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YesCT: Making MidCamp more accessible

mer, 14/01/2015 - 08:10
Making MidCamp more accessible

Even though it's still two months away, I know that MidCamp 2015 (March 19 - 22) is going to be special. The venue hosting MidCamp this year is the University of Illinois at Chicago. UIC is both my alma mater and present employer. Student Center East (where the training and conference sessions will take place) may be familiar grounds to me, but these days I am looking at it from the perspective of a visitor who is completely unfamiliar with its layout.

UIC Student Center East entrance from Polk and Halsted streetsVenue accessibility

Liz Henry's article Unlocking the Invisible Elevator identifies some of the ways in which conference organizers can be proactive about event accessibility:

Some information is great to have in advance. Maps and explanations of access paths work well. It helps if they’re in web-accessible formats, usable by screen readers, and downloadable. Some information has to be embedded in your conference venue. Signs should clearly mark the accessible paths. Maps are very helpful so that people can estimate distances; this is a big deal for those of us who are exhausted and in pain. Put maps next to your signs please!

In late November, I did a preliminary walkthrough of Student Center East. I meandered around the building, photographing the main entrance to Student Center East, the location, interiors and paths to elevators, escalators and stairways, major "landmarks" for points of reference, and the conference area hallways and rooms. It may sound a bit like I was casing the place, but I learned about traffic flow, congestion areas and different points of entry to each floor, whether by escalator and stairs or elevator.

Next, I contacted folks from UIC Office of Facility and Space Planning to obtain floor plans for each of the buildings and floors where MidCamp events are going to take place. They were quick to respond and the floor plans I got are very detailed. I annotated them, marking session rooms, elevators, restrooms and possible traffic flow. The annotations will serve as blueprint for locations of signs, as well as written directions that will be posted to the website.

Annotated floor plan of Student Center East ground floor, with photos of elevator #6 and escalator overlaid.

This week, MidCamp organizers and I plan to do another walkthrough at UIC. Together we hope to identify and address any accessibility and navigation pitfalls. Photos, annotated floor plans, and navigation information will be posted to the MidCamp website. We want to make sure that there is good information about the venue available ahead of time, as well as informative signs on the spot when you attend MidCamp.

Of course, floor plans and elevators are not the only aspect of conference accessibility. Childcare, real-time captioning, transcripts and captioning of session videos are some of the other ways in which events are made more accessible to diverse audiences. It's a direction that I hope MidCamp will follow.

Anonymized session selection

Another reason why I'm excited about is that MidCamp session submission is now open (it will close on Monday January 19). The session selection committee will pick from anonymized submissions for 20 and 50 minute talks. From the conference website:

  1. A volunteer who is NOT on the selection team will anonymize and remove gendered pronouns from abstracts/bios.
  2. The team will make a first round of selections from the anonymized submissions.
  3. A second round will then make sure we have not selected speakers multiple times (excluding panel participants).

By anonymizing session selection, we hope to give thorough consideration to everyone's proposals without biases ("oh, I know this speaker," or "I've never heard of this speaker"). Having a diverse lineup of speakers from all experience levels is important to us. A few weeks ago, Cathy Theys brainstormed a list of topics spanning social, technical, business, and other aspects of Drupal ecosystem that would be welcome at MidCamp. The list is long, but by no means exhaustive.

Are you on the fence about submitting a proposal? Take a look at the variety of suggestions for topics and fill out the submission form (the deadline is Monday, January 19). I want to see you at MidCamp!

References and resources

Contact me on Drupal.org or on Twitter. -alimac

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Capgemini Engineering: Drupal 8 PSR-4 Form compatibility in Drupal 7

mer, 14/01/2015 - 01:00

Up until Drupal 8 there has been little to encourage well organised code. It now has PSR-4 autoloading so your classes are automatically included. Even though Drupal 8 is just round the corner, a lot of us will still be using Drupal 7 for quite a while, however that doesn’t mean we can’t benefit from this structure in Drupal 7.

This post covers two parts:

  1. Autoloading class files.
  2. Avoiding extra plumbing to hook into your class methods.

You’re probably familiar with drupal_get_form(‘my_example_form’) which then looks for a function my_example_form(). The issue is that your form definition will no longer be in such a function but within a method in a class. To cover both these parts we will be using two modules:

  1. XAutoLoad - Which will autoload our class.
  2. Cool - Which allows us to abstract the usual functions into class methods.

