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3C Web Services: Super Login module for Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - mer, 13/04/2016 - 20:25

A tell-tale sign that a website is a Drupal site is the login page. If you go to WEBSITE_URL/user of most Drupal websites the login form that you're presented with is almost always the default and very Drupal-looking login. Now there's an easy way to change that on Drupal 8.

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FFW Agency: Great Examples Of Distributed Content Management In Higher Education

Planet Drupal - mer, 13/04/2016 - 19:47
Great Examples Of Distributed Content Management In Higher Education hank.vanzile Wed, 04/13/2016 - 17:47

In the first post in this series, What Is Distributed Content Management?, I defined two perspectives on that term: the distributed management of content and the management of distributed content.  While doing so, I used the example of a large university and the need to consider both aspects of Distributed Content Management as part of an effective digital strategy for higher education.  In today’s post I’ll develop that concept a bit further so we can discuss a few use cases in detail.

 

Setting The Scene

 

To ensure we’re all on the same page, imagine a large university.  For fun, let’s call it “Drupal University.”  Similar to many higher education institutions, the academic programs at Drupal University are split into multiple schools (let’s say 7) and each of those schools house a number of departments.  Some of the smaller schools may only have 3 to 5 departments, but others, such as Humanities or the Medical School, may have upwards of 25.  And let’s not forget that each of those departments is responsible for a number of different academic programs.  Toss in the requisite assortment of research labs, student organizations and administrative departments - you can see how quickly our college’s web presence gets complex!  At this scale we’re likely dealing with hundreds of different websites, all of which have requirements around content.  It’s the perfect platform for Distributed Content Management! Let’s explore a few use cases that might pop up.  Don’t worry, we’ll start with an easy one.

 

 

Use Case 1: Publishing Workflows For Individual Websites

 

For the web platform at Drupal University, this strategy is obvious.  Unless they employ an absurdly enormous central communications team, large universities simply must distribute their content production.  This doesn’t necessarily mean throwing open the gates!  Consideration of a content approval workflow is a critical part of the content strategy for any organization that employs Distributed Content Management.  Publishing workflows, whether manual or automated, must be tailored not only to the university, but to each school, department or group that’s in charge of a website.  Content to be published on the undergrad admissions websites likely requires significantly more oversight than the blog of an 8-person research lab.  The Medical School, with its 25 departments, probably has its own marketing and communications departments while a smaller school fights for the attention of centralized resources.  This is definitely a case where one size doesn’t fit all.  

 

Use Case 2: Sharing Content Out - Centralized Content On A Distributed Web Platform

 

Even the most decentralized universities have content that is centrally produced.  In some cases it may be easiest to just hyperlink to that content in its original location; however, consider, a news story about a student winning a prestigious award.  That story,  produced by the Communications Department for the News section of the college’s main website, may be reposted in its entirety in numerous strategically advantageous places: the homepage of the student’s academic program, the websites for her research lab, a site run by Admissions, another targeted at alumni.  Copying and pasting becomes a less efficient option the further content is distributed - more so when you consider the possibility of edits and possible unpublishing.  In later blog posts, I’ll discuss some of the techniques and products organizations are using to efficiently share content across numerous websites.

 

Use Case 3: Sharing Content In - Decentralized Websites As Points Of Origin

 

Another interesting use case presents itself when we consider distributed websites as the starting point for content creation.  Most universities maintain a central calendar of events, whether on a main website or in an Event Management System.  In a well-formed distributed content model, with an an appropriate CMS like Drupal, the same metadata that allows visitors to filter events - audience, department, program, etc. - can be easily used to syndicate those events to various websites.  Unfortunately, the same level of consideration is not always given to the publishing of new events.  Because central event calendars feed information to the entire college, they are often protected systems, editable only by a subset of users with appropriate permissions.  Content managers who are generally empowered to manage their own content may not have the same access to do so, or, in cases where they do have permission, find themselves needing to enter content into an entirely different system to get it published to their site.  But why should this be the case?  By extending the same technologies that allow websites to receive events from a central calendar, we can enable content managers to publish events to the calendar from within the same website they usually manage.  (The same content approval and publishing workflow considerations apply, of course.)

