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Drupal core announcements: Drupal 8 Question-and-Answer Core Conversation at DrupalCon Los Angeles

jeu, 07/05/2015 - 01:05

Do you have questions about the upcoming Drupal 8 release (or Drupal 8.1.x or 9 and beyond)? On Thursday, May 14 at DrupalCon Los Angeles, I'll be moderating a question-and-answer core conversation with a panel of the Drupal 8 core committers. Questions can be submitted in advance online, and anyone can submit a question (or more than one). I will curate the submissions to ask the panel the most interesting and relevant questions.

Some suggested topics:

  • Drupal core's newly refined structure and decision-making process (see my earlier post for background information).
  • Contributing as a core subsystem or topic maintainer
  • The upcoming Drupal 8.0.0 release: what to expect and how we're going to get there
  • Any questions you have for core committers
  • Or anything else on your mind!

This is a rare opportunity for the community to communicate directly with the Drupal 8 committer team. Help us make the most of of it -- submit your questions now!

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Gizra.com: How we could monitor Twitter (if we had to)

mer, 06/05/2015 - 23:00

Monitoring your live site is a pretty good idea - that's generally agreed. Same goes for visual regression testing. Doing it, however, is hard. Enough so that very few companies actually do visual regression testing/monitoring, so don't feel bad if you haven't either until now. But after reading this post you should seriously consider doing it. Or at least give it a try.

For example, here's an overview of how we could monitor Twitter, if someone would actually ask us to (as always you can jump right into the repository):

Visual regression on a Twitter page. So much functionality has been asserted in this simple screenshot

Continue reading…

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Drupal core announcements: Drupal core updates for May 6th, 2015

mer, 06/05/2015 - 20:42

Congratulations to Alex "effulgentsia" Bronstein and Jess "xjm", who became core committers as part of the Evolving and documenting Drupal core's structure, responsibilities, and decision-making policy (which could still use your review)!

What's new with Drupal 8?

Since the last Drupal Core Update, the minimum version of MySQL needed to run D8 was raised to 5.5.3, and Drupal 8.0.0-beta10 was released in time for DrupalCon Los Angeles (which is next week).

Some other highlights of the month were:

How can I help get Drupal 8 done?

See Help get Drupal 8 released! for updated information on the current state of the release and more information on how you can help.

We're also looking for more contributors to help compile these posts. Contact mparker17 if you'd like to help!

Drupal 8 In Real Life Whew! That's a wrap!

Do you follow Drupal Planet with devotion, or keep a close eye on the Drupal event calendar, or git pull origin 8.0.x every morning without fail before your coffee? We're looking for more contributors to help compile these posts. You could either take a few hours once every six weeks or so to put together a whole post, or help with one section more regularly. If you'd like to volunteer for helping to draft these posts, please follow the steps here!

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Jim Birch: No more usernames! Setting up Drupal 7 for Email Login

mer, 06/05/2015 - 19:00

Sorry, the user name 'Super Incredibly Good Looking Jim' is already taken...

I don't need another username.  I really don't need another username on a site that I am not going to have a public profile.  There are sites where having a username makes perfect sense, and then there are those that don't.

Reasons you may need to have a Username:
  • If the site offers a public profile
  • For use in internal commenting
  • For use in internal forum
  • For use in internal messaging

Even in some of these cases, we could get away with using a display name.  We will explore how to set up a Display Name that is separate from core's login funtionality below.

I am not building Twitter.  Nor am I building Ello, Reddit, Pinterest, or Periscope. In most cases, I only have administrators and content creators accessing the site.  Trying to keep the login process as painless as I can for my users, I will use an email address field as the unique identifier.  I would venture to guess that everyone online has at least one of those.

Read more

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Promet Source: Melding AngularJS With Drupal Sites: Retrospective

mer, 06/05/2015 - 18:28
Let's start with the template file. A brief tour of the template file If you pull up the template file, you will see something similar to the following:
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Drupal Watchdog: VIDEO: DrupalCon Amsterdam Interview: Tom Erickson

mer, 06/05/2015 - 18:17

In Drupal Watchdog’s proprietary corner, we have a lively chat with TOM ERICKSON (CEO, Acquia), who reveals himself as a pop-music maven, Napa oenophile, and passionate proponent of diversity in the technology field, particularly among women and millennials.

Tags:  DrupalCon Amsterdam DrupalCon Video Video: 
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Annertech: Let the world know: #DrupalOpenDays Ireland is fast approaching (and we're sponsoring)

mer, 06/05/2015 - 14:37
Let the world know: #DrupalOpenDays Ireland is fast approaching (and we're sponsoring)

Drupal Open Days - the largest meeting of Drupal developers, users, and enthusiasts in Ireland - is fast approaching. This year is looking like it's going to be the biggest and best one yet.

