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Richard Hartmann: Release Critical Bug report for Week 51

Planet Debian - ven, 19/12/2014 - 17:25

Real life has been interesting as of late; as you can see, I didn't post bug stats last week. If you have specific data from last Friday, please let me know and I will update.

The UDD bugs interface currently knows about the following release critical bugs:

  • In Total: 1095 (Including 179 bugs affecting key packages)
    • Affecting Jessie: 189 (key packages: 117) That's the number we need to get down to zero before the release. They can be split in two big categories:
      • Affecting Jessie and unstable: 134 (key packages: 90) Those need someone to find a fix, or to finish the work to upload a fix to unstable:
        • 32 bugs are tagged 'patch'. (key packages: 24) Please help by reviewing the patches, and (if you are a DD) by uploading them.
        • 13 bugs are marked as done, but still affect unstable. (key packages: 9) This can happen due to missing builds on some architectures, for example. Help investigate!
        • 89 bugs are neither tagged patch, nor marked done. (key packages: 57) Help make a first step towards resolution!
      • Affecting Jessie only: 55 (key packages: 27) Those are already fixed in unstable, but the fix still needs to migrate to Jessie. You can help by submitting unblock requests for fixed packages, by investigating why packages do not migrate, or by reviewing submitted unblock requests.
        • 29 bugs are in packages that are unblocked by the release team. (key packages: 11)
        • 26 bugs are in packages that are not unblocked. (key packages: 16)

How do we compare to the Squeeze release cycle?

Week Squeeze Wheezy Jessie 43 284 (213+71) 468 (332+136) 319 (240+79) 44 261 (201+60) 408 (265+143) 274 (224+50) 45 261 (205+56) 425 (291+134) 295 (229+66) 46 271 (200+71) 401 (258+143) 427 (313+114) 47 283 (209+74) 366 (221+145) 342 (260+82) 48 256 (177+79) 378 (230+148) 274 (189+85) 49 256 (180+76) 360 (216+155) 226 (147+79) 50 204 (148+56) 339 (195+144) ??? 51 178 (124+54) 323 (190+133) 189 (134+55) 52 115 (78+37) 289 (190+99) 1 93 (60+33) 287 (171+116) 2 82 (46+36) 271 (162+109) 3 25 (15+10) 249 (165+84) 4 14 (8+6) 244 (176+68) 5 2 (0+2) 224 (132+92) 6 release! 212 (129+83) 7 release+1 194 (128+66) 8 release+2 206 (144+62) 9 release+3 174 (105+69) 10 release+4 120 (72+48) 11 release+5 115 (74+41) 12 release+6 93 (47+46) 13 release+7 50 (24+26) 14 release+8 51 (32+19) 15 release+9 39 (32+7) 16 release+10 20 (12+8) 17 release+11 24 (19+5) 18 release+12 2 (2+0)

Graphical overview of bug stats thanks to azhag:

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Annertech: Code that makes Programmers Perform

Planet Drupal - ven, 19/12/2014 - 16:36
Code that makes Programmers Perform

Code that performs well should be an assumption, not a requirement. I've never had a client ask me, “will your code make my site run slower?" Clients just assume that I'm going to deliver a codebase that does not hold things up.

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Steve Kemp: Switched to using attic for backups

Planet Debian - ven, 19/12/2014 - 14:51

Even though seeing the word attic reminds me too much of leaking roofs and CVS, I've switched to using the attic backup tool.

I want a simple system which will take incremental backups, perform duplication-elimination (to avoid taking too much space), support encryption, and be fast.

I stopped using backup2l because the .tar.gz files were too annoying, and it was too slow. I started using obnam because I respect Lars and his exceptionally thorough testing-regime, but had to stop using it when things started getting "too slow".

I'll document the usage/installation in the future. For the moment the only annoyance is that it is contained in the Jessie archive, not the Wheezy one. Right now only 2/19 of my hosts are Jessie.

