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Drupal Watchdog: RESTful Web Services Module Basics

jeu, 16/04/2015 - 17:30
Article

Drupal 7 does not have built-in support for representational state transfer (REST) functionality. However, the RESTful Web Services module is arguably the most efficient way to provide resource representations for all the entity types, by leveraging Drupal's powerful Entity API. Unmodified, the module makes it possible to output the instances of the core entity types – node, file, and user – in JSON or XML format. Further entity type resources and formats are possible utilizing hooks in added code.

As with any REST solution, the RESTful Web Services module supports all four of the fundamental operations of data manipulation: create, read, update, and delete (CRUD). The corresponding RESTful API HTTP methods are POST, GET, PUT, and DELETE, respectively.

Anyone hoping to learn and make use of this module – especially for the first time – will likely be frustrated by the current project documentation, which is incomplete, uneven, and lacking clear examples. This article – a brief overview – is intended to introduce what is possible with this module, and help anyone getting started with it.

We begin with a clean Drupal 7 installation (using the Standard profile) running on a virtual host with the domain name "drupal_7_test". After installing and enabling the module, we find that it does not have the configuration user interface one might expect. In the demonstration code below, we focus on the node entity type.

Nabbing a Node

The simplest operation – reading an entity instance – is performed using a simple GET request containing the machine name of the entity type and the entity's ID.

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Drupal Association News: We Love Our Volunteers!

jeu, 16/04/2015 - 16:15

This week is National Volunteer Week, a week to recognize that volunteerism is a building block to a strong and thriving community.  The Drupal Community is no different: as an open-source project our volunteers are vital to the health and growth of our project.  There are so many roles and levels of contribution within our Drupal ecosystem that we at the Drupal Association wanted to highlight how much your contribution means to us and our work.  I took some time and asked around, here’s some of the glowing praise our staff has to say about our phenomenal volunteers. 

“I am continually impressed with the volunteers that I get to work with.  Not only do they rock at their jobs, but they are so dedicated to the work that they do for Drupal and the Cons specifically!  Anyone who has volunteered for a Con knows that it is a large undertaking, and a responsibility that isn't taken lightly. These volunteers come back each week with positive attitudes, valuable ideas and great results.  Although I have only been at the Association for a little over six months, I can truly say that these volunteers are what gives our Cons the 'special sauce' and I am lucky to get to work with volunteers from around the globe on a daily basis.” 

- Amanda Gosner, DrupalCon Coordinator

“Most of my day is spent with Drupal Association staff, who have the luxury of getting paid to think about Drupal for 8 hours a day. A good chunk of my job is working with volunteers though-- the Board of Directors, Drupal.org Working Groups, Community Organizers, DrupalCon session speakers. So many of you give so much of your time and your smarts back to the project and the community, and it's my privilege and duty to learn from you all.”

- Holly Ross, Executive Director

"I look forward to working working with community volunteers to help build and improve Drupal.org. The site would not be where it is today without everyone's work."

- Neil Drumm, Drupal.org Lead Architect

 

“I want to thank Cathy and Jared for being my sprint mentor at DrupalCon Latin America. I made my first comment on the issue queue. It felt so good to cross into that world finally, even if it is was just a baby toe crossing over.”

- Megan Sanicki, COO

 

“It feels like I’m hearing news every day about the amazing programs our community members put together all over the world — from Los Angeles to Uganda and beyond. Without help from amazing community volunteers who donate time working on social media, in the issue queues, or even volunteers who take a brief moment to drop a note in my inbox (“have you seen this?”), these stories would never be shared with our wider community.” 

- Leigh Carver, Content Writer

Today, we invite you to take a few minutes to recognize your fellow Drupal contributors by tweeting or sending a message via IRC to appreciate each other.  After all, without our volunteers, our Drupal Community would not be as lively, bright, and welcoming.  Want to lend a hand?  Our get involved page has plenty of ways to volunteer with the project.

