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Drupalpress, Drupal in the Health Sciences Library at UVA: Setting up Shibboleth + Ubuntu 14 + Drupal 7 on AWS with integration

lun, 16/11/2015 - 16:48

We’ve recently begun moving to amazon web services for hosting, however we still need to authenticate through ITS who handles the central SSO Authentication services for  In previous posts we looked at Pubcookie aka Netbadge - however Pubcookie is getting pretty long in the tooth (it’s last release back in 2010) and we are running Ubuntu 14 with Apache 2…. integrating pubcookie was going to be a PITA…. so it was time to look at Shibboleth – an Internet2  SSO standard that works with SAML  and is markedly more modern than pubcookie – allowing federated logins between institutions etc…

A special thanks to Steve Losen who put up with way more banal questions than anyone should have to deal with… that said, he’s the man

Anyhow – ITS does a fine job at documenting the basics -  Since we’re using ubuntu the only real difference is that we used apt-get

Here’s the entire install from base Ubuntu 14

apt-get install apache2 mysql-server php5 php-pear php5-mysql php5-ldap libapache2-mod-shib2 shibboleth-sp2-schemas drush sendmail ntp


Apache Set up

On the Apache2 side  we enabled some modules and the default ssl site

a2enmod ldap rewrite  shib2 ssl
a2ensite default-ssl.conf

Back on the apache2 side here’s our default SSL 

<IfModule mod_ssl.c>
<VirtualHost _default_:443>
ServerAdmin webmaster@localhost
DocumentRoot /some_web_directory/
<Directory /some_web_directory/>
AllowOverride All

SSLEngine on

SSLCertificateFile /somewheresafe/biocon_hsl.crt
SSLCertificateKeyFile /somewheresafe/biocon_hsl.key

<Location />
AuthType shibboleth
ShibRequestSetting requireSession 0 ##This part meant that creating a session is possible, not required
require shibboleth

the location attributes are important – if you don’t have that either in the Apache conf you’ll need it in an .htaccess in the drupal directory space

Shibboleth Config

The Shibboleth side confused me for a hot minute.

we used  shib-keygen as noted in the documentation to create keys for shibboleth and ultimately the relevant part of our /etc/shibboleth/shibboleth2.xml looked like this

<ApplicationDefaults entityID=””
REMOTE_USER=”eppn uid persistent-id targeted-id”>

<Sessions lifetime=”28800″ timeout=”3600″ relayState=”ss:mem”
checkAddress=”false” handlerSSL=”true” cookieProps=”https”>
<!–we went with SSL Required – so change handlerSSL to true and cookieProps to https

<SSO entityID=””>
<!–this is the production value, we started out with the testing config – ITS provides this in their documentation–>

<MetadataProvider type=”XML” file=”UVAmetadata.xml” />
<!–Once things are working you should be able to find this at – it’s a file you download from ITS = RTFM –>
<AttributeExtractor type=”XML” validate=”true” reloadChanges=”false” path=”attribute-map.xml”/>
<!–attribute-map.xml is the only other file you’re going to need to touch–>

<CredentialResolver type=”File” key=”sp-key.pem” certificate=”sp-cert.pem”/>
<!–these are the keys generated with shib-keygen –>
<Handler type=”Session” Location=”/Session” showAttributeValues=”true”/>
<!–During debug we used with the  showAttributeValues=”true” setting on to see what was coming across from the UVa  Shibboleth IdP–>

/etc/shibboleth/attribute-map.xml looked like this

<Attribute name=”urn:mace:dir:attribute-def:eduPersonPrincipalName” id=”eppn”>
<AttributeDecoder xsi:type=”ScopedAttributeDecoder”/>

<Attribute name=”urn:mace:dir:attribute-def:eduPersonScopedAffiliation” id=”affiliation”>
<AttributeDecoder xsi:type=”ScopedAttributeDecoder” caseSensitive=”false”/>
<Attribute name=”urn:oid:″ id=”affiliation”>
<AttributeDecoder xsi:type=”ScopedAttributeDecoder” caseSensitive=”false”/>

