Elsewhere

Drupalize.Me: Our Development Workflow and Pantheon Multidev

Planet Drupal - mar, 08/11/2016 - 14:29

When we were considering switching to the Pantheon hosting platform, one of the features that made us confident in our decision is what they call Multidev.

At its core, Multidev is just a method of spinning up complete environments for code that hasn't yet been merged into the main development branch. The main benefit to this is that it makes it incredibly easy to build a complete website environment that parallels your live site where any team member can functionally and visually test changes before they're fully merged.

This blog post covers the Drupalize.Me team's development workflow, and how we're using Pantheon's Multidev to be more efficient.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Dries Buytaert: A plan for media management in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - mar, 08/11/2016 - 10:23

Today, when you install Drupal 8.2, the out-of-the-box media handling is very basic. For example, you can upload and insert images in posts using a WYSIWYG editor, but there is no way to reuse files across posts, there is no built-in media manager, no support for "remote media" such as YouTube videos or tweets, etc. While all of these media features can be added using contributed modules, it is not ideal.

This was validated by my "State of Drupal 2016 survey" which 2,900 people participated in; the top two requested features for the content creator persona are richer image and media integration and digital asset management (see slide 44 of my DrupalCon New Orleans presentation).

This led me to propose a "media initiative" for Drupal 8 at DrupalCon New Orleans. Since then a dedicated group of people worked on a plan for the Drupal 8 media initiative. I'm happy to share that we now have good alignment for that initiative. We want to provide extensible base functionality for media handling in core that supports the reuse of media assets, media browsing, and remote media, and that can be cleanly extended by contributed modules for various additional functionality and integrations. That is a mouthful so in this blog post, I'll discuss the problem we're trying to solve and how we hope to address that in Drupal 8.

Problem statement

While Drupal core provides basic media capabilities, contributed modules have to be used to meet the media management requirements of most websites. These contributed modules are powerful — look at Drupal's massive adoption in the media and entertainment market — but they are also not without some challenges.

First, it is hard for end-users to figure out what combination of modules to use. Even after the right modules are selected, the installation and configuration of various modules can be daunting. Fortunately, there are a number of Drupal distributions that select and configure various contributed modules to offer better out-of-the-box experience for media handling. Acquia maintains the Lightning distribution as a general purpose set of components including media best practices. Hubert Burda Media built the Thunder distribution and offers publishers strong media management capabilities. MD Systems created the NP8 distribution for news publishers which also bundles strong media features. While I'm a big believer in Drupal distributions, the vast majority of Drupal sites are not built with one of these distributions. Incorporating some of these media best practices in core would make them available to all end-users.

Second, the current situation is not ideal for module developers either. Competing solutions and architectures exist for how to store media data and how to display a library of the available media assets. The lack of standardization means that developers who build and maintain media-related modules must decide which of the competing approaches to integrate with, or spend time and effort integrating with all of them.

The current plan

In a way, Drupal's media management today is comparable to the state of multilingual in Drupal 7; it took 22 or more contributed modules to make Drupal 7 truly multilingual and some of those provided conflicting solutions. Multilingual in Drupal 7 was challenging for both end-users and developers. We fixed that in Drupal 8 by adding a base layer of services in Drupal 8 core, while contributed modules still cover the more complex scenarios. That is exactly what we hope to do with media in a future version of Drupal 8.

The plan for the Drupal 8 media initiative is to provide extensible base functionality for media handling in core that supports the reuse of media assets, media browsing, and remote media, and that can be cleanly extended by contributed modules for various additional functionality and integrations.

In order to do so, we're introducing a media entity type which supports plugins for various media types. We're currently aiming to support images and YouTube videos in core, while contributed modules will continue to provide more, like audio, Facebook, Twitter, etc. To facilitate media reuse, WYSIWYG image embedding will be rebuilt using media entities and a media library will be included to allow selecting from pre-existing media.

We consider this functionality to be the minimum viable product for media in Drupal 8 core. The objective is to provide a simple media solution to make Drupal 8 easy to use out of the box for basic use cases. This would help users of sites large and small.

A work-in-progress prototype of the proposed media library. Expected timeline and call for help

We believe this could be achieved in a relatively short time — to be included in Drupal 8.3 or Drupal 8.4 as experimental modules. To help make this happen, we are looking for organizations to help fund two dedicated code sprints. The existing contributors are doing an amazing job but dedicated in-person sprints would go a long way to make the plans actually happen. If you are willing to help fund this project, let me know! Looking to help with the implementation itself? The media team meets at 2pm UTC every Wednesday. I also recommend you follow @drupalmedia for updates.

I tried to make a list of all people and organizations to thank for their work on the media initiative but couldn't. The Drupal 8 initiative borrows heavily from years of hard work and learnings on media related modules from many people and organizations. In addition, there are many people actively working on various aspects of the Drupal 8 media initiative. Special thanks to everyone who has contributed now and in the past. Also thank you to Gábor Hojtsy, Alex Bronstein and Janez Urevc for their contributions to this blog post.

