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PreviousNext: Boosting performance of a complex Drupal 7 project with Blackfire.io

Planet Drupal - lun, 24/08/2015 - 01:49

Earlier in the year we worked with a household Australian name to help them build a next-generation more-performant version of their energy-comparison site.

We used Blackfire.io to optimize the critical elements of the site.

Read on to find out more about our experience.

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Norbert Preining: Debian/TeX Live complete update

Planet Debian - lun, 24/08/2015 - 00:50

Triggered by all the bugs around font problems I spent my weekend instead of mountaineering with crawling through the TeX Live history for changes and fixes to dvipdfm-x. Thanks to 角藤さん for his hints, I have pulled out the changes necessary to fix Type1 support in dvipdfm-x and have reincluded them into the Debian texlive-bin package. The uploaded binaries (version 2015.20150524.37493-6) are already compiled against the new C++ ABI, see the Debian transition, so most systems will still need to wait for the update to be installable.

At the same time I did an update to the whole set of arch: all packages (texlive-base, texlive-lang, texlive-extra (version 2015.20150823-1). This was triggered by bug that seems to be caused by bad interplay between fontspec and l3 packages. Furthermore, I needed to remove the activation for fontconfig of the URW++ Base35 fonts, to ensure that fontconfig returns always the ones from the gsfonts package, instead of a mixture between TeX Live and gsfonts.

Unrelated bug fix: libpaper intergration has been fixed and should work again. So for now all the bugs are now hopefully settled and we are back to normal. What remains is trying to fix jessie which is also broken in some respects.

Updated packages

acro, animate, babel-bosnian, babel-french, babel-latin, beamer-FUBerlin, beebe, breqn, chemformula, chet, cnltx, crossrefware, dantelogo, datetime2-it-fulltext, disser, drm, dvipdfmx-def, ecclesiastic, eledform, gradstudentresume, idxcmds, l3build, mcf2graph, media9, pageslts, pdfpages, reledmac, siunitx, tcolorbox, tex4ht, texlive-docindex, texlive-scripts, udesoftec, upmethodology, xindy.

New packages

blochsphere, e-french, fitbox, nar

Enjoy.

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Mark Koester: Using Rules to Periodically Change a Your Drupal Site Configuration and Variables

Planet Drupal - dim, 23/08/2015 - 15:45

Wouldn’t it be cool if you could use Rules to periodically set, change or modify certain Drupal site configurations and variables?

Yeah, it would be cool and nowit is totally do-able with "Rules Set Site Variables”

Below is my use case and a simple recipe on how to use Rules (and a few helper modules) to change site configurations periodically. I imagine you can use it for all kinds of other craziness on your Drupal site.

Use Case: Modifying Node.Js Host Configuration Variable on Schedule

We are huge fans of Drupal and Node.js and use it on multiple integration projects. Combined together, Drupal provides powerful information handling and Node.js handles real-time scalability.

We use Heroku to handle our free, node.js Chatroom Demo site. Unfortunately, Heroku is ending its policy of forever free dyno and moving towards a limited free usage of 18 hours per day. It’s an understandable, business change. For our free Drupal, Node.js chatroom demo, this means I’d need to pay $7 per month to keep the site up and show the [amazingness of Drupal and Node.js](http://int3c.com/tags/nodejs OR shut down the site.

So, instead of paying this (I’m cheap), I decided to setup two Heroku, Node.js instances and simply use a Drupal cron process to flip my node.js server twice a day.

The end result is that twice a day my Drupal site will change which node.js server it is using and thus prevent me from overusing my free, 18 hour daily limit.

Technically, I could have written some custom code, but being a lazy Drupal developer and site builder, I figured there had to be some way to do this with Rules.

Unfortunately there wasn’t at the time. The only similar solution was Conditional Variables, which would only set a session variable and not a permanent change to the configuration.

My solution was to create "Rules Set Site Variables”, which provides a custom reaction where you set any Drupal site variable. You can read more about that module in "Announcing: Rules Set Site Variables Module.”

