Elsewhere

DebConf team: Talks review and selection process. (Posted by René Mayorga)

Planet Debian - dim, 20/07/2014 - 16:10

Today we finished the talk selection process. We are very grateful to everyone who decided to submit talks and events for DebConf14.

If you have submitted an event, please check your email :). If you have not received any confirmation regarding your talk status, please contact us on talks@debconf.org

During the selection process, we bore in mind the number of talk slots during the conference, as well as maintaining a balance among the different submitted topics. We are pleased to announce that we have received a total of 115 events, of which 80 have been approved (69%). Approval means your event will be scheduled during the conference and you will be guaranteed to have video coverage.

The list of approved talks can be found on the following link: https://summit.debconf.org/debconf14/all/

If you got an email telling your talk have being approved, and your talk is not listed, don’t panic. Check the status on summit, and make sure to select a track, if you have some track suggestions please mail us and tell us about it.

This year, we expect to also have a sort of “unconference” schedule. This will take place during the designated “hacking time”. During that time the talks rooms will be empty, and ad hoc meetings can be scheduled on-site while we are in the Conference. The method for booking a room for your ad hoc meeting will be decided and announced later, but is expected to be flexible (i.e: open scheduling board / 1 day or less in advance booking), Please don’t abuse the system: bear in mind the space will be limited, and only book your event if you gather enough people to work on your idea.

Please make sure to read the email regarding your talk. :) and prepare yourself.

Time is ticking and we will be happy to meet you in Portland.

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Larry Garfield: An open letter to conference organizers

Planet Drupal - dim, 20/07/2014 - 01:51

Let's be honest, I spend a lot of time at conferences. Over the past 2 years or so I've averaged more than one speaking engagement at a conference per month, including a half-dozen keynotes. I've also helped organize several conferences, mostly DrupalCamps and DrupalCons. I'd estimate conferences make up more than a third of my professional activity. (Incidentally, if someone can tell me how the hell that happened I'd love to hear it; I'm still confused by it.)

As a result I've gotten to see a wide variety of conference setups, plans, crazy ideas, and crazy wonderful ideas. There are many wonderful things that conference organizers do, or do differently, and of course plenty of things that they screw up.

I want to take this opportunity to share some of that experience with the organizers of various conferences together, rather than in one-off feedback forms that only one conference will see. To be clear, while I definitely think there are areas that many conferences could improve I don't want anyone to take this letter as a slam on conference organizers. These are people who put in way more time than you think, often without being paid to do so, out of a love for the community, for learning and sharing, and for you. Whatever else you may think about a conference or this list, the next time you're at a conference take a moment to find one of the organizers and give them a huge hug and/or firm handshake (as is their preference) and say thank you for all the work that they do.

read more

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Steve Kemp: Did you know xine will download and execute scripts?

Planet Debian - sam, 19/07/2014 - 22:48

Today I was poking around the source of Xine, the well-known media player. During the course of this poking I spotted that Xine has skin support - something I've been blissfully ignorant of for many years.

How do these skins work? You bring up the skin-browser, by default this is achieved by pressing "Ctrl-d". The browser will show you previews of the skins available, and allow you to install them.

How does Xine know what skins are available? It downloads the contents of:

NOTE: This is an insecure URL.

The downloaded file is a simple XML thing, containing references to both preview-images and download locations.

For example the theme "Sunset" has the following details:

  • Download link: http://xine.sourceforge.net/skins/Sunset.tar.gz
  • Preview link: http://xine.sourceforge.net/skins/Sunset.png

if you choose to install the skin the Sunset.tar.gz file is downloaded, via HTTP, extracted, and the shell-script doinst.sh is executed, if present.

So if you control DNS on your LAN you can execute arbitrary commands if you persuade a victim to download your "corporate xine theme".

Probably a low-risk attack, but still a surprise.

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Jo Shields: Transition tracker

Planet Debian - sam, 19/07/2014 - 21:35

Friday was my last day at Collabora, the awesome Open Source consultancy in Cambridge. I’d been there more than three years, and it was time for a change.

As luck would have it, that change came in the form of a job offer 3 months ago from my long-time friend in Open Source, Miguel de Icaza. Monday morning, I fly out to Xamarin’s main office in Boston, for just over a week of induction and face time with my new co workers, as I take on the title of Release Engineer.

My job is to make sure Mono on Linux is a first-class citizen, rather than the best-effort it’s been since Xamarin was formed from the ashes of the Attachmate/Novell deal. I’m thrilled to work full-time on what I do already as community work – including making Mono great on Debian/Ubuntu – and hope to form new links with the packer communities in other major distributions. And I’m delighted that Xamarin has chosen to put its money where its mouth is and fund continued Open Source development surrounding Mono.

If you’re in the Boston area next week or the week after, ping me via the usual methods!

Catégories: Elsewhere

Vasudev Kamath: Stop messing with my settings Network Manager

Planet Debian - sam, 19/07/2014 - 21:09

I use a laptop with Atheros wifi card with ath9k driver. I use hostapd to convert my laptop wifi into AP (Access point) so I can share network with my Nexus 7 and Kindle. This has been working fine for quite some time till my recent update.

After recent system update (I use Debian Sid), I couldn't for some reason convert my wifi into AP so my device can connect. I can't find anything in log nor in hostapd debug messages which is useful to trouble shoot the issue. Every time I start the laptop my wifi card will be blocked by RF-KILL and I have manually unblock (both hard and soft). The script which I use to convert my Wifi into AP is below

#Initial wifi interface configuration ifconfig "$1" up 192.168.2.1 netmask 255.255.255.0 sleep 2 # start dhcp sudo systemctl restart dnsmasq.service iptables --flush iptables --table nat --flush iptables --delete-chain iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o "$2" -j MASQUERADE iptables -A FORWARD -i "$1" -j ACCEPT sysctl -w net.ipv4.ip_forward=1 #start hostapd hostapd /etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf &> /dev/null &

I tried rebooting the laptop and for some time I managed to convert my wifi into AP, I noticed at same time that Network Manager is not started once laptop is booted, yeah this also started happening after recent upgrade which I guess is the black magic of systemd. After some time I noticed wifi has went down and now I can't bring it up because its blocked by RF-KILL. After checking the syslog I noticed following lines.