Catégories: Elsewhere

MD Systems blog: NP8 and Woodwing Content Station together support content creation process at Netzmedien

Planet Drupal - mar, 08/11/2016 - 09:41
In the last two months we released four portals for the Swiss tech publisher Netzmedien. All four websites are driven by the NP8 media distribution and their content is created and curated via Woodwing, a centralized multi-channel publishing platform.
Catégories: Elsewhere

Dirk Eddelbuettel: anytime 0.1.0: New features, some fixes

Planet Debian - mar, 08/11/2016 - 02:24

A new release of anytime is now on CRAN following the four releases in September and October.

anytime aims to convert anything in integer, numeric, character, factor, ordered, ... format to POSIXct (or Date) objects -- and does so without requiring a format string. See the anytime page for a few examples.

Release 0.1.0 adds several new features. New functions utctime() and utcdate() parse to coordinated universal time (UTC). Several new formats were added. Digit-only formats like 'YYYYMMDD' with or without 'HHMMSS' (or even with fractional secodns 'HHMMSS.ffffff') are supported more thoroughly. Some examples:

R> library(anytime) R> anytime("20161107 202122") ## all digits [1] "2016-11-07 20:21:22 CST" R> utctime("2016Nov07 202122") ## UTC parse example [1] "2016-11-07 14:21:22 CST" R>

The NEWS file summarises the release:

Changes in anytime version 0.1.0 (2016-11-06)
  • New functions utctime() and utcdate() were added to parse input as coordinated universal time; the functionality is also available in anytime() and anydate() via a new argument asUTC (PR #22)

  • New (date)time format for RFC822-alike dates, and expanded existing datetime formats to all support fractional seconds (PR #21)

  • Extended functionality to support not only ‘YYYYMMDD’ (without a separator, and not covered by Boost) but also with ‘HHMM’, ‘HHMMSS’ and ‘HHMMSS.ffffff’ (PR #30 fixing issue #29)

  • Extended functionality to support ‘HHMMSS[.ffffff]’ following other date formats.

  • Documentation and tests have been expanded; typos corrected

  • New (unexported) helper functions setTZ, testOutput, setDebug

  • The testFormat (and testOutput) functions cannot be called under RStudio (PR #27 fixing issue #25).

  • More robust support for non-finite values such as NA, NaN or Inf (Fixing issue #16)

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release. More information is on the anytime page.

For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Dirk Eddelbuettel: anytime 0.1.0: New features, some fixes

Planet Debian - mar, 08/11/2016 - 02:24

A new release of anytime is now on CRAN following the four releases in September and October.

anytime aims to convert anything in integer, numeric, character, factor, ordered, ... format to POSIXct (or Date) objects -- and does so without requiring a format string. See the anytime page for a few examples.

Release 0.1.0 adds several new features. New functions utctime() and utcdate() parse to coordinated universal time (UTC). Several new formats were added. Digit-only formats like 'YYYYMMDD' with or without 'HHMMSS' (or even with fractional secodns 'HHMMSS.ffffff') are supported more thoroughly. Some examples:

R> library(anytime) R> anytime("20161107 202122") ## all digits [1] "2016-11-07 20:21:22 CST" R> utctime("2016Nov07 202122") ## UTC parse example [1] "2016-11-07 14:21:22 CST" R>

The NEWS file summarises the release:

Changes in anytime version 0.1.0 (2016-11-06)
  • New functions utctime() and utcdate() were added to parse input as coordinated universal time; the functionality is also available in anytime() and anydate() via a new argument asUTC (PR #22)

  • New (date)time format for RFC822-alike dates, and expanded existing datetime formats to all support fractional seconds (PR #21)

  • Extended functionality to support not only ‘YYYYMMDD’ (without a separator, and not covered by Boost) but also with ‘HHMM’, ‘HHMMSS’ and ‘HHMMSS.ffffff’ (PR #30 fixing issue #29)

  • Extended functionality to support ‘HHMMSS[.ffffff]’ following other date formats.

  • Documentation and tests have been expanded; typos corrected

  • New (unexported) helper functions setTZ, testOutput, setDebug

  • The testFormat (and testOutput) functions cannot be called under RStudio (PR #27 fixing issue #25).

  • More robust support for non-finite values such as NA, NaN or Inf (Fixing issue #16)

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release. More information is on the anytime page.

For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Dirk Eddelbuettel: gettz 0.0.3

Planet Debian - mar, 08/11/2016 - 02:19

A minor release 0.0.3 of gettz arrived on CRAN two days ago.

gettz provides a possible fallback in situations where Sys.timezone() fails to determine the system timezone. That can happen when e.g. the file /etc/localtime somehow is not a link into the corresponding file with zoneinfo data in, say, /usr/share/zoneinfo.

This release adds a second #ifdef to permit builds on Windows for the previous R release (ie r-oldrel-windows). No new code, or new features.

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release.

More information is on the gettz page. For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Dirk Eddelbuettel: gettz 0.0.3

Planet Debian - mar, 08/11/2016 - 02:19

A minor release 0.0.3 of gettz arrived on CRAN two days ago.

gettz provides a possible fallback in situations where Sys.timezone() fails to determine the system timezone. That can happen when e.g. the file /etc/localtime somehow is not a link into the corresponding file with zoneinfo data in, say, /usr/share/zoneinfo.

