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Jonathan Wiltshire: Getting things into Jessie (#1)

Planet Debian - Sun, 16/11/2014 - 11:35
Make it easy for us to review your request

The release team gets a lot of mail at this time in the cycle. Make it easy for us by:

  • including as much information as you can think of
    • yes, even if you think it’s too much
    • remember we have probably never seen your package before
    • if you do write a lot, include a short summary at the top
  • not deviating from the freeze policy without a really good reason
    • explain why you deviated and why it’s really good in your request
  • demonstrating that you’ve considered and checked your changes carefully
    • that’s one (but not the sole) reason we ask for a source debdiff (and assume you’ve read it yourself)

 

Getting things into Jessie (#1) is a post from: jwiltshire.org.uk | Flattr

Categories: Elsewhere

Matthew Palmer: A benefit of running an alternate init in Debian Jessie

Planet Debian - Sun, 16/11/2014 - 06:00

If you’re someone who doesn’t like Debian’s policy of automatically starting on install (or its heinous cousin, the RUN or ENABLE variable in /etc/default/<service>), then running an init system other than systemd should work out nicely.

Categories: Elsewhere

Jingjie Jiang: Start the new journey

Planet Debian - Sun, 16/11/2014 - 04:26

I’m very excited about being accepted to the Debsources project in OPW. I’ll record everything about my adventure here.

Cheers ^_^


Categories: Elsewhere

Jo Shields: mono-project.com Linux packages – an update

Planet Debian - Sat, 15/11/2014 - 17:21

It’s been pointed out to me that many people aren’t aware of the current status of Linux packages on mono-project.com, so I’m here’s a summary:

Stable packages

Mono 3.10.0, MonoDevelop 5.5.0.227, NuGet 2.8.1 and F# 3.1.1.26 packages are available. Plus related bits. MonoDevelop on Linux does not currently include the F# addin (there are a lot of pieces to get in place for this to work).

These are built for x86-64 CentOS 7, and should be compatible with RHEL 7, openSUSE 12.3, and derivatives. I haven’t set up a SUSE 1-click install file yet, but I’ll do it next week if someone reminds me.

They are also built for Debian 7 – on i386, x86-64, and IBM zSeries processors. The same packages ought to work on Ubuntu 12.04 and above, and any derivatives of Debian or Ubuntu. Due to ABI changes, you need to add a second compatibility extension repository for Ubuntu 12.04 or 12.10 to get anything to work, and a different compatibility extension repository for Debian derivatives with Apache 2.4 if you want the mod-mono ASP.NET Apache module (Debian 8+, Ubuntu 13.10+, and derivatives, will need this).

MonoDevelop 5.5 on Ubuntu 14.04

In general, see the install guide to get these going.

Docker

You may have seen Microsoft recently posting a guide to using ASP.NET 5 on Docker. Close inspection would show that this Docker image is based on our shiny new Xamarin Mono docker image, which is based on Debian 7.The full details are on Docker Hub, but the short version is “docker pull mono:latest” gets you an image with the very latest Mono.

directhex@desire:~$ docker pull mono:latest Pulling repository mono 9da8fc8d2ff5: Download complete 511136ea3c5a: Download complete f10807909bc5: Download complete f6fab3b798be: Download complete 3c43ebb7883b: Download complete 7a1f8e485667: Download complete a342319da8ea: Download complete 3774d7ea06a6: Download complete directhex@desire:~$ docker run -i -t mono:latest mono --version Mono JIT compiler version 3.10.0 (tarball Wed Nov 5 12:50:04 UTC 2014) Copyright (C) 2002-2014 Novell, Inc, Xamarin Inc and Contributors. www.mono-project.com TLS: __thread SIGSEGV: altstack Notifications: epoll Architecture: amd64 Disabled: none Misc: softdebug LLVM: supported, not enabled. GC: sgen

The Dockerfiles are on GitHub.

