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Forum One: NVDA Screen Readers and Invisible Elements

Planet Drupal - Wed, 06/08/2014 - 17:02

Here’s an interesting bug…

It is a pretty common practice to hide from view text that is meant for visually impaired users to read via a screen reader. In Drupal, required fields will get a value that is hidden in this way via CSS in the field’s label elements. By default, this text reads “This field is required” however the text is translated, so it may vary depending on the language of the page. Visually, this text is hidden; sighted users will still see a red star character next to these fields, but it is only meant as a cue for users utilizing screen readers.

A common method of hiding these ‘Cur’ elements is to set the element’s width and height to 1px and use the the clip property. This method can be seen in this blog post and is briefly hit upon in this WebAIM article.

.element-invisible {

position: absolute !important;

height: 1px;

width: 1px;

overflow: hidden;

clip: rect(1px 1px 1px 1px); /* IE6, IE7 */

clip: rect(1px, 1px, 1px, 1px);

}

The Problem

I’ve come across an issue that can hamper accessibility. Users employing the NVDA Screen Reader with Firefox and using the screen reader viewer will see elements styled like this with the spaces removed, e.g., “Thisfieldisrequired.” This does not appear to be an issue in Chrome, and I have not tested in other browsers. The screen reader view renders as:


The Solution

It seems that this spacing is caused by how Firefox is interpreting the width property. Using a larger width here seems to resolve the issue, and a good threshold for this seems to be 9px. I tried it with 8, but oddly, that width leaves some words still missing spaces while correcting others. This may cause some layout issues, however. (I spend more of my time in back-end development, so I am not a CSS expert by any means.) Here is the result of changing the element’s width to 9px:

 

 

Thus, it seems changing the pixel size of these invisible elements could be one small step towards improving accessibility of this screen reader in Firefox.

Categories: Elsewhere

Enrico Zini: relationships

Planet Debian - Wed, 06/08/2014 - 16:47
On relationships

Good relationships are like a good video game

with an easy, uncomplicated interface

and lots of interesting content.

(Lynoure)

Categories: Elsewhere

Acquia: Drupal 8's new theming layer – Joël Pittet and Scott Reeves

Planet Drupal - Wed, 06/08/2014 - 16:09

Drupal 8 theming layer co-maintainers Joël Pittet and Scott Reeves sat down with me at NYC Camp 2014 at United Nations Headquarters in New York City to talk about how Twig and the new theming layer in Drupal 8 empowers front- and back-end developers, convergence and contribution in PHP, and more.

Categories: Elsewhere

Amazee Labs: How to write Sass within Chromes DevTools using Workspaces and Auto-reload

Planet Drupal - Wed, 06/08/2014 - 13:48
How to write Sass within Chromes DevTools using Workspaces and Auto-reload

There is this feature in Chromes’ DevTools that allows you to directly edit your local Sass files without ever leaving your beloved browser. Even better, it will refresh your CSS files as soon as Compass has compiled them for you (kinda like Guard!). And to go even further, it will show you where the CSS definitions really come from (the original Sass files), instead of that generated gibberish.

Intro

So to start, you'll obviously have to be working with Sass/Compass for this to work (pardon the pun!). I won’t go into detail on how to install these lovely things as this could take up an entire post itself. So if you know how to install Sass/Compass on your machine or have a handy co-worker you can annoy (preferably a sys-monkey admin) you’re good to go.

With Sass and Compass there are as always issues if you're not working with certain specific versions. The most reliable combination that worked for me was this one:

  • Susy 1.0.9
  • Ruby 1.9.3
  • Sass 3.3.0.alpha.134 (i suppose Sass 3.3.x will work fine too)
  • Compass 0.12.4.sourcemaps
The thing about source maps

For Compass you need an entirely different version from the one that you probably have, its called “compass-sourcemap”.

In order to get that juicy source map action you'll have to open up your shell and type in the following:

sudo gem install compass-sourcemaps --pre

This will install a compass version with source map, in the future source map will (hopefully) be included in the regular compass versions.

So what is compass-sourcemap exactly you ask? Well first of it’s super fantastic, even if you don't want to have all the workspace/auto-reload mayhem you should take a look at it.