This release adds a second #ifdef to permit builds on Windows for the previous R release (ie r-oldrel-windows). No new code, or new features.

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release.

More information is on the gettz page. For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Drupal Association News: Membership campaign recap from September-October 2016

Planet Drupal - lun, 07/11/2016 - 23:48
Thanks to all who helped

Many people contribute to our membership campaigns and the recent campaign is no different. Thanks to Andrey, Ricardo, Martha, Ivo, and Tom, for sharing your stories. To everyone who joined or renewed, thank you for your support. And, to our members and supporters who answered the call to share our message, thank you too.

You not only help the community by growing our membership, you give us motivation too.

Focus on grants

Members fund our Community Cultivation Grants program. The grants help grow communities and build local relationships for Drupal. This connection made the grants program an appropriate focus for a membership campaign.

This campaign was based on an idea: you feel more connected within the Drupal community when you receive a grant. Participants told their stories because this idea resonated with them. We shared their stories about feeling connected and how the member-funded grant inspired them to make a local impact for Drupal.

Results

We didn't meet the specific goals of 265 new members and $10,918 in revenue. New member growth did not happen to the degree we wanted for this campaign. We got to 45% of goal for number of new members who joined. Our revenue from the new members made it to 73% of our goal for funds raised. However, this is accounting for all new membership in the time period, and not specifically attribution to the campaign itself.

The breakdown went like this:

  • 120 signups by new members (100 Individual Members/ 20 Organization Members)
  • $8,050 revenue raised ($3730 Individual Members/ $4330 Organization Members)

For more details, see the data here.

We had three other concurrent places for sign ups. Our main ADO page, DrupalCon Dublin registration, and a page for DrupalCamp Atlanta were available. Thanks Eric, Dave, Shellie, and the whole Atlanta team for the pilot run.

During the 52-day period, 520 members joined or renewed and we raised $35,348 in total revenue. So if the goals I had set were for new, renewing, and reactivated members, we'd have been successful. Call this a good lesson in goal setting!

The first landing page on drupal.org

We had a team effort to create a well-designed landing page for this campaign. We used new design tools to create the first landing page for membership on drupal.org.  We'll use the tools again to add visual interest to our campaigns and we'll continue testing to find what works and what doesn't.

More testing is needed

In our last campaign, the landing page on assoc.drupal.org had 16K pageviews. This campaign had only 25% of that traffic. This disproved the hypothesis that drupal.org would bring more traffic to a membership landing page.

We can see the banner launch and takedown had an impact on page traffic based on the data below. The hill showing on the graph shows the period we ran the banner (September 9-17). However, when we reintroduced the banner on September 28 through October 29, we saw no significant bump in traffic.


Traffic was 25% of the previous campaign landing page.

Social sharing makes a difference

Traffic spikes occurred around days we emailed to ask members to share the campaign. Not only do we see engagement from members, but there were spikes in membership sign-ups too.



We used a story-based approach

I used a storymapping exercise to think through this campaign concept to ensure we were telling a story that left readers satisfied. A story moves along a bell curve from exposition, to problem, to rising action, crisis, resolution, and falling action before the end. I'll try this again for the next campaign. The story-based approach helps to get our narratives into the bigger world and people are left with something they can remember and share.

Coming next

We are taking a deep look at how the drupal.org engineering team has made an impact in the community for our next campaign. We begin with the premise that the work the team does has helped increase the velocity of the innovation of Drupal. The team reduces the friction in the contribution journey and by doing so, we all benefit from their work. More on this to come on drupal.org in a few months.

Personal blog tags: Membership
Catégories: Elsewhere

Mediacurrent: Cracking the Shell at BADCamp

Planet Drupal - lun, 07/11/2016 - 22:26

On October twenty-third I had the pleasure of speaking at BADCamp X, the tenth Bay Area Drupal Camp in Berkeley California. BADCamp is my favorite Drupal event not only because I can drive to it, but also because of the great people and quality of the camp, I never miss it.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Web Wash: Using Display Suite in Drupal 8: How to Use Display Suite Fields

Planet Drupal - lun, 07/11/2016 - 22:00
In the previous tutorial, you learnt how to customize content pages by using a Display Suite layout. Today, I want to show you how to use Display Suite fields. Display Suite fields shouldn’t be confused with the standard field system. The best way to think of a field in Display Suite is as just a fancy formatter. The field will only render content. You can’t use it to store values or define a widget like you can with the standard field system. You’ve already seen this fields in action. If you select a layout you’ll notice a bunch of new fields appear. These are Display Suite fields which are implemented by the module. A field can be created in two fields: in code or through the Display Suite user interface (UI). Today we’ll look at how to create fields using the Display Suite UI. In a future tutorial, you’ll learn how to implement a field in code.
Catégories: Elsewhere

Daniel Pocock: Quickstart SDR with gqrx, GNU Radio and the RTL-SDR dongle

Planet Debian - lun, 07/11/2016 - 20:56

Software Defined Radio (SDR) provides many opportunities for both experimentation and solving real-world problems. It is not exactly a new technology but it has become significantly more accessible due to the increases in desktop computing power (for performing the DSP functions) and simultaneous reduction in the cost of SDR hardware.