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KnackForge: Drupal 7 - Hooking Ajax events and views refresh

jeu, 16/04/2015 - 15:40
Drupal has a solid Ajax interface, we can hook into the Ajax events at various places. I will explain some 5 important methods,   1) beforeSerialize - called before data is packed and runs before the beforeSend & beforeSubmit 2) beforeSubmit - called before the ajax request 3) beforeSend - called just before the ajax request 4) success - called after ajax event returns data 5) complete - called after the request ends   Lets say you want to capture some ajax event (in built or made by other module) to do some event like Views refresh. We can use a very simple logic to do that.  
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Pronovix: Prototyping LinkForward with Drupal, a startup case study

jeu, 16/04/2015 - 15:10

This is the story of how I built a first prototype for LinkForward, a web application for power networkers, and how I built it in record time using Drupal (12 hours), without a single line of custom code.

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Cruiskeen Consulting: Drupal for Developers Second Edition

mer, 15/04/2015 - 23:53

Almost everyone who does any form of Drupal development uses Drush - it's the Swiss Army Knife of the Drupal world. Drush is the Drupal Shell, and it lets you do a whole lot of amazing things with Drupal sites without actually going to the site, logging in, and clicking buttons.  It's a command-line tool (and since I'm an old UNIX hand, it's just right for me.

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Drupal.org frontpage posts for the Drupal planet: A new way to welcome newcomers on Drupal.org

mer, 15/04/2015 - 22:04

The first initiative on the Drupal.org 2015 roadmap is ‘Better account creation and login’. One of the listed goals for that initiative is “Build a user engagement path which will guide users from fresh empty accounts to active contributors, identifying and preventing spammers from moving further.” This is something Drupal Association team has been focusing on in the last few weeks.

The first change we rolled out a few days ago was a ‘new’ indicator on comments from users whose Drupal.org accounts are fewer than 90 days old. The indicator is displayed on their profile page as well. We hope this will help make conversations in the issue queues and forum comments more welcoming, as people will be able to easily see that someone is new, and probably doesn’t know yet a lot about the way community works.

Today we are taking another step towards making Drupal.org more welcoming environment for new users. But first, a bit of background.

New users and spam

It is not a surprise for anyone that a big number of user accounts registering on the site are spam accounts. To fight that and prevent spam content from appearing on Drupal.org, we have a number of different tools in place. Of course, we don’t want these tools to affect all active, honest users of the site, and make their daily experience more difficult. To separate users we are sure about from those we aren’t sure about yet, we have a special ‘confirmed’ user role.

All new users start without such a role. Their content submissions are checked by Honeypot and Mollom, their profiles are not visible to anonymous visitors of the site, and the types of content they may create are limited. Once a user receives a ‘confirmed’ role, his or her submissions will not be checked by spam fighting tools anymore; their profile page will be visible to everyone, and they will be able to create more different types of content on the site.

This system works pretty well, and our main goal is to ensure that valid new users get the ‘confirmed’ role as quickly as possible, to improve their experience and enable them to fully participate on the site.

The best way to identify someone as not a spammer is have another human look at the content they post and confirm they are not spammers. Previously, we had a very limited number of people who could do that-- about 50. Because of that, it usually took quite some time for new user to get the role. This was especially noticeable during sprints.

Today we’d like to open a process of granting a ‘confirmed’ role to the thousands of active users on the site.

‘Community’ user role

Today, we are introducing a new ‘Community’ role on the site. It will be granted automatically to users who have been around for some time and reached a certain level of participation on Drupal.org. Users who have this role will be able to ‘confirm’ new users on the site. They will see a small button on comments and user profile of any user who has not yet been confirmed. If you are one of the users with ‘Community’ role, look out for this new Confirm button, and when you see one next to a user - take another look at what the person posted. If their content looks valid, just click ‘confirm’. By doing so, you will empower new users to fully participate on Drupal.org and improve their daily experience on the site.

With expect to have at least 10,000 active users with the ‘Community’ role. With so many people to grant the ‘confirmed’ role, new users should be confirmed faster than ever before.