Categories: Elsewhere

Andrew Cater: Formal key transitiion to 4096 bit key

Planet Debian - Sat, 15/11/2014 - 13:37
Following mini-Debconf and submitting my key to keyring-maint, here's a copy of the note marking the transition. I do retain a copy of the old key: it has not been compromised or revoked (until I'm sure my new key reaches the Debian keyring) and my vote in the GR is validly signed with the old key.

Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 08:11:53 +0000
From: "Andrew M.A. Cater"
To: keyring@rt.debian.org
Subject: Debian RT - new key for amacater
User-Agent: Mutt/1.5.23 (2014-03-12)

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

pub   1024D/E93ADE7B 2001-07-04
      Key fingerprint = F3FA 2752 1327 7904 846D  C0DE 3233 C127 E93A DE7B
uid                  Andrew Cater (Andrew M.A. Cater)
sub   1024g/E8C8CC00 2001-07-04

pub   4096R/22EF1F0F 2014-08-29
      Key fingerprint = 5596 5E39 93E0 6E2B 5BA5  CD84 4AA8 FC24 22EF 1F0F
uid                  Andrew M.A. Cater (Andy Cater)
uid                  Andrew M.A. Cater (non-Debian email)
sub   4096R/923AB77E 2014-08-29


This is intended to replace the old key by the new key as part of a key transition from old, insecure keys

All the best,

AndyC
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG v1

iEYEARECAAYFAlRipvgACgkQMjPBJ+k63nvaQACeM9OpQsFb2qzsmNRPH6fwLh5M
zhIAn19XSkKYF85Tj2kvuC5wl7PVSYPS

This because Google (and Planet Debian) are more reliable than my email inbox.

[Keys exchanged at the mini-Debconf have now been signed with the new 4096 bit key]

AndyC
Categories: Elsewhere

Don Armstrong: Adding a newcomer (⎈) tag to the BTS

Planet Debian - Sat, 15/11/2014 - 04:14

Some of you may already be aware of the gift tag which has been used for a while to indicate bugs which are suitable for new contributors to use as an entry point to working on specific packages. Unfortunately, some of us (including me!) were unaware that this tag even existed.

Luckily, Lucas Nussbaum clued me in to the existence of this tag, and after a brief bike-shed-naming thread, and some voting using pocket_devotee we decided to name the new tag newcomer, and I have now added this tag to the BTS documentation, and tagged all of the bugs which were user tagged "gift" with this tag.

If you have bugs in your package which you think are ideal for new contributors to Debian (or your package) to fix, please tag them newcomer. If you're getting started in Debian, and working on bugs to fix, please search for the newcomer tag, grab the helm, and contribute to Debian.

Categories: Elsewhere

Don Armstrong: Virginia King selected for Debbugs FOSS Outreach Program for Women

Planet Debian - Sat, 15/11/2014 - 01:23

I'm glad to announce that Virginia King has been selected as one of the three interns for this round of the FOSS Outreach Program for women. Starting December 9th, and continuing until March 9th, she'll be working on improving the documentation of Debian's bug tracking system.

The initial goal is to develop a Bug Triager Howto to help new contributors to Debian jump in and help existing teams triage bugs. We'll be getting in touch with some of the larger teams in Debian to help make this document as useful as possible. If you're a member of a team in Debian who would like this howto to address your specific workflow, please drop me an e-mail, and we'll keep you in the loop.

The secondary goals for this project are to:

  • Improve documentation under http://www.debian.org/Bugs
  • Document of bug-tags and categories
  • Improve upstream debbugs documentation
Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Association News: Don't Miss the Blink Reaction Membership Discount

Planet Drupal - Fri, 14/11/2014 - 23:09

At the Drupal Association, we love our members and want to show it. That’s why we team up with some of the best Drupal companies around every month to offer our members spectacular discounts.

This month, we’re pleased to announce that  Drupal Association Members can receive 30% off Blink Institute training classes from Blink Reaction. Using the discount code here, Drupal Association members can access fantastic training from Blink, led by veteran Drupalists who are expert trainers. Note: this offer can not be combined with other promotional offers.

Blink Reaction is a premiere provider of enterprise Drupal services to Fortune 1000 companies throughout the US. Their Drupal Training program is designed to help individuals, Enterprise service providers and small business owners harness the power of Drupal.