<Attribute name=”urn:mace:dir:attribute-def:eduPersonAffiliation” id=”unscoped-affiliation”>
<AttributeDecoder xsi:type=”StringAttributeDecoder” caseSensitive=”false”/>
<Attribute name=”urn:oid:″ id=”unscoped-affiliation”>
<AttributeDecoder xsi:type=”StringAttributeDecoder” caseSensitive=”false”/>

<Attribute name=”urn:mace:dir:attribute-def:eduPersonEntitlement” id=”entitlement”/>
<Attribute name=”urn:oid:″ id=”entitlement”/>

<Attribute name=”urn:mace:dir:attribute-def:eduPersonTargetedID” id=”targeted-id”>
<AttributeDecoder xsi:type=”ScopedAttributeDecoder”/>

<Attribute name=”urn:oid:″ id=”persistent-id”>
<AttributeDecoder xsi:type=”NameIDAttributeDecoder” formatter=”$NameQualifier!$SPNameQualifier!$Name” defaultQualifiers=”true”/>

<!– Fourth, the SAML 2.0 NameID Format: –>
<Attribute name=”urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:nameid-format:persistent” id=”persistent-id”>
<AttributeDecoder xsi:type=”NameIDAttributeDecoder” formatter=”$NameQualifier!$SPNameQualifier!$Name” defaultQualifiers=”true”/>
<Attribute name=”urn:oid:″ id=”eduPersonPrincipalName”/>
<Attribute name=”urn:oid:0.9.2342.19200300.100.1.1″ id=”uid”/>

Those two pieces marked in red are important – they’re going to be the bits that we pipe in to Drupal

For  debugging we used the following URL to see what was coming across – once it was all good we got a response that looks like

Session Expiration (barring inactivity): 479 minute(s)
Client Address:
SSO Protocol: urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:protocol
Identity Provider:
Authentication Time: 2015-11-16T15:35:39.118Z
Authentication Context Class: urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:ac:classes:PasswordProtectedTransport
Authentication Context Decl: (none)

uid: adp6j
unscoped-affiliation: member;staff;employee

The uid and eduPersonPrincipalName variables being the pieces we needed to get Drupal to set up a session for us

Lastly the Drupal bit

The Drupal side of this is pretty straight

We installed Drupal as usual  and grabbed the shib_auth module.


and on the Advanced Tab

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Drupal Commerce: Contributor Spotlight: Joël Pittet

lun, 16/11/2015 - 15:53
Say hi. (who are you and what do you do in the Commerce ecosystem)

Hi:) My name is Joël Pittet and I’m out of Vancouver, BC, Canada. I offered to help co-maintain commerce_discount and a few other Commerce modules as well as likely involved in messing about with patches all over Commerce ecosystem.

How did you get involved with contributing to Drupal Commerce?

Started working on a Drupal Commerce project, noticed things could use some fixing up and jumped in the deep end. I was recognized for helping triage the commerce queue in a fervor to fix all the things.

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Drupal Easy: DrupalEasy Podcast 164 - Dentistry (Paul Johnson - Drupal Social Media)

lun, 16/11/2015 - 15:18
Download Podcast 164

Paul Johnson (pdjohnson) joins Mike Anello and Ted Bowman to talk about Drupal's social media presence, how community members can get involved, and the forthcoming release of Drupal 8!

read more

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Jim Birch: No more View pages

lun, 16/11/2015 - 11:00

Views has long been one of the magic pieces that makes Drupal my CMS of choice.  Views allows us to easily create queries of content in the UI, giving great power to the site builder. 

When you first create a view, the default, obvious choice is to create a "Page" display of the view.  A Page has a URL that people can visit to see the information, and gets us as site builders closer to job done.  However, I don't want you to do it!

When you first create a view, the options are that you can make a Page and a Block.  Selecting neither will allow you to create a "Master" display, and additional modules can hook it and add addtional displays for your view.  In the screenshot below, you see we have additional displays of Attachment, Content pane, Context, and Feed in addition to the Block and Page displays.