In order to solve my use case to switch Heroku Node.js server, the final solution involved using Rules, Rules Once Per Day and "Rules Set Site Variables” as well as a couple of site and rules configurations.

Let’s take a look at how.

Which Modules? Rules, Rules Once Per Day and Rules Set Site Variables

In order to accomplish this task of periodically changing a site configuration, I used three modules (besides whatever else I’m using for Node.js and other parts):

I could have used a different triggering method but Rules Once Per Day was the easiest. Rules Once Per Day creates a Drupal event, which you can control and set to a specific time and which you can use as the triggering event with Rules.

Using "Rules Set Site Variables”, you then have the option of creating a Rules Reaction to set a Drupal variable.

After enabling these modules, there were only a few simple configurations.

Cron and Rules Once Per Day

In order for this to work you are going to need a functioning cron task on your server. This article won’t go into how to configure cron. But essentially for this to work, your server needs to run cron periodically in order to trigger rules and other things. In general you want cron to run every few minutes.

Rules Once Per Day provides a simple configuration setting page where you can configure when you want it to run according to your site time. This means that once a day this event will be triggered and your rules accordingly.

In my case, I use Rules Once a Day to change the site configuration to one of the Node.JS servers, create a future scheduled event in 12 hours and send me an email that the whole thing happened.

Configuring Rules to Change a Variable

Once you have created the event side of the rule, your next step is configuring the relevant action in this case “Set Drupal Site Variable”:

As you can see there are just two parts here: pick the variable you want to change and what text it will be set to.

Setting Up an Additional Rules Scheduled Component

Since I need to have this change every 12 hours, I need two scheduled events. The first scheduled event is from Rules Once a Day. The second event gets scheduled from the first one via a Rules Component.

A Rules Component is basically a conditional action you create that can then be trigger by other things. In this case, it gets scheduled via our original rule.

In order to add this to our original rule, we first need to create a new component and add your reaction events. In this case, I created another “Set Drupal Site Variable” action and another reaction to send me an email.

Packaging it all together

Using Rules, Rules Once a Day, Rules Components and Rules Set Site Variable, the final result is a series of configurable items that work together to switch my heroku node.js site server twice a day.

The rule configuration looks like this:

Conclusion: You can use rules to change site configuration

With "Rules Set Site Variables”, you change site configuration according various site events. In our case we use scheduled cron events to switch our heroku server and save some money.

On a wider level, any site builder can now use rules to modify their site’s configuration. Using a bit more configuration and some helper modules, you can make these changes according to a set schedule.

Live long and prosper Drupal Site Builders.

Tags: drupalDrupal PlanetPlanet DrupalNode.jsRulesSite Builder Mark Koester @markwkoester Mark has worked on Drupal since the early days of D6. He is passionate about open source as well as entrepreneurship. When he isn't building, he enjoys traveling and speaking one of his many foreign languages. Chengdu, China
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Frederic Marand: Logging for MongoDB

Planet Drupal - sam, 22/08/2015 - 19:51

One nice thing during Drupal 7/8 development is the ability, thanks to the devel module, to get a list of all SQL queries ran on a page. As I've been working quite a bit on MongoDB in PHP recently, I wondered how to obtain comparable results when using MongoDB in PHP projects. Looking at the D7 implementation, the magic happens in the Database class:

<?php
// Start logging on the default database.
define(DB_CHANNEL, 'my_logging_channel');
\Database::startLog(DB_CHANNEL);

// Get the log contents, typically in a shutdown handler.
$log = \Database::getLog(DB_CHANNEL);
?>

With DBTNG, that's all it takes, and devel puts it to good use UI-wise. So is there be an equivalent mechanism in MongoDB ? Of course there is !

read more

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Joachim Breitner: Quickest path to a local apt repository