If you aren’t sure if you have the ‘community’ role or not, don’t worry. We will send an email notification to every user whose account receives the new role. The email will have all the information about the role and how to use it.

Thanks for helping us make Drupal.org a better place!

Front page news: Planet Drupal
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Drupal Watchdog: VIDEO: DrupalCon Amsterdam Interview: MortenDK

mer, 15/04/2015 - 19:39

On a sunny Amsterdam morning, we catch Morten (Tag1 Consulting, Geek Röyale) as he speeds through DrupalCon’s RAI Convention Center on an urgent Viking mission. We waylay him long enough for this brief, Danish-accented, rapid-fire chit-chat.

MORTEN: I am Morten, also known as MortenDK.

RONNIE RAY: You gave a talk this morning?

MORTEN: Yes, I gave a talk about the Drupal 8 Twig project, which is the new theming layer for Drupal. And I gave a demo on all the new and exciting things we have in it.

So that was really good to show off from a front-ender’s perspective everything that was done over the last couple of years and how the new system is going to work in Drupal 8. It was a real gas to finally really show it off. People could see we’re not just lying, but it’s actually real.

RR: So, can I ask you, what are you reading now?

MORTEN: What?

RR: Any books, any magazines?

MORTEN: Ah – oh – uh – (bleep) – what’s the name of it? I actually have it on an audio file, it’s a fantasy story about... uh.. a lot of blood, a lot of personal vendettas. Good clean fun. But actually I haven’t had the time to read for a long time because I’ve been doing so much work on the Drupal project and I’ve been moving. Also, I took up my old hobby of painting miniatures again, just to geek out.

I’m a metal-head so pretty much anything... been into a lot of Opeth, a Swedish metal band – kind of a grown man’s metal. (Indecipherable.)

RR: Do you follow anyone on Twitter or FaceBook?

MORTEN: A couple, but normally not. Interviews with musicians are not always the most interesting thing, it’s the same thing as interviews with sports people, “So how did it go today?” “We played really hard!” “On the new album, we’re going to really show off.” So that’s kind of like... a couple of people... there’s a Swedish band called Arch Enemy I’ve been following closely.

RR: What’s the most exciting thing about Drupal 8 for you?

MORTEN: It is the front-end, the Twig system and the templates, and the way we have shifted focus in the front-end completely around, from being an afterthought to a whole new system that is built for front-enders instead of built by back-enders to front-enders. It’s kind of, we’ve taken control over our own destiny, and that I think is going to be the killer app for Drupal 8.

Tags:  DrupalCon DrupalCon Amsterdam Video Video: 
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Promet Source: How Drupalers Can Get Organized: Tips From a Librarian

mer, 15/04/2015 - 19:26

Ahh, libraries. The smell of books, the sounds of pages turning, the incessant Karaoke singalongs of the library workers. OK, maybe the last one is a bit far-fetched, but we all know it’s founded in some truth. The fact remains that libraries are a hallowed ground of information consumption and organization.

That organization doesn’t happen by dint of chance. No, there’s a lot of hard work that goes into maintaining a collection, and these steps taken by your local library workers might inspire us to approach our websites with the same set of diligent hands. Get sorting, people!

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Wellnet Blog: Weekly Module Review - #7 Fast Permissions Administration, insert permissions without issues!

mer, 15/04/2015 - 15:03

This week we’ll talk about FPA (Fast Permissions Administration), a very cute module I only discovered recently.

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Code Karate: Installing and configuring a Drupal 7 Sub-theme - 3 of 3

mer, 15/04/2015 - 13:44
Episode Number: 202

In the final video of the 3 part series, we look at creating and configuring a Drupal sub-theme. Specifically, we will be created a sub-theme based off of the Zen theme. If you aren’t familiar with Zen, it is a very popular base theme used by thousands of designers as a starting point when building a custom website theme.

