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ImageX Media: Speeding up your MySQL dump/restores with Mydumper

Planet Drupal - ven, 07/11/2014 - 23:39
Why Mydumper?

How many times in your last web development project have you had to load a mysql/mariadb database? If your answer was "too many", and you've been frustrated by how slow the process can be, this article may be for you.

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Appnovation Technologies: How to Use Drupal REST Services with AngularJs

Planet Drupal - ven, 07/11/2014 - 23:20

In a previous post I showed how to use Drupal 8 RESTful services.

var switchTo5x = false;stLight.options({"publisher":"dr-75626d0b-d9b4-2fdb-6d29-1a20f61d683"});
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Mediacurrent: Why Drupal is the Right Fit for Higher Ed

Planet Drupal - ven, 07/11/2014 - 21:35

After speaking to dozens of higher ed institutions over the last several years, I’m convinced now more than ever that open source technology, particularly Drupal, is the best fit for these organizations. I know I’m echoing what many in the Drupal community have observed for a while, but I’d like to describe why Drupal makes so much sense for higher ed.

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CMS Quick Start: Publishing Drupal 7 Content to Social Media: Part 1

Planet Drupal - ven, 07/11/2014 - 20:55

 Streamlined workflows are important for sites of any size. Today it is very common to update your readers via multiple social sites, namely Twitter and Facebook. However, it can be tedious sometimes to update your site, then update Facebook and Twitter separately with the correct links (especially if you publish a lot of content). In this series we are going to explore different ways of pushing content to your social media platforms automatically.

read more

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Richard Hartmann: Release Critical Bug report for Week 45

Planet Debian - ven, 07/11/2014 - 18:28

WE ARE FROZEN!

Please note that Lucas hacked a "key packages" count into this list. If you have spare cycles, look at those first.

I hope to have a (somewhat) random bug of the week thingie by next week which picks stalled bugs for increased exposure.

As you can see, we are a bit worse than in the Squeeze cycle, but way ahead of Wheezy. Stats with proper diffs will also start next week.

The UDD bugs interface currently knows about the following release critical bugs:

  • In Total: 1154 (Including 190 bugs affecting key packages)
    • Affecting Jessie: 295 (key packages: 150) That's the number we need to get down to zero before the release. They can be split in two big categories:
      • Affecting Jessie and unstable: 229 (key packages: 116) Those need someone to find a fix, or to finish the work to upload a fix to unstable:
        • 22 bugs are tagged 'patch'. (key packages: 12) Please help by reviewing the patches, and (if you are a DD) by uploading them.
        • 14 bugs are marked as done, but still affect unstable. (key packages: 8) This can happen due to missing builds on some architectures, for example. Help investigate!
        • 193 bugs are neither tagged patch, nor marked done. (key packages: 96) Help make a first step towards resolution!
      • Affecting Jessie only: 66 (key packages: 34) Those are already fixed in unstable, but the fix still needs to migrate to Jessie. You can help by submitting unblock requests for fixed packages, by investigating why packages do not migrate, or by reviewing submitted unblock requests.
        • 37 bugs are in packages that are unblocked by the release team. (key packages: 24)
        • 29 bugs are in packages that are not unblocked. (key packages: 10)

How do we compare to the Squeeze release cycle?