Jul 18 23:09:30 rudra kernel: [ 1754.891060] IPv6: ADDRCONF(NETDEV_CHANGE): wlan0: link becomes ready Jul 18 23:09:30 rudra NetworkManager[5485]: <info> (mon.wlan0): using nl80211 for WiFi device control Jul 18 23:09:30 rudra NetworkManager[5485]: <info> (mon.wlan0): driver supports Access Point (AP) mode Jul 18 23:09:30 rudra NetworkManager[5485]: <info> (mon.wlan0): new 802.11 WiFi device (driver: 'ath9k' ifindex: 10) Jul 18 23:09:30 rudra NetworkManager[5485]: <info> (mon.wlan0): exported as /org/freedesktop/NetworkManager/Devices/8 Jul 18 23:09:30 rudra NetworkManager[5485]: <info> (mon.wlan0): device state change: unmanaged -> unavailable (reason 'managed') [10 20 2] Jul 18 23:09:30 rudra NetworkManager[5485]: <info> (mon.wlan0): preparing device Jul 18 23:09:30 rudra NetworkManager[5485]: <info> devices added (path: /sys/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1c.1/0000:04:00.0/net/mon.wlan0, iface: mon.wlan0) Jul 18 23:09:30 rudra NetworkManager[5485]: <info> device added (path: /sys/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1c.1/0000:04:00.0/net/mon.wlan0, iface: mon.wlan0): no ifupdown configuration found. Jul 18 23:09:33 rudra ModemManager[891]: <warn> Couldn't find support for device at '/sys/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1c.1/0000:04:00.0': not supported by any plugin

Well I couldn't figure out much but it looks like NetworkManager has come up and after seeing interface mon.wlan0, a monitoring interface created by hostapd to monitor the AP goes mad and tries to do something with it. I've no clue what it is doing and don't have enough patience to debug that. Probably some expert can give me hints on this.

So as a last resort I purged the NetworkManager completely from the system and settled back to good old wicd and rebooted the system. After reboot wifi card is happy and is not blocked by RF-KILL and now I can convert it AP and use it as long as I wish without any problems. Wicd is not a great tool but its good enough to get the job done and does only what is asked to it unlike the NetworkManager.

So in short

NetworkManager please stop f***ing with my settings and stop acting oversmart.
Catégories: Elsewhere

MariqueCalcus: Optimize before you go live (Part 2).

Planet Drupal - sam, 19/07/2014 - 17:30
Part 2: Site builder

Drupal is a powerful content management framework but it's even better when you take into account the 20000+ modules and themes provided by the community. Whatever you are building, you will most likely find a module to help you. When you embrace the wonderful world of free and open source code, keep in mind that end users and search engines actually prefer fast websites. In this article we will discuss some common pitfalls that should be avoid, and will give some suggestions for site builder to create light and fast websites. This post is part of a multipart series. The first instalment was related to performance for back-end developer.

Read More...
Catégories: Elsewhere

Drupal core announcements: Tuesday, July 29: Drupal 8.0.x being branched for semantic versioning

Planet Drupal - sam, 19/07/2014 - 00:15
Start:  2014-07-29 12:00 - 14:00 America/New_York Online meeting (eg. IRC meeting)

On this date, the new 8.0.x branch for Drupal 8 will be created so we can start using the new Drupal release cycle in advance of beta 1.

Steps involved are:

  • drumm will create the 8.0.x branch
  • Existing issues will be moved automatically from 8.x-dev to 8.0.x-dev (this may take a couple of hours)
  • Testbot will be patched to look at the new 8.0.x branch instead of the old 8.x branch.

After we're sure there is no fallout from this, the README.txt on the old 8.x will be amended to inform about the change, and then the 8.x branch will be removed entirely after a few days.

Core developers should do the following once the process is complete to ensure they're patching against the latest version of the code:

git fetch
git checkout 8.0.x

Woohoo!

Catégories: Elsewhere

Ian Donnelly: How-To: Write a Plug-in

Planet Debian - ven, 18/07/2014 - 21:49

Hi Everybody!

I wanted to write a how-to on how to write an Elektra plug-in. Plug-ins are what allow Elektra to translate regular configuration files into the Elektra key database, and allow keys to be coverted back into regular configuration files. For example, the hosts plug-in is used to transcribe a hosts file into a meaningful KeySet in the Elektra Key Database. This plugin is what allows the kdb tool to be able to work with hosts files like in our mount tutorial.

While there are already a good number of plug-ins written for Elektra, we obviously don’t cover all the different types of configuration files. If you want to be able to use the features of Elektra, you may have to write a plug-in for your type of configuration file. Luckily, its not hard to do. Over the new few weeks I will be writing a tutorial for how to write your very own plug-in as well as explaining all the components of an Elektra plug-in. I will link the tutorials below as I finish them for easy reference, or if you already follow my blog I am sure you will notice them as they get published.

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Propeople Blog: Building Quality Into Drupal Development Workflow

Planet Drupal - ven, 18/07/2014 - 20:29
Background 

Building a large Drupal website can be a daunting and complex process. There are many engineering, project and other risks associated with it. More often than not, budget and deadline overrun occurs.

Moreover, large projects often result in a prolonged Q/A, testing and troubleshooting period which once again can pose additional risks. 