The Blink Training program has taught beginner and advanced methods to hundreds of individuals and corporations. Blink is proud to offer free and nearly free training through Global Drupal Training Days and at Drupal Camps alongside their public and private training offerings.

Make sure you take advantage of this great opportunity while it lasts. Kudos to our friends over at Blink -- thanks for sharing the Drupal love!

Categories: Elsewhere

Code Karate: Drupal 7 Imagefield Focus

Planet Drupal - Fri, 14/11/2014 - 22:31
Episode Number: 178

In this episode we look at the Imagefield Focus Module. This module adds another option to the image styles on a content type field. With this module you are able to specify a focus and crop area of your image. Once you have selected either or both of those areas the module then resizes and focuses on the certain area you specified.

Tags: DrupalFieldsDrupal 7Image HandlingDrupal PlanetUI/Design
Categories: Elsewhere

Midwestern Mac, LLC: Creating a contact form programmatically in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - Fri, 14/11/2014 - 19:24

Drupal 8's expanded and broadly-used Entity API extends even to Contact Forms, and recently I needed to create a contact form programmatically as part of Honeypot's test suite. Normally, you can export a contact form as part of your site configuration, then when it's imported in a different site/environment, it will be set up simply and easily.

However, if you need to create a contact form programmatically (in code, dynamically), it's a rather simple affair:

First, use Drupal's ContactForm class at the top of the file so you can use the class in your code later:

Categories: Elsewhere

Drupal Association News: Happy Global Training Day!

Planet Drupal - Fri, 14/11/2014 - 18:39

It's Global Training Day and we couldn't be more excited! All across the world, people are teaching and learning Drupal, and sharing that open source love.

Global Training Days happen once a quarter, and focus on one of two curriculums:

  • "Introduction to Drupal," a full day training on the basics of Drupal. Attendees will leave having successfully built a Drupal site. It is ideal for those interested in exploring Drupal as a career path.
  • "What is Drupal?" This half-day workshop will address the basics of Drupal, and will give an overview to those interested in evaluating or implementing Drupal.

Here are some of the highlights of today's Global Training Day tweets.

The first Global #Drupal Training Day Hungary is ON! @tanarurkerem and @kuszingjanos on the stage :) cc @DrupalAssoc pic.twitter.com/DGt1yvFuPg

— Zsófi M. (@zsofimajor) November 14, 2014

We are ready #drupalday!!! pic.twitter.com/ezIIl1aNHC

— Wellnet (@Wellnet) November 14, 2014

#DrupalCampMelbourne2014 Day 1 Group Photo in sunny Melbourne! pic.twitter.com/DgFh9Wcb7I

— Drupal Melbourne (@DrupalMelbourne) November 14, 2014

Where's Global Training Day happening? This map shows you where people are learning about Drupal all over the world.