Week Squeeze Wheezy Diff 43 284 (213+71) 468 (332+136) +184 (+119/+65) 44 261 (201+60) 408 (265+143) +147 (+64/+83) 45 261 (205+56) 425 (291+134) +164 (+86/+78) 46 271 (200+71) 401 (258+143) +130 (+58/+72) 47 283 (209+74) 366 (221+145) +83 (+12/+71) 48 256 (177+79) 378 (230+148) +122 (+53/+69) 49 256 (180+76) 360 (216+155) +104 (+36/+79) 50 204 (148+56) 339 (195+144) +135 (+47/+90) 51 178 (124+54) 323 (190+133) +145 (+66/+79) 52 115 (78+37) 289 (190+99) +174 (+112/+62) 1 93 (60+33) 287 (171+116) +194 (+111/+83) 2 82 (46+36) 271 (162+109) +189 (+116/+73) 3 25 (15+10) 249 (165+84) +224 (+150/+74) 4 14 (8+6) 244 (176+68) +230 (+168/+62) 5 2 (0+2) 224 (132+92) +222 (+132/+90) 6 release! 212 (129+83) +212 (+129/+83) 7 release+1 194 (128+66) +194 (+128/+66) 8 release+2 206 (144+62) +206 (+144/+62) 9 release+3 174 (105+69) +174 (+105/+69) 10 release+4 120 (72+48) +120 (+72/+48) 11 release+5 115 (74+41) +115 (+74/+41) 12 release+6 93 (47+46) +93 (+47/+46) 13 release+7 50 (24+26) +50 (+24/+26) 14 release+8 51 (32+19) +51 (+32/+19) 15 release+9 39 (32+7) +39 (+32/+7) 16 release+10 20 (12+8) +20 (+12/+8) 17 release+11 24 (19+5) +24 (+19/+5) 18 release+12 2 (2+0) +2 (+2/+0)

Graphical overview of bug stats thanks to azhag:

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Martin-Éric Racine: HEL has just frozen over. Wait. No. Debian did.

Planet Debian - ven, 07/11/2014 - 18:17
Noticing that Debian just entered its freeze, I went ahead and changed the APT sources on a spare host that is currently running stable. Then, it was time for this command to be executed:

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install dpkg apt locales && sudo apt-get --purge dist-upgrade &&a; sudo apt-get --fix-policy install && sudo apt-get --purge autoremove $(deborphan --guess-all)

I guess I'll be busy filing bug reports for the next few hours. Wish me (and each faulty package's maintainer) luck!

PS: apparently, so many aspects of Debian have become dependent upon GPG features that merely upgrading APT, DPKG and libc6+locales is no longer enough. One must also upgrade gnupg and gnupg2. Thus, the second element of the above recipe has become: sudo apt-get install dpkg apt locales gnupg gnupg2. Hopefully, APT's dist-upgrade command already knows that these must be upgraded first...
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Deeson: Using PhpStorm's Live Templates for t functions

Planet Drupal - ven, 07/11/2014 - 18:00

At Deeson's PhpStorm is our IDE of choice. Working with PhpStorm's Live Templates can save you some valueable time. In this post I'll show you how to use Live Templates to surround strings in simple t functions in template files.

Live templates

PhpStorm’s Live Templates are chunks of code which can be quickly inserted into a file. Surround Live Templates allow you to select a piece of text and surround it with template.

Drupal's t function

It's Drupal best practice to wrap all strings in a t function - this allow the sting to be translated. In a template file this looks like:

<span><?php print t('This is good Practice'); ?></span>

On most sites there will be hundreds of these strings, so anything that can shave off time will be worthwhile.

Take a look

Here’s an example of Surround Live Templates in action. It’s quick and easy to surround a string with a simple t function.

PhpStorm Live Templates and T function

Shortcuts

To show the Surround Live Template list on Macs use Cmd+Alt+J and if you are on a Windows machine use Ctrl+Alt+J.

Setting up Live Templates

To set up a Surround Live Template, go to Preferences > Live Templates and click the plus symbol in the top right of the window.

A Surround Live Template needs to have ‘$SELECTION$’ in it, which is replaced with the selected text. The template also need to be available in the correct contexts.

Here's one I prepared earlier...

Have a go

To set up this T string Surround Live Template, the template text needs to be:

<?php print t('$SELECTION$'); ?>

It needs to be applicable in the ‘HTML’ context.

That’s it! You should now be able to use the template. Let us know if you've got any PhpStorm tips too.