All of our sites already have some sort of "Page" content type, for basic content of the site.  In this page content type, we add fields, set meta descriptions, get added to the xml sitemap, and include the pages in Drupal's core search.  When you create a view page, we only get the output as a url, we miss the benefit of having a "Page" node at that url.

Read more

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Chris Hall on Drupal 8: Drupal Site Builder role

lun, 16/11/2015 - 09:59
Drupal Site Builder role chrishu Mon, 11/16/2015 - 08:59
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DrupalCon News: 7 Things You Must Experience in India

lun, 16/11/2015 - 01:47

India is shaped by countless influences, from centuries old civilizations to modern day technology. In its long journey, the country has absorbed many different cultures, which have given it different dimensions. You must experience some of these when you come for DrupalCon Asia 2016. Here is a list of seven unique experiences that will make your trip worth remembering.

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Darren Mothersele: How to Survive Gentrification of the Drupal Community

lun, 16/11/2015 - 01:00

We're finally approaching the release of Drupal 8.0.0 on 19th Nov. The biggest achievement of the Drupal community to date. A complete rewrite of the core system to use modern object-oriented PHP. An effort that is often referred to as "getting off the island".

While the switch from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 is a big change for developers, it is the result of a slow process of maturation of the Drupal community. Drupal 8 brings changes that will be welcomed by many, will bring in many new users, and of course, will push a few people out. How can we survive this "gentrification" of the Drupal community and prosper without losing touch with why we loved Drupal in the first place.


Cities all over the world are becoming more exclusive, more expensive, and a natural result of this is gentrification. It's contentious. Some see this as urban improvement, some as social cleansing.

I moved to London nearly 12 years ago. Dalston, to be precise. I was back in Dalston this weekend for a party, and it's very different to how I remember it from 2004. I compared the nice clean overground train to the unreliable and dirty Silverlink trains that used to run to Dalston. Then, walking down Kingsland road without being on guard. When I lived there in 2004 it was often cordoned off by police. The hipsters, the trendy coffee shops, and other obvious signs of gentrification proliferate.

Brixton was my home for many years, and I witnessed first hand the results of gentrification. I had an office space in Brixton, and decided to leave it when the landlord announced he was increasing the rent by 25%. I lived in several flats around Brixton over the years, and eventually moved (a bit) further south as rental prices in Brixton soared. I say this with tongue in cheek, well aware that to many I'd be seen as one of the gentrifiers! It's the communities that settled here during the 1940s and 1950s that gave the area it's eclectic multi-cultural feel. They're the ones who have been displaced, losing their homes and community as developers and "yuppies" take over.

Gentrification of the Drupal Community

I first used Drupal back in 2003, version 4 point something. It was fun. Hacky, but fun. I had to quickly get a site up for an event we were organising and Drupal offered a collaborative content model that set it apart from the other produces we evaluated.

I came back to Drupal in 2007 for another community site build, and Drupal 5 had been released. It was really fun. Yes, still very hacky, but it came with the power to build a CMS exactly the way I wanted it to work, and it came with an awesome community of other hackers. A community of dedicated open-source types, who valued openness, and working on projects for good. I was hooked and made the leap to full time Drupal development. Through Drupal I got involved in the first social innovation camp, and other tech-for-good type things.

Szeged 2008 was my first Drupalcon. 500 Drupal contributors and users in a small university town in Hungary. Everyone I met truly cared about making Drupal an awesome project and was contributing time and effort in any way they could. Several years later and Drupalcon have grown. 2000+ attendees in Barcelona this year, 2300+ in Amsterdam last year. But, as the community has grown, so has the commercial influence. With sales pitches as prevalent as learning sessions on the schedule.

One thing I noticed this year was that several sessions concluded, or included, a call for donations or funding to accelerate a particular module or project's development. The precedent was set in the starting session of the conference when the Drupal Association made an announcement about the Drupal 8 accelerate funding programme. I'm not saying this is a bad thing. If this is what it takes to get Drupal finished in today's conditions, then that's great. But, look at it as an indicator of how the community has changed, when compared to the sessions at Szeged seven years earlier. You would not have seen a call for quarter of a million dollar funding back then. Everyone was there because they loved it, not because they were being paid.