Thanks to the availability of a completely packaged gqrx and GNU Radio solution, you can now get up and running in less than half an hour and spending less than fifty dollars/pounds/euros.

We provided a full demo of the Debian Hams gqrx solution at Mini DebConf Vienna (video) and hope to provide a similar demo at MiniDebConf Cambridge on the coming weekend of 12-13 November.

gqrx is also available for Fedora users.

Choosing hardware

There are many different types of hardware, ranging from the low-cost RTL-SDR USB dongles to full duplex multi-transceiver systems.

My recommendation is to start with an RTL-SDR dongle due to extremely low cost, this will give you an opportunity to reflect on the opportunities of this technology before putting money into one of the transceivers and their accessories. The RTL-SDR dongle also benefits from being a small self-contained solution that you can carry around and experiment with or demo just about anywhere.

Important: Don't buy the cheapest generic RTL TV/radio receivers. It is absolutely essential to buy one of the units that has been explicitly promoted for SDR. These typically have a temperature compensated crystal oscillator (TCXO) which is absolutely essential for the reception of narrowband voice and digital signals. Without this, it is only possible to receive wideband broadcash FM radio and TV channels.

For those who want to try it out with us at MiniDebConf Cambridge, Technofix has UK stock (online ordering), they are about £26.

Getting gqrx up and running fast

Note: to avoid the wrong kernel module being loaded automatically, it is recoemmended that you don't connect the RTL-SDR dongle before you install the packages. If you did already connect it, you may need to reboot or rmmod dvb_usb_rtl28xxu.

If you are using a Debian jessie system, you can get all the necessary packages from jessie-backports.

If you haven't already enabled backports, you can do so with a command like this:


$ sudo echo "deb http://ftp.ch.debian.org/debian jessie-backports main" >> /etc/apt/sources.list

Make sure your local index is updated and then install the necessary packages:


$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get install -t jessie-backports gqrx-sdr rtl-sdr

Running it for the first time

Once the packages are installed, connect the RTL-SDR dongle to the computer and then start the gqrx GUI from a terminal:


$ gqrx

If the GUI fails to appear, look carefully at the error messages. It may be that the wrong kernel module has been loaded.

The properties window appears, select the RTL-SDR dongle:

Now the main screen will appear. Choose the wideband FM mode "WFM (mono)" and change the frequency to a value in the FM broadcast band such as 100MHz. Click the "Power on" button in the top left corner, just under the "File" menu, to start reception. Click in the middle of a strong signal to tune to that station. If you don't hear anything, check the squelch setting (it should be more negative than the signal strength value) and increase the Gain control at the bottom right hand side of the window.

Looking for ham / amateur radio signals

A popular band for hams is between 144 - 148 MHz (in some countries only a subset of this band is used). This is referred to as the two-meter band, as that is the wavelength at this frequency.

Hams often use the narrowband FM mode in this band, especially with repeater stations. Change the "Mode" setting from "WFM" to "Narrow FM" and change the frequency to a value in the middle of the band. Look for signals in the radio spectrum and click on them to hear them.

If you are not sure which part of the band to look in, search for the two-meter band plan for your country/region and look for the repeater output frequencies in the band plan.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Daniel Pocock: Quickstart SDR with gqrx, GNU Radio and the RTL-SDR dongle

Planet Debian - lun, 07/11/2016 - 20:56

Software Defined Radio (SDR) provides many opportunities for both experimentation and solving real-world problems. It is not exactly a new technology but it has become significantly more accessible due to the increases in desktop computing power (for performing the DSP functions) and simultaneous reduction in the cost of SDR hardware.

Thanks to the availability of a completely packaged gqrx and GNU Radio solution, you can now get up and running in less than half an hour and spending less than fifty dollars/pounds/euros.

We provided a full demo of the Debian Hams gqrx solution at Mini DebConf Vienna (video) and hope to provide a similar demo at MiniDebConf Cambridge on the coming weekend of 12-13 November.

gqrx is also available for Fedora users.

Choosing hardware

There are many different types of hardware, ranging from the low-cost RTL-SDR USB dongles to full duplex multi-transceiver systems.

My recommendation is to start with an RTL-SDR dongle due to extremely low cost, this will give you an opportunity to reflect on the opportunities of this technology before putting money into one of the transceivers and their accessories. The RTL-SDR dongle also benefits from being a small self-contained solution that you can carry around and experiment with or demo just about anywhere.

Important: Don't buy the cheapest generic RTL TV/radio receivers. It is absolutely essential to buy one of the units that has been explicitly promoted for SDR. These typically have a temperature compensated crystal oscillator (TCXO) which is absolutely essential for the reception of narrowband voice and digital signals. Without this, it is only possible to receive wideband broadcash FM radio and TV channels.

For those who want to try it out with us at MiniDebConf Cambridge, Technofix has UK stock (online ordering), they are about £26.

