Agrégateur de flux

Konstantinos Margaritis: SIMD book, update 3! Addition/Subtraction mostly finished

Planet Debian - mer, 30/07/2014 - 21:08

Finally. Apologies for the delay, but it's been a busy month. This time I will hold true to my word and upload a PDF for people to see (attached to this page).

So, what's new? Here is a list of things done:

* Finished ALL addition/subtraction related instructions for all engines and major derivatives (SSE*/AVX, VMX/VSX, NEON/armv8 NEON). With diagrams (these were the reasons it has taken so long).
* Reorganized the structure (split the book into Parts I/II, the instruction index will be in Part II, Part I will carry the design analysis of each SIMD engine.
* Added an TOC/index.
* So far, with just Addition/Subtraction Chapter and the rest empty sections, it has reached 175 pages (B5, again I'm not fixed on the size, it might actually change)! My estimate is that the whole book will surpass 800 pages with everything included.

TODO:

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Drupal core announcements: Drupal 8 alpha 14 on August 6th

Planet Drupal - mer, 30/07/2014 - 19:23

The next alpha for Drupal 8 will be alpha 14! Here is the schedule for the alpha release.

August 3rd-5th Only critical and major patches committed August 6th, 2014 Drupal 8.0.0-alpha14 released. Emergency commits only.

(Note that there are two concurrent Drupal 8 sprints Aug. 7-10, so we aren't planning to have the usual "disruptive patch window" following this alpha.)

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Appnovation Technologies: 3 Reasons to use Drupal for Enterprise Online Portal Dev

Planet Drupal - mer, 30/07/2014 - 17:36
"Enterprise Content Management" or ECM minimally encompasses Document Management, Collaboration, Records Management and Web Content Management. An enterprise online portal is a specially designed website that acts as an entry point for bringing information together from all these diverse sources in a uniform way. Building an enterprise online portal presents a unique set of challenges, including integrated authentication, governance of content added by multiple content contributors, migration of legacy data, and hosting within an enterprise infrastructure among others. var switchTo5x = false;stLight.options({"publisher":"dr-75626d0b-d9b4-2fdb-6d29-1a20f61d683"});
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Steinar H. Gunderson: Blehnovo, follow-up

Planet Debian - mer, 30/07/2014 - 17:00

A few weeks back, I posted about my adventures in getting Lenovo Switzerland/Germany to repair my laptop after I dropped it onto the floor and cracked the screen. (I'm sure they would be thrilled to hear that it sits next to my Wi-Fi on Linux rant, which got 39000 readers after reaching the front page Hacker News and then /r/linux.) Now that I'm leaving Norway tomorrow (via Assembly 2014 and then on to Zürich), I thought it would be a good time to wrap up the story.

In case you don't remember, we last left the situation July 7th, when I had called Lenovo Norway, who accepted my laptop for repair pretty much immediately after Lenovo Germany had staunchly refused for over a month. What happened next:

July 8th: DHL comes and picks up my laptop.

July 10th: I get an email saying that my laptop is repaired, and will be returned to me the next day.

July 11th: DHL calls me and asks if I'm at home. I say no, I'm at Solskogen, can they deliver it there instead? They redirect the package, no problems. Just as they call the second time, I'm away to shower after a run, but I ask them to just deliver it to someone there. A friend signs for it.

I start up the laptop, and woo, the screen works again. But the EFI menu has been tampered with, probably for diagnostic purposes, so it no longer boots Linux (but rather has a Windows entry that doesn't work). I spend half an hour fiddling with d-i to get it back again. During this process, I notice something strange -- my beautiful 1920x1080 screen has been replaced with a much less beautiful 1366x768 one! Also, if I lift the laptop in the wrong spot (at first I think it's related to the monitor bezel, but later understand that it's not), it promptly dies and spews garbage all over the screen. In any case, it's good enough to fix my backup job (which hadn't been properly running for a while--boo) and thus get the source code I've been working on out.