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Drupal.org frontpage posts for the Drupal planet: Drupal 7.33 released

Planet Drupal - ven, 07/11/2014 - 16:37

Drupal 7.33, a maintenance release with numerous bug fixes (no security fixes) is now available for download. See the Drupal 7.33 release notes for a full listing.

Download Drupal 7.33

Upgrading your existing Drupal 7 sites is recommended. There are no major new features in this release. For more information about the Drupal 7.x release series, consult the Drupal 7.0 release announcement.

Security information

We have a security announcement mailing list and a history of all security advisories, as well as an RSS feed with the most recent security advisories. We strongly advise Drupal administrators to sign up for the list.

Drupal 7 includes the built-in Update Manager module, which informs you about important updates to your modules and themes.

There are no security fixes in this release of Drupal core.

Bug reports

Drupal 7.x is being maintained, so given enough bug fixes (not just bug reports), more maintenance releases will be made available, according to our monthly release cycle.

Changelog

Drupal 7.33 contains bug fixes and small API/feature improvements only. The full list of changes between the 7.32 and 7.33 releases can be found by reading the 7.33 release notes. A complete list of all bug fixes in the stable 7.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Update notes

See the 7.33 release notes for details on important changes in this release.

Known issues

None.

Front page news: Planet DrupalDrupal version: Drupal 7.x
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Niels Thykier: Release sprint – Preparing for Jessie

Planet Debian - ven, 07/11/2014 - 15:52

The release team are doing a sprint right now up the mini-DebConf in Cambridge, kindly hosted by ARM.

We have a fairly large agenda of around 10 items, ranging from “simple” things like determine the name for the next release to reviewing the list of RC bugs affecting Jessie.

Personally, I am very pleased with our progress.  We managed to finish 8 of items on the first day.  Furthermore, we spent several hours on the RC bug list and keeping up with the unblock requests.

There is also live status of the release team, courtesy of Jonathan Wiltshire.  Mind you it is manually updated.

We will announce the results of our sprint Sunday morning in our Release update talk.  The announcement will also be posted to debian-devel-announce like our freeze announcement.

 


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Code Karate: Drupal 7 Exclude Node Title Module

Planet Drupal - ven, 07/11/2014 - 13:37
Episode Number: 177

Have you ever had to try to hide a title on a page in Drupal? Maybe you created a page to be your front page and don't want the Node title to show up. The Exclude Node Title module makes this situation or any other situation in which you need to hide a node title, as simple as a few clicks of the mouse.

Tags: DrupalDrupal 7Drupal Planet
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Andrew Cater

Planet Debian - ven, 07/11/2014 - 13:09
At mini-Debconf Cambridge:

Much unintentional chaos and hilarity and world class problem solving yesterday.

A routine upgrade from Wheezy - Jessie died horribly on my laptop when UEFI variable space filled, leaving No Operating System on screen.

Cue much running around: Chris Boot, Colin Walters, Steve dug around, booted the system usng rescue CD and so on. Lots more digging, including helpful posts by mjg59 - a BIOS update may solve the problem.

Flashing BIOS did clear the variables and variable space and it all worked perfectly thereafter. This had the potential for turning the laptop into a brick under UEFI (but still working under legacy boot).

As it is, it all worked perfectly - but where else would you get _the_ Grub maintainer, 2 x UEFI experts and a broken laptop all in the same room ?

If it hadn't happened yesterday, it would have happened at home and I'd have been left with nothing. As it is, we all learnt/remembered stuff and had a useful time fixing it.
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Andrew Cater

Planet Debian - ven, 07/11/2014 - 12:55
Here at the Debian mini-conf in Cambridge at ARM.

16 developers sat in near-total silence, the only noise keyboards and a server sitting next to me.

Some of them I've seen only on video presentations: one I first knew 20 years ago, one wrote all the HOWTO's I knew a couple of years before that - and was the second Linux user ever.