For example, on a casual day while you’re working with that sassy generated CSS, the inspector can’t really tell you where the real definitions are coming from. It only shows you the line within the generated CSS file. This is where source maps comes in, it generates an additional .map file for every .css file and tells your browser where the CSS definition is coming from. There are 4 things you'll have to do after you've installed all the necessary tools:

  1. Enable “CSS source maps” in the General Chrome DevTools Settings under “Sources”
  2. Enable it in your config.rb file, just add the following line (make sure its not already there)
    • sass_options = {:sourcemap => true}
  3. In the shell, run your compass just like you always have
    • compass watch
  4. Enjoy it!
Prepare your Drupal

Disable the “Aggregate and Compress CSS files.” option in your Drupal 7 Installation in “YOURSITE/admin/config/development/performance”.

Next up: download and enable this small module: https://github.com/AmazeeLabs/cache_buster

This will remove that pesky query behind your .css files, normally this would be a bad thing and you should never use this on a production site. However, for Chrome to properly track your local files it needs to have a permanent link to them, in other words a path that doesn't change. I got the code from an issue queue (i think…) on drupal.org but i can’t remember which one, I simply put it inside a module for easy handling. So credits go to the unknown contributor, thank you very much (and sorry)!

Before:

After:

Prepare your Chrome

Go back to your general DevTools settings and enable “Auto-reload generated CSS”, its right below the source maps option:

After that open up your local project with Chrome and navigate to “Sources” in DevTools. You should see something that looks a little like this:

What you’re gonna do next is adding your local site as a workspace inside Chrome, this will remain in there until you manually remove it. I like to take the entire theme folder; you could also add the entire site, that’s all up to you. If you've picked the folder you want, right click and pick “Add folder to workspace”. Navigate to the exact same folder on your local machine and select it.

At this point Chrome will ask you for writing permissions, just oblige and never think of it again. I mean it’s Google; what could possibly go wrong, amiright?

You should now see a new folder at the bottom of the sources tab inside your DevTools, it’s named after the folder you've just picked. Navigate to where the main .css file is (or any other .scss file), right click and select “Map to Network Resource”

Chrome will now bring up a selection of files from your site, match it to your local file.

And finally Chrome will ask you if it’s okay to reload DevTools; you are totally fine with that so pick “ok” - and you're done!

You can open any .scss files from your workspace or use the inspector to directly open a file and make all the changes you want. You can save using your standard cmd+s and even open files using cmd+o. Everything will be saved just as if it was done within a proper IDE, except its Chrome!

But there’s one more thing

If you right-click on any of your .scss files you can select “Local Modifications”; this will bring up a general “History” of all your changes and you can even revert them!

 

Categories: Elsewhere

KYbest: Exporting image field defaults in D7

Planet Drupal - Wed, 06/08/2014 - 11:32

We all love image fields' defaults: it's so easy to have a hero image for a product or a colleague's profile even when the editor does not provide one, with all the niceties such as displaying it with various image styles in a list, in the teaser or on the actual page. We all love Features module as it allows us to export Drupal 7 content types with all its settings.

Categories: Elsewhere

Chris Lamb: Strava Enhancement Suite update

Planet Debian - Wed, 06/08/2014 - 10:22

I've been told I don't blog about my projects often enough, so here's a feature update on my Chrome Extension that adds various improvements to the Strava.com fitness tracker.

All the features are optional and can be individually enabled in the options panel.


Repeated segments

This adds aggregate data (fastest, slowest, average, etc.) when segments are repeated within an activity. It's particularly useful for laps or—like this Everesting attempt—hill repeats:


Leaderboard default

Changes the default leaderboard away from "Overall" when viewing a segment effort. The most rewarding training often comes from comparing your own past performances rather than those of others, so viewing your own results by default can make more sense.

You can select any of Men, Women, I'm Following or My Results:


Hide feed entries

Hides various entry types in the activity feed that can get annoying. You currently have the option of hiding challenges, route creations, goals created or club memberships:


External links

Adds links to Strava Labs Flyby, Veloviewer, Race Shape, KOM Club, etc. on activity, segment detail and Challenge pages:


Variability Index

Calculates a Variability Index (VI) from the weighted average power and the average power, an indication of how "smooth" a ride was. Required a power meter. A VI of 1.0 would mean a ride was paced "perfectly", with very few surges of effort:


Infinite scroll

Automatically loads more dashboard entries when reaching the bottom, saving a tedious click on the "More" button:


Running TSS

Estimates a run's Training Stress Score (TSS) from its Grade Adjusted Pace distribution, a measure of that workout's duration and intensity relative to the athletes's capability, providing an insight into correct recovery time and overall training load over time:


Hide "find friends"

Hides social networking buttons, including invitations to invite or find further friends:


"Enter" posts comment

Immediately posts comment when pressing Enter/Return key in the edit box rather than adding a newline:


Compare running

Changes the default sport for the "Side by Side comparison" module to running when viewing athlete profiles:


Running cadence

Shows running cadence by default in the elevation profile:


Running heart rate

Shows running heart rate by default in elevation profile:


Estimated FTP

Selects "Show Estimated FTP" by default on the Power Curve page:


Standard Google map

Prefer the "Standard" Google map over the "Terrain" view:


Let me know if you have any comments, suggestions or if you have any other feedback. If you find this software useful, please consider donating via Paypal to support further development. You can also view the source and contribute directly on GitHub.

Categories: Elsewhere

Russell Coker: Booting GPT

Planet Debian - Wed, 06/08/2014 - 08:53

I’m installing new 4TB disks on an older Dell server, it’s a PowerEdge T110 with a G6950 CPU so it’s not really old, but it’s a couple of generations behind the latest Dell servers.

I tried to enable UEFI booting, but when I turned that option on the system locked up during the BIOS process (wouldn’t boot from the CD or take keyboard input). So I had to make it boot with a BIOS compatible MBR and a GPT partition table.

Number  Start (sector)    End (sector)  Size      Code  Name
  1            2048            4095  1024.0 KiB  EF02  BIOS boot partition
  2            4096        25169919  12.0 GiB    FD00  Linux RAID
  3        25169920      7814037134  3.6 TiB    8300  Linux filesystem

After spending way to much time reading various web pages I discovered that the above partition table works. The 1MB partition is for GRUB code and needs to be enabled by a parted command such as the following:

parted /dev/sda set 1 bios_grub on

/dev/sda2 is a RAID-1 array used for the root filesystem. If I was installing a non-RAID system I’d use the same partition table but with a type of 8300 instead of FD00. I have a RAID-1 array over sda2 and sdb2 for the root filesystem and sda3, sdb3, sdc3, sdd3, and sde3 are used for a RAID-Z array. I’m reserving space for the root filesystem on all 5 disks because it seems like a good idea to use the same partition table and the 12G per disk that is unused on sdc, sdd, and sde isn’t worth worrying about when dealing with 4TB disks.

Related posts:

  1. booting from USB for security Sune Vuorela asks about how to secure important data such...
  2. How I Partition Disks Having had a number of hard drives fail over the...
  3. Resizing the Root Filesystem Uwe Hermann has described how to resize a root filesystem...
Categories: Elsewhere

Modules Unraveled: 114 What PHPStorm brings to Drupal Developers with Maarten Balliauw - Modules Unraveled Podcast

Planet Drupal - Wed, 06/08/2014 - 07:00
Published: Wed, 08/06/14Download this episodePHPStorm
  • I’ve recently started using Sublime Text, how would you compare PHPStorm to other text editors?
  • What is an “IDE”?
  • What are some of stand out features of PHPStorm?
  • Where can people find out more about how to use the features of PHPStorm?
  • What is the pricing structure?

PHPStorm and Drupal
* What integrations does PHPStorm have with Drupal 7, right now?
* What will PhpStorm do for Drupal 8?

Questions from Twitter
  • Marc Drummond
    Really enjoy using @phpstorm. Always interested in learning how to get more out of my use of it.
Episode Links: Maarten on TwitterMaarten on GitHubMaarten’s blogPHPStorm WebsitePHPStorm TutorialsPhpStorm hands-onTags: DevelopmentEditorsplanet-drupal
Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Association News: What the Association Board Does, and Why You Should Run!

Planet Drupal - Wed, 06/08/2014 - 05:39

One of the things that sets the Drupal community apart from other open source projects is our big, amazing, and very diverse community. The Association board is structured to help represent our community with two community elected seats. After a an update to our bylaws this May, we now elect one board member per year to a two-year term. These seats are open to all community members, and we need you to fill them! Our next election will be held in early 2015, and we need your help finding great candidates.