I call Lenovo Norway. They are confused. They try to figure out what happened, but are having problems finding the right internal part number for the 1920x1080 screen. They say they'll call me back.

July 16th: I call Lenovo Norway, wondering why they haven't called me back. I also send them a video showing the issue. The guy says he'll need to check with his colleague and will contact me back, although he can't guarantee anything will happen the same day. They don't call me back.

July 17th: A guy from InfoCare calls and wonders if I'm available. Turns out he's sent out to fix my laptop. (He doesn't speak Norwegian, but he speaks English, so no problem.) He arrives in my house, and replaces the 1366x768 panel with a 1920x1080 one. I can't reproduce the crash issue offhand, but shows him the video. He tries to figure out what the crashes are due to, but can't immediately see anything being loose.

I call Lenovo Norway again, and say it's great they've fixed my panel, but that the issue still persists. The guy doesn't own my case but has seen the video. After some discussion and thinking, they can't remotely diagnose it, and we agree that I'll send it in again, because they can seemingly not send a full array of parts with InfoCare (so they'd potentially go five trips, which I understand it not so cool for them).

July 18th: DHL picks up the laptop again. The guy looks a bit bewildered.

July 23rd: The laptop arrives at Lenovo. I get an email saying it's fixed.

July 24th: DHL arrives with the laptop. The repair sheet says they have replaced the “primary memory” (which I suppose means RAM). I try to trigger the issue. It's gone!

So, that's the status. I have a perfectly working laptop, with a gorgeous 1920x1080 display. I'm basically in the state I thought I would be over the weekend when I dropped it May 30th, it just took almost two months instead of one working day.

So, is my warranty correctly registered in the system now? I have no idea, because while Lenovo Norway was busy repairing my laptop three times, Lenovo Germany appears to have done nothing at all (not even closed my case, because that should have triggered an email). So as far as I know, there's still an open case on me somewhere, where they try to figure out why system A shows I have accident coverage and system B doesn't.

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Dcycle: New Drupal 7 project checklist

Planet Drupal - mer, 30/07/2014 - 16:10

I had this checklist documented internally, but I keep referring back to it so I'll make it available here in case anyone else needs it. The idea here is to document a minimum (not an ideal) set of modules and tasks which I do for almost all projects.

Questions to ask of a client at the project launch
  • Is your site bilingual? If so is there more than one domain?
  • What type of compatibility do you need: tablet, mobile, which versions of IE?
  • How do you see your post-launch support and core/module update contract?
  • Do you need SSL support?
  • What is your hosting arrangement?
  • Do you have a contact form?
  • What is your anti-spam method? Note that CAPTCHA is no longer useful; I like Mollom, but it's giving me more and more false positives with time.
  • Is WYSIWYG required? I strongly suggest using Markdown instead.
  • Confirm that all emails are sent in plain text, not HTML. If you're sending out HTML mail, do it right.
  • Do you need an on-site search utility? If so, some thought, and resources, need to go into it or it will be frustrating.
  • What kind of load do you expect on your site (anonymous and admin users)? This information can be used for load testing.
  • If you already have a site, should old paths of critical content map to paths on the new site?
  • Should users be allowed to create accounts (with spam considerations, and see if an admin should approve them).
Sprint Zero: starting the project

Here is what should get done in the first Agile sprint, aka Sprint Zero:

  • If you are using continuous integration, a Jenkins job for tracking the master branch: this job should fail if any test fails on the codebase, or if quality metrics (code review, for example, or pdepend metrics) reach predefined thresholds.
  • A Jenkins job for pushing to dev. This is triggered by the first job if tests pass. It pushed the new code to the dev environment, and updates the dev environment's database. The database is never cloned; rather, a site deployment module is used.
  • An issue queue is set up and the client is given access to it, and training on how to use it.
  • A wiki is set up.
  • A dev environment is set up. This is where the code gets pushed automatically if all tests pass.
  • A prod environment is set up. This environment is normally updated manually after each end of sprint demo.
  • A git repo is set up with a basic Drupal site.
  • A custom module is set up in sites/*/modules/custom: this is where custom function go.
  • A site deployment module in sites/all/modules/custom. All deployment-related code and dependencies go here. A .test file and an .install should be included.
  • A site development module is set up in sites/*/modules/custom, which is meant to contain all modules required or useful for development, as dependencies.
  • A custom theme is created.
  • An initial feature is created in sites/*/modules/features. This is where all your features will be added.
  • A "sites/*/modules/patches" folder is created (with a README.txt file, to make sure it goes into git). This is where core and contrib patches should go. Your site's maintainers should apply these patches when core or contrib modules are updated. Patch names here should include the node id and comment number on Drupal.org.
Basic module list (always used) Development modules (not enabled on production)

I normally create a custom development module with these as dependencies:

Multilingual modules Launch checklist
  • Design a custom 404, error and maintenance page.
  • Path, alias and permalink strategy. (Might require pathauto.)
  • Think of adding revisions to content types to avoid clients losing their data.
  • Don't display errors on production.
  • Optimize CSS, JS and page caching.
  • Views should be cached.
  • System messages are properly themed.
  • Prevent very simple passwords.
  • Using syslog instead of dblog on prod
In conclusion

Most shops, and most developers, have some sort of checklist like this. Mine is not any better or worse than most, but can be a good starting point. Another note: I've seen at least three Drupal teams try, and fail, to implement a "Drupal Starter kit for Company XYZ" and keep it under version control. The problem with that approach, as opposed to a checklist, is that it's not lightweight enough: it is a software product which needs maintenance, and after a while no one maintains it.

Tags: blogplanet
Catégories: Elsewhere

Modules Unraveled: 113 - Updates on the WalkHub project with Kristof Van Tomme - Modules Unraveled Podcast

Planet Drupal - mer, 30/07/2014 - 15:39
Published: Wed, 07/30/14Download this episodeWalkhub
  • You’ve been on the show before to talk about walkthrough.it, but some things have changed since then. So, can you give us an overview of what Walkhub is?
  • What are walkthroughs?
  • What is your pricing model on Walkhub?
  • You’re in the process of a second Indiegogo campaign, but what was the first one for?
    • How did your first Indiegogo campaign go?
  • What is the current Indiegogo camaipn for?
    • What’s the status on that?
  • Why are you doing another campaign? Why aren’t you out of BETA yet? What’s the story there?
AMA
  • You just did an AMA on Reddit yesterday. How did that go?
  • What were some common questions? Or ones that stuck out to you?
Episode Links: Kristof on drupal.orgKristof on TwitterIndiegogo CampaignWalkhub.netReddit AMAWalkhub Demo on YouTubeTags: 
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Phase2: Amazing Design Through Empathy

Planet Drupal - mer, 30/07/2014 - 15:10
What can web designers learn from design of a timepiece for the blind?

 

The difference between a good product and an amazing one boils down to one thing: Empathy. Developing an understanding of your users that is so deep that you can feel what they feel enables you to design products and experiences that will truly resonate with your users.

Through illustrative and entertaining examples, I will take you on a tour of the the highs that are achievable through empathic design, and some of the depths that designers sink to when they design without empathy. You’ll learn how to activate the empathy that is already within you, and how you can use that power to improve all aspects of your product design, from requirements gathering to user research, and everything in between.

Join me for my presentations on this topic this week:

 

Drupal Capital Camp & Gov’t Days

Wednesday, July 30 from 11:15AM – Noon in room F1/F2

Design4Drupal Boston 2014

Saturday, August 2 from 3:30 – 4:30pm in room 141

 

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Code Karate: Drupal 7 Panelizer Module

Planet Drupal - mer, 30/07/2014 - 14:57
Episode Number: 160

The Drupal 7 Panelizer Module allows you to panelize (or use panels) for any entity type on your Drupal 7 site. This allows you to change the layout of a node page, user page, or any other type of entity that you can think of. Although it's a little more complicated to set up, the Panelizer module allows you to set up a slimmed down panels interface for other site managers to use.