The release team is in another room behind me: Jessie froze the night before last - whatever else will be said/done, we're on the path to release.

It feels very strange and comforting to see Debian in the round: to be able to talk to someone you might argue with in email and see a real person.

And HUGE thanks to all at ARM for time, effort, chasing around and to Sledge and Jo  Jo most of all for being stuck on a front desk waiting for people :)


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Steinar H. Gunderson: xkcd

Planet Debian - ven, 07/11/2014 - 12:04

Achievement unlocked: xkcd today has a comic about a product where I was part of the initial launch team. I suppose my work here is done.

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Johannes Schauer: automatically suspending cpu hungry applications

Planet Debian - ven, 07/11/2014 - 09:51

TLDR: Using the awesome window manager: how to automatically send SIGSTOP and SIGCONT to application windows when they get unfocused or focused, respectively, to let the application not waste CPU cycles when not in use.

I don't require any fancy looking GUI, so my desktop runs no full-blown desktop environment like Gnome or KDE but instead only awesome as a light-weight window manager. Usually, the only application windows I have open are rxvt-unicode as my terminal emulator and firefox/iceweasel with the pentadactyl extension as my browser. Thus, I would expect that CPU usage of my idle system would be pretty much zero but instead firefox decides to constantly eat 10-15%. Probably to update some GIF animations or JavaScript (or nowadays even HTML5 video animations). But I don't need it to do that when I'm not currently looking at my browser window. Disabling all JavaScript is no option because some websites that I need for uni or work are just completely broken without JavaScript, so I have to enable it for those websites.

Solution: send SIGSTOP when my firefox window looses focus and send SIGCONT once it gains focus again.

The following addition to my /etc/xdg/awesome/rc.lua does the trick:

local capi = { timer = timer }
client.add_signal("focus", function(c)
if c.class == "Iceweasel" then
awful.util.spawn("kill -CONT " .. c.pid)
end
end)
client.add_signal("unfocus", function(c)
if c.class == "Iceweasel" then
local timer_stop = capi.timer { timeout = 10 }
local send_sigstop = function ()
timer_stop:stop()
if client.focus ~= c then
awful.util.spawn("kill -STOP " .. c.pid)
end
end
timer_stop:add_signal("timeout", send_sigstop)
timer_stop:start()
end
end)

Since I'm running Debian, the class is "Iceweasel" and not "Firefox". When the window gains focus, a SIGCONT is sent immediately. I'm executing kill because I don't know how to send UNIX signals from lua directly.

When the window looses focus, then the SIGSTOP signal is only sent after a 10 second timeout. This is done for several reasons:

  • I don't want firefox to stop in cases where I'm just quickly switching back and forth between it and other application windows
  • When firefox starts, it doesn't have a window for a short time. So without a timeout, the process would start but immediately get stopped as there is no window to have a focus.
  • when using the X paste buffer, then the application behind the source window must not be stopped when pasting content from it. I assume that I will not spend more than 10 seconds between marking a string in firefox and pasting it into another window

With this change, when I now open htop, the process consuming most CPU resources is htop itself. Success!

I haven't encountered any disadvantages of this setup yet. If 10 seconds prove to be too short to copy and paste I can easily extend this delay. Even clicking on links in my terminal works flawlessly - the new tab will just only load once firefox gets focused again.

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Russ Allbery: On tolerating personal abuse

Planet Debian - ven, 07/11/2014 - 06:04

While I don't consider myself part of the science fiction community directly (my con-going days are probably over), I do follow it across a wide variety of blogs. There are a lot of hard conversations and considerable soul-searching going on right now concerning an on-line commentator in that community who had been nasty and vicious to people, but originally for reasons that many people thought were good causes. (I had been one of those people. It's always very, very tempting to appreciate a good vitriolic rant from someone who shares your world view. And very easy to lose track of the people those rants are aimed at, or the excesses to which those rants go.)