Hacking the hackers

While doing research for this post, I came across this brilliant essay, The hacker hacked, by Brett Scott about the gentrification of hacker culture. I quote his summary of the gentrification process:

Key to any gentrification process are successive waves of pioneers who gradually reduce the perceived risk of the form in question. In property gentrification, this starts with the artists and disenchanted dropouts from mainstream society who are drawn to marginalised areas. This, in turn, creates the seeds for certain markets to take root. A WiFi coffeeshop appears next to the Somalian community centre. And that, in turn, sends signals back into the mainstream that the area is slightly less alien than it used to be.

If you repeat this cycle enough times, the perceived dangers that keep the property developers and yuppies away gradually erode. Suddenly, the tipping point arrives. Through a myriad of individual actions under no one person’s control, the exotic other suddenly appears within a safe frame: interesting, exciting and cool, but not threatening. It becomes open to a carefree voyeurism, like a tiger being transformed into a zoo animal, and then a picture, and then a tiger-print dress to wear at cocktail parties. Something feels ‘gentrified’ when this shallow aesthetic of tiger takes over from the authentic lived experience of tiger.
-- Brett Scott

How does this relate to the Drupal community? Perhaps it starts with the NGOs and charities, our original flagship Drupal sites, that became our "artists and disenchanted dropouts from mainstream society". Then the big media companies move in as the "perceived dangers gradually erode". Eventually, The White House start using Drupal, and we're at home with the large enterprise clients and big corporate contracts.

As the Drupal project developed the requirements changed. Drupal's capabilities improve, and the Drupal user base and community advanced too.

This is evident in the development, and standardisation of things like configuration management. Something that was never an issue in the early days, as the community became more professional, solutions for configuration management were hacked together, and then became standardised.

Configuration management is just one example of the many benefits the Drupal community has experienced through the process of gentrification. There's also great test coverage, performance improvements, greater tooling, and many other advancements that came to Drupal as the community matured. Drupal became less about hacking and more about software engineering.

Drupal 8

Development on Drupal 8 started in March 2011 and four years later, is to set to be released on November 19, 2015. Over these years, Drupal has been rewritten, removing most of the pre-OO era PHP legacy.

Drupal's legacy was the "not invented here" mindset that became entrenched in the community through hacking solutions to extensibility into a language that was not designed to support it. And, a culture of not depending on third-party code due to early well publicised security issues with PHP extensions.

The move away from this legacy, the move to "get off the island", is a move towards more standardised, modern, development practises, and a move to embrace the wider PHP community.

Social cleansing

I mentioned before that gentrification is contentious. For some see it as urban improvement, some as social cleansing. Drupal and the Drupal community have clearly benefitted already, and it looks like prosperous times ahead for those who come along for the ride, and the newcomers who join and adopt Drupal.

But, what about the social cleansing. Will parts of the community be pushed out? Who gets left behind?

Drupal has suffered from an identity crisis. Because of it's flexibility, it's been used for many things. Drupal's openness to hacking, extending and ability to do just about anything, meant it was more than just a CMS. Over the years many talked about "small core", many used Drupal's core tools as a Framework, building apps and tools well beyond what a typical CMS would be used for.

Drupal 8 is a content management system.

Drupal 8 focuses on content management, on providing tools for non-technical users to build and manage sites. That's what it always wanted to be anyway.

Drupal 8 leverages the wider PHP community, in particular the Symfony components, as it's core. It no longer makes sense to see Drupal as a framework.

One of the parts of the community being displaced, are those using Drupal as a framework. If this is you then you may already be looking at a fork, like Backdrop, or playing with other frameworks, like the beautiful Laravel.

Another section of the community that may be displaced are those running Drupal on low end and shared hosting. Through the gentrification process, Drupal's requirements have increased. The increased hosting requirements have meant that dedicated Drupal platform hosting providers have emerged. More options for scalability and custom software stacks have taken precedent over solutions for smaller websites.