Tags: DrupalPanelsDrupal 7Site BuildingDrupal Planet
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Forum One: Double the Fun: DC Drupalists Unite!

Planet Drupal - mer, 30/07/2014 - 10:17

What could be more fun than summer camp? A Drupal summer camp, of course. And what could be more fun than a Drupal summer camp? Why, two Drupal summer camps, of course – merged into one!

This week we’re witnessing the unity of two long-awaited DC Drupal events with the joining of CapitalCamp and Drupal 4 Gov into a single event – CapitalCamp and Gov Days – and we’re enthused by all the possibilities that will come from having our local Drupal friends all in one place!

On Your Mark, Get Set…

This year we’re doing something brand new at CapitalCamp – we’re sprinting! That’s right, Forum One is hosting a Coder Lounge and Code Sprint room (Rooms C1 & C2) for fellow Drupalists to collaborate and bang out code together. This dedicated room will be available throughout CapitalCamp and Gov Days for developers to meet, greet, and collaborate on Drupal 8 code sprints. Developers will be convening in the mornings and afternoons to introduce sprints, identify issues, and get each other up and running…er, sprinting. Whether you’re new to code sprints or a seasoned veteran, come join us and contribute to the future of Drupal!

Expert Sessions

Our all-star team is proud to be presenting five sessions to the DC Drupal community this year!

On WednesdayDan Mouyard presents on Advanced Theming Tactics, covering how to follow the Drupal 8 CSS Architecture Guidelines while theming a Drupal 7 site, including:

  • Controlling Drupal’s markup
  • Creating custom layouts
  • Organizing your Sass partial structure
  • Using SMACSS to write maintainable CSS

Later in the day, William Hurley will be demystifying acronyms and bureaucratese with his session on Deploying Secure Drupal Sites, providing a roadmap for developers and IT managers to meet government security obligations while laying out specific issues that might be encountered, and how to overcome them.

On Thursday afternoon, Michael Rader, Sarah LeNguyen, and John Schneider are excited to present Hot Planet, Cool Site: Relaunching GlobalChange.gov – the inside story of the design and relaunch of this major website under the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) that focuses on assessing the impacts of climate change in the United States. Relaunching GlobalChange.gov was a big project that garnered big praise from the national press (and even the White House!), so we’re thrilled to be presenting on the site with our client at USGCRP for the first time.

And also on Thursday, Kalpana Goel will join with William Hurley to present a session on Routing in Drupal 8 to explain the many parts of routing, how to convert from the Drupal 7 menu system to the Drupal 8 routing system, as well as defining local tasks, local actions, and contextual links in Drupal 8.

But that’s not all, because on Friday, William returns for a CapitalCamp threepeat to present his final session of the conference: Automate All The Things – addressing why you need to be using automation, the tools you can use to make your development faster, easier and less error-prone, and common pitfalls that you might encounter along the way.

Seeing Red

As at DrupalCon last month, you’ll find Forum One staff in the hallways, sessions, and BoFs wearing our red shirts. Among our other attendees this week:

Once again, we’re excited as always to be actively participating in our hometown Drupal camps and are looking forward to sharing our knowledge, meeting new Drupal friends, and learning about new projects for us to explore.

Will you be at CapitalCamp and Gov Days this week? Stop by the Forum One Coder Lounge to say hi, or drop us a line at marketing@forumone.com – we’d love to meet up with you at Camp this year!

Catégories: Elsewhere

Janez Urevc: Progress of Disqus project in GSoC 2014

Planet Drupal - mer, 30/07/2014 - 08:57

For more info about the project and it's progress see the post on groups.drupal.org.