Planet Debian - sam, 22/08/2015 - 15:48

As I’m writing this, DebConf 15 is coming to an end. I spend most of my time improving the situation of the Haskell Packages in Debian, by improving the tooling and upgrading our packages to match Stackage 3.0 and build against GHC 7.10. But that is mostly of special interest (see this mail for a partial summary), so I’d like to use this post to advertise a very small and simple package I just uploaded to Debian:

During one of the discussion here I noticed that it is rather tricky to make a locally built package available to apt-get. The latest version in unstable allows one to install a debian package simply by running apt-get install on it, but in some cases, e.g. when you want a convenient way to list all packages that you made available for local use, this is insufficient.

So the usual approach is to create a local apt repository with your packages. Which is non-trivial: You can use dpkg-scanpackage, apt-ftparchive or reprepro. You need to create the directories, run the commands, add the repository to your local sources. You need to worry about signing it or setting the right options to make apt-get accept it without signing.

It is precisely this work that my new package local-apt-repository automates for you: Once it is installed, you simply drop the .deb file into /srv/local-apt-repository/ and after the next apt-get update the package can be installed like any other package from the archive.

I chose to use the advanced features that systemd provides – namely activation upon path changes – so works best with systemd as the init system.

If you want to contribute, or test it before it passes the NEW queue, check out the git repository.

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Christian Perrier: [LIFE] Running activities - Echappee Belle next week

Planet Debian - sam, 22/08/2015 - 07:47
Hello dear readers,

Next week, I'll be running the "Echappee Belle" race : 144km and 10.000 meters positive climb, in French Alps (Belledonne range, this time).

That will be, by far, my longest race ever and indeed a great challenge for me with very difficult tracks (when there are tracks).

I expect to run for about 48 hours, or even up to 55, two nights out.....or maybe less as I'm in very good shape.

You can follow me on the live tracking site. The race starts on Friday August 28th, 06:00 CET DST.

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flink: Install Apache Solr 5 and Drupal Search API on your laptop in minutes

Planet Drupal - sam, 22/08/2015 - 04:46

We recently had to debug a site for customer who was using Apache Solr and that wonderful Drupal module combo that goes with it: Search API and Search API Solr.
We were pleased to find that these components have continued to evolve over the past years, much to the benefit of their users . Setting up Apache Solr for Drupal is now easier than ever before, whether you use the command line or the newish Solr user interface.

In the steps below we've gone mostly for the point and click install.

1) On the Solr site, hit the download button. This redirects you to a page with a number of mirror sites from which you can download the .tgz. Or the .zip if you prefer.

2) Once downloaded unzip the .tgz or .zip and move it to your favourite application folder. I have fallen in the habit of abusing /Applications for this on my Mac, but you can use almost any folder that works for you.

3) Now cd into the epicentre of your Solr installation. When reading further documentation this is where it is assumed that you execute your Solr commands from:

cd /Applications/solr-5.2.1

4) A quick smoke test is to launch Solr in standalone (as opposed to cloud) mode

$ bin/solr start

Waiting to see Solr listening on port 8983 [/] Started Solr server on port 8983 (pid=10162). Happy searching!

Yay! Our Solr is up and running!

5) Let’s hook it up to Drupal by giving it a Search API configuration to work with. In your solr-5.2.1/server/solr directory create a new directory drupal-search and inside that a directory conf. Then drag all the files residing in /sites/all/modules/search_api_solr/solr-conf/5.x  into  drupal-search/conf.

Or using the command line:

$ mkdir server/solr/drupal-search
$ cp -r [DocumentRoot]]/sites/all/modules/search_api_solr/solr-conf/5.x server/solr/drupal-search/conf

6a) Now open a browser window and visit localhost:8983/solr and click the No cores available — Go and create one menu option in the bottom left. See the screenshot at the top of this article.

6b) Verify by picking "drupal-search" in the core selector drop-down. You should see something like this:

No errors? Great!

7) Revisit your Drupal site on the Search API config page, at admin/config/search/search_api and fill it out as shown below.