Getting gqrx up and running fast

Note: to avoid the wrong kernel module being loaded automatically, it is recoemmended that you don't connect the RTL-SDR dongle before you install the packages. If you did already connect it, you may need to reboot or rmmod dvb_usb_rtl28xxu.

If you are using a Debian jessie system, you can get all the necessary packages from jessie-backports.

If you haven't already enabled backports, you can do so with a command like this:


$ sudo echo "deb http://ftp.ch.debian.org/debian jessie-backports main" >> /etc/apt/sources.list

Make sure your local index is updated and then install the necessary packages:


$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get install -t jessie-backports gqrx-sdr rtl-sdr

Running it for the first time

Once the packages are installed, connect the RTL-SDR dongle to the computer and then start the gqrx GUI from a terminal:


$ gqrx

If the GUI fails to appear, look carefully at the error messages. It may be that the wrong kernel module has been loaded.

The properties window appears, select the RTL-SDR dongle:

Now the main screen will appear. Choose the wideband FM mode "WFM (mono)" and change the frequency to a value in the FM broadcast band such as 100MHz. Click the "Power on" button in the top left corner, just under the "File" menu, to start reception. Click in the middle of a strong signal to tune to that station. If you don't hear anything, check the squelch setting (it should be more negative than the signal strength value) and increase the Gain control at the bottom right hand side of the window.

Looking for ham / amateur radio signals

A popular band for hams is between 144 - 148 MHz (in some countries only a subset of this band is used). This is referred to as the two-meter band, as that is the wavelength at this frequency.

Hams often use the narrowband FM mode in this band, especially with repeater stations. Change the "Mode" setting from "WFM" to "Narrow FM" and change the frequency to a value in the middle of the band. Look for signals in the radio spectrum and click on them to hear them.

If you are not sure which part of the band to look in, search for the two-meter band plan for your country/region and look for the repeater output frequencies in the band plan.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Kris Vanderwater: Migrating my blog from Drupal 6 to 8

Planet Drupal - lun, 07/11/2016 - 20:52
Migrating my blog from Drupal 6 to 8 Kris Vanderwater 7 November 2016

Drupal 8 has been out for over a year at this point. I worked extensively on helping to improve portions of core during the Drupal 8 cycle, but maintaining your own site is radically different from trying to develop the platform that site(s) will reside upon. Upgrading my blog is especially exciting for me because I was still on Drupal 6. Getting to jump directly from Drupal 6 to Drupal 8 is a pretty big win and the fact that Drupal 8 supports this out of the box was amazing. Now granted this is just my blog, it's not even 100 nodes, but still...

Catégories: Elsewhere

Jaldhar Vyas: New Laptop / Problems with Windows part 896,324

Planet Debian - lun, 07/11/2016 - 20:01

I had mentioned previously that I had been forced to purchase a new laptop. I decided that I didn't want another Thinkpad. The Lenovo ones no longer have the high quality they had in the IBM days and while support is still pretty good by todays dismal standards it's not worth the premium price. (If I'm buying it with my own money that is.) I had heard good thing about Dells' Linux support so I looked into their offerings and ended up buying a Precision 7510. Mind you this model came with Windows 7 installed but I didn't mind. As I wanted to install Debian according to my own specs anyway, I was ok with just knowing that the hardware would be compatible. So I prepared a Jessie USB installation stick (This model doesn't have a CD/DVD drive.) and shrunk down the Windows installation (but not deleted it altogether for reasons to be explained below.)

At this point it is traditional to give a long, tortured account of how Heaven and Earth had to be moved to get Linux installed. But that is a thing of the past. The combination of good hardware and the excellent work of the debian-installer team, made the setup a breeze with only a couple of minor bumps in the road. One is that the kernel on the Jessie cd was not quite up to snuff. Downloading 4.6.0 from backports did the trick. Post-install, to get the most out of my nifty new 4K display, I needed the latest, alas non-free, nvidia-drivers. And for stable wifi (I always install over ethernet for this reason) I had to install the firmware-iwlwifi package. Everything else—even my printer—either "just worked" or needed only minor fiddling around.

Having used this machine for a while, the biggest problem I have is with the keyboard. It is nowhere near as tactile and comfortable to use as the old IBM Thinkpads. Even Lenovo Thinkpad keyboards are better. I'm a hunt-and-peck type myself but it is annoying. I think a real touch typist would hate it. The cursor and home, end, page up, page down etc. keys are in the wrong place and home and end are actually function keys. There is a pointer and a trackpad and two sets of mouse buttons which seems like a waste of space. In fact much space is wasted everywhere, space which could be used to improve the keyboard. Other than that I like it. The battery life is not the best but fairly good. It's a bit heavier than I was used to but I've gotten used to it. Although I didn't go with the SSD option, it is not that noisy; again you can get used to it. All in all, I think it is worth it for the price.