I'm not going to go into the details of the SF community issues here, since I have no context other than what I've read, and it's something to work out within that community. But I've been taking it as a useful reminder that abusive behavior not acceptable, even if it comes from people who are arguably on your side.

Anger is important. Anger is often how the world changes. But anger and abuse are not the same thing.

I wrote something a little bit ago in a different context. Given that reminder, and given some of the arguments that are going on in the free software community as well, it seemed like a good idea to post a somewhat edited version of it in a more public place:

None of us should be willing to continue to participate in a project in which we're expected to tolerate being abused and attacked, and all consequences of that abuse are our problem to deal with. It is simply not fun, and not motivating, and not interesting, and does not lead to us doing good work.

I say this from lots of hard-won personal experience. I was deeply involved in Usenet governance for many years. I have made all the same arguments that I see today in favor of "blunt" speech, vitriol, and attacks. I have been a passionate advocate for the "free speech" approach. I have told other people to just filter and use killfiles. I have said that words aren't worth getting worked up about, and it's easy to ignore people.

I was wrong.

It took a long time for me to figure out that I was wrong, not just for other people, but for myself as well. It took me much longer to walk away from Usenet governance for good because the environment was too toxic. It remains one of the best decisions I have ever made in my life. It was the best bit of self-care that I ever did.

I learned from that experience, and earlier this year, I walked away from a job for related reasons. I enjoyed the work, the job was much easier than the job that I have now, and I had a lot of time to work on free software and on Debian, but the emotional environment was toxic. (It was not as openly abusive, but it was an environment of disrespect, hierarchical dominance games, fear, blame, and emotional blackmail.) As a result, I've had to shift priorities considerably, but I'm a much happier person. It's worth having less time for things that I was previously enjoying to not to have to deal with an emotionally negative and confrontational environment. Life is too short, and I have the luxury of having choices.

Both of those incidents taught me that it's very easy for me to leave that sort of situation to fester for too long, and that I underestimate how much of an improvement it is for my quality of life to walk away from abusive and negative emotional situations. I am belatedly learning how to be more ready and willing to do this.

I very much understand the people who are concerned with ensuring there is space for strongly-worded opinions and heartfelt anger.

But we have to draw a line, and that line needs to rule out emotional abuse of people in our community even in the name of passionate polemics about something that's important. We have to enforce that line, and if that means ejecting people from our community, that's what we have to do. Because, if we don't, we're also ejecting people from our community: the quiet people, the people who are just trying to get work done, or the people who have had past experience with abusive environments and understand the need to bail when an environment starts going in that direction.

I'm not going to put up with the sort of environment I put up with when doing Big Eight newsgroup creation. I'm not saying this as some sort of threat -- I'm saying this to try to be very clear that not standing up for the members of our community and not supporting each other against abuse and emotional attacks also has consequences, and will destroy that community for a lot of us. I'm saying that I am not interested in living in an environment of fear and blame. And one should never underestimate the human power of giving people space and community in which they can be comfortable, relaxed, and truly happy.

Walking the line between this stance and the "tone argument," in which people who are being abused or disenfranchised are attacked for being angry, is very difficult. There are some helpful rules of thumb, such as distinguishing between punching up and punching down, but those rules of thumb can fail or be distorted, as the SF community is learning. It's important that people be able to express anger. It's also important that people be able to name names and identify specific behaviors that they believe are worthy of that anger. But when that anger escalates into attacks, there is a real danger that passionate righteousness turns into passionate abusiveness, a danger of losing the sense of community in our own sense of righteousness. And that's not something we can or should accept.

It's going to take a lot of hard work, a lot of open conversation, and a lot of empathy and care to find that line. There are many things in the world right now that should provoke anger, and with that anger comes power for good. But with that anger can also come a destructive blindness. The anger I want is the anger that drives us to change the world together, the anger that leads to confronting others with a reflection of their own better natures and challenging them to become better, more compassionate people. The anger that leads a man to feed the homeless in the true meaning of civil disobedience. Not the anger that crushes our enemies.

