Agrégateur de flux

Stanford Web Services Blog: Doing more with the editor, Part 1, adding CSS styles

Planet Drupal - ven, 21/11/2014 - 17:18

Have you ever wanted to put a border on an image or highlight a link for more information in a text field? It is possible to configure the  Styles dropdown menu in your WYSIWYG editor to allow you to add styles to the content in a text field. If you don't know how to configure your Styles dropdown, here's how you can add multiple classes to an element using the HTML editor pane of the WYSIWYG.

Disable the WYSIWYG

To edit the HTML in a text area:

  1. Navigate to the page you'd like to edit

Catégories: Elsewhere

The Cherry Hill Company: Deployment and Development workflows at Cherry Hill

Planet Drupal - ven, 21/11/2014 - 16:58

Last year, we reached a milestone at Cherry Hill when we moved all of our projects into a managed deployment system. We have talked about Jenkins, one of the tools that we use to manage our workflow and there has been continued interest on what our "recipe" consists of. Being that we are using open source tools, and we think of ourselves as part of the (larger than Drupal) open source community, I want to share a bit more of what we use and how it is stitched together. Our hope is that this helps to spark a larger discussion of the tools others are using, so we can all learn from each other.

Git is a distributed code revision control system. While we could use any revision control system such as CSV, Subversion (and even though this is a given with most agencies, we strongly suggest you use *some* system over nothing at all), git is fairly easy to use, has great...

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Catégories: Elsewhere

Daniel Pocock: PostBooks 4.7 packages available, xTupleCon 2014 award

Planet Drupal - ven, 21/11/2014 - 15:12

I recently updated the PostBooks packages in Debian and Ubuntu to version 4.7. This is the version that was released in Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) and is part of the upcoming Debian 8 (jessie) release.

Better prospects for Fedora and RHEL/CentOS/EPEL packages

As well as getting the packages ready, I've been in contact with xTuple helping them generalize their build system to make packaging easier. This has eliminated the need to patch the makefiles during the build. As well as making it easier to support the Debian/Ubuntu packages, this should make it far easier for somebody to create a spec file for RPM packaging too.

Debian wins a prize

While visiting xTupleCon 2014 in Norfolk, I was delighted to receive the Community Member of the Year award which I happily accepted not just for my own efforts but for the Debian Project as a whole.

Steve Hackbarth, Director of Product Development at xTuple, myself and the impressive Community Member of the Year trophy

This is a great example of the productive relationships that exist between Debian, upstream developers and the wider free software community and it is great to be part of a team that can synthesize the work from so many other developers into ready-to-run solutions on a 100% free software platform.

Receiving this award really made me think about all the effort that has gone into making it possible to apt-get install postbooks and all the people who have collectively done far more work than myself to make this possible:

Here is a screenshot of the xTuple web / JSCommunicator integration, it was one of the highlights of xTupleCon:

and gives a preview of the wide range of commercial opportunities that WebRTC is creating for software vendors to displace traditional telecommunications providers.

xTupleCon also gave me a great opportunity to see new features (like the xTuple / Drupal web shop integration) and hear about the success of consultants and their clients deploying xTuple/PostBooks in various scenarios. The product is extremely strong in meeting the needs of manufacturing and distribution and has gained a lot of traction in these industries in the US. Many of these features are equally applicable in other markets with a strong manufacturing industry such as Germany or the UK. However, it is also flexible enough to simply disable many of the specialized features and use it as a general purpose accounting solution for consulting and services businesses. This makes it a good option for many IT freelancers and support providers looking for a way to keep their business accounts in a genuinely open source solution with a strong SQL backend and a native Linux desktop interface.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Daniel Pocock: PostBooks 4.7 packages available, xTupleCon 2014 award

Planet Debian - ven, 21/11/2014 - 15:12

I recently updated the PostBooks packages in Debian and Ubuntu to version 4.7. This is the version that was released in Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) and is part of the upcoming Debian 8 (jessie) release.

Better prospects for Fedora and RHEL/CentOS/EPEL packages

As well as getting the packages ready, I've been in contact with xTuple helping them generalize their build system to make packaging easier. This has eliminated the need to patch the makefiles during the build. As well as making it easier to support the Debian/Ubuntu packages, this should make it far easier for somebody to create a spec file for RPM packaging too.

Debian wins a prize

While visiting xTupleCon 2014 in Norfolk, I was delighted to receive the Community Member of the Year award which I happily accepted not just for my own efforts but for the Debian Project as a whole.