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Petter Reinholdtsen: Of course USA loses in cyber war - NSA and friends made sure it would happen

Planet Debian - ven, 19/12/2014 - 13:10

So, Sony caved in (according to Rob Lowe) and demonstrated that America lost its first cyberwar (according to Newt Gingrich). It should not surprise anyone, after the whistle blower Edward Snowden documented that the government of USA and their allies for many years have done their best to make sure the technology used by its citizens is filled with security holes allowing the secret services to spy on its own population. No one in their right minds could believe that the ability to snoop on the people all over the globe could only be used by the personnel authorized to do so by the president of the United States of America. If the capabilities are there, they will be used by friend and foe alike, and now they are being used to bring Sony on its knees.

I doubt it will a lesson learned, and expect USA to lose its next cyber war too, given how eager the western intelligence communities (and probably the non-western too, but it is less in the news) seem to be to continue its current dragnet surveillance practice.

There is a reason why China and others are trying to move away from Windows to Linux and other alternatives, and it is not to avoid sending its hard earned dollars to Cayman Islands (or whatever tax haven Microsoft is using these days to collect the majority of its income. :)

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Petter Reinholdtsen: Of course USA looses in cyber war - NSA and friends made sure it would happen

Planet Debian - ven, 19/12/2014 - 13:10

So, Sony caved in (according to Rob Lowe) and demonstrated that America lost its first cyberwar (according to Newt Gingrich). It should not surprise anyone, after the whistle blower Edward Snowden documented that the government of USA and their allies for many years have done their best to make sure the technology used by its citizens is filled with security holes allowing the secret services to spy on its own population. No one in their right minds could believe that the ability to snoop on the people all over the globe could only be used by the personnel authorized to do so by the president of the United States of America. If the capabilities are there, they will be used by friend and foe alike, and now they are being used to bring Sony on its knees.

I doubt it will a lesson learned, and expect USA to loose its next cyber war too, given how eager the western intelligence communities (and probably the non-western too, but it is less in the news) seem to be to continue its current dragnet surveillance practice.

There is a reason why China and others are trying to move away from Windows to Linux and other alternatives, and it is not to avoid sending its hard earned dollars to Cayman Islands (or whatever tax haven Microsoft is using these days to collect the majority of its income. :)

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Dirk Eddelbuettel: Rocker is now the official R image for Docker

Planet Debian - ven, 19/12/2014 - 13:03

Something happened a little while ago which we did not have time to commensurate properly. Our Rocker image for R is now the official R image for Docker itself. So getting R (via Docker) is now as simple as saying docker pull r-base.

This particular container is essentially just the standard r-base Debian package for R (which is one of a few I maintain there) plus a mininal set of extras. This r-base forms the basis of our other containers as e.g. the rather popular r-studio container wrapping the excellent RStudio Server.

A lot of work went into this. Carl and I also got a tremendous amount of help from the good folks at Docker. Details are as always at the Rocker repo at GitHub.

Docker itself continues to make great strides, and it has been great fun help to help along. With this post I achieved another goal: blog about Docker with an image not containing shipping containers. Just kidding.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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Kenshi Muto: smart "apt" command

Planet Debian - ven, 19/12/2014 - 11:12

During evaluating Jessie, I found 'apt' command and noticed it was pretty good for novice-usual users.

Usage: apt [options] command CLI for apt. Basic commands: list - list packages based on package names search - search in package descriptions show - show package details update - update list of available packages install - install packages remove - remove packages upgrade - upgrade the system by installing/upgrading packages full-upgrade - upgrade the system by removing/installing/upgrading packages edit-sources - edit the source information file

'apt list' is like a combination of 'dpkg -l' + 'apt-cache pkgnames'. 'apt search' is a bit slower than 'apt-cache search' but provides with useful information. 'apt show' formats bytesizes and hides some (for experts) fields. install/remove/upgrade/full-upgrade are mostly same as apt-get. 'apt edit-sources' opens a editor and checks the integrity.