Tags: DrupalDrupal 7Theme DevelopmentDrupal Planet
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InternetDevels: Drupal for dummies: where and when is Drupal the Best Option?

mer, 15/04/2015 - 12:21

Let us give the floor to Jack Dawson, founder of Big Drop Inc. He shared his thoughts and ideas about Drupal with the readers of our blog.

Drupal is an open source CMS (content management system), which means that its block of code is available for extension and modification by anyone with programming knowledge. This is as opposed to close source/proprietary software, whose creators retain its IP rights. Open source software does not come with any fees, and it is fully modifiable to fit any user requirements.

Read more
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Free Energy Media: Simple REST API SMS App Integration with Telecom Provider

mer, 15/04/2015 - 10:34

I have been building apps recently that integrate a REST API which subscribes users to a Drupal web app via SMS, they are simultaneously subscribed in the telecom operators database. Conditions must be checked to keep the users status in sync with Drupal and the operator. Other conditions that I won’t cover here include recurring billing or the free trial period.

This is a practical example of how using the REST protocol allows technologies that are completely different to communicate with each other. The technologies in our stack include SMS, mobile billing and a Drupal web app.

First create the URL endpoint by using hook_menu

function my_module_menu() {
$items['my_url/send'] = array(
'title' => 'send',
'page callback' => 'my_module_send_page',
'access callback' => TRUE
);
return $items;
}

When a mobile originated text message “MO” is sent from the customer handset to the shortcode created for our app, a relay message is sent from the telecom integrator’s API and hits the endpoint created with hook_menu on our web app. We then use a GET request to get the values from the values posted to our endpoint url. Parameters include product identification information, partner ID, customer MSISDN and subscription method, as well as other info. We also run an additional API call to check if the MSISDN/phone number is valid and if there is enough money on the customer account.

Here we have the beginning of the callback function that runs when our endpoint is hit.

function my_module_send_page() {

if (isset($_GET['Origin'])) {
$mobile = $_GET['Origin'];
$PricePointId = $_GET['PricePointId'];
$prodId = $_GET['ProductId'];
$mtmo = time() . 'MO';

There are many conditions in the business requirements, which determine different messages in the $text variable to the customer. Success/failure, weekly/monthly, arabic/english, below is the case if success and weekly PricePointId is selected. There is also a check for what language is selected, here we use the language value in the user object, we get this from what language the user selects on the registration form. We then pass back the correct language in the $text variable in a post request using CURL with everything else. Here is some more of the callback function.

if ($PricePointId == XXXXXX) {
if($user->language == 'en') {
$text = 'You have successfully subscribed
}
else {
$text = 'تمّ إشتراكك بملهمتي بنجاح بسعر ‘
}
}

$data2 = array(
'Password' => 'test',
'ProductId' => $prodId,
'PricePointId' => $PricePointId,
'SenderId' => 92235,
'OpId' => XXX,
'Destination' => $mobile,
'Text' => $text,
'ExtTxId' => $mtmo,
);

$qry_str = drupal_http_build_query($data2);
$ch = curl_init();
curl_setopt($ch,CURLOPT_URL, 'http://integrator-api-endpoint/sendMT?' . (string) $qry_str);
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, true);
$result = curl_exec($ch);
curl_close($ch);

Here we get the result from the CURL post to the telecom API.
If the result is greater than one that is success, so we create the user in Drupal and we send a custom email using drupal_mail().

if($result > 0) {
$obj->field_product = $prodId;
$obj->save(); */
$smart_db->changeUserRoles($user->uid , 'subscribe');
$smart_db->changeplan($user->uid, $prodId, $free = TRUE);
$to=$user->mail;
drupal_mail('user', 'register_no_approval_required', $to, user_preferred_language($user, $default = NULL), array('account' => $user), variable_get('site_mail', ''));
}
}

Catégories: Elsewhere

Vardot: 8 Reasons to Get Excited About Drupal 8

mer, 15/04/2015 - 09:25
News

As the last barriers to Drupal 8's launch dwindle, 2015 is shaping up to be a good year for the Drupal community. And though its release date isn't confirmed yet, let's take a look at 8 reasons why Drupal developers and anyone who is looking for an improved experience with their website should be excited for the impending arrival of Drupal 8:

1. Drupal 8 is Mobile First: Mobile websites and apps are the new reality, and so for the first time Drupal is addressing this comprehensively; all built-in themes in Drupal 8 are responsive, making it easier to administer on a mobile device. 