Steve Hackbarth, Director of Product Development at xTuple, myself and the impressive Community Member of the Year trophy

This is a great example of the productive relationships that exist between Debian, upstream developers and the wider free software community and it is great to be part of a team that can synthesize the work from so many other developers into ready-to-run solutions on a 100% free software platform.

Receiving this award really made me think about all the effort that has gone into making it possible to apt-get install postbooks and all the people who have collectively done far more work than myself to make this possible:

Here is a screenshot of the xTuple web / JSCommunicator integration, it was one of the highlights of xTupleCon:

and gives a preview of the wide range of commercial opportunities that WebRTC is creating for software vendors to displace traditional telecommunications providers.

xTupleCon also gave me a great opportunity to see new features (like the xTuple / Drupal web shop integration) and hear about the success of consultants and their clients deploying xTuple/PostBooks in various scenarios. The product is extremely strong in meeting the needs of manufacturing and distribution and has gained a lot of traction in these industries in the US. Many of these features are equally applicable in other markets with a strong manufacturing industry such as Germany or the UK. However, it is also flexible enough to simply disable many of the specialized features and use it as a general purpose accounting solution for consulting and services businesses. This makes it a good option for many IT freelancers and support providers looking for a way to keep their business accounts in a genuinely open source solution with a strong SQL backend and a native Linux desktop interface.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Julien Danjou: Distributed group management and locking in Python with tooz

Planet Debian - ven, 21/11/2014 - 13:10

With OpenStack embracing the Tooz library more and more over the past year, I think it's a good start to write a bit about it.

A bit of history

A little more than year ago, with my colleague Yassine Lamgarchal and others at eNovance, we investigated on how to solve a problem often encountered inside OpenStack: synchronization of multiple distributed workers. And while many people in our ecosystem continue to drive development by adding new bells and whistles, we made a point of solving new problems with a generic solution able to address the technical debt at the same time.

Yassine wrote the first ideas of what should be the group membership service that was needed for OpenStack, identifying several projects that could make use of this. I've presented this concept during the OpenStack Summit in Hong-Kong during an Oslo session. It turned out that the idea was well-received, and the week following the summit we started the tooz project on StackForge.

Goals

Tooz is a Python library that provides a coordination API. Its primary goal is to handle groups and membership of these groups in distributed systems.

Tooz also provides another useful feature which is distributed locking. This allows distributed nodes to acquire and release locks in order to synchronize themselves (for example to access a shared resource).

The architecture

If you are familiar with distributed systems, you might be thinking that there are a lot of solutions already available to solve these issues: ZooKeeper, the Raft consensus algorithm or even Redis for example.

You'll be thrilled to learn that Tooz is not the result of the NIH syndrome, but is an abstraction layer on top of all these solutions. It uses drivers to provide the real functionalities behind, and does not try to do anything fancy.

All the drivers do not have the same amount of functionality of robustness, but depending on your environment, any available driver might be suffice. Like most of OpenStack, we let the deployers/operators/developers chose whichever backend they want to use, informing them of the potential trade-offs they will make.

So far, Tooz provides drivers based on:

All drivers are distributed across processes. Some can be distributed across the network (ZooKeeper, memcached, redis…) and some are only available on the same host (IPC).

Also note that the Tooz API is completely asynchronous, allowing it to be more efficient, and potentially included in an event loop.

Features Group membership

Tooz provides an API to manage group membership. The basic operations provided are: the creation of a group, the ability to join it, leave it and list its members. It's also possible to be notified as soon as a member joins or leaves a group.

Leader election

Each group can have a leader elected. Each member can decide if it wants to run for the election. If the leader disappears, another one is elected from the list of current candidates. It's possible to be notified of the election result and to retrieve the leader of a group at any moment.

Distributed locking

When trying to synchronize several workers in a distributed environment, you may need a way to lock access to some resources. That's what a distributed lock can help you with.

Adoption in OpenStack

Ceilometer is the first project in OpenStack to use Tooz. It has replaced part of the old alarm distribution system, where RPC was used to detect active alarm evaluator workers. The group membership feature of Tooz was leveraged by Ceilometer to coordinate between alarm evaluator workers.

Another new feature part of the Juno release of Ceilometer is the distribution of polling tasks of the central agent among multiple workers. There's again a group membership issue to know which nodes are online and available to receive polling tasks, so Tooz is also being used here.

The Oslo team has accepted the adoption of Tooz during this release cycle. That means that it will be maintained by more developers, and will be part of the OpenStack release process.