Biggest - checkout who is coming

Best - checkout the great line up of speakers

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LevelTen Interactive: Five Drupal Modules That Will Save You from Mobilegeddon

mer, 06/05/2015 - 07:00

Mobilegeddon has arrived. I hope your site was one of the survivors.... Read more

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flink: Take your Maps to the Max

mer, 06/05/2015 - 05:40

We’ve always loved maps. Google, Openlayers, Leaflet... bring them on!

To date, those three are the most popular engines to fetch and assemble the tiles that make up your maps and deliver them to the browser.

We love all three, and through IP Geolocation Views & Maps, we support all three.

We have a penchant for Leaflet because its code is open-sourced, well-written and from the ground up made to suit mobile. It is also extended easily. This is witnessed by the great number of handy map widgets and plugins that float about on GitHub and as module add-ons on drupal.org.

With all of these rapidly gaining popularity, we thought it might inspire if we'd show-case a number of these goodies on a single interactive map page for you to play with.

As you hover and click around we hope you become just as convinced as we are, that maps not merely constitute stylish page elements, but also enhance content navigation and reporting, in ways that cannot be achieved through menus, search boxes and spreadsheets.

The best news is that you can now click all of this together in Drupal without any coding whatsoever. To make it totally easy for you to produce a map like the one below, we've made screenshots of the complete map configuration.

And that's enough from us. Time for you to PLAY !

Produced in collaboration with RegionBound.


div#node-91 img { max-width: 250px; } File under: Planet Drupal
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DrupalCon News: Developer Contest at DrupalCon!

mar, 05/05/2015 - 22:10

Are you ready to create a great shopping experience and possibly win some fun prizes? Sphere.io’s Developer Contest at DrupalCon Los Angeles is your chance. Build a working Webshop (responsive, of course!) by developing a Drupal extension that integrates Drupal 8 and SPHERE.IO. Submissions are due Monday, May 11th at 9:00pm PST!

About the Mission:

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DrupalCon News: Build Lasting Connections at Women in Drupal Event

mar, 05/05/2015 - 20:55

At my first Women in Drupal event, there were approximately fifteen women gathered in the corner of a temporarily-unused DrupalCon room. We turned on the lights, circled the chairs, and talked comfortably about our work. At the time, I was a backend developer and almost always the only woman on my teams.

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Lullabot: Lullabot's 7th Annual DrupalCon Party

mar, 05/05/2015 - 20:33

Lullabot's annual party has become a DrupalCon tradition – fun friendly people hanging out and having a good time. If you're new to DrupalCon, it's a great place to meet people. If you're an old-timer like most of us, it's a great place to see old friends and make new ones.

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Acquia: Four Final Questions You Should Ask Your Drupal Cloud Host

mar, 05/05/2015 - 18:48

You know how when you're buying a car, and the questions just keep on coming? And the salesperson keeps making roundtrips to the manager's desk?

It's kind of like that when you're considering where to host your website. There's always time for more questions. It's one less surprise later on.

That's why I keep adding to my list.

It started, you may recall, with just five questions. A week later, I added five more. Now, before closing out this series, I've got a final four.

Ask now, avoid unpleasant surprises later. That's my motto, and it should be yours.

1. What is your level of Drupal expertise?

Acquia offers the industry's highest level of technical Drupal expertise. Our support organization is larger than most hosting companies––over 60 professionals worldwide with over 250 years of combined experience. And Acquia’s overall level of in-house Drupal expertise is unparalleled with over 150 Drupalists, including core owners, security team members, and module contributors. Furthermore, Acquia’s wealth of Drupal knowledge is being expanded continuously. Closed loop processes between our support and engineering organizations help to drive new tools and add to our Help Center, which we then share with the Drupal community.

2. If my site turns into a volcano of errors, will you proactively notify me?

Acquia monitors the health of customers’ servers, and we proactively notify customers of the nature of any issues we detect. When the problem is server-side, we mitigate it, and when the issue is caused by something on the application side, we provide recommended steps to resolve the issue (though we do not usually implement them ourselves unless the customer cannot for some reason).

Acquia also gives customers access to advanced monitoring at the application level, via partners like New Relic or features like our Uptime Monitoring tool—both of which can be used to alert customers in a self-service fashion whenever the application is suffering. If the root cause is server-related, we will notify the customer proactively, but some issues are application-only (meaning they do not trigger server health alerts on our end), so that is why we recommend that customers utilize application-level monitoring whenever possible.