So, I'd like to recommend 'apt' command to Debian users.

Well, why did I write this entry...? ;) I found a mistranslation I had made in ja.po of apt. Because it is critical mistranslation (Japanese users will confuse by it), I want to fix it strongly.

Dear apt deity maintainers, could you consider to update apt for Jessie? (#772678. FYI there are other translation updates also: #772913, #771982, and #771967)

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Enrico Zini: upgrade-encrypted-cyanogenmod

Planet Debian - ven, 19/12/2014 - 10:21
Upgrade Cyanogenmod with an encrypted phone

Cyanogenmod found an update, it downloaded it, then it rebooted to install it and nothing happened. It turns out that the update procedure cannot work if the zip file to install is in encrypted media, so a workaround is to move the zip into unencrypted external storage.

As far as I know, my Nexus 4 has no unencrypted external storage.

This is how I managed to upgrade it, I write it here so I can find it next time:

  1. enable USB debugging
  2. adb pull /cmupdater/cm-11-20141115-SNAPSHOT-M12-mako.zip
  3. adb reboot recovery
  4. choose "install zip from sideload"
  5. adb sideload cm-11-20141115-SNAPSHOT-M12-mako.zip
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Wouter Verhelst: Introducing libjoy

Planet Debian - ven, 19/12/2014 - 00:29

I've owned a Logitech Wingman Gamepad Extreme since pretty much forever, and although it's been battered over the years, it's still mostly functional. As a gamepad, it has 10 buttons. What's special about it, though, is that the device also has a mode in which a gravity sensor kicks in and produces two extra axes, allowing me to pretend I'm really talking to a joystick. It looks a bit weird though, since you end up playing your games by wobbling the gamepad around a bit.

About 10 years ago, I first learned how to write GObjects by writing a GObject-based joystick API. Unfortunately, I lost the code at some point due to an overzealous rm -rf call. I had planned to rewrite it, but that never really happened.

About a year back, I needed to write a user interface for a customer where a joystick would be a major part of the interaction. The code there was written in Qt, so I write an event-based joystick API in Qt. As it happened, I also noticed that jstest would output names for the actual buttons and axes; I had never noticed this, because due to my 10 buttons and 4 axes, which by default produce a lot of output, the jstest program would just scroll the names off my screen whenever I plugged it in. But the names are there, and it's not too difficult.

Refreshing my memory on the joystick API made me remember how much fun it is, and I wrote the beginnings of what I (at the time) called "libgjs", for "Gobject JoyStick". I didn't really finish it though, until today. I did notice in the mean time that someone else released GObject bindings for javascript and also called that gjs, so in the interest of avoiding confusion I decided to rename my library to libjoy. Not only will this allow me all kinds of interesting puns like "today I am releasing more joy", it also makes for a more compact API (compare joy_stick_open() against gjs_joystick_open()).

The library also comes with a libjoy-gtk that creates a GtkListStore* which is automatically updated as joysticks are added and removed to the system; and a joytest program, a graphical joystick test program which also serves as an example of how to use the API.

still TODO:

  • Clean up the API a bit. There's a bit too much use of GError in there.
  • Improve the UI. I suck at interface design. Patches are welcome.
  • Differentiate between JS_EVENT_INIT kernel-level events, and normal events.
  • Improve the documentation to the extent that gtk-doc (and, thus, GObject-Introspection) will work.

What's there is functional, though.

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Gregor Herrmann: GDAC 2014/18

Planet Debian - jeu, 18/12/2014 - 23:01

what constantly fascinates me in debian is that people sit at home, have an idea, work on it, & then suddenly present it to an unexpecting public; all without prior announcements or discussions, & totally apart from any hot discussion-de-jour. the last example I encountered & tried out just now is the option to edit source packages online & submit patches. - I hope we as a project can keep up with this creativity!

this posting is part of GDAC (gregoa's debian advent calendar), a project to show the bright side of debian & why it's fun for me to contribute.