This opens the door to push Tooz further in OpenStack. Our next candidate would be write a service group driver for Nova.

The complete documentation for Tooz is available online and has examples for the various features described here, go read it if you're curious and adventurous!

Catégories: Elsewhere

Jonathan Wiltshire: Getting things into Jessie (#6)

Planet Debian - ven, 21/11/2014 - 11:30
If it’s not in an unblock bug, we probably aren’t reading it

We really, really prefer unblock bugs to anything else right now (at least, for things relating to Jessie). Mails on the list get lost, and IRC is dubious. This includes for pre-approvals.

It’s perfectly fine to open an unblock bug and then find it’s not needed, or the question is really about something else. We’d rather that than your mail get lost between the floorboards. Bugs are easy to track, have metadata so we can keep the status up to date in a standard way, and are publicised in all the right places. They make a great to-do list.

By all means twiddle with the subject line, for example appending “(pre-approval)” so it’s clearer – though watch out for twiddling too much, or you’ll confuse udd.

(to continue my theme: asking you to file a bug instead costs you one round-trip; don’t forget we’re doing it at scale)

 

Getting things into Jessie (#6) is a post from: jwiltshire.org.uk | Flattr

Catégories: Elsewhere

Károly Négyesi: Where does migrate in core stand?

Planet Drupal - jeu, 20/11/2014 - 23:48

Migrate is horribly broken! Migrate works awesome! Both are true. (Yes!) So Keith Dechant reported migrating a live Drupal 7 site to Drupal 8. Melissa Anderson is migrating a Drupal 6 site and gets mostly bugs. How is this possible? Well, Keith was coding his way around bugs, not just using what core provided (this should be obvious since we do not yet provide Drupal 7 sources in core) and Melissa had a site builder approach to it. Both of them are poised to contribute: Keith will share his code for Drupal 7 in the sandbox and Melissa files great bug reports and writes documentation with tips of how to use xdebug to find out what's broken with a migration. At this juncture if you are not prepared for either you will have a bad time with using migrate. Otherwise, see, it works!

Catégories: Elsewhere

Drupal.org Featured Case Studies: The Weather Channel (weather.com)

Planet Drupal - jeu, 20/11/2014 - 23:41
Completed Drupal site or project URL: http://www.weather.com

Weather.com is the highest trafficked Drupal site in existence, with over 1 billion unique visitors per month. The Weather Channel teamed up with Mediacurrent to migrate from their previous content management system to Drupal. Not only were we able to help The Weather Chanel adopt an open-source solution, but the new website has drastically improved page load times and reduced infrastructure requirements.

Key modules/theme/distribution used: PanelsServicesWysiwygOrganizations involved: MediacurrentAcquiaTeam members: jeffdiecksSilicon.ValetKendall TottenkbasarabjamesrutherfordAndrew M Rileypaulmckibbenderek.derapsmrjmdmarkie
Catégories: Elsewhere

Steve McIntyre: UEFI Debian CDs for Jessie...

Planet Debian - jeu, 20/11/2014 - 22:59

So, my work for Wheezy gave us working amd64 UEFI installer images. Yay! Except: there were a few bugs that remained, and also places where we could deal better with some of the more crappy UEFI implementations out there. But, things have improve since then and we should be better for Jessie in quite a few ways.

First of all, Colin and the other Grub developers have continued working hard and quite a lot of the old bugs in this area look to be fixed. I'm hoping we're not going to see so many "UEFI boot gives me a blank black screen" type of problems now.

For those poor unfortunates with Windows 7 on their machines, using BIOS boot despite having UEFI support in their hardware, I've fixed a long-standing bug (#763127 that could leave people with broken systems, unable to dual boot.

We've fixed a silly potential permissions bug in how the EFI System Partition is mounted: (#770033.

Next up, I'm hoping to add a workaround for some of the broken UEFI implementations, by adding support in our Grub packages (and in d-i) for forcing the installation of a copy of grub-efi in the removable media path. See #746662 for more of the details. It's horrid to be doing this, but it's just about the best thing we can do to support people with broken firmware.

