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Open Source Training: Custom Formatters for Easy Drupal Embeds

Planet Drupal - Wed, 30/04/2014 - 16:15

Many websites want to allow users to submit videos, audio files, documents and the like.

However, if those files are stored on other sites, it can be difficult to display that content consistently. For example, if you allow people to submit YouTube videos, there are multiple different types of embed code.

One of our members wanted to allow users to submit Google docs that would automatically be shown inside iframes.

The solution to all these problems is the "Custom Formatters" module. Here's how to use Custom Formatters:

Categories: Elsewhere

Russell Coker: Links April 2014

Planet Debian - Wed, 30/04/2014 - 15:55

Yves Rossy is the Jetman, he flys with a wing and four jet engines strapped to his body, he gave an interesting TED talk about flying along with some exciting videos [1].

Larry Brilliant gave an informative and inspiring TED talk about stopping pandemics [2]. I thought that Smallpox was the last disease to be eradicated but I was wrong.

Michael Shermer gave an interesting TED talk about pattern recognition and self deception [3]. It’s a pity that the kissing prank shown at the end only pranked women, they should be less sexist and prank men too.

Raffaello D Andrea gave an interesting TED presentation about “Athletic” quadcopters [4]. It’s very impressive and has the potential for several new human/machine sports.

Lisa D wrote an insightful article about Prejudice Spillover discussing the way that people who aren’t in minority groups only seem to care about injustice when a member of the majority is targetted by mistake [5].

Ron Garret wrote an insightful post about the Divine Right of Billionaires which debunks some stupid arguments by a billionaire [6]. Ron says that “it’s often instructive to examine incorrect arguments, especially when those arguments are advanced by smart people” and demonstrates it in this post.

Lisa D wrote an interesting post about her problems with financial aid bureaucracy [7]. She intended the post to be a personal one about her situation, but I think it illustrates problems with the various aid programs. If aid was available to her with less bureaucracy then she would be doing paid work, completing her studies, and heading towards post-graduate studies.

Mark Shuttleworth wrote an insightful article about ACPI, security, and device tree [8]. It’s the first time I’ve seen a good argument for device tree.

TED presented an interesting video-conference interview with Edward Snowden [9]. It’s unusually long by TED standards but definitely worth watching.

Tom Meagher (who’s wife was raped and murdered two years ago) wrote an insightful article about rape culture [10].

Key Lay (the Victorian Chief Commissioner of Police) wrote a good article encouraging men to act to stop violence against women [11]. It’s particularly noteworthy when a senior police officer speaks out about this given the difficulties women have had in reporting such crimes to police.

Emily Baker wrote an insightful article about the lack of support for soldiers who survive war [12]. A lot of attention and money is spent remembering the soldiers who died in the field but little on those who live suffer afterwards, more soldiers die from suicide than enemy fire.

Daniel Pocock wrote an informative article about the failings of SMS authentication for online banking [13]. While he has good points I think he’s a little extreme. Stopping the least competent attackers is still a significant benefit as most potential attackers aren’t that competent.

Jess Zimmerman wrote an interesting article for Time about the “Not All Men” argument that is a current trend in derailing discussions about the treatment of women [14].

The Belle Jar has an insightful article “Why Won’t You Educate Me About Feminism” about some ways that men pretend to care about the treatment of women [15].

Jon Evans wrote an article for Tech Crunch about the “Honywell Bubble Count” measure of diversity in people you follow on social media [16]. Currently on Twitter I follow 57 accounts of which 15 are companies and organisations, so I follow 42 people. I follow 13 women 31%, for a visible minority group other than my own it’s 2/42 or 5%, for people who live in other countries I think it’s 8/42 (although it’s difficult to determine where some people live) which is 19%. So my Honywell number is 55.

The Top Stocks forum has an interesting post by a Coal Seam Gas (CSG) worker [17]. It seems that CSG is even worse than I thought.

Ashe Dryden wrote an informative post for Model View Culture about the backlash that members of minority groups (primarily women) receive when they speak out [18].

Related posts:

  1. Links April 2012 Karen Tse gave an interesting TED talk about how to...
  2. Links March 2014 Typing Animal wrote an interesting article about the dangers of...
  3. Links February 2014 The Economist has an interesting and informative article about the...
Categories: Elsewhere

Frederick Giasson: Configuring and Using the OSF Search API (Screencast)

Planet Drupal - Wed, 30/04/2014 - 14:40

In this screencast, I will show you how you can leverage the semantic power of the OSF Search endpoint into Drupal using OSF for Drupal. You will see how you can configure the OSF SearchAPI module, how you can turn any property into a filtering facet and how you can display the facets into blocks.