Drupal 8 was originally using PSR-0 which has been deprecated in favour of PSR-4. As a consequence the Cool module uses PSR-0 in its examples although it does support PSR-4. We will create an example module called psr4_form.

The information on autoloading and folder structure for PSR-4 in Drupal 8 states that we should place our form class in psr4_form/src/Form/FormExample.php however the cool module instead loads from a FormControllers folder: psr4_form/src/FormControllers/FormExample.php.

We can get round this by providing our own hook_forms() as laid out in the Cool module:

/** * Implements hook_forms(). */ function psr4_form_forms($form_id, $args) { $classes = \Drupal\cool\Loader::mapImplementationsAvailable('Form', '\Drupal\cool\Controllers\FormController'); unset($classes['Drupal\\cool\\BaseForm']); unset($classes['Drupal\\cool\\BaseSettingsForm']); $forms = array(); foreach ($classes as $class_name) { $forms[$class_name::getId()] = array( 'callback' => 'cool_default_form_callback', 'callback arguments' => array($class_name), ); } return $forms; }

If you are ok placing your class in the FormControllers folder then you can omit the above function to keep your .module file simple or you could put the hook in another module. Potentially the Cool module could be updated to reflect this.

This class requires a namespace of the form Drupal\<module_name>\Form. It also extends the BaseForm class provided by the Cool module so we don’t need to explicitly create our form functions:

namespace Drupal\psr4_form\Form; class FormExample extends \Drupal\cool\BaseForm { ... }

Within our FormExample class we need a method getId() to expose the form_id to Drupal:

public static function getId() { return 'psr4_form'; }

And of course we need the form builder:

public static function build() { $form = parent::build(); $form['my_textfield'] = array( '#type' => 'textfield', '#title' => t('My textfield'), ); return $form; }

All that is left is to define your validate and submit methods following the Drupal 8 form API.

At the time of writing, the Cool module isn’t up to date with Drupal 8 Form API conventions. I started this blog post with the intention of a direct copy and paste of the src folder. Unfortunately the methods don’t quite follow the exact same conventions and they also need to be static:

Drupal 7 Drupal 8 getId getFormId build buildForm validate validateForm submit submitForm

This example module can be found at https://github.com/oliverpolden/psr4_form.

Taking it further

Drupal 8 is just round the corner but a lot of us will still be using Drupal 7 for the foreseeable future. Taking this approach allows us to learn and make use of Drupal 8 conventions as well as making it easier to migrate from Drupal 7. It would be nice to see the Cool module be brought up to date with the current API, perhaps something I will be helping with in the not so distant future.

Links Modules Information

Drupal 8 PSR-4 Form compatibility in Drupal 7 was originally published by Capgemini at Capgemini on January 14, 2015.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Mediacurrent: Level up your Drush-Fu with aliases that work across all environments

mar, 13/01/2015 - 22:40

Have you noticed how your remote drush aliases (e.g., @my-dev-server) don't work when you're logged into the remote server? It's because aliases with the "remote-host" key specified can't work locally. Quite annoying!

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Drupal core announcements: Drupal core updates for January 12, 2015

mar, 13/01/2015 - 21:40
What's new with Drupal 8?

Happy New Year everyone! Since the last Drupal Core Update on December 3rd, Drupal 8 passed over 2500 contributors (congratulations to tadityar on becoming the 2500th D8 contributor on December 9)!

Some other highlights of the month were:

How can I help get Drupal 8 done?

See Help get Drupal 8 released! for updated information on the current state of the release and more information on how you can help.

Drupal 8 In Real Life Whew! That's a wrap!

Do you follow Drupal Planet with devotion, or keep a close eye on the Drupal event calendar, or git pull origin 8.0.x every morning without fail before your coffee? We're looking for more contributors to help compile these posts. You could either take a few hours once every six weeks or so to put together a whole post, or help with one section more regularly. If you'd like to volunteer for helping to draft these posts, please follow the steps here!