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DrupalCon Amsterdam: Become a Mentor at DrupalCon Amsterdam

Planet Drupal - mer, 30/07/2014 - 08:29

From volunteering your time at events to making a donation, there are plenty of ways to give back to the Drupal project - but by and large, one of the most important things individual Drupalers can do is donate their expertise and become a mentor.

Currently, we have only 24 mentors signed up, and we need 40 mentors to make DrupalCon Amsterdam a success. We’re anticipating several hundred individuals sign up for to join the sprint on Friday and mentorship is a great way to help people new to contributing learn Drupal and, eventually, contribute back valuable time, resources, and code to the project.

To become a mentor, click here to sign up. We need mentors for all levels of Drupal expertise, from teaching absolute Drupal beginners to assisting advanced users how to navigate the Drupal.org issue queue.

Need a ticket to attend?

There are a limited number of free DrupalCon ticket coupons available for people who sign up to mentor, and the deadline to sign up and request a ticket is Friday, 1 August. Don't miss out on an opportunity to help others and get your ticket sponsored!

We’re looking forward to the Amsterdam Mentored Code Sprint and the First-Time Sprinter Workshop. We hope that you’ll join us there!

--
Cathy Theys (YesCT)
Brian Gillbert (realityloop)
Ruben Teijeiro (rteijeiro)
DrupalCon Amsterdam Sprint Leads

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Drupal Association News: Announcing Our Newest Staff Members

Planet Drupal - mar, 29/07/2014 - 22:49

We’re thrilled to announce the addition of four new staff members to the Drupal Association team. Please help us give a warm welcome to Oliver Davies, Archie Brentano, Phillip Bulebar, and Ryan Aslett!

Oliver (opdavies) started with the Drupal Association in May of this year as a Drupal.org Developer. He has been active in the Drupal community for several years, has contributed numerous patches and modules, and prior to working with the Drupal Association, he contributed to the accessibility of the project. Since joining several months ago, Oliver has already made tremendous contributions to the Association and has seized the opportunity to give back to the community in any way he can.

Archie Brentano (isntall) is the Association’s new DevOps Engineer. Previously, Archie worked as a Multnomah County System Administrator, focusing on enterprise Drupal sites on Amazon Web Services infrastructure. Archie will be concentrating on the infrastructure side of Drupal.org, and has joined the organization because he was impressed by the Drupal community and saw a perfect opportunity to learn more about Drupal and become better involved.

Phillip Bulebar (pbulebar) comes to the Drupal Association with a long and successful track record in marketing and web content management. As the Association’s new Content Manager, Phillip will be creating and optimizing content on Drupal.org to help ensure it meets the needs of visitors. Prior to joining the Association, Phillip held management roles for companies including Nike, Nautilus and other specialty retailers, with much of his focus on creating, delivering, analyzing and optimizing digital content.

Ryan Aslett (mixologic) is joining the Drupal Association as the organization’s first QA Engineer. Previously, Ryan worked as a freelance full stack Drupal developer in the Portland, Oregon area; he has a wide variety of experience in everything from working with Perl to engineering composting toilets in Ecuador and Colombia. At the Association, Ryan will be improving BDD tests for Drupal.org websites, and we’re thrilled to welcome him on board.

Please help us give a warm welcome to our four newest staff members. We’re thrilled to have them on board and know they’ll do great things for the Drupal community.

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Ian Campbell: Debian Installer ARM64 Dailies

Planet Debian - mar, 29/07/2014 - 21:36

It's taken a while but all of the pieces are finally in place to run successfully through Debian Installer on ARM64 using the Debian ARM64 port.

So I'm now running nightly builds locally and uploading them to http://www.hellion.org.uk/debian/didaily/arm64/.

If you have CACert in your CA roots then you might prefer the slightly more secure version.