 

Use Case 4: Integrating With Controlled Content Systems

 

At the far end of the Distributed Content Management spectrum are systems that need to publish consistent, controlled content to websites with no possibility for discrepancies across multiple sites.  A common case of this in higher education would be a Course Catalog System (Acalog, SmartCatalog, CourseLeaf, etc.).  One of the primary jobs of these systems is to integrate with the university’s Student Information System, providing the canonical description of a course, its contents, credits, costs, etc.  If a university chooses to publish course descriptions on individual program sites, eliminating user error and neglect - mistakes made through copying and pasting, older content not being updated, etc. - is of great importance.  As such, determining a strategy for directly integrating with these systems, rather than relying on a standard approach to decentralized content management, must be an important part of a university’s content strategy.

 

What’s Next?

 

In my next post I’ll continue exploring use cases for Distributed Content Management but switch our focus to the pharmaceutical industry.  Thoughts or questions?  Reach out in the comments below or tweet them to me at @HankVanZile.

 

Tagged with Comments
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Mediacurrent: Build your QA Department- Part 1: Laying a Foundation

Planet Drupal - mer, 13/04/2016 - 18:11
About me

With 15 years of experience in the Information Technology field, and 10 of those years focused on leadership, I’ve learned first hand the value of investing in people and setting them up for success. Before joining Mediacurrent, I started a QA department from scratch and grew it to its current size. Prior to that, I built an IT team. If you're an incoming leader, here's how to start building your own QA/IT department.

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Mehdi Dogguy: 2016 DPL election

Planet Debian - mer, 13/04/2016 - 15:46
It is time of the year where Debian project members should elect a new project leader. This year, only one candidate has stepped up, yours truly. As a reminder, my platform is published here. The campaign has been quite calm, comparing to past editions, which is not surprising given the number of candidates. There have been some interesting questions though as detailed below:
There are not many questions. It will take little time to read, if you haven't already.

Last but not least, please do vote! You have until 2016-04-16 23:59:59 UTC to vote (as announced here). It is very important to share your opinion and take part in the reflection around the future of the project. That every project member takes part in the evolutions that should be implemented to stay relevant and innovative in what we do.
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Jonathan McDowell: Software in the Public Interest contributing members: Check your activity status!

Planet Debian - mer, 13/04/2016 - 14:04

That’s a longer title than I’d like, but I want to try and catch the attention of anyone who might have missed more directed notifications about this. If you’re not an SPI contributing member there’s probably nothing to see here…

Although I decided not to stand for re-election at the Software in the Public Interest (SPI) board elections last July, I haven’t stopped my involvement with the organisation. In particular I’ve spent some time working on an overhaul of the members website and rolling it out. One of the things this has enabled is implementation of 2009-11-04.jmd.1: Contributing membership expiry, by tracking activity in elections and providing an easy way for a member to indicate they consider themselves active even if they haven’t voted.

The plan is that this will run at some point after the completion of every board election. A first pass of cleanups was completed nearly a month ago, contacting all contributing members who’d never been seen to vote and asking them to update their status if they were still active. A second round, of people who didn’t vote in the last board election (in 2014), is currently under way. Affected members will have been emailed directly and there was a mail to spi-announce, but I’m aware people often overlook these things or filter mail off somewhere that doesn’t get read often.

If you are an SPI Contributing member who considers themselves an active member I strongly recommend you login to the SPI Members Website and check the “Last active” date displayed is after 2014-07-14 (i.e. post the start of the last board election). If it’s not, click on the “Update” link beside the date. The updated date will be shown once you’ve done so.

Why does pruning inactive members matter? The 2015 X.Org election results provide at least one indication of why ensuring you have an engaged membership is important - they failed to make a by-laws change that a vast majority of votes were in favour of, due to failing to make quorum. (If you’re an X.org member, go vote!)

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Jonathan McDowell: Software in the Public Interest contributing members: Check your activity status!