As we shared in the 2013 election wrap up presentation at the DrupalCon Prague public board meeting, we have a couple of challenges when it comes to public elections. The first is fielding a diverse candidate pool. We had some great candidates, but very few women, people of color, or candidates from outside the US. In our next election, we'd like to see more diversity in the candidate pool. Secondly, we have very low turn out for the elections. Anyone with a Drupal.org user account created before nominations open and with at least one login in the last year can vote. Yet, we had just 668 votes in the last election - not even a full percent! 

So now we're on a mission to make sure that the community understands the role of the board in the Drupal Project, the work that the board undertakes, and what it takes to serve on the board yourself. On Tuesday, 5 August, we held a webcast that outlines what the board does, how the elections work, and how to run. You can watch the whole thing here, and check out some of the key points, below.

  What does the Board Do?

Association board members, like all board members for US-based organizations, have three legal obligations: duty of care, duty of loyalty, and duty of obedience. In addition to these legal obligations, there is a lot of practical work that the board undertakes. These generally fall under the fiduciary responsibilities of the board and include:

  • Overseeing Financial Performance
  • Setting Strategy
  • Setingt and Reviewing Legal Policies
  • Fundraisng
  • Managing the Executive Director

To accomplish all this, the board meets each month for two hours, and comes together for the two-day retreats, usually scheduled to coincide with the North American and European Cons as well as one January or early February meeting. As a board member, you can expect to spend a minimum of five hours a month.

How do Nominations and Elections Work?

The first elections were held in 2012 after a lengthy community discussion was held to determine the specifics of who should be able to run, how voting would work, and who would be eligible to vote (among other details). The planning discussion that surfaced most of these issues is a great background read. The result is a nomination and voting process that is still in use today. 

Nominations are only accepted as self-nominations in our elections. You may not nominate another person. We accept those nominations during a short (two to three week) window, and after much outreach into the community. To nominate yourself, you need only complete a short form that asks for information such as your bio, your interest in running, what makes you a good candidate, as well as a photo and contact information.

For voting, we use the Instant Run Off method. The method of voting ensures that whoever wins is supported by a majority of voters. Voters rank candidates according to their preferences, and do not have to rank every candidate to complete their votes. Voting will be open for a week to two weeks, and any individual with a Drupal.org account before nominations open and who has logged in at least once in the prior year may vote.

Oh, and in case you're wondering, we use the Election Module to make this all happen.

Who Can Run? How do I Run? What do I do?

Anyone can run for the board, and we welcome all candidates. However, we do want to point out that serving on the board is very different than many of the other opportunities to contribute to the Drupal community. The board works at a strategic level, not a tactical one, and is often thinking one to three years out at a time. We want new board members to find ways to contribute and have a voice as quickly as possible, so we recommend that you have (or that you find) experience with any of the following types of areas:

  • Other board experience
  • Reading financial documents
  • Drupal community committee experience
  • Strategic planning
  • Policy development

However, I want to stress that NONE of these are REQUIRED to run for or serve on the board. There are many great and free resources at BoardSource and the Bridgespan Group about board service and board skills. And because elections are not for six months, you have plenty of time to get some reading under your belt!

All completed candidate self-nomination forms are published at the end of the nomination period. We call this phase "Meet the Candidates" and community members will be able to ask questions of you on your candidate profile page. Additionally, we will set up several webcasts for candidates to address community questions live, in a variety of time zones. 

When are the next elections?

In prior years, we held elections in the fall. This was difficult because it meant that most of the recruitment and meet the candidate work was done in August, when many humans in the northern hemisphere are on vacation. We've switched to a beginning of the year format which allows us to elect and ratify a candidate with plenty of time to get the onboarded and prepped to attend the DrupalCon North America retreat. Here is the schedule for the next election:

  • Community Discussion (August/September 2014)
  • Technical Setup (December/Jan)
  • Nominations (February 1-20)
  • Meet the Candidates (Feb 21 - March 6)
  • Voting (March 9 - 20)
  • Ratification & Communication (March 25)

Have more questions? Never fear! We are always happy to answer them. Leave them in the comments or send me an email.

Categories: Elsewhere

Symphony Blog: FAQ Field vs FAQ module in Drupal

Planet Drupal - Wed, 06/08/2014 - 05:20

We had been always using FAQ module to create Frequently Asked Questions for any of our projects. But on our latest theme, BizReview, we switch to a new module, FAQ Field.

FAQ is a classic module, it is there since Drupal 6. So when we have to build a FAQ section, using this module is a no brainer. This is the FAQ module in action on our Velocity theme.

 

read more

Categories: Elsewhere

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