Hopefully before too long I can arrange to have them building on one of the project machines and uploaded to somewhere a little more formal like people.d.o or even the regular Debian Installer dailies site. This will have to do for now though.

Warning

The arm64 port is currently hosted on Debian Ports which only supports the unstable "sid" distribution. This means that installation can be a bit of a moving target and sometimes fails to download various installer components or installation packages. Mostly it's just a case of waiting for the buildd and/or archive to catch up. You have been warned!

Installing in a Xen guest

If you are lucky enough to have access to some 64-bit ARM hardware (such as the APM X-Gene, see wiki.xen.org for setup instructions) then installing Debian as a guest is pretty straightforward.

I suppose if you had lots of time (and I do mean lots) you could also install under Xen running on the Foundation or Fast Model. I wouldn't recommend it though.

First download the installer kernel and ramdisk onto your dom0 filesystem (e.g. to /root/didaily/arm64).

Second create a suitable guest config file such as:

name = "debian-installer" disk = ["phy:/dev/LVM/debian,xvda,rw"] vif = [ '' ] memory = 512 kernel = "/root/didaily/arm64/vmlinuz" ramdisk= "/root/didaily/arm64/initrd.gz" extra = "console=hvc0 -- "

In this example I'm installing to a raw logical volume /dev/LVM/debian. You might also want to use randmac to generate a permanent MAC address for the Ethernet device (specified as vif = ['mac=xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx']).

Once that is done you can start the guest with:

xl create -c cfg

From here you'll be in the installer and things carry on as usual. You'll need to manually point it to ftp.debian-ports.org as the mirror, or you can preseed by appending to the extra line in the cfg like so:

mirror/country=manual mirror/http/hostname=ftp.debian-ports.org mirror/http/directory=/debian

Apart from that there will be a warning about not knowing how to setup the bootloader but that is normal for now.

Installing in Qemu

To do this you will need a version of http://www.qemu.org which supports qemu-system-aarch64. The latest release doesn't yet so I've been using v2.1.0-rc3 (it seems upstream are now up to -rc5). Once qemu is built and installed and the installer kernel and ramdisk have been downloaded to $DI you can start with:

qemu-system-aarch64 -M virt -cpu cortex-a57 \ -kernel $DI/vmlinuz -initrd $DI/initrd.gz \ -append "console=ttyAMA0 -- " \ -serial stdio -nographic --monitor none \ -drive file=rootfs.qcow2,if=none,id=blk,format=qcow2 -device virtio-blk-device,drive=blk \ -net user,vlan=0 -device virtio-net-device,vlan=0

That's using a qcow2 image for the rootfs, I think I created it with something like:

qemu-img create -f qcow2 rootfs.qcow2 4G

Once started installation proceeds much like normal. As with Xen you will need to either point it at the debian-ports archive by hand or preseed by adding to the -append line and the warning about no bootloader configuration is expected.

Installing on real hardware

Someone should probably try this ;-).

Catégories: Elsewhere

Drupal Easy: Drupal Web Developer Career Series Post 4: View from the Summit

Planet Drupal - mar, 29/07/2014 - 20:46

This is final installment of our four-part blog post series that encapsulates the advice, tips and must-do elements of career building in the Drupal Community from the panel of experts collected for DrupalEasy’s DrupalCon Austin session; Drupal Career Trailhead; Embark on a Path to Success. It will be listed with other career resources for reference at the DrupalEasy Academy Career Center.

-->

read more

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Drupal Easy: DrupalEasy Podcast 136: Wolves (Jason Smith - Weather.com)

Planet Drupal - mar, 29/07/2014 - 20:29
Download Podcast 136

Jason Smith (Silcon.Valet), Solutions Architect for Mediacurrent, joins Mike, and Ryan to talk about one of the highest-trafficked sites in the world re-launching on Drupal: weather.com. Other topics discussed include the Acquia CEO’s recent Reddit AMA, sprint nutrition, and Damien McKenna.

read more

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Daniel Pocock: Pruning Syslog entries from MongoDB

Planet Debian - mar, 29/07/2014 - 20:27

I previously announced the availability of rsyslog+MongoDB+LogAnalyzer in Debian wheezy-backports. This latest rsyslog with MongoDB storage support is also available for Ubuntu and Fedora users in one way or another.