Finally, I've been getting lots of requests for adding i386 (32-bit x86) UEFI support in our official images. Back in the Wheezy development cycle, I had test images that worked on i386, but decided not to push that support into the release. There were worries about potentially critical bugs that could be tickled on some hardware, plus there were only very few known i386 UEFI platforms at the time; the risk of damage outweighed the small proportion of users, IMHO. However, I'm now revisiting that decision. The potentially broken machines are now 2 years older, and so less likely to be in use. Also, Intel have released some horrid platform concoction around the Bay Trail CPU: a 64-bit CPU (that really wants a 64-bit kernel), but running a 32-bit UEFI firmware with no BIOS Compatibility Mode. Recent kernels are able to cope with this mess, but at the moment there is no sensible way to install Debian on such a machine. I'm hoping to fix that next (#768461. It's going to be awkward again, needing changes in several places too.

You can help! Same as 2 years ago, I'll need help testing some of these images. Particularly for the 32-bit UEFI support, I currently have no relevant hardware myself. That's not going to make it easy... :-/

I'll start pushing unofficial Jessie EFI test images shortly.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Tiago Bortoletto Vaz: Things to celebrate

Planet Debian - jeu, 20/11/2014 - 21:32

Turning 35 today, then I get the great news that the person whom I share my dreams with has just become a Debian member! Isn't beautiful? Thanks Tássia, thanks Debian! I should also thank friends who make an ideal ambience for tonight's fun.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Neil McGovern: Barbie the Debian Developer

Planet Debian - jeu, 20/11/2014 - 21:00

Some people may have seen recently that the Barbie series has a rather sexist book out about Barbie the Computer Engineer. Fortunately, there’s a way to improve this by making your own version.

Thus, I made a short version about Barbie the Debian Developer and init system packager.

(For those who don’t know me, this is satirical. Any resemblance to people is purely coincidental.)

Catégories: Elsewhere

Gunnar Wolf: UNAM. Viva México, viva en paz.

Planet Debian - jeu, 20/11/2014 - 19:38

We have had terrible months in Mexico; I don't know how much has appeared about our country in the international media. The last incidents started on the last days of September, when 43 students at a school for rural teachers were forcefully disappeared (in our Latin American countries, this means they were taken by force and no authority can yet prove whether they are alive or dead; forceful disappearance is one of the saddest and most recognized traits of the brutal military dictatorships South America had in the 1970s) in the Iguala region (Guerrero state, South of the country) and three were killed on site. An Army regiment was stationed few blocks from there and refused to help.

And yes, we live in a country where (incredibly) this news by themselves would not seem so unheard of... But in this case, there is ample evidence they were taken by the local police forces, not by a gang of (assumed) wrongdoers. And they were handed over to a very violent gang afterwards. Several weeks later, with far from a thorough investigation, we were told they were killed, burnt and thrown to a river.

The Iguala city major ran away, and was later captured, but it's not clear why he was captured at two different places. The Guerrero state governor resigned and a new governor was appointed. But this was not the result of a single person behaving far from what their voters would expect — It's a symptom of a broken society where policemen will kill when so ordered, where military personnel will look away when pointed out to the obvious, where the drug dealers have captured vast regions of the country where are stronger than the formal powers.

And then, instead of dealing with the issue personally as everybody would expect, the president goes on a commercial mission to China. Oh, to fix some issues with a building company. That coincidentally or not was selling a super-luxury house to his wife. A house that she, several days later, decided to sell because it was tarnishing her family's honor and image.

And while the president is in China, the person who dealt with the social pressure and told us about the probable (but not proven!) horrible crime where the "bad guys" for some strange and yet unknown reason (even with tens of them captured already) decided to kill and burn and dissolve and disappear 43 future rural teachers presents his version, and finishes his speech saying that "I'm already tired of this topic".

Of course, our University is known for its solidarity with social causes; students in our different schools are the first activists in many protests, and we have had a very tense time as the protests are at home here at the university. This last weekend, supposed policemen entered our main campus with a stupid, unbelievable argument (they were looking for a phone reported as stolen three days earlier), get into an argument with some students, and end up firing shots at the students; one of them was wounded in the leg.

And the university is now almost under siege: There are policemen surrounding us. We are working as usual, and will most likely finish the semester with normality, but the intimidation (in a country where seeing a policeman is practically never a good sign) is strong.

And... Oh, I could go on a lot. Things feel really desperate and out of place.

Today I will join probably tens or hundreds of thousands of Mexicans sick of this simulation, sick of this violence, in a demonstration downtown. What will this achieve? Very little, if anything at all. But we cannot just sit here watching how things go from bad to worse. I do not accept to live in a state of exception.