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Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppRedis 0.1.2

Planet Debian - ven, 07/11/2014 - 03:34

A new release of RcppRedis is now on CRAN. It contains additional commands for hashes and sets, all contributed by John Laing and Whit Armstrong.

Changes in version 0.1.2 (2014-11-06)
  • New commands execv, hset, hget, sadd, srem, and smembers contributed by John Laing and Whit Armstrong over several pull requests.

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the most recent release. As always, more detailed information is on the RcppRedis page page.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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tanay.co.in: Cracking Acquia Certified Developer - Front end Specialist Certification

Planet Drupal - ven, 07/11/2014 - 02:46

I had a chance to try the upcoming (Drupal) Acquia Certified Developer - Front end Specialist Certification Exam. Thanks to Acquia Certification Team for allowing me to try it out.

 

I have been able to clear it with an 83% score. That was way beyond what I was expecting. I expected the exam to focus heavily on advanced CSS and JS and hence was not expecting a good score. But it turned out the exam gives good weightage to Drupal theming and templating and various other concepts in Drupal that gave me a fair chance to score.

 

The exam evaluates you on the following areas:

  • Fundamental Web Development Concepts

  • Theming Concepts

  • Sub-Theming Concepts

  • Templates

  • Template Functions

  • Layout Configuration

  • Performance

  • Security

 

The official exam blue print and curriculum is not released by Acquia yet. So I do not have the links here for you. They should be out soon. The exam is scheduled to be released for public on December 1st.

 

But for any of you taking the exam pre-release, or if you are planning to take the exam immediately after the release, here is some information for you that could help you in your preparation before the official study guide comes out.

 

Fundamental Web Development Concepts

There were questions about CSS, JS, Jquery. Some of the resources that could help:

 

CSS Selectors:

 

Positioning:

 

Javascript and Jquery: (The below ones are too generic. But I would recommend a full refresher of jquery and javascript if you are a backend developer attempting the certification)

 

Drupal + Javascript:

 

Drupal + CSS

 

Responsive Web Design:

 

Grid Systems:

  • A fair idea of any one of those CSS grid systems would help

 

HTML 5:

 

Theming Concepts

You should make yourself thoroughly familiar with all the Theming and Advanced Theming chapters in The Definitive Guide to Drupal 7.

 

 

Sub- Theming Concepts

 

Layout Configuration Templates Template Functions:

 

Performance:

 

Security:

 

This notes is very specific to the Front End Specialist Certification. If you are looking for Acquia Certified Developer examination, check out my previous post on Cracking Acquia Drupal Certification.

 

Drop in your comments below if you have any additional resources that would help in the exam preparation that I have missed above.

 

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Wim Leers: Drupal 8's render pipeline

Planet Drupal - ven, 07/11/2014 - 00:59

In Drupal 8, we’ve significantly improved the way pages are rendered. I will explain the entire render pipeline, which will also cover:

  • render caching — blocks and entities are now render cached automatically!
  • cache tags — finally we have the cache invalidation system we’ve always needed!
  • assets — only the necessary assets are loaded anymore, thanks to asset dependencies!
  • bubbling — rather than relying on global statics that broke caching, we now correctly bubble up all attached metadata — no more frustrations!

But I will also explain what is going to be possible in Drupal 8:

  • anonymous page loads: invalidating Varnish/CDNs with perfect precision
  • authenticated page loads: not completely regenerated on every page load, but assembled from render cached parts
  • alternative render strategies, like Big Pipe

Where relevant, I’ll compare with Drupal 7, how you can write Drupal 7 code today that will be easy to upgrade to Drupal 8, and which Drupal 7 backports exist (hint: Big Pipe does exist!).