Press "Save settings" and you should see lots of green, like the screenshot below.
Check and tweak the configuration if necessary via the Edit tab at the top.

8) Made a mistake? You can delete your Solr core like so:

$ bin/solr delete -c drupal-search

Then try again from step 5) or 6).

* * *

File under: Planet Drupal
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Junichi Uekawa: Back to Tokyo, and it's hot.

Planet Debian - sam, 22/08/2015 - 02:09
Back to Tokyo, and it's hot.

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Norbert Preining: Work-Life Balance at Amazon

Planet Debian - sam, 22/08/2015 - 01:00

Having had personal contact with Amazon employees, and having read the NYT article Inside Amazon: Wrestling Big Ideas in a Bruising Workplace, I have only a few things to say:

  • Most Japanese companies have different methods, but work hours are similar, and exploitation even worse (voluntary service etc)
  • I loved one comment in the MobileRead thread on the article, link to the post:

    All you need to do is make one assumption: dishonest people will outperform honest people over the short term. Then every year Amazon’s “culling” will get rid of the honest people and keep the dishonest ones. Rinse and repeat. Soon only the sociopaths are left.

    Best supporting quote from the article: “You learn how to diplomatically throw people under the bus.”

What remains – I guess I would be a horrible performer at Amazon, and I am proud of it.

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Wuinfo: Should or Could a Drupal Developer Practice Like a Lawyer

Planet Drupal - sam, 22/08/2015 - 00:50

For a small Drupal shop or an individual Drupal consultant, how to grow up? It seems that small Drupal shops face a glass ceiling when they want to move upward. They are not able to find a larger project because they not big enough. It is not trustworthy or not give the stack holder a confidence if there are not a team of developers. Should we solve this problem by working together in a partnership? The Drupal developer is a very technical intensive. Let us follow the way lawyers did in their practice. We get together and build a strong team.

What is the benefit to run a Drupal shop in a partnership?
1) It is easy to setup unless we want to form an LLP partnership. As a professional Drupal Freelance, we may have some client already. Initial partners sign an agreement and form a partnership with some existing customers already.

2) A good size team gives confidence to customers. It is going to be easier to win a bigger project.

3) Having a partnership formed, we can recruit more junior developers and train them.

The challenge here is we never did it before. We do may not have any ways to follow. A comprehensive partnership agreement is needed. Here are some important things that we need think through before we form a partnership:
1) Types of Partnerships (General Partnership or Limited Liability Partnership)
2) Governance and Decision-Making
3) Partner Compensation
4) Capital Contribution
5) Overhead and Liabilities
6) Parental Leaves and Sabbaticals
7) Retirement and Termination.

Professional Drupal developers will benefit by practicing partnership in professional service. A reputable good size team is capable of catch and deliver bigger and more profitable projects.

Drupal developers provide highly skilled professional service. Lawyers give professional service related law. Lawyers have lawyer office to provide their service in a decent way. Why not copy the way how they did it to provide our Drupal service.

Referred document: http://www.cba.org/cba/PracticeLink/WWP/agreement.aspx

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Rhonda D'Vine: DebConf15

Planet Debian - ven, 21/08/2015 - 23:00

I tried to start to write this blog entry like I usually do: Type along what goes through my mind and see where I'm heading. This won't work out right now for various reasons, mostly because there is so much going on that I don't have the time to finish that in a reasonable time and I want to publish this today still. So please excuse me for being way more brief than I usually am, and hopefully I'll find the time to expand some things when asked or come back to that later.

Part of the reason of me being short on time is different stuff going on in my private life which requires additional attention. A small part of this is also something that I hinted in a former blog entry: I switched my job in June. I really was looking forward to this. I made them aware of what the name Rhonda means to me and it's definitely extremely nice to be addressed with female pronouns at work. And also I'm back in a system administration job which means there is an interest overlap with my work on Debian, so a win-win situation on sooo many levels!