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Drupal Watchdog: MySQL Query Optimization

mar, 13/01/2015 - 18:52
Feature

A large part of MySQL optimization lies in improving poorly performing SQL queries. While tuning is important, it often has nowhere near the impact of actually fixing a poorly performing query. Fixing queries is also a lot more fun. Obviously query optimization is a large subject, and can’t possibly be covered in full in a single article. I highly recommend that you get a book on this subject; for any Drupal developer, it is well worth learning.

As a web developer using a CMS, you are only slightly removed from the SQL layer. Not completely knowing how to use this layer and how to optimize it is very limiting. To get you started, we will cover some very basic optimization, index usage, and join optimization techniques.

Index Basics

Even though indexes are very important for database performance, they are not completely understood by many developers, which often leads to easily-avoidable problems. The main issue is the mystical belief that the MySQL optimizer should be able to quickly run a query if an index so much as touches the columns in question. Sadly, indexes are not magical.

It is best to think of an index as a tree, largely because they are trees in most DB systems. (B+Trees, specifically; for more information, see http://wdog.it/4/1/btree.)

Thus, if you have an example index test that covers (columnA, columnB), you literally have a tree of columnA values, with columnB values in the leaves. If you have a query that has a WHERE condition on these two columns, MySQL will go through this tree looking for the correct columnA value first, and then go into the leaves of that object, and find the correct columnB value.

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OpenLucius: Drupal Grants, what to do with this node access system?

mar, 13/01/2015 - 17:48
Viewing, editing and deleting pages in Drupal

When you have some experience with Drupal it will be clear that you can set your rights for content management in the permission table (/admin/people/permissions).

Check the appropriate permissions and everyone will get the required rights to view, add, edit or delete content. In other words the so-called CRUD actions: Create, Read, Update, Delete.

So far so good.

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ERPAL: Looking back on 2014 with Drupal business apps

mar, 13/01/2015 - 16:30

The year 2014 was entirely about flexible and open business applications based on Drupal - and we’ll continue to follow this vision in 2015.
In 2014 we staffed up our ERPAL team and won strategic clients who gave us feedback and helped us continue to finance our open source development. This positive resonance provides confirmation that Drupal can become an ever-larger part of the open source business application market.
One of the ERPAL Platform projects of 2014 that we’re very proud of was presented in a featured webinar on open integration with Drupal commerce. The ERPAL Platform based foam creator gives an industrial company the means to let its clients construct and order individually manufactured products – all directly online. The orders are sent to the manufacturing department and production starts. Because the application is fully integrated with the company’s workflow and IT infrastructure, no manual data transfer is needed and the efficiency of the whole sales-to-production process has increased by more than 75%. This unique use case shows the power of Drupal extended well beyond content sites.

Whereas other open source business apps like Odoo focus solely on broadening the palette of business apps available for ERP systems, ERPAL comes from the other direction. We use Drupal as a highly flexible and stable application framework that helps you build any kind of web application at all - and Drupal can do this with almost no coding, just by configuring. Using this strategy we introduced Drupal to some businesses that hadn’t even heard of Drupal. And now that they see its power and flexibility, they wouldn’t want to go without it anymore.
With ERPAL Platform, which we released in 2014, we provide Drupal developers and site builders with a free Drupal distribution for building highly flexible business applications and e-commerce businesses in a Drupal box. It integrates many Drupal modules like Drupal Commerce and Rules, which are known to leverage flexibility. With the help of the Drupal community we implemented an architecture that covers contact management and all components of the sales process such as quotes, orders and invoices. As Drupal became more open, providing web service for all entities in Drupal 8, we implemented the architecture of ERPAL to integrate with other services. Together with a closed beta customer test pool, we are running ERPAL Platform as a fully-integrated agency platform, automating integration tasks between Jira, Mite, Trello, Redmine and toggle. It helps save time in administration and automates billing and controlling processes in project-based business. Thanks to everyone who joined our ERPAL Platform integration survey. This survey is still open and we are looking forward to even more feedback to help us increase our number of beta testers.

Because in 2014 we were deploying more than 25 Drupal-based business apps and always had Drupalgeddon in mind, we decided to go public with our technology for Drupal update automation, which we previously had used only internally for our clients. Drop Guard lets Drupal users and agencies automate Drupal security updates immediately after a new security update release. If you’re interested in further details, workflows and technology, read more in our blog post about how since 2012 we’ve automated Drupal security updates with ERPAL: you can too!