Drupal also potentially loses the innovators. Drupal always had a reputation for being cutting edge and innovative. As it moves to become the enterprise choice of open-source CMS, innovation becomes less important, and stability, security, and backwards compatibility become more important. The biggest innovations in Drupal (flexible content types and Views) date back to the 4.7 era. Views is now in core in Drupal 8. As Drupal matures further from this point, we'll probably see Drupal adopting innovations from other systems and ecosystems, rather than innovating on it's own. It's well placed to do this now, built on Symfony components, innovations from the wider community will be easier to integrate.

Surviving Gentrification Do you abandon the form, leave it to the yuppies and head to the next wild frontier? Or do you attempt to break the cycle, deface the estate-agent signs, and picket outside the wine bar with placards reading "Yuppies Go Home"?
-- Brett Scott

Or, do come along for the ride? Enjoy the benefits of gentrification, without losing the reason why you got involved in the first place?

If you're going to stick around then you're going to need change a few things. Here's 5 steps that will get you started:

1. Learn the foundations that Drupal is now built on.

If (like me) you've got a background in OO then this shouldn't be too hard. I did several years of post-graduate research into semantics and verification of object-oriented software. You definitely don't need to go that deep, but I would highly recommend getting to grips with classic works on design patterns such as Gang of Four and Martin Fowler.

With a basic understanding of the core "patterns" of object-oriented software, you start to appreciate how Symfony works.

Drupal, Silex, Laravel, Symfony Full Stack, Symfony CMF, phpBB, Joomla, Magento, Piwik, PHPUnit, Sonata, and many more projects are built on this same foundation. So, it's definitely worth learning, and Drupal can be a good way to learn it, while still working with a system you know well.

Try building a simple app with Silex.

Check out Drupalcon (and Laracon) on YouTube. There's some great stuff. Like this talk from Ryan Weaver about Symfony and this talk by Ross Tuck about Models and Service Layers.

2. Do PHP the right way.

PHP has changed. There's a lot of outdated information and a lot of legacy code. Drupal 8 has been rewritten to remove this legacy code, but there's still a lot of bad advice on how to write PHP out there. Read PHP The Right Way for a full guide on how modern PHP should be crafted.

3. Use Composer, use and create PHP packages.

Getting off the island, and embracing the wider PHP ecosystem means using Composer, and it's ecosystem of PHP packages. There are many more packages that are potentially compatible with Drupal, and by architecting your Drupal extensions as more general PHP packages you have access to a much wider pool of potential collaborators.

Creating PHP packages also forces you to write clean code, think like a software engineer, and write more maintainable, extensible, and reusable code. Check out The PHP League as examples of solid PHP packages. They have a good Skeleton starting package.

You may have made custom Drupal modules before. Try thinking about how you can refactor these into separate packages, and using the Drupal "module" as a small layer that integrates your logic with Drupal.

The SOLID principles will guide you towards creating good packages.

4. Use an IDE

This was a big one for me. I was always against using an IDE, burnt by early experiences with open-source IDEs. I settled on a customised Sublime Text setup, and various other apps. I didn't see much benefit over using one app for everything when I could combine a selection of my favorite apps to do the same thing.

I'm not sure why I stuck to this. I also do a lot of C++ programming. I have my own programming language (Cyril) for creating audio-reactive visuals. I use XCode for C++ as the debugging tools are essential when you're dealing with object graphs, memory management, and debugging pointer issues. So, why not use an IDE for my web development?

I tried PHPStorm and it's great. Far from the cumbersome experience I had in the early days with open-source IDEs, it offers a smooth, fast, integrated experience.

I think you can get away without an IDE when you're hacking on Drupal 7, but on an OO system like Drupal 8 you will need an IDE. You will need the integrated tooling, testing, and you'll be much more efficient with intelligent autocompletion, hinting, quick access to docs, and fast navigation of the huge codebase.

5. Identify your values and serve your purpose.

As the corporates, enterprises, and big businesses take over, it's important to remain true to your yourself. By identifying your values you will be well placed to notice when they are being compromised.