Propeople was recently presented with the following challenge by a client:

 
  • 1200 budget hours

  • 2 month of development time

  • 4 developers

  • 1 hard launch date

To add another challenge to the mix, there was minimal Q/A engineer availability for the project.

In order to meet the client’s budget and timeline requirements above, we needed to rethink a new development workflow that largely incorporated quality into the project in order to meet both the deadline and budget requirements. 

 Typical Development Workflow 

Propeople selected GIT as the revisioning software to manage the development process/workflow for the project. GIT is a popular, open source distributed versioning system used by many organizations of all sizes. For more information on GIT, you can visit this site.

Organizations that employ a repository management system such as GIT, typically one of the following workflow models is used.

 1. Using the Master Branch

This workflow is typically employed by smaller organizations with a small number of developers working on the project. In this workflow, all of the code changes are committed into the master branch by all of the developers. It results in a linear development workflow:

This workflow works well at keeping everything simple, allowing developers to avoid branching and merging. It also allows for the creation of some tags to designate stable release or state of the code repository.

However, there are many drawbacks to this workflow. One of the most overlooked facts is that most likely, John and Joe will not check each other’s commits. Once a change is committed to the master branch, the change is incorporated into the project until someone notices any poorly written code or commits. 

 2. Development -> Stage -> Production

One of the most widely adopted workflows, this three-tiered workflow fully leverages GIT’s ability to create and merge branches. It also gives web developers the ability to mirror the branches to a different “working environment” so that they can have:

  • Development website

  • Staging website

  • Production website

3. Feature Branch

We ultimately chose to adopt a “feature” branch workflow for this project. This model takes advantage of the git branching/merging model. It is also chosen because we did not necessarily need a “staging” or “production” environment during the agile development phase.

This workflow works well at keeping everything simple, allowing developers to avoid branching and merging. It also allows for the creation of some tags to designate stable release or state of the code repository.

However, there are many drawbacks to this workflow. One of the most overlooked facts is that most likely, John and Joe will not check each other’s commits. Once a change is committed to the master branch, the change is incorporated into the project until someone notices any poorly written code or commits. 

 

Introduction of Github and the Magical Pull Request

 

One of the biggest reasons that we adopted the feature branch approach is Github. Github.com is one of the longest-running and most popular hosted git management platforms. It offers many developer friendly tools. One of the most useful and popular tools and functions is the Pull Request.

 Looking ahead

We are looking ahead to adding automated regression testing to the pull requests. This will allow developers to easily see page changes caused by their commits.

A more integrated issue and time tracking system would help consolidate all of the project efforts into Github. We used a separate issue tracking and hour tracking system for the project.

 Conclusion

Largely due to the new development workflow, we were able to meet the the hard deadline set by client. Although the project had a 8% budget overrun, this number is a great success, given the 27%* industry average. We were also able to reduce our post launch Q/A cycle by 66.67%, from 30 days to 10 days.

A big thanks to the masterminds behind the new development workflow:

Yuriy Gerasimov (https://www.drupal.org/user/257311)

Andriy Podanenko (https://www.drupal.org/u/podarok)

 

http://hbr.org/2011/09/why-your-it-project-may-be-riskier-than-you-think/

 

Tags: CIGITContinuous IntegrationQ/AProjectService category: TechnologyCheck this option to include this post in Planet Drupal aggregator: planetTopics: Tech & Development
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Dominique Dumont: Looking for help to package Perl6, moar and others for Debian

Planet Debian - ven, 18/07/2014 - 19:32

Let’s face reality: I cannot find the time to properly maintain Perl6 related packages for Debian. Given the recent surge of popularity of rakudo, it would be a shame to let these packages rot.

Instead of throwing the towel, I’d rather call for help to maintain these packages. You don’t need to be a Debian Developer or Maintainer: I will gladly review and upload packages.

The following packages are looking for maintainer:

  • rakudo (currently RC buggy)
  • moar (needs to be packaged, some work has been done by Daniel Dehennin)
  • parrot (up to date)
  • nqp (need to be updated. current version no longer compiles on all arch)

Next step to help Perl6 on Debian is to join:

All the best

 


Tagged: debian, package, Perl6
Catégories: Elsewhere

Forum One: Building Your (Drupal) Business: What Keeps You Up At Night?

Planet Drupal - ven, 18/07/2014 - 16:57

How to get more business in the door, and once you have it – how in the world to get it all done?!

These were some of the issues that “keep them up at night”  raised by business owners in the Drupal professional services sector at the recent DrupalCon in Austin, TX.  I’ve co-led a “Bats of a Feather”  session at DrupalCon for three years now for business owners on the key issues they face; this year we had, again, a highly engaged audience of about 40-50 business owners and leaders join. Sean Larkin of ThinkShout, a digital agency in Portland, OR, joined me in facilitating the discussion. The attendees were all from consulting / professional services firms, ranging in size from 1 to 80, with a median size of about a dozen employees.

We listed and clustered the topics / questions of primary interest (see picture of our flip chart notes), which were:

  • Business development and lead generation – how to keep work flowing in
  • Growth and capacity – how to balance hiring with business inflow
  • Support and hosting – how to provide effective support and hosting services
  • Scaling a sales team
  • The Acquia effect – how Acquia’s presence affects Drupal agencies
  • Partnering with other firms.

We homed in on the two ends of the business pipeline – how to bring in more work, and how to scale the business once you have the work. Here are a few of the highlights:

Subcontracting

We had a lively discussion about whether and how to work as a subcontractor to other larger firms as a way to keep busy. Some folks are happy to do “white label” work for which they do not need to do business development, while others avoid it.

Pros: Tap into the clientele and BD pipeline of a larger organization that already has a backlog.

Cons: You’ll never build your own vision of your company if you are anonymous and behind someone else, your rates will never be as good, and you might sometimes end up being the scapegoat.