Categories: Elsewhere

Paul Booker: How to create Blocks in Drupal 7

Planet Drupal - Fri, 14/11/2014 - 18:28
// $Id$ /** * @file * Implements various blocks to improve pending content workflow. */ /** * Implements hook_block_info(). */ function approval_block_info() { $blocks['pending_comments'] = array( 'info' => t('Pending Comments'), 'status' => TRUE, 'region' => 'sidebar_first', 'weight' => 0, ); $blocks['unpublished_nodes'] = array( 'info' => t('Unpublished Nodes'), 'status' => TRUE, 'region' => 'sidebar_first', 'weight' => 0, ); return $blocks; } /** * Implements hook_block_configure(). */ function approval_block_configure($delta) { $form = array(); switch($delta) { case 'pending_comments': $form['pending_comment_count'] = array( '#type' => 'textfield', '#title' => t('Configure Number of Comments to Display'), '#size' => 6, '#description' => t('Enter the number of pending comments that will appear in the block.'), '#default_value' => variable_get('pending_comment_count', 5), ); break; case 'unpublished_nodes': $form['unpublished_node_count'] = array( '#type' => 'textfield', '#title' => t('Configure Number of Nodes to Display'), '#size' => 6, '#description' => t('Enter the number of unpublished nodes that will appear in the block.'), '#default_value' => variable_get('unpublished_node_count', 5), ); break; } return $form; } /** * Implements hook_block_save(). */ function approval_block_save($delta = '', $edit = array()) { switch($delta) { case 'pending_comments': variable_set('pending_comment_count', (int)$edit['pending_comment_count']); break; case 'unpublished_nodes': variable_set('unpublished_node_count', (int)$edit['unpublished_node_count']); break; } return; } /** * Implements hook_block_view(). */ function approval_block_view($delta = '') { switch ($delta) { case 'pending_comments': $block['subject'] = t('Pending Comments'); $block['content'] = approval_block_contents($delta); return $block; break; case 'unpublished_nodes': $block['subject'] = t('Unpublished Nodes'); $block['content'] = approval_block_contents($delta); return $block; break; } } /** * A module-defined block content function. */ function approval_block_contents($delta) { switch ($delta) { case 'pending_comments': if (user_access('administer comments')) { $nbr_comments = variable_get('pending_comment_count'); $result = db_query("SELECT cid, subject FROM {comment} WHERE status = 0 limit $nbr_comments"); $items = array(); foreach ($result as $row) { $items[] = l($row->subject, 'comment/'.$row->cid.'/edit'); } return array('#markup' => theme('item_list', array('items' => $items))); } break; case 'unpublished_nodes': if (user_access('administer nodes')) { $nbr_nodes = variable_get('unpublished_node_count'); $result = db_query("SELECT nid, title FROM {node} WHERE status = 0 limit $nbr_nodes"); $items = array(); foreach ($result as $row) { $items[] = l($row->title, 'node/'.$row->nid.'/edit'); } return array('#markup' => theme('item_list', array('items' => $items))); } break; } } Tags: URL: paulbooker / gist:5420976
Categories: Elsewhere

Richard Hartmann: Release Critical Bug report for Week 46

Planet Debian - Fri, 14/11/2014 - 17:34

I know I promised better stats, but meh... Next week :(

As you can see, there's been a bit of a mass-filing going on. and that pushed ys above Wheezy's count for week 46.

My own personal favourite bug is, of course, this one.

The UDD bugs interface currently knows about the following release critical bugs:

  • In Total: 1263 (Including 218 bugs affecting key packages)
    • Affecting Jessie: 427 (key packages: 175) That's the number we need to get down to zero before the release. They can be split in two big categories:
      • Affecting Jessie and unstable: 313 (key packages: 131) Those need someone to find a fix, or to finish the work to upload a fix to unstable:
        • 33 bugs are tagged 'patch'. (key packages: 15) Please help by reviewing the patches, and (if you are a DD) by uploading them.
        • 12 bugs are marked as done, but still affect unstable. (key packages: 6) This can happen due to missing builds on some architectures, for example. Help investigate!
        • 268 bugs are neither tagged patch, nor marked done. (key packages: 110) Help make a first step towards resolution!
      • Affecting Jessie only: 114 (key packages: 44) Those are already fixed in unstable, but the fix still needs to migrate to Jessie. You can help by submitting unblock requests for fixed packages, by investigating why packages do not migrate, or by reviewing submitted unblock requests.
        • 82 bugs are in packages that are unblocked by the release team. (key packages: 32)
        • 32 bugs are in packages that are not unblocked. (key packages: 12)

How do we compare to the Squeeze release cycle?