All in all, 2014 was an amazing year for ERPAL and we saw that there’s a market for open source business applications. We’re looking forward to contributing even more code, know-how, webinars and sessions to the Drupal community in 2015.

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Drupalize.Me: Changes in the Form API in Drupal 8

mar, 13/01/2015 - 15:13

In my previous post, I documented the first of my Adventures in Porting a D7 Form Module to Drupal 8. In that article, I documented how I used the Drupal Module Upgrader to convert my Drupal 7 module, Form Fun, to Drupal 8 and what I learned along the way about how Routes and Controllers replaced hook_menu, and what I gleaned from change records about other API changes. This article is a continuation of that post, so you might want to pop over and give it a read so that you're up to speed with what we're doing here.

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DrupalOnWindows: Setting up Code Syntax Higlighting with Drupal

mar, 13/01/2015 - 07:00

While setting up (still in progres..) this website we found the need to enable easy Code Highlighting to be done through our WYSIWYG editor of choice: CKeditor. What looked like a 30 minute task, ended up in a more than 3 hour adventure. Let's see what happened.

Language English
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Liran Tal's Enginx: Drupal Performance Tip – be humble on hook_init()

lun, 12/01/2015 - 17:06
This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Drupal Performance Tips

In the spirit of the computer video game Doom and its skill levels, we’ll review a few ways you can improve  your Drupal speed performance     and optimize for better results and server response time. These tips that we’ll cover may be at times specific to Drupal 6 versions, although     you can always learn the best practices from these examples and apply them on your own code base.

Doom skill levels: (easiest first)

1. I’m too young to die

2. Hey, not too rough

3. Hurt me plenty

4. Ultra-violence

5. Nightmare!

  This post is rated “I’m too young too die” difficulty level.

 

Drupal is known for its plethora of hooks, and their use is abundant through-out any Drupal modules to plug into the way that Drupal works. That’s fine, though once you’ve decided you’re moving on with Drupal as your live web application/website and you’re using modules from the eco-system, that is when you need to spend some more time reviewing modules a little bit closer than just their download counts or issues on drupal.org

hook_init() runs on every page load. Imagine you’re having a few modules implementing this hook, then you already have impact on your server response time performance for every page access in Drupal. Maybe those modules have a very slight overhead there, maybe that’s part of what they do, and that’s fine, but it may at times benefit you to review and investigate if the code there, that maybe your team added too, is better being re-factored to some other place and not on every page load.

There is another perspective for it of course, maybe things do need to take place on every page load, but their implementation in the code might be faulty. Imagine you’re doing some expensive IO on every page load, like calling an API, or querying a heavy table. Maybe you can re-factor to cache this information?

 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

The post Drupal Performance Tip – be humble on hook_init() appeared first on Liran Tal's Enginx.

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Evolving Web: Parallelized web scraping using RollingCurl

lun, 12/01/2015 - 16:35

The web is full of information! Your web sites probably already use many APIs for maps, Twitter, IP geolocation, and more. But what about data that's on the web, but doesn't have a readily available API?

read more
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Yuriy Gerasimov: Centralize your logs with logstash (getting started guide)

lun, 12/01/2015 - 13:51

Logstash is a great tool to centralize logs in your environment. For example we have several drupal webheads that write logs into syslog. It would be really nice to see those logs somewhere centrally to find out about your system's health status and debug potential problems.

In this article I would like to show how easy to start using logstash for local development.

First of all in order to run logstash you need to follow instructions http://logstash.net/docs/1.4.2/tutorials/getting-started-with-logstash.

Logstash has following concepts:

  • inputs -- where we grab logs from. This can be files on local files system, records of database table, redis and many more.
  • codecs -- way you can serialize/unserialize you data. Think about it as json decode when you get records or running json encode when you are saving log message.
  • filters -- instruments to filter particular log records we want to process. Example -- syslog has many records but we want to extract only drupal related.
  • outputs -- where we are passing our processed log records. It can be a file (multiple different formats), stdout or what is most interesting elastic search

Tricky part comes when you need to install Elastic Search to store your logs and Kibana to view them. There is very nice shortcut for development purposes -- to use already built docker image for that.

I have found very handy to use https://registry.hub.docker.com/u/sebp/elk/ image.