Just one thing was missing: a flexible way to prune the database. LogAnalyzer provides a very basic pruning script that simply purges all records over a certain age. The script hasn't been adapted to work within the package layout. It is written in PHP, which may not be ideal for people who don't actually want LogAnalyzer on their Syslog/MongoDB host.

Now there is a convenient solution: I've just contributed a very trivial Python script for selectively pruning the records.

Thanks to Python syntax and the PyMongo client, it is extremely concise: in fact, here is the full script:

#!/usr/bin/python import syslog import datetime from pymongo import Connection # It assumes we use the default database name 'logs' and collection 'syslog' # in the rsyslog configuration. with Connection() as client: db = client.logs table = db.syslog #print "Initial count: %d" % table.count() today = datetime.datetime.today() # remove ANY record older than 5 weeks except mail.info t = today - datetime.timedelta(weeks=5) table.remove({"time":{ "$lt": t }, "syslog_fac": { "$ne" : syslog.LOG_MAIL }}) # remove any debug record older than 7 days t = today - datetime.timedelta(days=7) table.remove({"time":{ "$lt": t }, "syslog_sever": syslog.LOG_DEBUG}) #print "Final count: %d" % table.count()

Just put it in /usr/local/bin and run it daily from cron.

Customization

Just adapt the table.remove statements as required. See the PyMongo tutorial for a very basic introduction to the query syntax and full details in the MongoDB query operator reference for creating more elaborate pruning rules.

Potential improvements
  • Indexing the columns used in the queries
  • Logging progress and stats to Syslog


LogAnalyzer using a database backend such as MongoDB is very easy to set up and much faster than working with text-based log files

AttachmentSize loganalyzer-demo.png102.01 KB
Catégories: Elsewhere

Midwestern Mac, LLC: Moving on to Acquia

Planet Drupal - mar, 29/07/2014 - 20:22

I wanted to post this here, since this is more of my sounding board for the Drupal community, but the details are on my personal blog: starting October 6, I will be working for Acquia as a Technical Architect in their Professional Services group!

What does this mean for this site/blog, Hosted Apache Solr, and Server Check.in? Not much, actually—they will continue on, likely at the same pace of development they've been for the past year or so (I'll work on them when I get an odd hour or two...). I am still working on completing Ansible for DevOps, and will actually be accelerating my writing schedule prior to starting the new job, since I'll have a little wedge of free time (a.k.a. unemployment!) between Mercy (my current full-time employer) and Acquia.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Gunnar Wolf: Editorial process starting in 3... 2... 1...

Planet Debian - mar, 29/07/2014 - 20:09

Yay!

Today I finally submitted our book, Fundamentos de Sistemas Operativos, for the Editorial Department of our institute. Of course, I'm not naïve enough to assume there won't be a heavy editorial phase, but I'm more than eager to dive into it... And have the book printed in maybe two months time!

Of course, this book is to be published under a free license (CC-BY-SA). And I'm talking with the coauthors, we are about to push the Git repository to a public location, as we believe the source for the text and figures can also be of interest to others.

The book itself (as I've already boasted about here :-} ) is available (somewhat as a preprint) for download.

Catégories: Elsewhere

Christian Perrier: Developers per country (July 2014)

Planet Debian - mar, 29/07/2014 - 18:34
This is time again for my annual report about the number of developers per country.

This is now the sixth edition of this report. Former editions:

So, here we are with the July 2014 version, sorted by the ratio of *active* developers per million population for each country.