2. Drupal 8 Enhances Multilingual Support: Programming languages aren't constrained by geopolitical boundaries, but traditional "human" languages are, creating barriers between developers and users; with Drupal 8, an emphasis on improved multilingual and globalization support has been prioritized to deliver improved web experiences for both users and developers. There are improvements to language maintenance options, site translations and easier-to-customize settings. This bodes well for developers and site users everywhere.

3. Drupal 8 Utilizes the Symfony2 Framework: Drupal 8 has become more object-oriented by utilizing the Symfony2 framework, taking advantage of a stack of standard components used throughout a variety of frameworks; this makes it easier for new developers to learn Drupal and begin building powerful digital products in less time.

4. Drupal 8 Uses Twig: Drupal 8 is also making use of "Twig," an agile and secure template engine for PHP. Twig has been tailored to run smoothly together with Symfony's class-based approach to programming, and it provides a greater separation between logic and display. This also helps boost security, since PHP can no longer be embedded directly in templates. And just like Symfony2, Twig removes barriers to entry for front-end developers new to Drupal, adopting a syntax that should be familiar to developers with experience with Handlebars or other similar systems.

5. Drupal 8 Makes Content Creation Easy: Drupal 8 uses the common WYSIWYG editor (a.k.a What You See is What You Get). This means the process of content creation, from formatting to editing, has been designed to be more user-friendly. Personalization of content is improved by drag and drop buttons that include images with captions, and the editor toolbar is customizable, allowing content authors to add or remove editing buttons based on what they use most. HTML tags will automatically update as well.

6. Improved Configuration Management: Drupal 8 comes with a file system-based configuration management system, which makes it simple to transport configuration changes such as new content types, fields, or views from development to production. It also lets you use version control for your configuration, so you can keep your configured data in files, separate from production data in the database. 

7. Drupal 8 Won't be Wordpress: Despite being considered the most sophisticated CMS out of the 'Big Three' (the other two being Wordpress and Joomla), in recent years Drupal has failed to compete with Wordpress for overall market share. There's a variety of reasons for this, chiefly being Wordpress is less sophisticated and therefore easier to develop. Drupal 8 won't be a watered-down CMS attempting to pander to a wider audience of developers and clients. Drupal 8 will include features like Symfony2 and Twig that should lessen the learning-curve for developers—resulting in growth in the ranks of Drupal developers—but without sacrificing its core capabilities. 

8. Drupal 8 Will be Better for Clients: With Drupal 8, the combination of user-friendly content authoring, multilingual support, and smooth interface features will make using Drupal-built sites easier than ever before, and improved back-end features will mean Drupal will be far more attractive to novice developers. This means it will be cheaper to build website as the Drupal community grows, and that clients will be receiving far more dynamic web solutions than their budgets could've gotten them previously.

So who is going to benefit from Drupal 8? Well, in theory everyone. Without sacrificing the complex architecture that sets it apart from other open source platforms, Drupal 8 should improve both user and developer accessibility, and it does both without becoming more proprietary. And best of all, skilled Drupal development  teams like Vardot—who already build dynamic applications using Drupal 7—will have enhanced tools with which to continue creating beautiful web solutions; and that alone should give anyone who is looking for improved web and mobile experience a 9th reason to be excited for Drupal 8's impending release.