3. Do you offer advanced platform analysis tools to help ensure that my application is running at its best?

Every Acquia Cloud Subscription comes with a suite of tools that make managing your Drupal sites easier than ever before. Drupal site developers, administrators, and site owners can quickly identify problems, eliminate costly mistakes, simplify processes, and improve overall site performance. Acquia’s monitoring tools analyze and measure the quality of your site based on security and performance parameters. Dozens of tests ensure your site’s conformance with best practices for security, performance, and general Drupal and web application development. Monitoring over 50 settings, these tools provide real-time analysis and proactive alerts for issues with your Drupal code and configuration. You can identify code issues and modifications fast, easily download patch files, and view needed updates at-a-glance. You’ll receive a site score to help you improve the quality of your site. You’ll get clear, actionable recommendations to help solve problems and expand your Drupal knowledge.

Acquia provides several additional tools that help you quickly troubleshoot problems with your application. The Uptime Monitoring tool monitors your site’s uptime and responsiveness. It checks your site every minute to see if it’s online and serving pages. For a developer looking to quickly and easily get visibility into a problem, log streaming is a solution that allows for easy access to information without having to download a full day’s log file. It provides real-time access to server logs from within the UI—making troubleshooting more efficient.

4. What is your uptime Service Level Agreement (SLA), and how do you ensure that you meet it?

Acquia commits to 99.95 percent platform, infrastructure, and application uptime. To ensure this, we operate monitoring services 24x7. Acquia uses the Nagios monitoring platform to provide instant access to over 50 vital real-time and historical metrics. We also maintain robust home-grown monitoring tools to ensure performance. Our team of Cloud Operations professionals is always standing by—proactively monitoring your environment and responding to critical issue alerts. With coverage in all time zones and fluency in five languages, the team is available 24x7 for critical, site-impacting issue response.

Tags:  acquia drupal planet
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Drupal Watchdog: VIDEO: DrupalCon Amsterdam Interview: Cathy Theys

mar, 05/05/2015 - 18:09

CATHY THEYS (Drupal Community Liaison, Blackmesh) runs sprints. She also mentors young Drupal sprinters. Go, Cathy!

Tags:  DrupalCon Amsterdam DrupalCon Video Video: 
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Drupal Watchdog: Protecting Your Drupal 8 Resources

mar, 05/05/2015 - 16:05
Article

Drupal 8 incorporates a Modular Authentication System which, given a request, attempts to identify a Drupal user by inspecting the HTTP request headers.

Authentication comes in handy when we want to restrict access to a resource in Drupal. It can be applied to any route, although the method to implement it may differ. It is most commonly used to identify requests when we are exposing data through an API from our Drupal site.

Authentication and Authorization

Imagine you are going through airport security. The security agent asks to see your ID – a passport or driver’s license, say. The act of showing your ID is what we call Authentication. In Drupal – as in almost all websites – your authentication credentials are your username and password.

Next, the security agent checks your boarding pass to verify that you are in the right place and have clearance to get on a plane. That’s called Authorization. In Drupal your role (and therefore the permissions assigned to that role) are your Authorization credentials.

To summarize: authentication means who are you?; authorization means may you proceed?.

Enjoy your flight!

Authentication in Drupal 8

In Drupal 8, Authorization is handled by the Access System and won't be covered in this article; there is an internal system to handle Authentication, so let's start with the following statement:

Thanks to the Modular Authentication System, different Authentication Providers may extract a $user out of a given $request object.

There are a few keywords in that statement. Let's dissect them briefly:

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ThinkShout: Monkeying Around with D8

mar, 05/05/2015 - 11:00
Leading the Charge

I have used A LOT of email marketing service providers over the years and my opinion of them was twofold: they were all similar and none of them were particularly great. Was it possible that this was just a category of business that would never be exciting or innovative? Was I destined to be a project manager who half-heartedly recommended whatever email service provider I was using most at the time to clients?

Enter the chimp...

Despite its playful name, MailChimp made a serious shift in a category that had always had potential but lacked a champion. My first thought when I used the tool was that even if the feature set was identical to all its competitors, MailChimp’s user interface alone set it apart. But once I dug into its capabilities, I became a bona fide fan (dare I say ambassador) of the brand. From automated email workflows and slick segmentation capabilities, to the Chimpadeedoo tablet app that facilitates email sign-ups without an internet connection, MailChimp became the new king of the jungle.