I installed Debian but I only really use it as a base to run VMWare Workstation. I occasionally have to support software across multiple platforms but I don't want the hassle or expense of multiple computers so I have Windows (the original installation upgraded to Windows 10) and Mac OS X running in VMs. Plus I have another VM running Kubuntu LTS for my day to day computing, another Debian install running sid for packaging, and Minix. Backups are as simple as making a snapshot of the VM. If something accidently gets screwed up, I can easily revert it back to a known good state. Ideally, I would like to replace VMWare with a free solution such as qemu or virtualbox etc. but as far as I know VMWare is far ahead in emulation capabilities (OpenGL support for example.) which is vital for efficiently using the proprietary OS's.

Things were going swimmingly until a few days ago which brings me to part two of this post. I booted into the Windows 10 VM only to be greeted by a message from the Windows boot manager that "A component of the operating system has expired." I tried going back to a snapshot from September (when this definitely was working) but I still got the same thing. A bit of googling revealed this has happened to others and the advice seemed to be to reset the computers date and reinstall Windows 10. It took several tries but I finally got that done, completed the task I needed to do and shut it down. At the end of the day I shut the whole laptop down and thought no more of it.

The next day I boot up and...where is grub? It seems that during the Windows reinstall, it had overwritten grub with the Windows boot loader. And while grub is nice enough to add an entry for Windows when detected, Windows does not extend the same courtesy to Linux. Ok time to bring out my trusty USB stick again and reinstall grub. Oops I've wiped it off to store other things. No matter, download another image and do it again. Reboot and...back in Windows. Fiddle around in the EFI settings until I can get it to boot from USB.

Now i'm in the shell provided by debian-installer so I can mount and chroot my Linux partition and reinstall grub. Except no I can't because it is Luks encrypted. Ok apt-get install cryptsetup, open it with my passphrase and now I can mount the partion, chroot into and reinstall grub. Except no I can't because it is a logical volume group. Back to apt-get, install lvm2, vgscan (because of course I've forgotten the name of the group,) vgchange and now I can mount, chroot, etc. etc. Except no I can't.

# mount /dev/mapper/vg00-root /mnt # chroot /mnt # grub-install /dev/sda error: cannot find a device for /boot/grub (is /dev mounted?).

sigh

# mount /dev/sda5 /boot special device /dev/sda5 does not exist.

Well, /dev is mounted but it does indeed not contain a device called sda5.

# /etc/init.d/udev start udev requires a mounted procfs. not started.

Very well then.

# mount -t proc none /proc # /etc/init.d/udev start

Nope. proc needs sysfs.

# mount -t sysfs none /sys # /etc/init.d/udev start

Still no. You get a warning about how it is a bad idea to run udev from an interactive shell and there is still not /dev/sda5. Time to start googling again. It turns out what I should have done is open another shell from the installer environment and do...

# mount --bind /dev/ /mnt/dev

Now I can mount /boot/grub and reinstall grub and it should all work right?

I should be so lucky. Ok back to square one. I now did what I should have done in the first place and searched the Debian wiki. Sure enough there is a page which deals exactly with my predicament. Finally I get everything installed correctly and triumphantly reboot into Linux.

Of course now Windows doesn't work again...

Catégories: Elsewhere

Jaldhar Vyas: New Laptop / Problems with Windows part 896,324

Planet Debian - lun, 07/11/2016 - 20:01

I had mentioned previously that I had been forced to purchase a new laptop. I decided that I didn't want another Thinkpad. The Lenovo ones no longer have the high quality they had in the IBM days and while support is still pretty good by todays dismal standards it's not worth the premium price. (If I'm buying it with my own money that is.) I had heard good thing about Dells' Linux support so I looked into their offerings and ended up buying a Precision 7510. Mind you this model came with Windows 7 installed but I didn't mind. As I wanted to install Debian according to my own specs anyway, I was ok with just knowing that the hardware would be compatible. So I prepared a Jessie USB installation stick (This model doesn't have a CD/DVD drive.) and shrunk down the Windows installation (but not deleted it altogether for reasons to be explained below.)

At this point it is traditional to give a long, tortured account of how Heaven and Earth had to be moved to get Linux installed. But that is a thing of the past. The combination of good hardware and the excellent work of the debian-installer team, made the setup a breeze with only a couple of minor bumps in the road. One is that the kernel on the Jessie cd was not quite up to snuff. Downloading 4.6.0 from backports did the trick. Post-install, to get the most out of my nifty new 4K display, I needed the latest, alas non-free, nvidia-drivers. And for stable wifi (I always install over ethernet for this reason) I had to install the firmware-iwlwifi package. Everything else—even my printer—either "just worked" or needed only minor fiddling around.

Having used this machine for a while, the biggest problem I have is with the keyboard. It is nowhere near as tactile and comfortable to use as the old IBM Thinkpads. Even Lenovo Thinkpad keyboards are better. I'm a hunt-and-peck type myself but it is annoying. I think a real touch typist would hate it. The cursor and home, end, page up, page down etc. keys are in the wrong place and home and end are actually function keys. There is a pointer and a trackpad and two sets of mouse buttons which seems like a waste of space. In fact much space is wasted everywhere, space which could be used to improve the keyboard. Other than that I like it. The battery life is not the best but fairly good. It's a bit heavier than I was used to but I've gotten used to it. Although I didn't go with the SSD option, it is not that noisy; again you can get used to it. All in all, I think it is worth it for the price.