So, this picture is just right: A bit over a month ago, two dear friends from Guadalajara city came, and we had a nice walk in the University. Our national university is not only huge, it's also beautiful and loaded with sights. And being so close to home, it's our favorite place to go with friends to show around. This is a fragment of the beautiful mural in the Central Library. And, yes, the University stands for "Viva México". And the university stands for "Peace". And we need it all. Desperately.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Another Drop in the Drupal Sea: A new approach to Drupal training

Planet Drupal - jeu, 20/11/2014 - 19:30

There are many paid and free Drupal training sites on the internet. To the best of my knowledge, none of them is open source. And I'm quite certain none of them is "ridiculously open."

read more

Catégories: Elsewhere

Acquia: Custom Distributions on Acquia Cloud: Part 2 -- Updating with Drush Make

Planet Drupal - jeu, 20/11/2014 - 18:57

In the first post of this series on Drush Make we looked at building a custom Drupal install profile on Acquia Cloud using Drush make. In this installment, we look at managing and updating the code in your install profile and deploying it onto Acquia Cloud. Keeping up with new releases is one of the most important aspects of maintaining any site and leveraging Drush make can dramatically reduce the effort involved with that process.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Drupal Association News: Better than FTP

Planet Drupal - jeu, 20/11/2014 - 18:42

As things stand today, Drupal.org's mirror network is an essential part of the Drupal.org infrastructure. The ftp.drupal.org infrastructure hosts millions of files, serving everything from Drupal Core to contributed modules and themes, but it's beginning to show its age.

Our current FTP mirrors (co-located, in Oregon, Illinois, and New York) have been behaving erratically: projects have been failing to sync to the mirrors, being deleted before update, and sometimes disappearing from the mirrors for hours or days at a time. Even when working properly, the replication from the primary to additional mirrors can take as much as 45 minutes.

Compounding these issues is the fact that we do not have robust control or access to the existing architecture when problems arise.

So we've taken a step back to ask:

How can we deliver these files in a more reliable way?
On the modern web, the key elements of file delivery are:

  • High availability
  • Peering capacity designed for global delivery
  • Fast replication
  • HTTPS/TLS support

A Content Delivery Network is the answer to these problems, which is why we're evaluating MaxCDN to replace the ftp.drupal.org infrastructure.

But wait - does this mean the ftp:// protocol will no longer work?
Yes. The FTP protocol is aging as well...

  • In the month of October 2014, ftp:// had 96 unique visitors. Of those 96 unique visitors, only 33 of them made over 10 requests.
  • The ftp pathing differs from http, making the experience of using ftp:// confusing and inconsistent.
  • Replacing the ftp:// protocol with http will enable us to secure Drupal.org with HTTPS across all domains.

How you can help
We need users to help us test MaxCDN as an alternative for file delivery. You can track the issue here, and help us by testing the MaxCDN based downloads. Please report back your findings (good or bad) and let us know if there are any showstoppers.

To test, add this line to your /etc/hosts file:

~$ sudo vim /etc/hosts
198.232.124.192 ftp.drupal.org

And continue using ftp.drupal.org as you normally would through Drupal.org project pages, drush dl, etc.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Mediacurrent: The Weather Channel’s Journey to Drupal

Planet Drupal - jeu, 20/11/2014 - 18:00

When my business partner, Paul Chason, and I joined forces over seven years ago we had a rather simple vision for Mediacurrent. We were convinced that open-source software offered a superior value proposition over proprietary, licensed based solutions. We had an ambitious goal of starting a digital agency that was going to revolutionize how companies thought about the way they managed their web properties. As Simon Sinek so eloquently describes, this was our "why" and purpose.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Drupal Watchdog: Different, Not Difficult

Planet Drupal - jeu, 20/11/2014 - 17:36
Article

As AppNeta’s developer evangelist, I work with customers in five different programming languages to monitor application performance. Drupal is just one part of one language, but I’ll always have a soft spot for it because it’s where I learned to program. When I get a chance, I like to keep my skills sharp by contributing to the community-maintained TraceView integration module. Last spring, I decided to port it and learn Drupal 8 the hard way.

Like most Drupal developers, I’d never tried writing Symfony code or using Composer to manage packages. Before attempting it, I decided to research both Symfony in its own right and how it is being leveraged to rewrite Drupal. Thankfully, there were many rich tutorials on “the basics” even then, and, after a relatively painless porting process, I had the module running with a skeletal Symfony bundle inside it.