Fast forward a few years, and here I am working at ThinkShout, MailChimp’s Drupal partner. We built and maintain the MailChimp Drupal module, which is used by nearly 22,000 websites.

If you are familiar with MailChimp’s motto - listen hard and change fast - (or if you just read the first couple paragraphs of this blog post), then it should come as no surprise that innovation is at the heart of MailChimp’s culture. With the release of Drupal 8 looming this Fall, MailChimp and ThinkShout saw a unique opportunity to lead the charge by porting one of the most popular email modules to be D8 compatible.

The Only Way Through it is Through it

Being a trailblazer isn’t easy, and MailChimp understood that pushing the envelope on D8 development would require an investment of time and resources. While the core MailChimp module is relatively simple, the bundled submodules are feature-rich and technically complex.

Let’s recap what the MailChimp module allows you to do:

  • Any “object” in Drupal that has an email address, say a User, Contact, or even a Comment, can be automatically subscribed to a list and segmented based on other attributes, like their zip code.
  • Display a list subscription status on an entity or a subscription form.
  • Map Drupal Data, such as name and address, to merge fields in MailChimp.
  • Create forms to allow site visitors to sign up for any Mailchimp List or combination of Lists.
  • Create Pages, Blocks, or both to display forms.
  • Create campaigns containing any Drupal entity, or entities, as content.
  • Send campaigns created in Drupal through MailChimp or Drupal.
  • View campaign statistics and email activity for all list subscribers.

Luckily, one of the greatest aspects of our partnership with MailChimp is our shared passion for recognizing opportunity in challenges and giving back to the community. With that spirit, a couple of ThinkShout engineers dove in head first with the goal of porting the majority of the popular D7 module’s features over to D8 in time for a beta release at DrupalCon LA. During the process, they realized that the available Drupal 8 documentation wasn’t keeping up with the speedy pace of D8 development. Over the course of several weeks, our engineers updated documentation and created examples to make life (or at least development) a little easier for the next developer looking to create something similar.

It’s a Sprint, Not a Marathon

With the conference approaching, it was time to call on the ThinkShout village to help put the polish on the new module. Since nine heads are better than two when it comes to user testing and QA, we scheduled a sprint to focus our engineering department on providing that critical perspective needed at the end of a large development project.

During our afternoon sprint, our engineering department ran a battery of tests (both human and automated) to document and resolve bugs. Our engineering staff has grown quite a bit recently, so the sprint also provided an opportunity for knowledge sharing about MailChimp and D8 development across the team. As a non-engineer fly on the wall, it was exciting to witness the energy at the sprint table, as bugs were closed and high-fives were thrown.

The Future is Now

So far, I’ve focused on what some of the challenges of early D8 development have been, and you’re surely wondering by now “So, what do you think about D8?” Short answer: we’re excited, and we think you should be, too.

Drupal 8 standardizes module development by enforcing PSR-4 compliant namespaces. Whereas D7 allows developers to dictate where a form or entity is placed, for example, D8 loads files in the correct path automatically. What does this mean for developers? Well, it means time saved by not having to search an entire codebase to find where the developer before you placed a form. And because this structure is more in line with general engineering practices, it will be easier for any developer to ramp up for Drupal development.

But the benefits aren’t just for developers. We are also excited about the efficiencies that will be created for our nonprofit clients. Not only do they stand to benefit from the streamlined development approach, but that shift in approach will also make it easier to find resources to maintain and enhance their sites.

Learn More About the New MailChimp Module

Come and see us at DrupalCon LA, where our very own Lev Tsypin will be giving a lightning talk about the evolution of MailChimp's support for Drupal, the basics of how the integration works, and a hint at what's to come for Drupal 8. Don’t worry if you can’t make it to the talk because we’ll also be hanging out in the MailChimp booth. And if you spot one of us (you’ll recognize us by our ThinkShout hoodies), stop us! We’d love to chat about what we’ve learned about D8 and why were are excited for its release. Also, be sure to check out past blogs we've written about our work on the MailChimp module.

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Drupal core announcements: Drupal 7 core release on Wednesday, May 6

mar, 05/05/2015 - 07:39
Start:  2015-05-06 (All day) America/New_York Online meeting (eg. IRC meeting) Organizers:  David_Rothstein

The monthly Drupal core bug fix/feature release window is this Wednesday, May 6. Although there was a release just last month, it's a good time for another one, to fix a regression introduced in Drupal 7.36 that affected some sites as well as to get a few other fixes in. Therefore, I plan to release Drupal 7.37 this Wednesday.