Interestingly, at Forum One, we did not subcontract for larger firms in our early growth stages, but it has become a sizable part of our portfolio in recent years.

Partnering

We had good discussion about partnering among other firms – finding the businesses in your area that have similar or complementary offerings, and looking to scratch each others’ backs. The Drupal share of the total web CMS market pie is still small, so we can all pitch in with each other to make the pie even bigger.

Why grow?  A lot of the owners from solo or very small shops have to do everything from bringing in the business to doing the work and sending the invoices. Not to mention cleaning the bathroom before a client comes over (been there). They are eager to grow out of that stage and have help so they can focus on what they feel they are best at. But how far to grow? One of the owners spoke about his satisfaction with having a 15-person team that was cohesive, cooperative, and did great work for their clients; he said he had no aspirations to grow beyond that and have bigger headaches.  It’s great that he’s clear about his goals for the business and is on track.  Others talked about wanting to build bigger practices.

At Forum One, I’ve been in the thick of all these stages of growth, from a small team of three doing everything, to a multidisciplinary team of about 80. In our case, we’ve chosen to grow aggressively for three main reasons: to expand the capabilities we can offer our clients, increase the impact of our work for our clients, and offer growing career opportunities to our team.

Taking big steps

A few of the attendees said they are grappling with issues of when and how to take their next big step – whether it’s hiring their first staff person, signing a lease for office space, or bringing on their first operational hire (project manager, BD person, operations manager, etc.). We did not have time to talk about these issues, but I think those of us who have been through these big steps were smiling to ourselves. I know I was. Not because we know the answers – there are no easy ones. But we’ve been through it and know that those stages are part of the excitement and the challenge of building a business out of nothing!

For further dialogue and networking on these topics, check out and join the LinkedIn group for owners of Drupal services firms called “Drupal CxO Owners Network.”

Catégories: Elsewhere

Mario Lang: Croudsourced accessibility: Self-made digital menus

Planet Debian - ven, 18/07/2014 - 16:50

Something straight out from the real world: Menu cards in restaurants are not nice to deal with if you are blind. It is an old problem we grow used to ignoring over time, but still something that can be quite nagging.

There are a lot of psychological issues involved in this one. Of course, you can ask for the menu to be read out to you by the staff. While they usually do their best, you end up missing out on some things most of the time.

First of all, depending on the current workload in the restaurant, the staff will usually try to cut some time and not read everything to you. What they usually do is to try to understand what type of meal you are interested in, and just read the choices from that category to you. While this can be considered a service in some situations (human preprocessing), there are situations were you will definitely miss a highlight on the menu that you would have liked to choose if you knew that it was there.

And even if the staff decides to read the complete menu to you (which is rare), you are confronted with the 7-things-in-my-head-at-once problem. It is usually rather hard to decide amongst a list of more then 7 items, because our short-term memory is sort of limited. What the sighted restaurant goers do, is to skip back and forth between the available options, until they hit a decisive moment. True, that can take a while, but it is definitely a lot easier if you can perform "random access reads" to the list of choices yourself. However, if someone presents a substantial number of choices to you in a row, as sequential speech, you loose the random access ability. You either remember every choice from the beginning and do your choosing mentaully (if you do have extraordinary mental abilities), or you end up asking the staff to read previous items aloud again. This can work, but usually it doesn't. At some point, you do not want to bother the staff anymore, and you even start to feel stupid for asking again and again, while this is something totally normal to every sighted person, just that "they" do their "random access browsing" on their own, so "they" have no need to feel bad about how long it takes them to decide, minus the typical social pressure that arises after a a certain time for everyone, at least if you are dining in a group.

In very rare cases, you happen to meet staff that is truly "awake", doing their best to not let you feel that they might be pressed on time, and really taking as much time as necessary to help you make the perfect decision. This is rare, but if it happens, it is almost a magical moment. One of these moments, where there are no "artificial" barriers between humans doing communcation. Anyway, I am drifting away.

The perfect solution to this problem is to provide random access browsing of a restaurant menu with the help of digital devices. Trying to make braille menus available in all restaurants is a goal which is not realistically reachable. Menus go out of date, and need changing. And getting a physical braille copy updated and reprinted is considerably more involved as with digital media. Restaurant owners will also likely not see the benefit to rpvide a braille card for a very small circle of customers. With a digital online menu, that is a completely different story.

These days, almost every blind person in at least my social circles owns an iOS (or similar) device. These devices have speech synthesis and web browsers.

Of course, some restaurants especially in urban areas do already have a menu online. I have found them manually with google and friends sometimes in the past, which has already given me the ability to actually sit back, and really comfortably choose amongst the available offerings myself, without having to bother a human, and without having to feel bad about (ab)using their time.

However, the case where a restaurant really has their menu online is rather rare still in the area where I am. And, it can be tedious to google for a restaurant website. Sometimes, the website itself is just marginally accessible, which makes it even more frustrating to get a relaxed dinner-experience.

I have discovered a location-based solution for the restaurant-menu problem recently. Foursquare offers the ability to provide a direct link to the menu in a restaurant-entry. I figured, since all you need to do is write a single webpage where the (common) menu items are listed per restaurant, that I could begin to create restaurant menus for my favourite locations, on my own. Well, not quite, but almost. I will sometimes need help from others to get the menu digitized, but that's just a one-time piece of work I hopefully can outsource :-). Once the actual content is in my INBUX, I create a nice HTML page listing the menu in a rather speech-based browser friendly way.

I have begun to do this today, with the menu of a restaurant just about 500 meters away from my apartment. Unterm goldenen Dachl now has a menu online, and the foursquare change request to publish the corresponsing URL is already pending. I don't fully understand how the Foursquare change review process works yet, but I hope the URL should be published in the upcoming days/weeks.