Slides: Drupal 8's render pipelineConference: DrupalCamp GhentLocation: Ghent, BelgiumDate: Nov 7 2014 - 09:30Duration: 45 minutesExtra information: 

See http://ghent2014.drupalcamp.be/sessions/drupal-8s-render-pipeline.

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Daniel Kahn Gillmor: GnuPG 2.1.0 in debian experimental

Planet Debian - ven, 07/11/2014 - 00:27
Today, i uploaded GnuPG 2.1.0 into debian's experimental suite. It's built for amd64 and i386 and powerpc already. You can monitor its progress on the buildds to see when it's available for your architecture.

Changes

GnuPG 2.1 offers many new and interesting features, but one of the most important changes is the introduction of elliptic curve crypto (ECC). While GnuPG 2.1 discourages the creation of ECC keys by default, it's important that we have the ability to verify ECC signatures and to encrypt to ECC keys if other people are using this tech. It seems likely, for example, that Google's End-To-End Chrome OpenPGP extension will use ECC. Users who don't have this capability available won't be able to communicate with End-To-End users.

There are many other architectural changes, including a move to more daemonized interactions with the outside world, including using dirmngr to talk to the keyservers, and relying more heavily on gpg-agent for secret key access. The gpg-agent change is a welcome one -- the agent now holds the secret key material entirely and never releases it -- as of 2.1 gpg2 never has any asymmetric secret key material in its process space at all.

One other nice change for those of us with large keyrings is the new keybox format for public key material. This provides much faster indexed access to the public keyring.

I've been using GnuPG 2.1.0 betas regularly for the last month, and i think that for the most part, they're ready for regular use.

Timing for debian

The timing between the debian freeze and the GnuPG upstream is unfortunate, but i don't think i'm prepared to push for this as a jessie transition yet, without more backup. I'm talking to other members of the GnuPG packaging team to see if they think this is worth even bringing to the attention of the release team, but i'm not pursuing it at the moment.

If you really want to see this in debian jessie, please install the experimental package and let me know how it works for you.

Long term migration concerns

GnuPG upstream is now maintaining three branches concurrently: modern (2.1.x), stable (2.0.x), and classic (1.4.x). I think this is stretches the GnuPG upstream development team too thin, and we should do what we can to help them transition to supporting fewer releases concurrently.

In the long-term, I'd ultimately like to see gnupg 2.1.x to replace all use of gpg 1.4.x and gpg 2.0.x in debian, but unlikely to to happen right now.

In particular, the following two bugs make it impossible to use my current, common monkeysphere workflow:

And GnuPG 2.1.0 drops support for the older, known-weak OpenPGPv3 key formats. This is an important step for simplification, but there are a few people who probably still need to use v3 keys for obscure/janky reasons, or have data encrypted to a v3 key that they need to be able to decrypt. Those people will want to have GnuPG 1.4 around.

Call for testing

Anyway, if you use debian testing or unstable, and you are interested in these features, i invite you to install `gnupg2` and its friends from experimental. If you want to be sensibly conservative, i recommend backing up `~/.gnupg` before trying to use it:

cp -aT .gnupg .gnupg.bak sudo apt install -t experimental gnupg2 gnupg-agent dirmngr gpgsm gpgv2 scdaemon If you find issues, please file them via the debian BTS as usual. I (or other members of the pkg-gnupg team) will help you triage them to upstream as needed.

Tags: ecc, experimental, gnupg

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Mediacurrent: Drupal 8 Theming Update

Planet Drupal - jeu, 06/11/2014 - 22:46

This webinar is an update to Dante Taylor’s TWIG: Getting Started in Drupal 8 presentation from October 2013. The most significant change to Drupal 8 theming is the introduction of the Classy Theme, which was part of the 8.0.0-beta2 release last month. In a nutshell, Classy is a base theme for those who want to have templates with the core classes. Setting Classy as a base is simple—add the following line to the theme.info.yml file inside the theme directory:

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