You probably got into open-source because you believe in the power of collaboration. But, this value of collaboration can often be at odds with the cut-throat corporate culture of competition.

To be aware of this is to be aware of the opportunity to spread openness and collaboration with our work.

As the proceeds of Drupal's success flow into the community, it's important to use this to do good. To continue to serve our communities and society as a whole. To enable collaboration, share our work, and use openness to build the world we want.

Final thoughts

The real opportunity, is to spread Drupal's values of cooperation to the wider population.

This is part of a bigger shift in society to adopt open-source values, principles, and methodologies. Chris Anderson says it best:

If the past ten years have been about discovering new social and innovation models on the Web, then the next ten years will be about applying them to the real world.
-- Chris Anderson

The Work Open Manifesto offers a useful formulation of what it means to be open that can apply beyond open source software: "Think Big, Start Small, Work Open".

Drupal is great case study for starting small, thinking big, and working openly.

The Drupal community has always has been transforming, improving ourselves, improving the product, improving our practises, and improving our tools.

Now it's time to think beyond Drupal, beyond the Drupal community, and to see Drupal's values of collaboration, teamwork, and openness spread through the wider community, society, and the world.

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Paul Johnson: Tell me your Celebr8D8 plans

sam, 14/11/2015 - 12:40

I am spearheading the Drupal 8 release celebrations on social media Thursday 19th November. Perhaps, like me, you have been working behind the scenes on a personal project to mark this significant occasion. If you have a website, special party, publicity stunt planned I'm keen to know about it. Come the big day I will use Drupal's social media and @Celebr8D8 to tell the world about your event, site, stunt.

Use my contact form to let me know about your release day plans. Thanks!

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agoradesign: Including image styles in your module or theme in Drupal 8

sam, 14/11/2015 - 11:29
Today I have a small practical tipp for those, who want to include a custom image style in their module or theme in Drupal 8, including a best practice proposal.
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ActiveLAMP: Visual Regression Testing with

sam, 14/11/2015 - 03:00 is a nifty website testing tool created by Gizra. We at ActiveLAMP were first introduced to at DrupalCon LA, in fact, is built on, you guessed it, Drupal 7 and it is an open source visual regression toolkit.

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Drupal core announcements: Drupal core security release window on Wednesday, November 18

ven, 13/11/2015 - 22:24
Start:  2015-11-18 (All day) America/New_York Organizers:  David_Rothstein Event type:  Online meeting (eg. IRC meeting)

The monthly security release window for Drupal 6 and Drupal 7 core will take place on Wednesday, November 18.

This does not mean that a Drupal core security release will necessarily take place on that date for either the Drupal 6 or Drupal 7 branches, only that you should prepare to look out for one (and be ready to update your Drupal sites in the event that the Drupal security team decides to make a release).

There will be no bug fix/feature release on this date; the next window for a Drupal core bug fix/feature release is Wednesday, December 2 (and before that, on November 19, Drupal 8.0.0 is scheduled to be released).

For more information on Drupal core release windows, see the documentation on release timing and security releases, and the discussion that led to this policy being implemented.

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Drupal core announcements: CHANGELOG.txt is being updated to prepare for D8 release. What changes to you want highlighted?

ven, 13/11/2015 - 20:52

CHANGELOG.txt is being updated to prepare for D8 release. What changes to you want highlighted?

See issue:

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InternetDevels: Almost twins: 8 things Drupal and InternetDevels have in common!

ven, 13/11/2015 - 16:55

Embed code for infographics:

