stanford MetaTag NoBots - Hide your site from search engines!

Planet Drupal - Mon, 13/10/2014 - 18:00

When we launch a site at Stanford Web Services, we open the doors and roll out the red carpet for the search engines to index the site. However, before launch we like to keep the content under wraps and ask the search engines not to index the site. To do this, we use a module called Stanford MetaTag NoBots.

Categories: Elsewhere

Acquia: How to setup auto-translation of nodes using Rules and Tmgmt

Planet Drupal - Mon, 13/10/2014 - 15:17

This how-to guide describes how to set up automatic machine-based translations for content on a Drupal site. Whenever a node is created, translation jobs will be created for every language specified, and depending on how you set up your translator, you should be able to completely automate the translation process. For this project we are using SDL, but you should be able to use other translators.

1. Download and enable the translation management modules. This can be done through Drush or through the modules interface in drupal.

Categories: Elsewhere

InternetDevels: Ready! Drupal! Action! DrupalCon Amsterdam!

Planet Drupal - Mon, 13/10/2014 - 13:05

Where on this planet as a pedestrian you can be hit by bicycle and… be guilty for it? Amsterdam, you are just awesome! :)

DrupalCon is over and its attendees are in the relaxed process of event reminiscence. True drupallers are never tired of sessions, code-sprints, workshops and just fuss between these events; and yes, this year’s Con has provided all of these! But you know what? You can read about this stuff in dozens of other materials. And here we have gathered those moments and snapshots, which made our days at DrupalCon!

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Categories: Elsewhere

SK+ Drupallets: Top Modules for Drupal 7

Planet Drupal - Mon, 13/10/2014 - 08:29

Dozens of useful contributed modules for building Drupal 7 sites.

There are many really useful contributed modules to take your site beyond the basics of Drupal core. There are modules to improve, allow, and/or help with everything from accessibility to workflow, from images to input formats, and beyond.

This session will be of interest to beginner and intermediate Drupallers, as well as those who manage or hire Drupallers or who are just trying to decide whether to use Drupal.

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Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Bits at Web-Dev: Codit: Blocks a video introduction to making custom blocks

Planet Drupal - Mon, 13/10/2014 - 07:17

This screen share walks you through why you might want a more powerful way of making blocks and why Codit: Blocks is a good candidate if you need lots of custom blocks.

Categories: Elsewhere

Dirk Eddelbuettel: Seinfeld streak at GitHub

Planet Debian - Mon, 13/10/2014 - 02:23

Early last year, I referred to a Seinfeld Streak in a blog post referring to almost two months of updates to the Rcpp Gallery. This is sometimes called Jerry Seinfeld's secret to productivity: Just keep at it. Don't break the streak.

I now have different streak:

Now we'll see how far this one will go.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Categories: Elsewhere

Midwestern Mac, LLC: St. Louis Drupal Group - Hackathon on Headless Drupal 8 & AngularJS

Planet Drupal - Mon, 13/10/2014 - 00:00

Now that Drupal 8.0.0-beta1 is out, and the headless Drupal craze is in full-swing, the Drupal St. Louis meetup this month will focus on using Drupal 8 with AngularJS to build a demo pizza ordering app. (The meetup is on Thurs. Oct. 23, starting at 6:30 p.m.; see even more info in this Zero to Drupal post).

We'll be hacking away and seeing how far we can get, and hopefully we'll be able to leave with at least an MVP-quality product! I'll be at the event, mostly helping people get a Drupal 8 development environment up and running. For some, this alone will hopefully be a huge help, and maybe motivation to adopt Drupal 8 more quickly!

If you're in or around the St. Louis area, consider joining us; especially if you would like to learn something about either Drupal 8 or AngularJS!

Categories: Elsewhere

Jonathan Wiltshire: Clean builds for the win

Planet Debian - Sun, 12/10/2014 - 22:50

I’ve just spent a little time squashing several bugs on the trot, all the same: insufficient build-dependencies when built in a clean environment. Typically this means that the package was uploaded after being built on a developer’s normal machine, which already has everything required installed.

It’s long been the case that we have several ways to build packages in a clean chroot before upload, which reveals these sorts of errors and more. There’s not really any excuse for uploading packages that fail to build in this way.

Please, for the sanity of everyone working with the archive, don’t upload packages that haven’t been built in a clean environment. It’s such a waste of everybody’s time if you don’t do this most basic of checks.

Clean builds for the win is a post from: jwiltshire.org.uk | Flattr

Categories: Elsewhere

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