I am using Foursquare because it is the backend of a rather popular mobile navigation App for blind people, called Blindsquare. Blindsquare lets you comfortably use Open Street Map and Foursquare data to get an overview of your surroundingds. If a food place has a menu entry listed in Foursquare, Blindsquare conveniently shows it to you and opens a browser if you tap it. So there is no need to actually search for the restaurant, you can just use the location based search of Blindsquare to discover the restaurant entry and its menu link directly from within Blindsquare. Actually, you could even find a restaurant by accident, and with a little luck, find the menu for it by location, without even knowing how the restaurant is called. Isn't that neat? Yeah, that's how it is supposed to work, that's as much independence as you can get.

And, it is, as the title suggests, croudsourced accessibility. Becuase while it is nice if a restaurant owner cares to publish their menu themselves, if they haven't, you can do it yourself. Either as a user of assistive technologies, to scratch your own itch. Or as a friend of a person with a need for assistive technologies. Next time you go to lunch with your blind friend, consider making available the menu to them digitally in advance, instead of reading it. Other people will likely thank you for that, and you have actually achieved something today. And if you happne to put a menu online, make sure to submit a change request to Foursquare. Many blind people are using blindsquare these days, which makes it super-easy for them to discover the menu.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Osamu Aoki: Debian does not boot ...Crucial/Micron RealSSD m4/C400/P400

Planet Debian - ven, 18/07/2014 - 16:24
Today, my PC did not boot as usual to Debian.  BIOS could not find my /dev/sda and was looking for netboot image.  I restarted my PC and got into BIOS boot setting.  Hmmm.... my first SDD (/dev/sda) is missing.  My second HDD (/dev/sdb) is there.  But I did not put the Grub boot-loader there.   No wonder it does not boot.

I have a 32GB USB3 stick with the full Debian system.  It is not a live CD image USB stick but a HDD formatted and encrypted system.  Though it is not fastest system, it is very light and usable.  I plugged it in and boot it.  It boots OK but /dev/sda is still missing.  While it booted, I saw "ata1: COMRESET failed (errorno=-16)" .  So this ata1 SSD can not be accessed from BIOS nor Linux.   Sigh ...

Looking around the web under the USB stick system, I saw some people were talking about loose serial ATA cable sometimes cause this message.   Since my PC is laptop, I have no flexible cable but has on-board connector inside for SSD.

Hoping my problem is just a bad connection problem, I crack opened back panel of PC.  The SSD looks fine.  I unplugged it from connector and reinserted back into the connector.  After repeating several times to be sure, I closed the back panel and booted.

It boot as expected into Debian.  Looks like everything is fine.
  SMART Error Log Version: 1
  No Errors Logged
Good.

If you have any boot problem like mine, please reinsert your SSD to connector like I did before you panic.

Good luck.

Osamu

PS: This Crucial/Micron RealSSD m4/C400/P400 M4-CT256M4SSD2 previously had a problem.  A firmware bug made it read-only.  The firmware updates fixed my Debian system which I could do without Win*** OS since firmware update was a bootable disk image file.

Catégories: Elsewhere

ThinkShout: Getting Started with SASS for Drupal and Zen, Part II

Planet Drupal - ven, 18/07/2014 - 15:00

In part one of "Getting Started with SASS for Drupal and Zen," we went over getting your environment set up to work with SASS.

If you followed the instructions in part one, you should have SASS/Compass, Zen, and your sub-theme installed. Your theme will be installed in sites/all/YOUR THEME NAME.

Test the Install

Let's test to see if SASS is installed and compiling. Use your toolkit to compile your SASS directory or run compass watch from the command line in your theme directory. You should see the following output.

>>> Compass is watching for changes. Press Ctrl-C to Stop

To see more Compass commands, you can run Compass -h.

Open your Drupal site in your browser. Now that we are polling for changes with Compass, let's add the following to style.scss to see our changes being applied. After you save your change, refresh your page and you should see the difference.

body { background: #000; color: #fff; }

Compass will also output the overwritten files in your console if you are using command line to run it. It's okay to delete the CSS you added, so things will appear like the default Zen theme.

SASS Primer

If you haven't used SASS, prepare to be hooked on it. Some advantages of SASS include DRY (Don't Repeat Yourself), CSS, function (mixins) for repetitive and lengthy blocks of CSS, and the ability to extend common styles.

Variables

Variables in SASS start with a '$'. Use variables to define values you will use throughout your stylesheets. For example, let's define our color palette in _init.scss. There is a commented section for colors. You can drop them in there. I'm going to grab this zen 2 palette from Kuler.

$sand: #b0ae9e; $brown: #424345; $white: #fafeff; $seagreen: #9dbec7; $wetsand: #b0a092; $red: #ff0000; $gray: #a1a1a1;

Now these colors can be used everywhere in our stylesheets without having to write the hex value each time.

Nesting

In typical CSS fashion, we would write a style like this:

a { color: #9dbec7; text-decoration: none; } a:hover { color: #424345; -webkit-transition: color 0.5 ease-out 0.5s; -moz-transition: color 0.5 ease-out 0.5s; -o-transition: color 0.5 ease-out 0.5; transition: color 0.5 ease-out 0.5s; }

With SASS, we can nest the style like this:

a { color: $seagreen; text-decoration: none; &:hover { color: $brown; -webkit-transition: color 0.5s ease-out 0.5s; -moz-transition: color 0.5s ease-out 0.5s; -o-transition: color 0.5s ease-out 0.5; transition: color 0.5s ease-out 0.5s; } }

The ampersand represents the outer anchor selector. Also, notice how we are relying on the variables we defined for the colors instead of using hex values.

Mixins and Extends Mixins

Let's clean up that transition by writing a mixin for it.