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Wunderkraut Belgium: Captain Drupal returns

ven, 13/11/2015 - 15:46
In the run up to Drupal 8’s launch on the 19th we’ll be posting a Captain Drual cartoon every day from Monday 16th November so you can follow our hero’s journey to enter the era of Drupal 8!
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Krimson: Drupal 8 will be released on November 19

ven, 13/11/2015 - 12:36
We're ready to celebrate and build (even more) amazing Drupal 8 websites.  On November 19 we'll put our Drupal 8 websites in the sure to come back and check out our website.
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Krimson: 77 of us are going

ven, 13/11/2015 - 12:36
People from across the globe who use, develop, design and support the Drupal platform will be brought together during a full week dedicated to networking, Drupal 8 and sharing and growing Drupal skills. As we have active hiring plans we’ve decided that this year’s approach should have a focus on meeting people who might want to work for Wunderkraut and getting Drupal 8 out into the world. As Signature Supporting Partner we wanted as much people as possible to attend the event. We managed to get 77 Wunderkrauts on the plane to Barcelona!  From Belgium alone we have an attendance of 17 people. The majority of our developers will be participating in sprints (a get-together for focused development work on a Drupal project) giving all they got together with all other contributors at DrupalCon. We look forward to an active DrupalCon week.   If you're at DrupalCon and feel like talking to us. Just look for the folks with Wunderkraut carrot t-shirts or give Jo a call at his cell phone +32 476 945 176.
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Krimson: Watch our epic Drupal 8 promo video

ven, 13/11/2015 - 12:36
Drupal 8 is coming and everyone is sprinting hard to get it over the finish line. To boost contributor morale we’ve made a motivational Drupal 8 video that will get them into the zone and tackling those last critical issues in no time.
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Krimson: Open Monumentendag

ven, 13/11/2015 - 12:36
Once again Heritage day was a huge succes. About 400 000 visitors visited Flanders monuments and heritage sites last Sunday.  The Open Monumentendag website received more than double the amount of last year's visitors. Visitors to the website organised their day out by using the powerful search tool we built that allowed them to search for activities and sights at their desired location.  Not only could they search by location (province, zip code, city name, km range) but also by activity type, keywords, category and accessibility.  Each search request being added as a (removable) filter for finding the perfect activity. By clicking on the heart icon, next to each activity, a favorite list was drawn up.  Ready for printing and taking along as route map. Our support team monitored the website making sure visitors had a great digital experience for a good start to the day's activities. Did you experience the ease of use of the Open Monumentendag website?  Are you curious about the know-how we applied for this project?  Read our Open Monumentendag case.  
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Krimson: Very proud to be a part of it

ven, 13/11/2015 - 12:36
Drupal Association Executive Director Holly Ross is thrilled that Wunderkraut is joining as first and says: "Their support for the Association and the project is, and has always been, top-notch. This is another great expression of how much Wunderkraut believes in the incredible work our community does." As Drupal Signature Supporting Partner we commit ourselves to advancing the Drupal project and empowering the Drupal community.  We're very proud to be a part of it as we enjoy contributing to the Drupal ecosystem (especially when we can be quircky and fun as CEO Vesa Palmu states). Our contribution allowed the Drupal Association to: Complete's D7 upgrade - now they can enhance new features Hired a full engineering team committed to improving infrastructure Set the roadmap for success.
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Krimson: Adapting solutions based on client input

ven, 13/11/2015 - 12:36
But in this post I'd like to talk about one of the disadvantages that here at Wunderkraut we pay close attention to. A consequence of the ability to build features in more than one way is that it's difficult to predict how different people interact (or want to interact) with them. As a result, companies end up delivering solutions to their clients that although seem perfect, turn out, in time, to be less than ideal and sometimes outright counterproductive.  Great communication with the client and interest in their problems goes a long way towards minimising this effect. But sometimes clients realise that certain implementations are not perfect and could be made better. And when that happens, we are there to listen, adapt and reshape future solutions by taking into account these experiences.  One such recent example involved the use of a certain WYSIWYG library from our toolkit on a client website. Content editors were initially happy with the implementation before they actually started using it to the full extent. Problems began to emerge, leading to editors spending way more time than they should have performing editing tasks. The client signalled this problem to us which we then proceed to correct by replacing said library. This resulted in our client becoming happier with the solution, much more productive and less frustrated with their experience on their site.  We learned an important lesson in this process and we started using that new library on other sites as well. Polling our other clients on the performance of the new library revealed that indeed it was a good change to make. 
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