Planet Debian - mer, 13/04/2016 - 14:04

That’s a longer title than I’d like, but I want to try and catch the attention of anyone who might have missed more directed notifications about this. If you’re not an SPI contributing member there’s probably nothing to see here…

Although I decided not to stand for re-election at the Software in the Public Interest (SPI) board elections last July, I haven’t stopped my involvement with the organisation. In particular I’ve spent some time working on an overhaul of the members website and rolling it out. One of the things this has enabled is implementation of 2009-11-04.jmd.1: Contributing membership expiry, by tracking activity in elections and providing an easy way for a member to indicate they consider themselves active even if they haven’t voted.

The plan is that this will run at some point after the completion of every board election. A first pass of cleanups was completed nearly a month ago, contacting all contributing members who’d never been seen to vote and asking them to update their status if they were still active. A second round, of people who didn’t vote in the last board election (in 2014), is currently under way. Affected members will have been emailed directly and there was a mail to spi-announce, but I’m aware people often overlook these things or filter mail off somewhere that doesn’t get read often.

If you are an SPI Contributing member who considers themselves an active member I strongly recommend you login to the SPI Members Website and check the “Last active” date displayed is after 2014-07-14 (i.e. post the start of the last board election). If it’s not, click on the “Update” link beside the date.

Why does pruning inactive members matter? The 2015 X.Org election results provide at least one indication of why ensuring you have an engaged membership is important - they failed to make a by-laws change that a vast majority of votes were in favour of, due to failing to make quorum. (If you’re an X.org member, go vote!)

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Keith Packard: x.org-election

Planet Debian - mer, 13/04/2016 - 08:51
X.org Election Time — Vote Now

It's more important than usual to actually get your vote in — we're asking the membership to vote on changes the the X.org bylaws that are necessary for X.org to become a SPI affiliate project, instead of continuing on as a separate organization. While I'm in favor of this transition as I think it will provide much needed legal and financial help, the real reason we need everyone to vote is that we need ⅔ of the membership to cast ballots for the vote to be valid. Last time, we didn't reach that value, so even though we had a majority voting in favor of the change, it didn't take effect. If you aren't in favor of this change, I'd still encourage you to vote as I'd like to get a valid result, no matter the outcome.

Of course, we're also electing four members to the board. I'm happy to note that there are five candidates running for the four available seats, which shows that there are enough people willing to help serve the X.org community in this fashion.

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tanay.co.in: Drupal 8 Activity Cards for Study Groups

Planet Drupal - mer, 13/04/2016 - 07:47

At Acquia India, 15 of us had enrolled ourselves in a self-guided D8 study group program. Most of us are developers who are very familiar with D7. Some of us are already working on full time Drupal 8 projects while some of us are trying out some pet projects.

The format of our study group looks like the below:

  1. We meet for 20 mins in the morning every alternate day (Mon, Wed, Fri) to discuss the activity card of the day

  2. We disperse and then complete the prescribed exercise offline during the day

  3. Often, we discuss the challenges or blockers from the day’s exercise on the next call

We have built a set of Activity Cards for this program. These cards assume you are very familiar with D7 and will cover topics that have significantly changed between D7 and D8. Each Activity card consists of:

  1. A small objective

  2. Primary Tutorial

  3. Exercise

  4. Some cards have an additional secondary tutorial / reference material and a bonus exercise

The exercises are crafted so they don’t take more than an hour to complete after reading the prescribed primary tutorial. Sometimes, they do take longer though.

These cards could be a great learning tool for small teams that might want to form a similar D8 study group.

These cards were built by a small team learning D8, than by someone who has already mastered it. So the could be prone to errors. Drop a note to me or comment here, if you see any errors in the cards, or if you have any suggestions on any of the cards, or if you wish to collaborate with us in building new cards.

The cards are available here. An embed of the doc is right below here. We have around ~10 cards as of date.  We will keep adding more cards to the collection as our study group progresses.