@mixin transition($property, $duration, $easing) { -webkit-transition: $color $duration $easing; -moz-transition: $color $duration $easing; -o-transition: $color $duration $easing; transition: $color $duration $easing; }

Now we can rewrite the anchor style and include the transition mixin.

a { color: $seagreen; text-decoration: none; &:hover { color: $brown; @include transition(color, 0.5s, ease-out, 0.5s); } }

Keep in mind that Compass already provides some great cross-browser mixins for CSS3. Style transition is one of them.

Extends

SASS lets you inherit common styles. A practical example is styling buttons. Buttons might have common styling, but differ in color or size.

// This is a SASS comment /* This is also a comment */ // Our default button .button { background: $seagreen; padding: 1em; border: 1px solid $seagreen; } .primary { @extend .button; padding: 1.5em 2em; } .warn { @extend .button; background: $red; } .disabled { @extend .button; background: $gray; }

So why didn't we just use nesting? Extending keeps you from having to write multiple class names on html elements instead of writing it like the following:

<a class="button primary" href="http://thinkshout.com">ThinkShout</a>

We can use one class because 'primary' will include all the same styles as 'button.'

<a class="primary" href="http://thinkshout.com">ThinkShout</a> Using SASS in Your Theme

The stylesheets in your Zen sub-theme are organized according to the principles of SMACSS. You'll notice the style.scss file doesn't actually contain any styles, but only imports. The _init.scss file contains additional imports such as Zen Grids and Compass utilities, mixins and helpers. If you look in layouts/responsive.scss, you'll see the Zen theme includes a mobile-first responsive layout by default.

Let's add some sass of our own. Add a file called _main-nav.scss to the components directory. In that file, add the following SASS. It's similar to the style we used in our SASS primer.

#navigation { background: $sand; .links { a, a:visited { color: $white; text-decoration: none; &:hover { color: $brown; @include transition(color, 0.5s, ease-out, 0.5s); } } } }

In order to get this change to take effect, you need to import it into your style.scss. Add an import statement for _main-nav.scss in the components section.

/* Component (SMACSS module) rules */ @import "components/misc"; @import "components/main-nav"; // Add this import statement

You may be wondering why you don't need the underscore in front of the file when importing. The underscore tells SASS that the file is a partial. The partial won't be compiled into its own file. It will be included in the style.css when compiled. If you don't have Compass running, go ahead and run compass watch in your theme directory or use your toolkit to compile. You should see your navigation style applied to your Drupal site when you refresh.

As you progress in your SASS development, I encourage you to use the SASS Globbing gem. It makes importing a breeze.

Now that you have used SASS in your theme and have the basics down, be sure to check out the SASS and Zen Grids documentation to be even more productive in your theme development. Get the code for this article on Github.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Elena 'valhalla' Grandi: Reducing useless noise from irssi

Planet Debian - ven, 18/07/2014 - 14:24
Yesterday I missed a query from a friend (with the answer to a question *I* had asked in the first place) because it ended up in window 30-something and my statusbar was full of dim numbers from channels where people had just joined/left.

This morning I've set
activity_hide_level = JOINS PARTS QUITS
and my world is a much neater place :)

(I may have to add NICKS and possibly MODES, but they are rare enough and I'm still not sure I don't care about them, especially the latter.)
Catégories: Elsewhere

Jonathan McDowell: On the state of Free VoIP

Planet Debian - ven, 18/07/2014 - 00:00

Every now and then I decide I'll try and sort out my VoIP setup. And then I give up. Today I tried again. I really didn't think I was aiming that high. I thought I'd start by making my email address work as a SIP address. Seems reasonable, right? I threw in the extra constraints of wanting some security (so TLS, not UDP) and a soft client that would work on my laptop (I have a Grandstream hardphone and would like an Android client as well, but I figure those are the easy cases while the "I have my laptop and I want to remain connected" case is a bit trickier). I had a suitable Internet connected VM, access to control my DNS fully (so I can do SRV records) and time to read whatever HOWTOs required. And oh my ghod the state of the art is appalling.

Let's start with getting a SIP server up and running. I went with repro which seemed to be a reasonably well recommended SIP server to register against. And mostly getting it up and running and registering against it is fine. Until you try and make a TLS SIP call through it (to a sip5060.net test address). Problem the first; the StartCom free SSL certs are not suitable because they don't advertise TLS Client. So I switch to CACert. And then I get bitten by the whole question about whether the common name on the cert should be the server name, or the domain name on the SIP address (it's the domain name on the SIP address apparently, though that might make your SIP client complain).

That gets the SIP side working. Of course RTP is harder. repro looks like it's doing the right thing. The audio never happens. I capitulate at this point, and install Lumicall on my phone. That registers correctly and I can call the sip:test.time@sip5060.net test number and hear the time. So the server is functioning, it's the client that's a problem. I try the following (Debian/testing):

  • jitsi - Registers fine, seems to lack any sort of TURN/STUN support.
  • ekiga - No sign of TLS registration support.
  • twinkle - Not in testing. A recompile leads to no sign of an actual client starting up when executed.
  • sflphone - Fails to start (Debian bug #745695).
  • Empathy - Fails to connect. Doesn't show any useful debug.
  • linphone - No TLS connect (Debian bug #743494).

I'm bored at this point. Can I "dial" my debian.org SIP address from Lumicall? Of course not; I get a "Codecs incompatible" (SIP 488 Not Acceptable Here) response. I have no idea what that means. I seem to have all of the options on Lumicall enabled. Is it a NAT thing? A codec thing? Did I sacrifice the wrong colour of goat?

At some point during this process I get a Skype call from some friends, which I answer. Up comes a video call with them, their newborn, perfect audio, and no hassle. I have a conversation with them that doesn't involve me cursing technology at all. And then I go back to fighting with SIP.