I'm at DebConf15 since almost two weeks now. On my way here I was complimented on my outfit by a security guard at the Vienna airport which surprised me but definitely made my day. I was wearing one of these baggy hippie pants (which was sent to me by a fine lady I met at MiniDebConf Bucharest) but pulled up the leg parts to the knees so it could be perceived as a skirt instead. Since I came here I was pretty busy with taking care of DCschedule bot adjustments (like, changing topic and twittering from @DebConf at the start of the talks), helping out with the video team when I noticed there was a lack of people (which is a hint for that you might want to help with the video team in the future too, it's important for remote people but also for yourself because you can't attend multiple sessions at the same time).

And I have to repeat myself, this is the place I feel home amongst my extended family, even though I it still is sometimes for me to get to speak up in certain groups. I though believe it's more an issue of certain individuals taking up a lot of space in discussions without giving (more shy) people in the round the space to also join in. I guess it might be the time that we need a session on dominant talking patterns for next year and how to work against them. I absolutely enjoyed such a session during last year's FemCamp in Vienna which set the tone for the rest of the conference, and it was simply great.

And then there was the DebConf Poetry Night. I'm kinda disappointed with the outcome this year. It wasn't able to attract as much people anticipated, which I to some degree account to me not making people aware of it well enough, overlapping with a really great band playing at the same time in competition, and even though the place where we did it sounded like a good idea at first, it didn't had enough light for someone to read something from a book (but that was solved through smartphone lights). I know that most people did enjoy it, so it was good to do it, but I'm still a fair bit disappointed with the outcome and will try to work on improving on that grounds for next year. :)

With all this going on there unfortunately wasn't as much time as I would have liked to spend with people I haven't seen for a long time, or new people I haven't met yet. Given that this year's DebConf had an height in attendees (526 being here at certain times during the two weeks, and just today someone new arrived too, so that doesn't even have to be the final number) it makes it a bit painful to have picked up so many tasks and thus lost some chances to socialize as much as I would have liked to.

So, if you are still here and have the feeling we should have talked more, please look for me. As Bdale pointed out correctly in the New to DebConf BoF (paraphrased): When you see us DebConf old timers speaking to someone else and you feel like you don't want to disturb, please do disturb and speak to us. I always enjoyed to get to know new people. This for me always is one of the important aspects of DebConf.

Also, I am very very happy to have received feedback from different people about both my tweets and my blog, thank you a lot of that. It is really motivating to keep going.

So, lets enjoy the last few hours of DebConf!

Another last side notice: While my old name in the Debian LDAP did manage to find some wrongly displayed names in the DebConf website, like for speakers, or volunteers, it was clear to me that having it exposed through SSO.debian.org isn't really something I appreciate. So I took the chance and spoke to Luca from the DSA team right here today, and ... got it fixed. I love it! Next step is getting my gpg key exchanged, RT ticket is coming up. :)

/debian | permanent link | Comments: 1 | Flattr this

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Simon Kainz: DUCK challenge: Final week

Planet Debian - ven, 21/08/2015 - 22:30

Well, here are the stats for the final week of the DUCK challenge as well as DebConf15:

So we had 21 packages fixed and uploaded by 14 different uploaders. People were really working hard on this during DebConf. A big "Thank You" to you!!

Since the start of this challenge, a total of 89 packages, were fixed.

Here is a quick overview:

Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 # Packages 10 15 10 14 10 9 21 Total 10 25 35 49 59 68 89

Thank you all for participating - either on purpose or "accidentially": Some people were really surprised as i sneaked up on them at DebConf15, confronting them with a green lighter! I just tried to put even more fun into Debian, i hope this worked out

Pevious articles are here: Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Week 4, Week 5,Week 6.

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Acquia Developer Center Blog: Now or later? Weighing the benefits of early adoption for Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - ven, 21/08/2015 - 17:36

If you’re considering a switch to Drupal 8, why not become an early adopter? Becoming an early adopter has some risks — and Acquia will work with you to mitigate those risks — but it also has huge benefits.