Week Squeeze Wheezy Diff 43 284 (213+71) 468 (332+136) +184 (+119/+65) 44 261 (201+60) 408 (265+143) +147 (+64/+83) 45 261 (205+56) 425 (291+134) +164 (+86/+78) 46 271 (200+71) 401 (258+143) +130 (+58/+72) 47 283 (209+74) 366 (221+145) +83 (+12/+71) 48 256 (177+79) 378 (230+148) +122 (+53/+69) 49 256 (180+76) 360 (216+155) +104 (+36/+79) 50 204 (148+56) 339 (195+144) +135 (+47/+90) 51 178 (124+54) 323 (190+133) +145 (+66/+79) 52 115 (78+37) 289 (190+99) +174 (+112/+62) 1 93 (60+33) 287 (171+116) +194 (+111/+83) 2 82 (46+36) 271 (162+109) +189 (+116/+73) 3 25 (15+10) 249 (165+84) +224 (+150/+74) 4 14 (8+6) 244 (176+68) +230 (+168/+62) 5 2 (0+2) 224 (132+92) +222 (+132/+90) 6 release! 212 (129+83) +212 (+129/+83) 7 release+1 194 (128+66) +194 (+128/+66) 8 release+2 206 (144+62) +206 (+144/+62) 9 release+3 174 (105+69) +174 (+105/+69) 10 release+4 120 (72+48) +120 (+72/+48) 11 release+5 115 (74+41) +115 (+74/+41) 12 release+6 93 (47+46) +93 (+47/+46) 13 release+7 50 (24+26) +50 (+24/+26) 14 release+8 51 (32+19) +51 (+32/+19) 15 release+9 39 (32+7) +39 (+32/+7) 16 release+10 20 (12+8) +20 (+12/+8) 17 release+11 24 (19+5) +24 (+19/+5) 18 release+12 2 (2+0) +2 (+2/+0)

Graphical overview of bug stats thanks to azhag:

Categories: Elsewhere

Paul Booker: How to create an autocomplete form element in Drupal 7

Planet Drupal - Fri, 14/11/2014 - 17:22
<?php function demo_menu() { $items['demo-autocomplete-test'] = array( 'title' => 'Test autocomplete', 'page callback' => 'drupal_get_form', 'page arguments' => array('demo_form'), 'access arguments' => array('view published content'), 'type' => MENU_NORMAL_ITEM, ); $items['demo-autocomplete-engine'] = array( 'page callback' => 'demo_autocomplete', 'access arguments' => array('view published content'), 'type' => MENU_CALLBACK, ); return $items; } function demo_form($form, &$form_state) { $form = array(); $form['colors'] = array( '#title' => t('Colors'), '#type' => 'textfield', '#maxlength' => 60, '#autocomplete_path' => 'demo-autocomplete-engine', ); $form['submit'] = array( '#type' => 'submit', '#value' => 'Submit', ); return $form; } function demo_autocomplete($text) { $results = array(); $query = db_select('colors', 'c'); $query ->condition('c.color', '%' . db_like($text) . '%', 'LIKE') ->fields('c', array('color')) ->orderBy('color', 'ASC'); $colors = $query->execute(); foreach ($colors as $row) { $results[$row->color] = check_plain($row->color); } drupal_json_output($results); } Tags:
Categories: Elsewhere

MariqueCalcus: Prius is in Beta like Drupal :-)

Planet Drupal - Fri, 14/11/2014 - 17:05

Alongside the long awaited Drupal 8 Beta release, we have also updated our first Drupal 8 theme. We haven't include many new features but we have tried to clean up its code and have improved our starter kit. Anyway, let's dig into the latest new features we have discovered with the first Beta releases of Drupal 8. Feel free to check out the code on drupal.org or read our dedicated blog entry if you want to find out more about our first Drupal 8 theme. If you can wait to see the result, take a look at our online demo.

Read More...
Categories: Elsewhere

Blue Drop Shop: Failing is Important: Drupal Camp A/V Kit Update

Planet Drupal - Fri, 14/11/2014 - 15:17

When I learned BADCamp wasn't going to be recording sessions, I jumped at the chance to field-test the camp record kits I'm working on. After all, I was confident I fixed the audio equation and was going to start talks with the Drupal Association about next steps.

The current recipe for the kit is a Hauppage HD Rocket PVR for the screen capture and the Zoom H2N voice recorder as the microphone. Add to that a handful of dongles and converters to cover HDMI in/out for the PVR, and you're good to go.

Walking in to BADCamp, I was feeling great. I'm a big advocate for session records and I would be covering three rooms. Pretty cool, right? 

Wrong.