Tags:  Drupal 8 Drupal Development Drupal Planet Title:  8 Reasons to Get Excited About Drupal 8
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Steindom LLC: Creating a LESS-based Bootstrap subtheme

mer, 15/04/2015 - 04:10

I've been a long-time Omega themer (and I especially love Omega 4), but outside of Drupal I always use Bootstrap as a starting point for styling a site. The Bootstrap theme has come a long way since I last evaluated it, so I gave it another try recently. It was tricky to set up a subtheme, so I'm sharing my steps here.

I found some clues from this article, but refined the process a bit.

Download the Bootstrap base theme

There hasn't been a stable release of the Bootstrap theme recently (as of the time of this writing), so I grabbed the latest DEV which contains lots of bug fixes and extends Bootstrap theming support into more nooks and crannies of Drupal's interface. If you have drush:

drush dl bootstrap-7.x-3.x-dev Create your sub-theme

You could do this the hard way, by copying the "starterkits/less" folder out of the bootstrap theme folder into your own space (e.g., "sites/default/themes", renaming "less" to something like "bootstrap_subtheme"). Or, just use drush:

drush cc drush
drush dl bootstrap-wizard

(Choose to make it a sub-theme of Bootstrap, using the LESS starterkit.)

Install Bootstrap library source code

Since we're compiling the CSS from LESS, we won't need the Bootstrap distribution, but we will need the source code. Also, the Bootstrap JS files are included via our sub-theme's .info file. So grab the latest Bootstrap 3 release (3.3.4 at the time of this writing) and install it into your sub-theme (in our example above, "bootstrap_subtheme/bootstrap"). The only folders you need are "fonts", "js", and "less".

Tweak the sub-theme LESS

Inside the "less" folder of your sub-theme, there are several .less files. The main one is style.less, which is what you'll compile later. It brings in bootstrap.less (which is a copy of the same file in your bootstrap library folder), and then adds Drupal overrides, and then some blank header, content, and footer files.

You can keep your bootstrap.less file as-is, and comment out the components you don't want. Or you can scrap it all and use something like this:

@import "variables";
@import "../bootstrap/less/bootstrap.less";

This will import your local variables.less file, and then the rest of Bootstrap's source. Speaking of variables.less, the one that shipped with the starterkit at the time of writing had deprecated Bootstrap variables, so I rewrote mine to basically load in the variables from the Bootrap library and then override the ones I care about. That way I can easily upgrade the Bootstrap library at a later date with minimal need to update my sub-theme's LESS. My variables.less looks like this:

// Import Bootstrap's variables, then override them below.
@import "../bootstrap/less/variables.less";

// Update path to fonts.
@icon-font-path: "../bootstrap/fonts/";

Note that I changed the icon path. This fixed the references being broken when my LESS compiled to CSS.

Compile your LESS to CSS

Compiling your LESS is pretty easy. You need to install LESS first, but it should be as simple as:

npm install -g less

Then from your theme's folder, execute the following to compile your LESS into your sub-theme's style.css:

lessc less/style.less > css/style.css

That's it! You now have a LESS-powered sub-theme. Add your custom theming to the built-in header.less, content.less or footer.less files. I usually prefer to create a separate file for each type of thing—content type, navigation, homepage, etc). Just remember to remember to reference any additional files in style.less.

Last thoughts

Unless you already have it a newer version of jQuery on your site somehow, you'll probably want to install jQuery Update and configure it to use at least jQuery 1.9, the minimum requirement for Bootstrap.

Oh, and don't forget to enable your new sub-theme!

Submitted by Joel Stein on April 14, 2015.Tags: Drupal, Drupal 7, Drupal Planet
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DrupalCon News: Sessions and BoFs are live

mer, 15/04/2015 - 01:28

DrupalCon Los Angeles is less than a month away, and we couldn't be more excited for the great lineup of sessions and training opportunities. We're thrilled to announce that the schedule is now live on the website, so you can begin building your own dream DrupalCon schedule and planning your day. BOFs are also open, so make sure you claim your space soon -- they go quickly!