Gunnar makes the comment about Skype creating a VoIP solution 10 years ago when none was to be found. I believe they're still the market leader. It just works. I'm running the Linux client, and they're maintaining it (a little behind the curve, but close enough), and it works for text chat, voice chat and video calls. I've spent half a day trying to get a Free equivalent working and failing. I need something that works behind NAT, because it's highly likely when I'm on the move that's going to be the case. I want something that lets my laptop be the client, because I don't want to rely on my mobile phone. I want my email address to also be my VoIP address. I want some security (hell, I'm not even insisting on SRTP, though I'd like to). And the state of the Open VoIP stack just continues to make me embarrassed.

I haven't given up yet, but I'd appreciate some pointers. And Skype, if you're hiring, drop me a line. ;)

Catégories: Elsewhere

Christian Perrier: OpenAmbit now in Debian (for owners of Suunto Ambit sport watches)

Planet Debian - ven, 18/07/2014 - 00:00
I recently bought a Suunto Ambit 2 sport watch for my running activities, replacing my good old Garmin ForeRunner 405 whose battery life wasn't longer in sync with the length of some of my runs... Ambit 2 watches have up to 50 hours autonomy, which is great for long races, as well as a barometric altitude recording, which is way more precise that GPS-based altitude recording. Both these are keys for mountain running, indeed... Sadly, Suunto only provides software for Windows and the software is mandatory to use in order to sync the watch logs and settings with Movescount.com, the Suunto web site. Even more: any change to the watch settings has to be done through Movescount, which means that without software, you can't really use the watch....:-( Thankfully, a few people have worked on an "OpenAmbit" project (www.openambit.org) that's aimed at dealing with this and provide Linux users with a way to sync their watches without requiring a Windows computer. And, as you may imagine, I wanted to package it for Debian. Indeed, some packaging work had already been done for Ubuntu, in a PPA, by Dominik Stadler at https://launchpad.net/~dominik-stadler/+archive/dsta-trusty-ppa. Still, I wanted this to go the preferred way of the official archive for the software to get more visibility. Finally, after a few failures (doh, how picky are our FTPmasters about licenses.....which is a Good Thing!), OpenAmbit landed in unstable one week ago. This is as of now the 0.2 version, that doesn't work with the most recent versions of Suunto firmwares. However, a 0.2+20140606 version is on its way and....it works with my watch..:-) So, Yet Another Success for the pkg-running-devel packaging team in Debian, once again proving that Debian developers are also deeply interested in physical activities..:-) And, also, this is a proof that I'm not yet only running and no longer working for Debian....
Catégories: Elsewhere

Drupal Easy: BYOD (Bring Your Own Developers) Drupal Career Training

Planet Drupal - jeu, 17/07/2014 - 23:11

With four sessions graduating more than 60 People over the past four years, there's no doubt that the Drupal Career Starter Program can bring aspiring developers from zero to hero in just a matter of a few months. Imagine what it can do for you, or your people, who are already developers, but need to be trained up in Drupal. We have, and are making it highly accessible in a live, online format designed to fit into working schedules.

The upcoming Drupal Career Online training program kicks off in just about a month, and your organization now has the ability to choose the developer(s) that match well to your team and leverage our unique, holistic training to turn them into a solid member of your Drupal development team.

-->

read more

Catégories: Elsewhere

Drupal core announcements: Drupal core updates for July 16, 2014

Planet Drupal - jeu, 17/07/2014 - 22:45
What's new with Drupal 8?

This week saw the commit of part one and two of the major menu-system rewrite in which menu-links become plugins. The original patch weighed in at over 600kb and was one of the remaining seven beta-blockers. Splitting it into five separate issues made reviews more forthcoming and this was evident with part one and two moving quickly from needs review to RTBC to ultimately being committed. Reviewers have now moved onto parts three through five.
There was a massive volume of commits this week with cleanups keeping the committers very-busy, lots of deprecated functions were removed and lots of procedural menu and form code was ported to the new Object-oriented approaches.

Where's Drupal 8 at in terms of release?

In the past week, we've fixed 3 critical issues and 8 major issues, and opened 5 criticals and 9 majors. That puts us overall at 107 release-blocking critical issues and 623 major issues.

Outstanding beta blockers

Outstanding critical issues in Drupal 8

Outstanding major issues in Drupal 8

Where can I help? Top criticals to hit this week

Each week, we check with core maintainers and contributors for the "extra critical" criticals that are blocking other work. These issues are often tough problems with a long history. If you're familiar with the problem-space of one of these issues and have the time to dig in, help drive it forward by reviewing, improving, and testing its patch, and by making sure the issue's summary is up to date and any API changes are documented with a draft change record, we could use your help!

More ways to help

Issue #1679344: Race condition in node_save() when not using DB for cache_field recently caused a Drupal.org outage. The issue already has a proposed resolution recommended in comment #24 — help out by reviewing the patch for either D7 or D8.

Additionally, there are a bunch of easy documentation issues which need some help moving forward. For each of these, there is a "Child Issues" sidebar. Look there for issues that are "active", "needs work", or "needs review":

As always, if you're new to contributing to core, check out Core contribution mentoring hours. Twice per week, you can log into IRC and helpful Drupal core mentors will get you set up with answers to any of your questions, plus provide some useful issues to work on.

You can also help by sponsoring Drupal core development.