Then I will briefly show you how you can create new search results templates and how the template selection works using type inference.

Finally I will show you how you can enable and disable inference in the search feature, and how you can leverage the semantic structure of your data to change the relevancy of the search results returned. You have all the leisure to boost different characteristics of your data to return more relevant results to your users.

 


Categories: Elsewhere

Mirco Bauer: Smuxi 0.11 "Distractions" Release

Planet Debian - Wed, 30/04/2014 - 14:28
RSS Atom Smuxi - IRC Client Smuxi 0.11 with multi identity support, message patterns, fixed Twitter and new website

And here we go again! We're proud to announce the new version of Smuxi, release 0.11 "Distractions". During the development, 11 bug reports and 2 feature requests in 112 commits were worked on. Notable highlights in this release are:

User Interface Enhancements
  • The chat list can be shrunken. This is especially handy with XMPP/Jabber and long group chat identifiers.
  • The highlight counter is now a separate column. This enhances the vertical alignment with other highlights and guarantees to be visible even if the chat name was truncated.
Multi Identity Support

Smuxi cares for user feedback. Multi identity support was the most voted feature and thus it has been implemented! Now you can please your schizo^Wdesire to use different nicks, users and real names depending on the server. Simply edit the server in preferences and change the details.

Message Patterns

Everybody knows text can be boring because it is all just text. Nothing can sidetrack you except reading that bare text. Text often has recurring patterns from which something useful and interactive can be created. For example, someone writes:

Hey meebey, do you know RFC2812?

RFCs are a recurring pattern with a distinct number behind it and are real references to something in the internet (collection of protocol specifications).

So I would usually fire up a browser tab, copy/paste or type RFC2812 into my favorite search engine and click the first hit. Then I'd reply to the question afterwards. But with Smuxi's message patters, it turns RFC2812 into a link on which you can simply click to launch the relevant document.

Wow this is very cool, but isn't this already happening with http URLs and email addresses? Exactly! Why shouldn't more information be used to create useful things from it? Smuxi message patterns allow you to define text patterns that are transformed into clickable links. This can be used for RFCs, CVEs, bug report numbers (#XXX), git commit hashes and much more. Make good use of your creativity!

By default Smuxi comes with built-in message patterns for:

  • URLs
  • heuristic URLs (not starting with http:// etc)
  • email addresses
  • RFCs
  • CVEs
  • Debian Security Advisories (DSA)
  • Many popular bug trackers (GNU, GCC, kernel, Launchpad, freedesktop, GNOME, KDE, Xfce, Debian, Redhat, Novell, Xamarin, openSUSE, Mozilla, Samba, SourceForge, CPAN, boost, Claws and Smuxi)

If you know more general patterns useful for others, please submit them.

For a full list of built-in message patterns or how to add your own patterns, head over to the message pattern documentation.

Hooks Enhancements
  • A bug was fixed that prevented hooks from issuing more than one command
  • New hook points:
    • engine/session/on-group-chat-person-added
    • engine/session/on-group-chat-person-removed
    • engine/session/on-group-chat-person-updated
  • New hook variables:
    • CMD
    • CMD_PARAMETER
    • CMD_CHARACTER
    • PROTOCOL_MANAGER_PRESENCE_STATUS: Unknown, Offline, Online, Away
Twitter Enhancements

As of 14 Jan 2014, Twitter disallows unencrypted HTTP requests which broke Smuxi's Twitter support. Smuxi is now making exclusively encrypted requests (HTTPS) and thus works with Twitter again.

JabbR (Beta) Enhancements
  • Messages now raise Smuxi hooks
  • The Validate certificate setting is now correctly honored.
Updated Translations

Smuxi should now be in your language, including:

  • Initial complete Dutch (Jeroen Baten)
Behind the Scenes
  • New Smuxi git repository @ GNOME
  • Cleaner XMPP code (Oliver Schneider)
  • Smuxi's STFL text frontend is doing a graceful shutdown on quit (Calvin B))
  • New sexy website! We hope you like it
Contributors

Contributors to this release are the following people:

  • Mirco Bauer (98 commits)
  • Oliver Schneider (6 commits)
  • Calvin B (6 commits)
  • Andrés G. Aragoneses (1 commit)
  • Jeroen Baten (translations)

Thank you very much for your contributions to Smuxi!

Want it? Go here and grab it right now!

Posted Mon Apr 14 13:23:29 2014
Categories: Elsewhere

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