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Mediacurrent: New Year's Resolutions: Drupal Edition

Planet Drupal - jeu, 18/12/2014 - 22:46

Lose weight. Eat better. Run a 5K. Travel more. These are resolutions we all make year after year. But this year, we challenged our team to think outside the box and inside the drop. Now that 2014 has come and gone, and we prepare to countdown to 2015, we asked our team what they are looking to accomplish in Drupal in the New Year.

“Get more of my modules out for D8.” - Andrew Riley

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John Goerzen: Aerial Photos: Our Little House on the Prairie

Planet Debian - jeu, 18/12/2014 - 19:37

This was my first attempt to send up the quadcopter in winter. It’s challenging to take good photos of a snowy landscape anyway. Add to that the fact that the camera is flying, and it’s cold, which is hard on batteries and motors. I was rather amazed at how well it did!

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Drupal Watchdog: At Your Request

Planet Drupal - jeu, 18/12/2014 - 19:29
Feature

In the beginning there was the Common Gateway Interface, commonly known as CGI – a standard approach used to dynamically generate web pages. Originally devised in 1993 by the NCSA team and formally defined by RFC 3875 in 2004, CGI 1.1 took seven years to go from the original RFC to an endorsed standard.

In 1994, not long after the original CGI standard was documented by NCSA, Rasmus Lerdorf created Personal Home Page tools (PHP Tools), an implementation of the Common Gateway Interface written in C. After going through a number of iterations and name-changes this grew to be the PHP language we know and love.

One of PHP's strengths was the way in which it made many of the request and server specific variables, as defined by the CGI standard, easy to access – through the use of superglobals, namely $_POST, $_GET, and $_SERVER. Each of these is an associative array. In the case of $_POST, the request body is parsed for you and turned into an array of user-submitted values, keyed by field name, and conveniently supporting nested arrays. Similarly for $_GET, the query string is parsed by PHP and turned into a keyed array. In the case of $_SERVER, the gamut of server-specific variables are available for your script to interrogate.

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Blink Reaction: Try Drupal 8 now

Planet Drupal - jeu, 18/12/2014 - 19:08

You may have heard and read a lot about Drupal 8 lately, without much support to go along with it. Well here at Blink Reaction, we are working on changing that and contributing as much help as we can to the community with the issues that we’ve come across so far in Drupal 8. In this post I will show you how you can try Drupal 8 by installing dependencies such as composer and drush so you can have a Drupal 8 site running on your local machine.

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Cheeky Monkey Media: My BADCamp 2014 Experience

Planet Drupal - jeu, 18/12/2014 - 18:00

I have been privileged to be able to attend a number of conferences and events, such as DrupalCon Austin, Portland etc,  since we started Cheeky Monkey Media. In the past, we’ve talked about having your DrupalCon Survival kit prepared before you head out the door to help make...Read More

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Blair Wadman: What is a Drupal developer?

Planet Drupal - jeu, 18/12/2014 - 15:30

As the Drupal market continues to rock and roll, more and more clients need "Drupal Developers". But what exactly is a Drupal Developer? A Drupal Developer is someone who knows Drupal right? Right?!

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Drupalize.Me: Adventures in Porting a D7 Form Module to Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - jeu, 18/12/2014 - 14:26

Got some Drupal 7 modules that use the Form API lying around? Want to learn how to port them to Drupal 8? The process could just be the crash course you've been looking for in Drupal 8, object-oriented, module development.

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Code Karate: Drupal 7 Rules Filter: Manage and search your Drupal rules

Planet Drupal - jeu, 18/12/2014 - 14:18
Episode Number: 186

The Drupal Rules Filter Module is a simple module that makes it easy to sort through a long list of Drupal Rules. This is a module that is especially useful on those larger scale Drupal websites that rely heavily on the rules module and have many contributed Drupal modules installed.