Throughout day one of sessions, a couple laptops had connection issues and had to bypass recordings, but overall things appeared to be going smoothly. It wasn't until the end of the day when copying files off the thumb drives that I noticed many recordings were 0k mp4 files, primarily from the main room. This was the most disconcerting, because every indication was that things were working.

On this, I have a couple ideas, but no solid understanding of why the files didn't write. That was the easiest room in terms of handshake between PVR and projector, plus there was a dedicated A/V crew that was helping hook up laptops.

When we tested at Fox Valley's camp, the laptop was typically disconnected by the time I made it to the rooms to swap out equipment. I suspect that disconnecting the device before hitting the stop button and waiting long enough for the files to write may kill the save. This one will be easy to test.

Projectors were also an issue. In the main space, none were HD and all were different flavors of Sony. Some hooked up just fine, while others squeezed the output. The Saturday-only keynote room was loving it. 

And then there were presenter laptop issues. There were a few older VGA-only laptops. One refused to work with the VGA to HDMI converted, while one worked for about 15 minutes before failing off and on, mid-presentation. One of the A/V techs suggested that maybe there is not enough USB power on the laptops to handle both the PVR and the converter, so a powered USB hub may be in order. Most Macbooks were fine, but a handful gave output with a very green tint to it.

No surprise, HDMI in/out is proving to be more of a hurdle than originally anticipated. In addition to HDMI in, the PVR also has an option to accept component video. It's likely that converting VGA out from a laptop to component video in to the PVR will be a safer bet. So the question becomes whether I can convert the HDMI out of the PVR to VGA for the projectors.   

All in all, this was an enormous fail. That said, this was the absolute best time for it to happen. My goal is to build a system that can handle the majority of the random that a camp will throw at it. 

I'm looking forward to testing the next iteration.

Tags:
Categories: Elsewhere

Tyler Frankenstein: Build a Mobile App to Geo Locate Nearby Places with Drupal

Planet Drupal - Fri, 14/11/2014 - 13:30

In this tutorial (for DrupalCamp Ohio 2014) we'll explore how to build a mobile application and website that can geo locate places near our current position. The nearby location results will be displayed on a map, and will allow us to click on a result item to view its complete details.

The website will be powered by Drupal 7. The mobile application will be built using DrupalGap, which is powered by PhoneGap and jQuery Mobile. Let's get started!

Categories: Elsewhere

InternetDevels: Welcome us in Lviv! New office of InternetDevels company

Planet Drupal - Fri, 14/11/2014 - 13:11

Long time ago in a galaxy far far away… Hold on, it was precisely 7 years ago, 15 November, 2007 in Lutsk, when the InternetDevels Drupal development studio was founded. The company has made a long way since then: overcomed lots of obstacles to gain the respected position at web development market; established number of contacts and connections; made significant contribution to the world’s Drupal community; taken over new development technologies, like Symfony framework… But there’s always something to do!

Read more
Categories: Elsewhere

Debian Med: Bits from Debian Med team (by Andreas Tille)

Planet Debian - Fri, 14/11/2014 - 07:50
New set of metapackages

The version number of debian-med metapackages was bumped to 1.99 as a signal that we plan to release version 2.0 with Jessie. As usual the metapackages will be recreated shortly before the final release to include potential changes in the package pool. Feel free to install the metapackages med-* with the package installer of your choice.

As always you can have a look at the packages in our focus by visiting our tasks pages. Please note that there may be new packages that aren’t ready for release and that won’t be installed by using the current metapackages. This is because we don’t stop packaging software when the current testing is in freeze.

Some support for Hospital Information Systems

This release contains, for the first time some support for Hospital Information Systems (HIS) with the dependency fis-gtm of the med-his metapackage. This was made possible due to the work of Luis Ibanez (at kitware at the time when working on the packaging) and Amul Shah (fisglobal). Thanks to a fruitful cooperation between upstream FIS and Debian the build system of fis-gtm was adapted to enable an easier packaging.

The availability of fis-gtm will simplify running Vista-foia on Debian systems and we are finally working on packaging Vista as well to make Debian fit for running inside hospitals.