I installed Debian but I only really use it as a base to run VMWare Workstation. I occasionally have to support software across multiple platforms but I don't want the hassle or expense of multiple computers so I have Windows (the original installation upgraded to Windows 10) and Mac OS X running in VMs. Plus I have another VM running Kubuntu LTS for my day to day computing, another Debian install running sid for packaging, and Minix. Backups are as simple as making a snapshot of the VM. If something accidently gets screwed up, I can easily revert it back to a known good state. Ideally, I would like to replace VMWare with a free solution such as qemu or virtualbox etc. but as far as I know VMWare is far ahead in emulation capabilities (OpenGL support for example.) which is vital for efficiently using the proprietary OS's.

Things were going swimmingly until a few days ago which brings me to part two of this post. I booted into the Windows 10 VM only to be greeted by a message from the Windows boot manager that "A component of the operating system has expired." I tried going back to a snapshot from September (when this definitely was working) but I still got the same thing. A bit of googling revealed this has happened to others and the advice seemed to be to reset the computers date and reinstall Windows 10. It took several tries but I finally got that done, completed the task I needed to do and shut it down. At the end of the day I shut the whole laptop down and thought no more of it.

The next day I boot up and...where is grub? It seems that during the Windows reinstall, it had overwritten grub with the Windows boot loader. And while grub is nice enough to add an entry for Windows when detected, Windows does not extend the same courtesy to Linux. Ok time to bring out my trusty USB stick again and reinstall grub. Oops I've wiped it off to store other things. No matter, download another image and do it again. Reboot and...back in Windows. Fiddle around in the EFI settings until I can get it to boot from USB.

Now i'm in the shell provided by debian-installer so I can mount and chroot my Linux partition and reinstall grub. Except no I can't because it is Luks encrypted. Ok apt-get install cryptsetup, open it with my passphrase and now I can mount the partion, chroot into and reinstall grub. Except no I can't because it is a logical volume group. Back to apt-get, install lvm2, vgscan (because of course I've forgotten the name of the group,) vgchange and now I can mount, chroot, etc. etc. Except no I can't.

# mount /dev/mapper/vg00-root /mnt # chroot /mnt # grub-install /dev/sda error: cannot find a device for /boot/grub (is /dev mounted?).

sigh

# mount /dev/sda5 /boot special device /dev/sda5 does not exist.

Well, /dev is mounted but it does indeed not contain a device called sda5.

# /etc/init.d/udev start udev requires a mounted procfs. not started.

Very well then.

# mount -t proc none /proc # /etc/init.d/udev start

Nope. proc needs sysfs.

# mount -t sysfs none /sys # /etc/init.d/udev start

Still no. You get a warning about how it is a bad idea to run udev from an interactive shell and there is still not /dev/sda5. Time to start googling again. It turns out what I should have done is open another shell from the installer environment and do...

# mount --bind /dev/ /mnt/dev

Now I can mount /boot/grub and reinstall grub and it should all work right?

I should be so lucky. Ok back to square one. I now did what I should have done in the first place and searched the Debian wiki. Sure enough there is a page which deals exactly with my predicament. Finally I get everything installed correctly and triumphantly reboot into Linux.

Of course now Windows doesn't work again...

Catégories: Elsewhere

Acquia Developer Center Blog: Meet Paul Johnson, the face behind @drupal, #celebr8d8, and more

Planet Drupal - lun, 07/11/2016 - 18:51

I sat down with Drupal Social Media Lead, Paul Johnson at Drupal Camp London 2016, a few weeks after DrupalCon Asia in Mumbai. Paul runs the official community social media accounts on Twitter and elsewhere. I feel Paul is a kindred soul, since he and I both love highlighting and celebrating the Drupal community's stories and achievements.

The @drupal Twitter account alone has more than 65 thousand followers and Paul uses his powers for good. "I get so much satisfaction out of it. There's nothing I like more than to hear that it's made a difference to somebody, or I've heard something and made other people aware of it privately and that's maybe solved a problem. Social media is used for quite a lot of things ... It's not just a marketing channel."

Our conversation

Follow Drupal on social media!

Here are the accounts Paul runs:

Here is the Drupal Association Social Media Request Form that Paul mentions during our conversation.

And here is the full, official Drupal social media directory.

Mentioned in the conversation
Celebrate D8!

Images used in the podcast video
Podcast series: Drupal 8Skill Level: BeginnerIntermediateAdvanced
Catégories: Elsewhere

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: week 80 in Stretch cycle

Planet Debian - lun, 07/11/2016 - 18:17

What happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday October 30 and Saturday November 5 2016:

Upcoming events
  • Chris Lamb and Holger Levsen will be presenting at MiniDebConfCambridge 2016 in Cambridge, United Kingdom on November 10th-13th.

  • Vagrant Cascadian will be presenting Introduction to Reproducible Builds at the SeaGL.org Conference in Seattle, USA on November 12th.

  • The next IRC meeting will be held on November 15th.