Cover Pic Courtesy: http://blogs.lawlib.widener.edu/

Click here if you are having trouble viewing the iframe below

 
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Drupal Console: Drupal Console and Drush collaboration efforts

Planet Drupal - mer, 13/04/2016 - 05:11
The Drupal Console team has analyzed the proposal of one of the Drush co-maintainers in the blog post "Modern Command Line Tools for Drupal". We continue to agree to collaborate and share efforts to create libraries that any Drupal CLI project can take advantage of. With that said, we don’t agree with creating a new Drupalisim or a new Drupal way to write symfony/console based commands.
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Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible builds: week 49 in Stretch cycle

Planet Debian - mar, 12/04/2016 - 23:52

What happened in the reproducible builds effort between March 27th and April 2nd:

Toolchain fixes
  • Emmanuel Bourg uploaded ant/1.9.6-2 which makes the Tstamp task support the SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH variable, and the Javadoc task use en as the default locale if none was specified and SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH is set.
Packages fixed

The following packages have become reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: ctioga2, erlang-bitcask, libcommons-collections3-java, libjgoodies-animation-java, libjide-oss-java, octave-gsl, octave-interval, octave-io, octave-quaternion, octave-signal, octave-stk, segment, service-wrapper-java, sqlline, svnkit, uddi4j, velocity-tools.

The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed:

Some uploads fixed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them:

Patches submitted which have not made their way to the archive yet:

  • #783239 on kexec-tools by Lunar: follow-up patch to cope with locale variations.
  • #819347 on starvoyager by Sascha Steinbiss: sort the list of input object files.
  • #819352 on xpdf by Sascha Steinbiss: sort the list of linked object files.
  • #819512 on breeze by Dhole: force grep to treat all files as text to avoid locale-related issues.
  • #819726 on ckbuilder by boyska: add support for SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH.
  • #819767 on libtool by rain1: removes extra timestamps from the build system, ensure a stable file order when creating the source archive, and replace uses of the hostname command with the fixed string "localhost".
tests.reproducible-builds.org

The i386 builders are now testing packages on i386 for reproducibility. It will probably take 4 weeks until everything has been build twice, on this arch. (h01ger)

Package reviews

52 reviews have been removed, 24 added and 4 updated in the previous week.

Chris Lamb reported 13 new FTBFS.

New issue: copyright_year_in_comments_generated_by_ckbuilder.

Misc.

This weeks edition was mostly written by Lunar, with some help by Reiner Herrmann and h01ger.

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Acquia Developer Center Blog: Drupal How-To: Adding Images to Your Site. The Basics, and How to Tweak the Defaults

Planet Drupal - mar, 12/04/2016 - 21:23

In this 3-part Drupal How-To series, I'm going to show you how various options for configuring images on your site.

Here, in Part 1, we'll see how to tweak the default image options. In Part 2, we'll see ways to allow WYSIWYG and inline images. In Part 3, we'll see the latest options for responsive images.

Tags: acquia drupal planet
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myDropWizard.com: Why you SHOULDN'T upgrade from Drupal 6!

Planet Drupal - mar, 12/04/2016 - 21:00

Ever since Drupal 6's End-of-Life on February 24th, there have been countless blogs and articles about why you should upgrade to Drupal 7 or 8 as quickly as possible.

But this may be the only article arguing that you SHOULDN'T upgrade from Drupal 6! ;-)

If you have a complex Drupal 6 site, and you haven't started the upgrade process yet - contrary to conventional wisdom - the best answer may be: keep waiting.

No, this isn't an April Fools joke, and we're not being sarcastic. :-)

Want to know why? Keep reading!

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Evolving Web: Drupal Project Management Training at DrupalCon New Orleans

Planet Drupal - mar, 12/04/2016 - 20:54

Evolving Web is heading down to DrupalCon New Orleans this May. This will be the first North American DrupalCon since Drupal 8 was released, so excitement will be in the air.