In this post, I want to talk to you about those benefits and also share with you my experience with Examiner and its early adoption of Drupal 7.

If you’re not familiar with it, Examiner is a news company powered by thousands of self-contributing writers. Currently, it’s read by 22 million people a month. But back in 2009, the company was having problems with its ColdFusion CMS, and those problems were hampering its growth.

Examiner decided to move away from the legacy homegrown platform to Drupal. So they acquired NowPublic, a citizen-journalism company I founded, for its Drupal expertise and leadership. That’s how I became the CTO of Examiner (I later joined Acquia in 2012).

Moving ahead, the big question we faced at Examiner was: Do we go with Drupal 6, a stable but mature technology? Or do we take a bold leap and implement the yet-to-be-released Drupal 7? Ultimately, we chose to become early adopters, going with Drupal 7.  

Here are the reasons that powered that decision:

1) You stay in front of the technology wave

While a good product at the time, there was no denying that Drupal 6 was closer to its end of lifecycle, while Drupal 7 was just taking off. We already understood the costs involved in supporting a legacy product. And we knew any extra investment early on would be offset by things like a longer lifecycle.

As a side note, unlike previous versions of the platform, Drupal 8 releases will come out every six months. So if you plan to become an early adopter of Drupal 8, not only are you taking advantage of the latest and greatest today — but you will continually upgrade to the latest features over the lifecycle of the product.

2) You differentiate yourself from the competitors

At Examiner, we wanted to set ourselves apart from the competition and we knew D7 would give us that edge. AOL was starting to invest in Patch at that time. And we felt that if we wanted to grow our audience and draw the best journalism to our site, we needed best-in-breed tools.  

3) You can attract the top talent

Great developers want to be on the cutting edge. Who wouldn’t want to jump on an opportunity to work full-time on their passion and be able to contribute back to Drupal? When we brought in a great platform at Examiner, we attracted the best Drupal developers in the world. Very quickly, we hired 15 of the top 50 developers in the Drupal community.  

4) You have the opportunity to shape your investment

Getting in on Drupal 7 earlier put us in the driver’s seat with the technology. That was important. We weren’t looking to adopt just any set of tools. We wanted an opportunity to shape the next generation of a platform. And we knew Drupal was going to meet our needs better than anything else out there. Plus, it’s a lot less risky than building your own CMS, because you are not going it alone. You’re going in as part of a community.  

5) It forces you to develop best practices

Being an early adopter forces you to use best practices with respect to software development. At Examiner, we were able to participate in the community and contribute code to the platform. So for us, being an early adopter forced us to do things the right way — and that set a standard within the company moving forward.

After a year of work, Examiner moved to a new platform built on Drupal 7. Thanks to Drupal 7, Examiner went from not being able to meet the needs of its users to exceeding them. We were able to deliver new features on a faster cadence. We had the best-in-breed platform, the easiest to use interfaces, and ultimately those features accelerated the growth of the company.

Examiner launched on Drupal 7 six months before the official release of the platform. We started developing on it almost a year and a half before the release. So we were really early adopters. Examiner faced tremendous risks, because at that time, Drupal 7 was nowhere near as put together as Drupal 8 is today, but we still decided to do it — and it paid off.  Today, Examiner is a top 60 website.

Being an early adopter is definitely an investment. It will cost more to be an early adopter of Drupal 8, but as Examiner has demonstrated, those costs are set off by several factors. And if you are concerned about the risks, keep this in mind: more than 400 sites are already running Drupal 8. And Acquia has already announced we are ready to support anyone with Drupal 8.

What are your thoughts? Do you have any experiences on being an early adopter of Drupal 7? And how do you feel about the risks/benefits of being an early adopter for Drupal 8? We’d love to hear back from you and get the conversation going.