Notable Commits

The best of git log --since "1 week ago" --pretty=oneline (112 commits in total):

  • Various conversions of controllers and forms to OO code, only a handful remain now
    • Issue 2010246 by tim.plunkett, tkuldeep17, plopesc, InternetDevels, pfrenssen, googletorp: Convert update_manager_install_form, update_manager_update_form, update_manager_update_ready_form to the new form interface.
    • Issue 2030165 by Berdir, tim.plunkett, vijaycs85, tkuldeep17 | rteijeiro: Convert form_test_* functions to classes.
    • Issue 1978926 by likin, YesCT, Pancho, kim.pepper, h3rj4n, tim.plunkett, disasm, Luxian, neetu morwani | vijaycs85: Convert locale_translation_status_form to a Controller.
    • Issue 2132477 by tkuldeep17, tim.plunkett | shameemkm: Convert batch_test forms to controllers.
    • Issue 2086499 by phiit, tim.plunkett | Gábor Hojtsy: Convert two page callbacks in language_elements_test.module to the new controller system.
    • Issue 2078867 by tim.plunkett, jackbravo, ianthomas_uk, InternetDevels, piyuesh23, disasm, nano_monkey | vijaycs85: Convert _form_test_* functions to classes.
    • Issue 1998198 by pwolanin, splatio, Albert Volkman, tim.plunkett, andypost, disasm, Les Lim, tkuldeep17: Convert user_pass_reset to a new-style Form object.
    • Issue 2302525 by tim.plunkett: Convert file_module_test_form to a class.
    • Issue 2078015 by er.pushpinderrana, RoSk0 | alexanansi: Modernize views_test_data.module forms.
    • Issue 2302531 by tim.plunkett: Convert database_test_theme_tablesort to a class.
  • Issue 2291137 by cilefen | webchick: Rename various *links.yml files to improve DX.
  • Issue 2202511 by hussainweb, benjy | mikeryan: Added Implement migration groups.
  • Issue 2302463 by effulgentsia: Cleanup User::hasPermission() and UserSession::hasPermission() to follow Law of Demeter.
  • Issue 2302331 by kim.pepper: Move drupal_valid_path to PathValidator service.
  • Issue 2296839 by MKorostoff, er.pushpinderrana | YesCT: Remove deprecated comment_num_new().
  • Issue 2289063 by larowlan, andypost | Berdir: Change contact message entity to behave more like a normal entity.
  • Issue 2301239 by pwolanin, dawehner, Wim Leers, effulgentsia, joelpittet, larowlan, xjm, YesCT, kgoel, victoru, berdir, likin, and plach: MenuLinkNG part1 (no UI or conversions): plugins (static + MenuLinkContent) + MenuLinkManager + MenuTreeStorage.
  • Issue 2284103 by alexpott, fabpot, damiankloip, Xano, Xen, Berdir: Fixed Remove the request from the container - this switches from using Request to RequestStack, gets rid of our custom HttpKernel and the Request scope, lets us upgrade Symfony past 2.3 and closes a critical. Special thanks to Fabien Potencier, Project Lead for Symfony for getting the ball rolling and working with the Drupal community on patches.
  • More standardising of entity-field API
    • Issue 2292821 by andypost, larowlan: Use widget for comment subject field.
    • Issue 1498662 by andypost, larowlan | dawehner: Refactor comment entity properties to multilingual.
    • Issue 1856562 by andypost | sun: Convert "Subject" and "Message" into Message base fields.
  • Lots of cleanup of deprecated functions
    • Issue 2297487 by er.pushpinderrana, marcingy: Remove the check_plain function.
    • Issue 2301591 by joshi.rohit100: Remove drupal_rebuild_form() as it is deprecated.
    • Issue 2208893 by ngocketit, longwave: Remove unused functions from Views.
    • Issue 2301601 by joshi.rohit100: Remove drupal_validate_form() as it is deprecated.
    • Issue 2301587 by joshi.rohit100: Remove form_state_defaults() as it is deprecated.
    • Issue 2301577 by ParisLiakos, joshi.rohit100: Remove drupal_alter() as it is deprecated.
    • Issue 2300853 by joshi.rohit100: Remove language() method from bootstrap.inc as it is deprecated.
    • Issue 2300891 by joshi.rohit100: Remove format_backtrace() from error.inc as deprecated.
    • Issue 2301597 by joshi.rohit100: Remove drupal_prepare_form() as it is deprecated.
    • Issue 2300831 by joshi.rohit100: Remove module_exists() as it is deprecated.
    • Issue 2300857 by joshi.rohit100: Remove lock() method from bootstrap.inc as deprecated.
    • Issue 2300821 by joshi.rohit100: Remove module_invoke_all() as it is deprecated.
    • Issue 2300847 by joshi.rohit100: Remove drupal_get_form() as it is deprecated.
    • Issue 2300843 by joshi.rohit100: Remove drupal_json_encode() and drupal_json_decode() methods as deprecated.
    • Issue 2300833 by joshi.rohit100: Remove module_hook() as it is deprecated.
    • Issue 2300697 by joshi.rohit100: Remove drupal_is_cli() as It is deprecated.
    • Issue 2299499 by joshi.rohit100: Remove form_clear_error() as it is deprecated.
    • Issue 2301975 by kim.pepper: Move drupal_is_front_page to PathMatcher service.
  • Issue 697760 by sun: Replace getInfo() in tests with native phpDoc + annotations (following PHPUnit).

You can also always check the Change records for Drupal core for the full list of Drupal 8 API changes from Drupal 7.

Drupal 8 Around the Interwebs

Blog posts about Drupal 8 and how much it's going to rock your face.

  • Drupalize.me recap Drupal 8's plugin system.
  • Nuvole give us a preview of their Amsterdam session on packaging and reusing configuration in Drupal 8.
  • chx gives us an update on Drupal 8 from both his and a MongoDB perspective.
  • Wunderkraut gave us the lowdown on configuration entities in Drupal 8.
  • Cameron Zemek from PreviousNext introduces us to Mink previewing one of the core-conversations from Amsterdam.
Drupal 8 in "Real Life" Whew! That's a wrap!

Do you follow Drupal Planet with devotion, or keep a close eye on the Drupal event calendar, or git pull origin 8.x every morning without fail before your coffee? We're looking for more contributors to help compile these posts. You could either take a few hours once every six weeks or so to put together a whole post, or help with one section more regularly. Contact xjm if you'd like to help communicate all the interesting happenings in Drupal 8!

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