Tags: DrupalRulesDrupal 7Drupal PlanetSite Administration
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Drupal Association News: Meeting Personas: The Drupal Expert

Planet Drupal - jeu, 18/12/2014 - 13:00

This post is part of an ongoing series detailing the new personas that have been drawn up as part of our Drupal.org user research.

Kate Marshalkina has been using Drupal for three and a half years. A web developer by trade, Kate was approached by a friend who wanted her to do Drupal work with him. After doing some research on the system, Kate agreed.

“It’s quite difficult to learn Drupal without paid work because it requires a lot of time and experience to learn the Drupal way of doing things,” Kate said. “I had joined a security startup, and a security company obviously cares about security on the web. So we decided to use Drupal because it’s a safe, well known open source system. I learned a lot while I was working on my tasks, but I spent a lot of my free time to learn Drupal. Once I started learning, I couldn’t stop— I’d previously worked with other content management with less documentation and information and then I started learning Drupal and... because of the community, and all of the learning resources and videos that are available, I was hooked."

“After working with Drupal for three months, I started my blog and not long after that I presented a session at DrupalCamp Moscow. Now, I’m a Drupal lover after three and a half years working with the platform."

Drupal.org: A Valuable Resource

Every day, Kate checks in to Drupal.org: she says she visits the site to find new modules, check the issue queues, and check API documentation. “I’m very comfortable with Drupal.org, but it was hard getting used to it when I started. Initially, it was a question for me why I should even use Drupal.org, and I didn’t know what the benefits are.

"I really like my dashboard on Drupal.org,” said Kate. “It’s a great page where I can see daily updates on my issues — and of course I follow a lot. It’s nice that I can also easily view updates on issues in critical bugs in core and so on, see crucial updates, core releases, and of course I also follow the Drupal Planet RSS feed."

Drupal Planet is one of the most helpful tools for Kate when it comes to getting new Drupal knowledge, and she often encourages her colleagues to follow it. "I think Drupal Planet is an exciting part of Drupal.org. It’s a great resource for Drupal related articles for everyone; beginner to expert, frontend to backend to sysadmin, the information for all these people is usually very high quality on Drupal Planet. When I’m working with fellow developers who have questions, I always ask them to look on Drupal Planet because I know that the information there is of a high quality, and that anyone can find the knowledge they need in there."

It's About the People

Some of the recent changes made on Drupal.org, including the addition of user pictures to the issue queue, have made Kate’s Drupal experience vastly better.

“[The pictures] are great because it makes Drupal.org more personalized, and you can more easily remember the people you talked to because of their photos. And, it reminds people that Drupal isn’t just a CMS, it’s a community, and the people are important.”

“It’s a big question for me how to enroll younger developers,” said Kate. “Looking at the contribution opportunities, [new people] may feel like they can’t be a contributor. So sometimes, they may encounter a bug they don’t know how to fix and think, “oh no, a bug!” instead of recognizing it as an opportunity to learn and grow. If we can encourage more people to become contributors, they will benefit from it and Drupal will benefit from them."

Kate’s advice for new Drupalers is to “start right out and register on Drupal.org. Share modules, create patches, learn how to use git and so on… it’s not easy, but it’s worth it."

Growing With the Project

As for herself, Kate hopes to increase her skill level by contributing to Drupal 8 core.

"I participated in DrupalCon Amsterdam, and really liked what Dries said about getting more benefits to small companies who contribute so that it will be easier for employers to understand why they spent their time and pay for developers on core. I would be much more experienced if I could participate in Drupal core development."

"I also want to someday give a session at DrupalCon,” Kate added. "I give a lot of sessions in my local community, camps and so on. I’ll be speaking at Moscow Drupal Camp in November, but hope to speak at a DrupalCon soon."

We all wish you the best of luck, Kate, and hope to see you on a stage at DrupalCon soon!

Personal blog tags: drupal.org user researchpersona interviews
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