Workflow: PendingFeatured: NoTags: acquia drupal planetDrupal 8 related: YesAuthor: Michael Meyers
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ThinkShout: Relaunching the Southern Poverty Law Center's Website

Planet Drupal - ven, 21/08/2015 - 17:00

When projects get hectic around the office, we remind ourselves “We’re just pushing pixels.” We’re geeks. We sit in an air-conditioned office and play with cutting edge technologies on shiny MacBooks, drinking aeropress coffee. At the same time, we choose to work with nonprofit clients - experienced organizers and passionate advocates working on diverse issues in environmental protection, human rights, early childhood education, access to health care, and community building. We cannot do what they do; but it is wonderful to help them tell their stories and meaningfully engage their constituents online.

Over the last year, we’ve been particularly inspired to have had the chance to collaborate with the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) on the redesign of its website. At the same time, our work with them brought further attention to our team about the many human rights challenges that our country has faced over the last year.

Our initial conversations with SPLC took place days before the death of Eric Garner. And over the year that we’ve been working with the Center, 16 unarmed Black people have been killed by police in the U.S. The Southern Poverty Law Center has been at the forefront of the national conversation about this issue.

If you don’t know SPLC, it is a leading advocacy and educational organization dedicated to fighting hate and bigotry and seeking justice for the most vulnerable members of society. Since 1971, SPLC has been using litigation to fight for civil rights. So hated by the Ku Klux Klan, SPLC’s offices were burned to the ground in 1983 by Alabama Klansmen. Then, in 1987 SPLC won a historic $7 million verdict against the United Klans of America for the 1981 lynching of Michael Donald - effectively bankrupting the KKK and crippling their organization.

In addition to its fight against hate and extremism, SPLC works on a range of human rights issues, such as children’s rights, immigrant justice, economic justice, mass incarceration, and LGBT rights. And so, fortunately, in addition to watching SPLC weigh in tirelessly on the police’s deadly use of force this year, we have also been able to celebrate with its staff over the landmark win over gay marriage bans, as well as the 50th Anniversaries of the March on Selma and the Passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Again, we have nothing to do with the success of this organization, but to collaborate with this team and to be close to their work has been incredible. We couldn’t be more proud of the website that we designed and implemented along with SPLC’s incredible communications team. Over the next few weeks, we will be writing about the many technical and process innovations we had the chance to implement with the SPLC team. In the meantime, we hope that you will take some time to explore their new site and to join us in celebrating and supporting their mission.

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Six Mile Tech: Making a Drupal 8 Contrib Module - The Movie: Raw and Uncut

Planet Drupal - ven, 21/08/2015 - 16:44

As a contrib module developer that is starting to delve into Drupal 8 I wanted to share my experience working with Drupal 8. This is a video of me going through the process of re-creating the contrib module Token Conditions that I had created the week before. Along the way I delve into some new systems in Drupal 8 and give examples of how to figure out how to add functionality to this vastly changed version of Drupal.  

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InternetDevels: How DruDesk works: a closer look at our Drupal support service

Planet Drupal - ven, 21/08/2015 - 14:49

Created and powered by InternetDevels Drupal development company

If your website could speak, there’s one most important thing you would probably hear. And this thing is “Please send me to DruDesk!”. Such a silent request can come up in many cases — let’s see when.

Read more
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Midwestern Mac, LLC: Vagrant web development - is VMware better than VirtualBox?

Planet Drupal - ven, 21/08/2015 - 14:42

My Mac spends the majority of the day running at between one and a dozen VMs. I do all my development (besides iOS or Mac dev) running code inside VMs, and for many years I used VirtualBox, a free virtualization tool, along with Vagrant and Ansible, to build and manage all these VMs.

Since I use build and rebuild dozens of VMs per day, and maintain a popular Vagrant configuration for Drupal development (Drupal VM), as well as dozens of other VMs (like Ansible Vagrant Examples), I am highly motivated to find the fastest and most reliable virtualization software for local development. I switched from VirtualBox to VMware Fusion (which requires a for-pay plugin) a year ago, as a few benchmarks I ran at the time showed VMware was 10-30% faster.