So you need docker to be installed (http://docs.docker.com/installation/ubuntulinux/). Then you import docker image and run it.

sudo docker pull sebp/elk sudo docker run -p 5601:5601 -p 9200:9200 -p 5000:5000 -it --name elk sebp/elk

Now we have docker image working plus it has port forwarding to our localhost.

In order to send your logstash logs to elastic search you need to use elasticsearch output. Here is logstash configuration file example that can be run for testing.

input { stdin { } } output { stdout { codec => rubydebug } elasticsearch { host => "localhost" port => "9200" protocol => "http" } }

Now when you run logstash and enter couple of messages they will be fed to elasticsearch. Now you can open http://localhost:5601/ to see kibana in action.

Next step would be to set up your own rules of extracting drupal (or any other type) logs and pushing them to elastic search. But this is very individual task that is out of the scope of this guide.

Tags: drupaldrupal planetlogstash
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Paul Rowell: Drupal fields; improving select lists

dim, 11/01/2015 - 21:39

Everyone knows what a select list is, what it looks like and how it works. But that doesn't mean it can't get better, here a few modules that can be used to improve the experience for users when selecting items.

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Drupal Camp NJ 2015: Drupal 8 core critical issues sprint to coincide with camp

dim, 11/01/2015 - 17:53

The Central NJ Drupal Meetup has received one of the first grants from the new Drupal Association Drupal 8 Accelerate program. The Sprint will take place from January 29 to Febrary 1. For more details see https://groups.drupal.org/node/453848 

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DrupalOnWindows: Drupal on IIS or Apache

dim, 11/01/2015 - 10:38

In this article I will try to find out if there is any performance lead in running Drupal on IIS over Apache. I will not run any benchmarks on my own, just analyze what I could find about this surfing the web. Type "iis vs apache drupal" in Google and this is what I found.

The links

Drupal Performance on IIS7 vs Apache

Date: Mid 2012

Language English
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3C Web Services: How to override field templates in Drupal 7

ven, 09/01/2015 - 22:42

Drupal provides a quick and simple way to customize field output globally using template files. Overriding a field's template file can be useful if you need to customize the HTML, data, or provide custom logic to a Drupal field. Template files allow you to target all fields, fields of specific names, fields of specific types and fields of specific content types.

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Chapter Three: Principles of Configuration Management - Part Two

ven, 09/01/2015 - 22:01

This is the second in a series of posts about Drupal 8's configuration management system. The Configuration Management Initiative (CMI) was the first Drupal 8 initiative to be announced in 2011, and we've learned a lot during thousands of hours of work on the initiative since then. These posts will share what we've learned and provide background on the why and how. In case you missed it, you can read the first part here.

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Drupal Easy: DrupalEasy Podcast 142: New Jersey (News Lightning Round)

ven, 09/01/2015 - 21:29
Download Podcast 142

...and we're back! After a holiday hiatus, Andrew, Ryan, Ted, and Mike are back for a guest-less news round-up. We set the timer and spent 3 minutes on over a dozen different Drupal-related news items from the past 8 weeks. Drupal 8, Drupal.org user personas, and major merger, someone gets a job, and several 2014 lists are covered, along with our picks of the week.

read more

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Dries Buytaert: Acquia retrospective 2014

ven, 09/01/2015 - 21:01

As is now a tradition for me, here is my annual Acquia retrospective, where I look back at 2014 and share what's on my mind as we start the new year. I take the time to write these retrospectives not only for you dear reader, but also for myself, because I want to keep a record of the changes we've gone through as a company and how my personal thinking is evolving from year to year. But I also write them for you, because you might be able to learn from my experiences or from analyzing the information provided. If you would like to, you can read my previous retrospectives: 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

For Acquia, 2014 was another incredible year, one where we beat our wildest expectations. We crossed the major milestone of $100 USD million in annual revenue, the majority of which is recurring subscription revenue. It is hard to believe that 2014 was only our sixth full year as a revenue-generating business.

We've seen the most growth from our enterprise customers, but our number of small and medium size customers has grown too. We helped launch and host some incredible sites last year: from weather.com (a top 20 site) to the Emmys. Our efforts in Europe and Asia-Pacific are paying off; our EMEA business grew substantially, and the Australian government decided to switch the entire government to Drupal and the Acquia Platform.