With Drupal 8's release, lots of new Drupal projects are being planned. As part of DrupalCon, we'll be leading a Drupal Project Management Training on May 9th.

read more
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Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible builds: week 48 in Stretch cycle

Planet Debian - mar, 12/04/2016 - 20:28

What happened in the reproducible builds effort between March 20th and March 26th:

Toolchain fixes
  • Sebastian Ramacher uploaded breathe/4.2.0-1 which makes its output deterministic. Original patch by Chris Lamb, merged upstream.
  • Rafael Laboissiere uploaded octave/4.0.1-1 which allows packages to be built in place and avoid unreproducible builds due to temporary build directories appearing in the .oct files.

Daniel Kahn Gillmor worked on removing build path from build symbols submitting a patch adding -fdebug-prefix-map to clang to match GCC, another patch against gcc-5 to backport the removal of -fdebug-prefix-map from DW_AT_producer, and finally by proposing the addition of a normalizedebugpath to the reproducible feature set of dpkg-buildflags that would use -fdebug-prefix-map to replace the current directory with “.” using -fdebug-prefix-map.

Sergey Poznyakoff merged the --clamp-mtime option so that it will be featured in the next Tar release. This option is likely to be used by dpkg-deb to implement deterministic mtimes for packaged files.

Packages fixed

The following packages have become reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: augeas, gmtkbabel, ktikz, octave-control, octave-general, octave-image, octave-ltfat, octave-miscellaneous, octave-mpi, octave-nurbs, octave-octcdf, octave-sockets, octave-strings, openlayers, python-structlog, signond.

The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed:

Some uploads fixed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them:

Patches submitted which have not made their way to the archive yet:

  • #818742 on milkytracker by Reiner Herrmann: sorts the list of source files.
  • #818752 on tcl8.4 by Reiner Herrmann: sort source files using C locale.
  • #818753 on tk8.6 by Reiner Herrmann: sort source files using C locale.
  • #818754 on tk8.5 by Reiner Herrmann: sort source files using C locale.
  • #818755 on tk8.4 by Reiner Herrmann: sort source files using C locale.
  • #818952 on marionnet by ceridwen: dummy out build date and uname to make build reproducible.
  • #819334 on avahi by Reiner Herrmann: ship upstream changelog instead of the one generated by gettextize (although duplicate of #804141 by Santiago Vila).
tests.reproducible-builds.org

i386 build nodes have been setup by converting 2 of the 4 amd64 nodes to i386. (h01ger)

Package reviews

92 reviews have been removed, 66 added and 31 updated in the previous week.

New issues: timestamps_generated_by_xbean_spring, timestamps_generated_by_mangosdk_spiprocessor.

Chris Lamb filed 7 FTBFS bugs.

Misc.

On March 20th, Chris Lamb gave a talk at FOSSASIA 2016 in Singapore.

The very same day, but a few timezones apart, h01ger did a presentation at LibrePlanet 2016 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Seven GSoC/Outreachy applications were made by potential interns to work on various aspects of the reproducible builds effort. On top of interacting with several applicants, prospective mentors gathered to review the applications.

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Drupal Association News: Global Training Days - April 2016 Summary

Planet Drupal - mar, 12/04/2016 - 16:46

Global Training Days this quarter had 38 locations. Not only was this event hosted around the world, but one of the online trainings had students join from 6 continents! Some trainings came together thanks to collaborations of several partners; for example, the NYC training was jointly hosted and organized by Phase2 and Sego Solutions in partnership with Stony Brook University, DoSomething.org, TekSystems, and NY Public Library. We also saw camps hold #DrupalGTD training sessions as part of their events at DrupalCamp Transylvania and DrupalCamp Guadalajara. Each participant helps to make the Drupal community stronger, so we'd like to say a big thanks to everyone involved!

Each training helps to make Drupal more accessible because attendees are given the fundamentals needed to get started with making their own web projects. See the full list of participants at https://www.drupal.org/global-training-days/2016 and mark your calendar for the next training events on September 9th and 10th.

[View the story "Drupal Global Training Days in April 2016" on Storify] Personal blog tags: Drupal Global Training Day
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Acquia Developer Center Blog: Drupal 8 Module of the Week: Coffee

Planet Drupal - mar, 12/04/2016 - 16:21

Each day, more Drupal 7 modules are being migrated to Drupal 8 and new ones are being created for the Drupal community’s latest major release. In this series, the Acquia Developer Center is profiling some of the most prominent, useful modules, projects, and tools available for Drupal 8. This week, a personal favorite: Coffee.