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Drupal Easy: DrupalEasy Podcast 161 - No Custom Code (Jay Epstein - Relativity Data Model)

Planet Drupal - ven, 21/08/2015 - 09:26
Download Podcast 161

Jay Epstein (jeppy64), Senior Developer with TrakTek joins Mike, Ted, and Ryan to talk about his Relativity Data Model and why he feels it is a superior method for architectuing Drupal sites with a limited number of modules and no custom code. We dive into the techniques, contrib modules, and benefits of the model before our weekly roundup of Drupal news and events.

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Catégories: Elsewhere

Norbert Preining: The sins of the past – adding Cyrillic glyphs without renaming fonts

Planet Debian - ven, 21/08/2015 - 02:16

The URW Base35 fonts are a great set of fonts, available for free as in free software. They have been part of various distributions and systems since long time. Big thanks to URW for their work. But these fonts don’t have Cyrillic or Greek glyphs. Be it as it is, world would be easy. People would need to use different fonts for these languages. Comes around someone who did the unthinkable – namely adding the Cyrillic and Greek glyphs to the fonts (by now nothing bad), but then NOT renaming the fonts. Here we see one point of the stupidity of GPL and absolute freedom. Because what we now have is that documents produced several TeX engines (in particular XeTeX and LuaTeX) which use fontconfig to search the fonts, suddenly pick up these changed fonts that fake their identity, and what comes out is this, a complete rubbish:

And now we are suffering huge pain from that. Look at the bug reports of that are coming in:

  • 796120 xdvipdfmx broken
  • 789391 developers reference fonts broken
  • 787759 fonts broken in dblatex

Just to name a few. And there is a simple way to circumvent this: Don’t install gsfonts which guarantees that fontconfig finds the real original URW fonts within the TeX Live tree first.

I have now spent many hours to track down these problems, find the reason, and at the end of the day there is always gsfonts with its broken fonts with added Cyrillic glyphs. I honestly don’t care about the history, there are now many fonts with Cyrillic and Greek glyphs, there is no need to fake fonts, and incorrectly take over font names.

This should be a lesson to all the GPL zealots that require absolute freedom of each and everything. Unfortunately things don’t work like that. Using AND RENAMING is ok, the Knuth license as I would say, but anything else is just a source of much pain.

End for today, I have to go to work now. Real work instead of fighting sins of the past.

Nothing to enjoy here.

Additional information Just to let you know, before starting a flame war, I have already contacted the upstream developers, that is TeX Live, and explained them the situation. I don’t see much chance for fixing, since the problem is with fonts without upstream and support, which are probably only used in Debian (I haven’t seen them anywhere else but some mentioning in RH), and which are not officially supported or distributed. It really needs a nice developer to look into why this breakage appeared. Let us hope. And instead of flaming, anyone here is invited to dig into the code him/herself and search for changes.

Additional information 2015-08-22 Just to back up my complaints and counteract several of the comments: I am quoting from an email of a colleague on the list where we are discussing the problem:

However, the fonts extended by Valek Filippov are quite problematic. The Type1 spec clearly requires that there may not exist two different fonts with the same /FontName. The modified fonts shipped with Ghostscript have the same /FontName as the original fonts donated by URW and not even the /UniqueID was changed. IMO they are broken because they don’t comply with the Type1 specification.

I hope that convinced also the last in doubt.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Savas Labs: Sassy Drupal theming: Setting up Bourbon and Neat

Planet Drupal - ven, 21/08/2015 - 02:00

When Savas built a custom Drupal 8 theme, we needed to include a grid framework and chose Bourbon's Neat for its ease of use, its light weight, and the library of useful Sass mixins provided by Bourbon. In this post I detail how to set all of this up and use Compass to compile SCSS.

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Catégories: Elsewhere

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