We hired 233 people in 2014 and ended the year with 575 employees. About 25% of our employees work from home. The other 75% work from offices around the world; Burlington MA (US), Portland OR (US), Washington DC (US), Paris (France), Reading (United Kingdom), Ghent (Belgium), Singapore, Brisbane (Australia) and Sydney (Australia). About 75% of our employees are based in the United States. Despite our fast growth rate in staff, recruiting remains a key challenge; it's hard to hire as fast as we do and maintain the high bar we've set for ourselves in terms of talent and commitment.

We raised venture funding twice in 2014: a $50MM series F round led by New Enterprise Associates (NEA) followed by Amazon investing an undisclosed amount of money in our business. It's not like Tom Erickson and I enjoy raising money, but we have been able to secure the financing that is necessary for a fast-growth, enterprise subscription business like Acquia. Building and expanding a sales and marketing team is notoriously difficult and requires big investments. At the same time, we're building and supporting the development of multiple products in parallel. Most companies only build one product. We're going after a big dream to become the preferred platform for what has been called the "pivot point of many enterprise tech stacks" -- the technologies that permit organizations to deliver on the promises of exceptional digital customer experiences from an agile, open, resilient platform. We're going after a big dream and are competing against behemoths. We can't show up to a gunfight with a knife, so to speak.

Building a digital platform for the enterprise

Digital has changed everything, and more and more organizations need or want to transform into digital-first businesses to stay in step with the preferences of their customers. Furthermore, technology innovations keep occurring at an ever faster and more disruptive pace. No organization is immune to the forces of digital disruption. At Acquia, we help our customers with this wave of digital transformation by providing a complete technology platform and the support and security necessary to maintain it. The Acquia Platform consists of tools and support for building, delivery and managing dynamic digital experiences. It includes Acquia Cloud, which helps developers deliver complex applications at scale, and Acquia Lift, our digital engagement services for bringing greater context to highly personalized experiences. Let me give you an update on each of the major components.

Drupal tools and support

Drupal gives organizations the ability to deliver a unified digital experience that includes mobile delivery, social and commerce. Great inefficiencies exist in most organizations that use a variety of different, disconnected systems to achieve those three essentials. They are tired of having to tie things together; content is important, social is important, commerce is important but connecting all these systems seamlessly and integrating them with preferred applications and legacy systems leads to massive inefficiencies. Companies want to do things well, and more often than not, Drupal allows them to do it better, more nimbly and in a far more integrated framework.

In 2010, we laid out our product vision and predicted more and more organizations would start to standardize on Drupal. Running 20 different content management systems on 20 different technology stacks is both an expensive and unnecessary burden. We've seen more and more large organizations re-platform most of their sites to Drupal and the Acquia Platform. They realize they don't need multiple content management systems for different sites. Great examples are Warner Music and Interscope Records, who have hundreds of sites on Drupal across the organization, resulting in significant cost savings and efficiency improvements. The success of our Acquia Cloud Site Factory solution has been gratifying to witness. According to a research study by Forrester Consulting, which we released late last year, ACSF is delivering a 944% return on investment to its adopters.

After many years of discussion and debate in the Drupal community, we launched the Acquia Certification Program in March 2014. So far, 546 Drupal developers from more than 45 countries have earned certification. The exams focus on real world experience, and the predominant comments we've heard this past year are that the exams are tough but fair. Acquia delivered six times the amount of training in 2014 compared to the previous year, and demand shows no sign of slowing.

Last, but definitely not least, is Drupal 8. We contributed significantly to Drupal 8 and helped it to achieve beta status; of the 513 critical Drupal 8 bugs fixed in 2014, Acquia's Office of the CTO helped fix 282 of them. We also funded work on the Drupal Module Upgrader to automate much of the work required to port modules from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8.

Acquia Cloud

But Drupal alone isn't enough for organizations to succeed in this digital-first world. In addition to adopting Drupal, the cloud continues to enable organizations to save time and money on infrastructure management so they can focus on managing websites more efficiently and bringing them to market faster. Acquia customers such as GRAMMY.com have come to depend on the Acquia Cloud to provide them with the kind of rugged, secure scale that ensures when the world's attention is focused on their sites, they will thrive. On a monthly basis, we're now serving more than 33 billion hits, almost 5 billion pageviews, 9 petabytes of data transferred, and logging 13 billion Drupal watchdog log lines. We added many new features to Acquia Cloud in 2014, including log streaming, self-service diagnosis tools, support for teams and permissions, two-factor authentication, new dashboards, improved security with support for Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), an API for Acquia Cloud, and more.