  • Reproducible Debian Hackathon - A small hackathon organized in Boston, USA on December 3rd and 4th. If you are interested in attending, please contact Valerie Young (spectranaut in the #debian-reproducible IRC channel on irc.oftc.net.)

  • The second Reproducible Builds World Summit will be held in Berlin, Germany on December 13th-15th.

Reproducible work in other projects Bugs filed Reviews of unreproducible packages

81 package reviews have been added, 14 have been updated and 43 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues.

3 issue types have been updated:

1 issue type has been removed:

1 issue type has been updated:

Weekly QA work

During of reproducibility testing, some FTBFS bugs have been detected and reported by:

  • Chris Lamb (17)
diffoscope development
  • diffoscope 62 was uploaded to unstable by Mattia Rizzolo:

    • Add rudimentary support for OpenDocumentFormat files. (Michel Messerschmidt)
    • Detect JSON order-only differences and print them nicely. (Mattia Rizzolo)
buildinfo.debian.net development tests.reproducible-builds.org

Reproducible Debian:

  • With thanks to Profitbricks continued sponsorship, Holger setup two new amd64 build nodes (and the associated Jenkins jobs) with 15/16 cores and 48GB RAM each for a total of four such amd64 nodes to double the build capacity of our amd64 build network.
Misc.

Also with thanks to Profitbricks sponsoring the "hardware" resources, Holger created a 13 core machine with 24GB RAM and 100GB SSD based storage so that Ximin can do further tests and development on GCC and other software on a fast machine.

This week's edition was written by Chris Lamb, Ximin Luo, Vagrant Cascadian, Holger Levsen and reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: week 80 in Stretch cycle

Planet Debian - lun, 07/11/2016 - 18:17

What happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday October 30 and Saturday November 5 2016:

Upcoming events
  • Chris Lamb and Holger Levsen will be presenting at MiniDebConfCambridge 2016 in Cambridge, United Kingdom on November 10th-13th.

  • Vagrant Cascadian will be presenting Introduction to Reproducible Builds at the SeaGL.org Conference in Seattle, USA on November 12th.

  • The next IRC meeting will be held on November 15th.

  • Reproducible Debian Hackathon - A small hackathon organized in Boston, USA on December 3rd and 4th. If you are interested in attending, please contact Valerie Young (spectranaut in the #debian-reproducible IRC channel on irc.oftc.net.)

  • The second Reproducible Builds World Summit will be held in Berlin, Germany on December 13th-15th.

Reproducible work in other projects Bugs filed Reviews of unreproducible packages

81 package reviews have been added, 14 have been updated and 43 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues.

3 issue types have been updated:

1 issue type has been removed:

1 issue type has been updated:

Weekly QA work

During of reproducibility testing, some FTBFS bugs have been detected and reported by:

  • Chris Lamb (17)
diffoscope development
  • diffoscope 62 was uploaded to unstable by Mattia Rizzolo:

    • Add rudimentary support for OpenDocumentFormat files. (Michel Messerschmidt)
    • Detect JSON order-only differences and print them nicely. (Mattia Rizzolo)
buildinfo.debian.net development tests.reproducible-builds.org

Reproducible Debian:

  • With thanks to Profitbricks continued sponsorship, Holger setup two new amd64 build nodes (and the associated Jenkins jobs) with 15/16 cores and 48GB RAM each for a total of four such amd64 nodes to double the build capacity of our amd64 build network.
Misc.

Also with thanks to Profitbricks sponsoring the "hardware" resources, Holger created a 13 core machine with 24GB RAM and 100GB SSD based storage so that Ximin can do further tests and development on GCC and other software on a fast machine.

This week's edition was written by Chris Lamb, Ximin Luo, Vagrant Cascadian, Holger Levsen and reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC.

Catégories: Elsewhere

groups.drupal.org frontpage posts: Drupal Accepted into Google Code-In 2016

Planet Drupal - lun, 07/11/2016 - 18:11

Proud to announce that Drupal was officially accepted to participate in Google's Code-In 2016 contest. More info @ https://codein.withgoogle.com/

At this point, Drupal needs mentors. Please contact me directly if interested in mentoring a few tasks or many tasks over next few months. We need all the help we can find. Tasks for GCI are meant to be easier for students ages 13-17. Amount of effort to mentor a few tasks is actually easy and enjoyable.

Not interested in mentoring, but have tasks for students? Do you want someone to write/test patches or create video tutorials for your module? Ping me for access to our task spreadsheet and add as many tasks as you want.

Chat with us in real time on IRC @ Freenode in #drupal-google

Catégories: Elsewhere

Evolving Web: Using Configuration Management and Git in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - lun, 07/11/2016 - 15:55

Drupal 8 Configuration Managment (CM) is a "killer feature" for a web Content Management System (CMS). When setting up a Drupal site, we spend a lot of time on site configuration: Roles, Permissions, Content Types, Menus, Vocabularies, etc. In most CMS's, all these changes are stored in their databases, making it hard to deploy, track, reuse and rollback important changes.

read more
Catégories: Elsewhere

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