Catégories: Elsewhere

Freelock : A hacked neglected site, Pantheon migration, and why you need a Drupal Site Assessment

mer, 15/04/2015 - 00:47

We recently had a new client contact us and ask if we could move their sites over to Pantheon so they could do some in-house development work. Of course we can do that for you! We recommended doing a Site Assessment for them, just to make sure we know what we're dealing with. Our Site Assessment gives us a good understanding of the state of a client's current site.

Securityhacked siteSite AssessmentDrupalmaintenanceDomainsPantheonDrupal MigrationDrupal Planet
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Open Source Training: Help Us Create Free Drupal 8 Training Videos

mar, 14/04/2015 - 22:44

Drupal 8 is just around the corner, and the Drupal community is excited!

We want to make sure that as many people as possible can use Drupal 8. However, many new Drupal 8 users will need training, which can be expensive and difficult to find.

So, we started a Kickstarter project to create Drupal 8 training and give it away for free!

Sounds intriguing? Watch the video to find out more ...

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Mediacurrent: Top Drupal 7 Modules: Final Edition

mar, 14/04/2015 - 22:22

If you have been to the Mediacurrent blog before you have probably seen my Top 50 modules lists for Drupal 6 and 7. This current list will be my final update for Drupal 7. My last blog from 2012 was in dire need of updating so I have gone through one last time to give our readers my a good list of modules to start with for their next Drupal 7 site.

If you have visited Drupal.org recently you will notice that there are literally thousands of modules available to download. This can be very intimidating for new users who are just getting started building Drupal sites. The secret for newbies to know is that most developers continually use a few dozen of the same modules on almost every project.

As a 9 year veteran of Drupal I like to share my list of modules that I personally use on almost every site I build. If you are just getting started, this is a good list to begin with. If you are an intermediate or even an expert developer it can be helpful to skim the list to see if there are any modules that can help you on your next project.

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Red Crackle: Working With The Drupal Google Analytics Module

mar, 14/04/2015 - 20:00
This article helps you install the Drupal Google Analytics module. Go through the accompanying screenshots to enable and configure the module for your Drupal 7 site. We will show you how to deploy the Tracking ID for your site. We will be going through the different options you will come across while enabling this module. At the end of the article, we will show how Drupal Google Analytics works with real-time examples. We hope this article lays the foundation for your site to generate valuable insights day in, day out.
Catégories: Elsewhere

Drupal Watchdog: Ready To Learn

mar, 14/04/2015 - 18:32
Feature

Drupal 8 is right around the corner; it's time to start brushing off your old textbooks, taking notes, asking questions, and preparing for all the awesomeness coming your way.

For most of us, Drupal 8 represents a departure from what we've come to know about how to create with Drupal. In short, we've got a learning curve we're going to have to overcome before we can be proficient with Drupal 8. But I'm here to tell you: it’s okay, we're in this together, and, given the proper learning environment and a little bit of guidance, you'll be Drupal 8 ready in no time.

In the glorious words of Douglas Adams, “Don't panic!”

While most of us have a tendency to want to jump right into the documentation and start poring over code samples, this is a good opportunity to take a step back and make sure we're ready to learn before we dive in. So let’s take a minute to think about education theory and the environment we put ourselves in when preparing to learn a new technology. How do we remove blockers from the learning process and set ourselves up for success?

Consider:

  • What is my motivation for learning this?
  • Where can I practice what I'm learning?
  • How will I know if I have learned the right thing?

How motivated are you?

Are you learning for fun, or for work?

Because you want to, or because you have to?

Our motivation – and our understanding of it – allows us to decide whether it is worth the investment in time and energy necessary to learn something new today – right now – which we may not use until tomorrow.

One of the best ways to assess whether or not you've learned something is to teach it to someone else. Lucky for you, you're not the only one embarking on the quest to learn Drupal 8; there are plenty of opportunities to share your new knowledge with others. Local user groups, co-workers – even friends on IRC – all represent great teaching opportunities. Moreover, these interactions often turn into discussions, and discussions are one of the best ways to get beyond the how and into the why.

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