Initially, I relied on the same strategy as the Drupal 7 version of the TraceView module, which monitors hook execution time by installing two additional modules: an “early” module with a very low weight and a “late” module with a very high weight. As each hook was removed from core, I moved its implementations from the modules into the bundle and tagged that event with listeners at maximum and minimum priority.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Dries Buytaert: Weather.com using Drupal

Planet Drupal - jeu, 20/11/2014 - 17:06
Topic: DrupalAcquiaDrupal sites

One of the world's most trafficked websites, with more than 100 million unique visitors every month and more than 20 million different pages of content, is now using Drupal. Weather.com is a top 20 U.S. site according to comScore. As far as I know, this is currently the biggest Drupal site in the world.

Weather.com has been an active Drupal user for the past 18 months; it started with a content creation workflow on Drupal to help its editorial team publish content to its existing website faster. With Drupal, Weather.com was able to dramatically reduce the number of steps that was required to publish content from 14 to just a few. Speed is essential in reporting the weather, and Drupal's content workflow provided much-needed velocity. The success of that initial project is what led to this week's migration of Weather.com from Percussion to Drupal.

The company has moved the entire website to Acquia Cloud, giving the site a resilient platform that can withstand sudden onslaughts of demand as unpredictable as the weather itself. As we learned from our work with New York City's MTA during Superstorm Sandy in 2012, “weather-proofing” the delivery of critical information to insure the public stays informed during catastrophic events is really important and can help save lives.

The team at Weather.com worked with Acquia and Mediacurrent for its site development and migration.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Acquia: Meet Cal Evans ... Meet Jeffrey A. "jam" McGuire

Planet Drupal - jeu, 20/11/2014 - 15:14
Language Undefined

Voices of the ElePHPant / Acquia Podcast Ultimate Showdown Part 1 - Cal Evans and I got the chance to sit down and talk (a lot!) at DrupalCon Amsterdam and talk about a range of topics we have in common. In this first part of a 2-part series, we talk Drupal, PHP convergence and the "PHP Renaissance", open source communities, proprietary v open source business and the ethics of helping, and more.

Why PHP?

According to Cal, PHP has three things going for it:

Catégories: Elsewhere

Steve Kemp: An experiment in (re)building Debian

Planet Debian - jeu, 20/11/2014 - 14:28

I've rebuilt many Debian packages over the years, largely to fix bugs which affected me, or to add features which didn't make the cut in various releases. For example I made a package of fabric available for Wheezy, since it wasn't in the release. (Happily in that case a wheezy-backport became available. Similar cases involved repackaging gtk-gnutella when the protocol changed and the official package in the lenny release no longer worked.)

I generally release a lot of my own software as Debian packages, although I'll admit I've started switching to publishing Perl-based projects on CPAN instead - from which they can be debianized via dh-make-perl.

One thing I've not done for many years is a mass-rebuild of Debian packages. I did that once upon a time when I was trying to push for the stack-smashing-protection inclusion all the way back in 2006.

Having had a few interesting emails this past week I decided to do the job for real. I picked a random server of mine, rsync.io, which stores backups, and decided to rebuild it using "my own" packages.

The host has about 300 packages installed upon it:

root@rsync ~ # dpkg --list | grep ^ii | wc -l 294

I got the source to every package, patched the changelog to bump the version, and rebuild every package from source. That took about three hours.

Every package has a "skx1" suffix now, and all the build-dependencies were also determined by magic and rebuilt:

root@rsync ~ # dpkg --list | grep ^ii | awk '{ print $2 " " $3}'| head -n 4 acpi 1.6-1skx1 acpi-support-base 0.140-5+deb7u3skx1 acpid 1:2.0.16-1+deb7u1skx1 adduser 3.113+nmu3skx1

The process was pretty quick once I started getting more and more of the packages built. The only shortcut was not explicitly updating the dependencies to rely upon my updages. For example bash has a Debian control file that contains:

Depends: base-files (>= 2.1.12), debianutils (>= 2.15)

That should have been updated to say:

Depends: base-files (>= 2.1.12skx1), debianutils (>= 2.15skx1)

However I didn't do that, because I suspect if I did want to do this decently, and I wanted to share the source-trees, and the generated packages, the way to go would not be messing about with Debian versions instead I'd create a new Debian release "alpha-apple", "beta-bananna", "crunchy-carrot", "dying-dragonfruit", "easy-elderberry", or similar.

In conclusion: Importing Debian packages into git, much like Ubuntu did with bzr, is a fun project, and it doesn't take much to mass-rebuild if you're not making huge changes. Whether it is worth doing is an entirely different question of course.

Catégories: Elsewhere

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