There was some interesting work done by Emilien Klein who was working hard to get GNUHealthpackaged. Emilien has given a detailed explanation on the Debian Med mailing list giving reasons why he removed the existing packages from the Debian package pool again. While this is a shame for GNUHealth users there might be an opportunity to revive this effort if there was better coordination between upstream and Tryton (which is the framework GNUHealth is based upon). In any case the packaging code in SVN as a useful resource to base private packages on. Feel free to contact us via the Debian Med mailing list if you consider creating GNUHealth Debian packages.

Packages moved from non-free to main

The Debian Med team worked hard to finally enable DFSG free licenses for PHYLIPand other package based on this tool. PHYLIP is well known in bioinformatics and actually one of the first packages in this field inside Debian (oldest changelog entry 28 Aug 1998). Since then it was considered non-free because its use was restricted to scientific / non-commercial use and also has the condition that you need to pay a fee to the University of Washington if you intend to use it commercially.

Since Debian Med was started we were in continuous discussion with the author Joe Felsenstein. We even started an online petition to show how large the interest in a DFSG free PHYLIP might be. As a side note: This petition was *not* presented to the authors since they happily decided to move to a free license because of previous discussion and since they realised that the money they "gained" over they years was only minimal. The petition is mentioned here to demonstrate that it is possible to gather support to see positive changes implemented that benefit all users and that this approach can be used for similar cases.

So finally PHYLIP was released in September under a BSD-2-clause license and in turn SeaView (a similarly famous program and also long term non-free citizen) depending on PHYLIP code was freed as well. There are several other tools like python-biopython and python-cogent which are calling PHYLIP if it exists. So not only is PHYLIP freed we can now stop removing those parts of the test suites of these other tools that are using PHYLIP.

Thanks to all who participated in freeing PHYLIP specifically its author Joe Felsenstein.

Autopkgtest in Debian Med packages

We tried hard to add autopkgtests to all packages where some upstream test suite exists and we also tried to create some tests on our own. Since we consider testing of scientific software a very important feature this work was highly focused on for the Jessie release. When doing so we were able to drastically enhance the reliability of packages and found new formerly hidden dependency relations. Perhaps the hardest work was to run the full test suite of python-biopython which also has uncovered some hidden bugs in the upstream code on architectures that are not so frequently used in the field of bioinformatics. This was made possible by the very good support of upstream who were very helpful in solving the issues we reported.

However, we are not at 100% coverage of autopkgtest and we will keep on working on our packages in the next release cycle for Jessie+1.

General quality assurance

A general inspection of all Debian Med packages was done to check all packages which were uploaded before the Wheezy release and never touched since then. Those packages where checked for changed upstream locations which might have been hidden from uscan and in some cases new upstream releases were spotted by doing this investigation. Other old packages were re-uploaded conforming to current policy and packaging tools also polishing lintian issues.

Publication with Debian Med involvement

The Debian Med team is involved in a paper which is in BioMed Central (in press). The title will be "Community-driven development for computational biology at Sprints, Hackathons and Codefests"

Updated team metrics

The team metrics graphs on the Debian Med Blend entry page were updated. At the bottom you will find a 3D Bar chart of dependencies of selected metapackages over different versions. It shows our continuous work in several fields. Thanks to all Debian Med team members for their rigorous work on our common goal to make Debian the best operating system for medicine and biology.

Please note that VCS stat calculation is currently broken and does not reflect the latest commits this year.

Blends installable via d-i?

In bug #758116 it is requested to list all Blends and thus also Debian Med in the initial tasksel selection. This would solve a long term open issue which was addessed more than eleven years ago (in #186085) in a more general and better way. This would add a frequently requested feature by our users who always wonder how to install Debian Med.

While there is no final decision on bug #758116 and we are quite late with the request to get this implemented in Jessie feel free to contribute ideas so that this selection of Blends can be done in the best possible manner.

Debian Med Bug Squashing Advent Calendar 2014

The Debian Med team will again do the Bug Squashing Advent Calendar. Feel free to join us in our bug squashing effort where we close bugs while other people are opening doors. :-)

Categories: Elsewhere

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