Tags: acquia drupal planetcoffeekeyboard shortcut
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ThinkShout: The Southern Poverty Law Center Gets Nominated for a Webby

Planet Drupal - mar, 12/04/2016 - 14:00

Have you heard the news? A ThinkShout-built site has been nominated for a Webby! And yes, it’s a Drupal site.

The nominated site is none other than Splcenter.org, the online voice of the Southern Poverty Law Center, an organization committed to teaching tolerance, battling institutionalized prejudice, and giving a voice to the most vulnerable people in our communities. Our partnership with the SPLC has been a source of great pride for us, as it’s led to an amazing collaboration for our respective teams.

The Southern Poverty Law Center demonstrated its commitment to web excellence during the redesign process by investing in a platform that supports the vital work they do in the fight against injustice in our country, making it available and accessible to the people who need it most. This was an incredible undertaking, and I encourage you to check out our case study on the journey to the relaunch of the SPLC to learn more about the process.

The Webbys are perhaps the most prestigious awards of their kind and simply being nominated is an honor. Splcenter.org is technically up for two awards in the “Websites - Law” category. The first is a Webby, chosen by the Webby Academy. The second is the People’s Voice Webby. While we can’t affect the outcome of the first award (beyond the work we put into making a great website), the community decides the winner of the second. Yes, you can help a great organization win by voting for the SPLC!

The site is the product of countless hours of work and careful planning. We strove to build the SPLC a site that would further their mission and protect them from cyber attacks carried out by the forces of hate they combat every day. Together, we’ve accomplished these goals. We believe that work speaks for itself on the new site, but the improvement is measurable, too: since launch, we’ve tracked a 55% increase in overall traffic year-over-year, with a 120% increase in mobile traffic. From the Hate Map – which provides a highly accessible, albeit terrifying view of the rise of hate groups in the U.S. – to the sheer volume of civil rights news and resources made readily available and searchable from any page, the SPLC continues to expand its award-winning voice online. We’re asking you to contribute your vote and show the world that the SPLC deserves the People’s Voice award.

Please take a moment to cast your vote for the Southern Poverty Law Center. With the Webby’s, your voice makes a difference, so please vote and be heard!

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Petter Reinholdtsen: A French paperback edition of the book Free Culture by Lawrence Lessig is now available

Planet Debian - mar, 12/04/2016 - 10:40

I'm happy to report that the French paperback edition of my project to translate the Free Culture book by Lawrence Lessig is now available for sale on Lulu.com. Once I have formally verified my proof reading copy, which should be in the mail, the paperback edition should be available in book stores like Amazon and Barnes & Noble too.

This French edition, Culture Libre, is the work of the dblatex developer Benoît Guillon, who created the PO file from the initial translation available from the Wikilivres wiki pages and completed and corrected the translation to match the original docbook edition my project is using, as well as coordinated the proof reading of the final result. I believe the end result look great, but I am biased and do not read French. In addition to the paperback edition, the book is available in PDF, EPUB and Mobi format from the github project page linked to above.

When enabling book store distribution on Lulu.com, I had to nearly triple the price to allow the book stores some profit. I also had to accept that I will get some revenue when a book is sold via Lulu.com. But because of the non-commercial clause in the book license (CC-BY-NC), this might be a problem. To bypass the problem I discussed how to handle the revenue with the author, and we agreed that the revenue for these editions go to the Creative Commons non-profit Corporation who handle donations to the Creative Commons project. So far they have earned around USD 70 on sales of the English and Norwegian Bokmål editions, according to Lulu.com. They will get the revenue for the French edition too. Their revenue is higher if you buy the book directly from Lulu.com instead of via a book store, so I recommend you buy directly from Lulu.com.

Perhaps you would like to get the book published in your language? The translation is done using a web based translator service, so the technical bar to enter is fairly low. Get in touch if you would like to make this happen.

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