The final patches for 7.37 have been committed and the code is frozen (excluding documentation fixes and fixes for any regressions that may be found in the next couple days). So, now is a wonderful time to update your development/staging servers to the latest 7.x code and help us catch any regressions in advance.

The primary purpose of this release is to fix a regression caused by Drupal 7.36 which caused content types on some existing sites to become disabled after the update (see the 7.36 release notes and the issue for further information). The fix is intended to work for sites that already upgraded to Drupal 7.36 (it should restore content types that were erroneously disabled) as well as for those that did not. More testing of this issue in particular is welcome.

You might also be interested in the tentative CHANGELOG.txt for Drupal 7.37 and the corresponding list of important issues that will be highlighted in the Drupal 7.37 release notes.

If you do find any regressions, please report them in the issue queue. Thanks!

Upcoming release windows after this week include:

  • Wednesday, May 20 (security release window)
  • Wednesday, June 3 (bug fix/feature release window)

For more information on Drupal core release windows, see the documentation on release timing and security releases, and the discussion that led to this policy being implemented.

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DrupalCon News: Accessibility at DrupalCon

lun, 04/05/2015 - 23:49

Inclusivity is incredibly important to us at the Drupal Association. As part of our organizational value of respect, we state: “We respect and value inclusivity in our global community and strive to recognize, understand, and respond to its needs."

But we believe that actions speak louder than words, and that’s why we’re pleased that DrupalCon will be so friendly to our community members who may require assistance or have certain accessibility needs during the events.

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Drupal Association News: 2015 At-Large Election Data Released

lun, 04/05/2015 - 22:35

It was just a few weeks ago that we welcomed Addison Berry as our new At-Large board director after a very eventful elections process. Almost as soon as we announced the news, we heard feedback via Twitter and the announcement blog post comments that there was strong interest in seeing the voting data. In our transparent community, it only seemed natural to share the aggregated voting data.

We agreed, but because we had not previously shared any of that data publicly, we decided to take it to the board for discussion before doing so. One thing we did NOT want to do is discourage candidates from further community participation by exposing voting data without their knowledge. So, at the 15 April board meeting, we discussed the requests.

The board members were all in agreement that sharing the data is a good thing. The one concern was that because this issue had not been raised before, we had not asked the candidates or shared with them that voting data would be shared. It was agreed that in future elections, we will inform candidates on the self-nomination page that their data will be shared. For sharing this election's data, we went back and asked candidates to opt-in to share their voting results.

So, what we are sharing this year is a first step toward broader transparency around elections data. This year, we can only share with you an image file with data obscured for candidates who did not opt-in. The file does show you the progression of the IRV voting runoff, but we recognize that an image file is not highly usable.

However, the discussion we had around sharing voting data was really informative and actually fun (I love data!). We have already developed a number of stories for the next iteration of the elections module that we deploy, and these will allow us to potentially track and share a lot more aggregate data. It would be great, for example, to know where the votes came from geographically. It would also be great to release the data in a more usable way, like a CSV file. Feel free to share what you would like to see from future elections in the comments below. Just know that we are committed to only share aggregated data and will never drill down to share how a particular voter voted.

With that, it's time to share the voting data. Remember that we use IRV voting, so the image below shows that process - getting to a candidate with more than 50% of the votes (as opposed to a simple majority). The result is that the candidates with the fewest #1 placements are eliminated in each round until one candidate has a majority. You can see the votes of candidates being transferred in each round. Things become much clearer in the end when you can see the final 5 candidates:

  • Ani Gupta
  • Anonymous
  • Enzo
  • Michael Schmid (not named, but he is the remaining candidate when the winner is declared)
  • Addison Berry (the winner!)

Thank you again for the push to share this data and we look forward to do even more in the next election:

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Drupal Easy: DrupalEasy Podcast 151: Shirtless at Drupalcon (Brett Meyer and Stephanie Gutowski - Drupal Watchdog/DrupalCon Los Angeles preview)

lun, 04/05/2015 - 20:22
Download Podcast 151

Brett Meyer, Director of Strategy at ThinkShout, and Stephanie Gutowski, Community Engagement Organizer/Manager at ThinkShout, join Ted, Ryan, and Mike to talk about video games. Specifically, Dragon Age: Inquisition. Seriously - Brett and Stephanie have an article in the upcoming issue of Drupal Watchdog where they relate content strategy in web sites to content strategy in content-heavy videos games. We also focus on DrupalCon Los Angeles including what we're looking forward to, if sessions are still necessary, community vs. business networking, and if it's possible to only pack a single shirt.

read more

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