Acquia Lift

As powerful as the Drupal/Acquia Cloud combination may be, our customers demand far more from their digital properties, focusing more and more on optimizing them to fully deliver the best possible experience to each individual user. Great digital experiences have always been personal; today they have to become contextual, intuitively knowing each user and dynamically responding to each user's personal preference from device to location to history with the organization. After two years of development and the acquisition of TruCentric, we launched Acquia Lift in 2014.

It's surprising how many organizations aren't implementing any form of personalization today. Even the most basic level of user segmentation and targeting allows organizations to better serve their visitors and can translate into significant growth and competitive differentiation. Advanced organizations have a single, well-integrated view of the customer to optimize both the experience and the lifetime value of that customer, in a consistent fashion across all of their digital touchpoints. Personalization not only leads to better business results, customers have come to expect it and if they don't find it, they'll go elsewhere to get it. Acquia Lift enables organizations to leverage data from multiple sources in order to serve people with relevant content and commerce based on intent, locations and interests. I believe that Acquia Lift has tremendous opportunity and that it will grow to be a significant business in and of itself.

While our key areas of investment in 2014 were Acquia Cloud and Acquia Lift, we did a lot more. Our Mollom service blocked more than 7.8 billion spam messages with an error rate of only 0.01%. We continue to invest in commerce; we helped launch the new Puma website leveraging our Demandware connector and continue to invest and focus on the integration of content and commerce. Overall, the design and user experience of our products has improved a lot, but it is still an area for us to work on. Expect us to focus more heavily on user experience in 2015.

The results of all our efforts around the launch of the Acquia Platform have not gone unnoticed. In October, Acquia was identified as a Leader in the 2014 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Web Content Management.

The wind is blowing in the right direction

I'm very optimistic about Acquia's future in 2015. I believe we've steered the company to be positioned at the right place at the right time. As more organizations are shifting to becoming digital-first businesses they want to build digital experiences that are more pervasive, more contextual, more targeted, more integrated, and last but not least, more secure.

The consolidation from many individual point solutions to one platform is gaining momentum, although re-platforming is usually a long process. Organizations want the unified or integrated experience that Drupal has to offer, as well as the flexibility of Open Source. It is still time consuming and challenging to create quality content, and I believe there is plenty of opportunity for us and our partners to help with that going forward.

Without a doubt, organizations want to better understand their customers and use data-driven decision to drive growth. Data is becoming the new product. The opportunity this creates in commerce is massive.

Cloud computing and Software as a Service (SaaS) continues to be on the rise. Cloud is top of mind and the transition away from on-premise solutions is accelerating even as the arguments around security and privacy issues in the cloud continue to be raised. While there is a certain amount of emotion, and sometimes politics, people are beginning to realize that the cloud is usually more secure and more robust against cyber-attacks than traditional on-premise systems.

The promise of Drupal 8, arguably the most significant advance in the evolution of the Drupal software, has me very excited. It is shaping up to be a great release, and I'm confident it will further secure Drupal's reputation among developers, designers, agencies and site managers as the most flexible, powerful content management solution available.

All of this is not to say 2015 will be easy. This is an incredibly exciting and fast-changing space in the world of technology. Acquia is growing in an incredibly fast-paced, dynamic sector and we realize our mission is to help our customers understand how to think ahead to ever more innovation and change. Simplifying our overall messaging and defining ourselves around the Acquia Platform is a significant first step.

Of course, none of this success would be possible without the support of our customers, partners, the Drupal community, the Acquia team, and our many friends. Thank you for your support in 2014, and I look forward to working with you to find out what 2015 will bring!

Catégories: Elsewhere

Lullabot: Manage Your Drupal.Org Projects and Sprints with a Kanban Board

ven, 09/01/2015 - 20:30

I'm not very good with managing my tasks through a simple list—despite my best efforts, the list always seems to keep growing. I prefer to use a Kanban Board, a popular method of arranging lists that highlights the current status of each task. It's nice to see that I actually do get things done, after all!

Catégories: Elsewhere

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