Act: number of active developers Dev: total number of developers A/M: number of active devels per million pop. D/M: number of devels per million pop. 2009: rank in 2009 2010: rank in 2010 2011: rank in 2011 (June) 2012: rank in 2012 (June) 2013: rank in 2012 (July) 2014: rank now Code Name Population Act Dev Dev Act/Million Dev/Million 2009 2010 June 2011 June 2012 July 2013 July 2014
fi Finland 5259250 19 31 3,61 5,89 1 1 1 1 1 1
ie Ireland 4670976 13 17 2,78 3,64 13 9 6 2 2 2
nz New Zealand 4331600 11 15 2,54 3,46 4 3 5 7 7 3 * mq Martinique 396404 1 1 2,52 2,52

3 4 4 4
se Sweden 9088728 22 37 2,42 4,07 3 6 7 5 5 5
ch Switzerland 7870134 19 29 2,41 3,68 2 2 2 3 3 6 * no Norway 4973029 11 14 2,21 2,82 5 4 4 6 6 7 * at Austria 8217280 18 29 2,19 3,53 6 8 10 10 10 8 * de Germany 81471834 164 235 2,01 2,88 7 7 9 9 8 9 * lu Luxemburg 503302 1 1 1,99 1,99 8 5 8 8 9 10 * fr France 65350000 101 131 1,55 2 12 12 11 11 11 11
au Australia 22607571 32 60 1,42 2,65 9 10 12 12 12 12
be Belgium 11071483 14 17 1,26 1,54 10 11 13 13 13 13
uk United-Kingdom 62698362 77 118 1,23 1,88 14 14 14 14 14 14
nl Netherlands 16728091 18 40 1,08 2,39 11 13 15 15 15 15
ca Canada 33476688 34 63 1,02 1,88 15 15 17 16 16 16
dk Denmark 5529888 5 10 0,9 1,81 17 17 16 17 17 17
es Spain 46754784 34 56 0,73 1,2 16 16 19 18 18 18
it Italy 59464644 36 52 0,61 0,87 23 22 22 19 19 19
hu Hungary 10076062 6 12 0,6 1,19 18 25 26 20 24 20 * cz Czech Rep 10190213 6 6 0,59 0,59 21 20 21 21 20 21 * us USA 313232044 175 382 0,56 1,22 19 21 25 24 22 22
il Israel 7740900 4 6 0,52 0,78 24 24 24 25 23 23
hr Croatia 4290612 2 2 0,47 0,47 20 18 18 26 25 24 * lv Latvia 2204708 1 1 0,45 0,45 26 26 27 27 26 25 * bg Bulgaria 7364570 3 3 0,41 0,41 25 23 23 23 27 26 * sg Singapore 5183700 2 2 0,39 0,39


33 33 27 * uy Uruguay 3477778 1 2 0,29 0,58 22 27 28 28 28 28
pl Poland 38441588 11 15 0,29 0,39 29 29 30 30 30 29 * jp Japan 127078679 36 52 0,28 0,41 30 28 29 29 29 30 * lt Lithuania 3535547 1 1 0,28 0,28 28 19 20 22 21 31 * gr Greece 10787690 3 4 0,28 0,37 33 38 34 35 35 32 * cr Costa Rica 4301712 1 1 0,23 0,23 31 30 31 31 31 33 * by Belarus 9577552 2 2 0,21 0,21 35 36 39 39 32 34 * ar Argentina 40677348 8 10 0,2 0,25 34 33 35 32 37 35 * pt Portugal 10561614 2 4 0,19 0,38 27 32 32 34 34 36 * sk Slovakia 5477038 1 1 0,18 0,18 32 31 33 36 36 37 * rs Serbia 7186862 1 1 0,14 0,14



38 38
tw Taiwan 23040040 3 3 0,13 0,13 37 34 37 37 39 39
br Brazil 192376496 18 21 0,09 0,11 36 35 38 38 40 40
cu Cuba 11241161 1 1 0,09 0,09
38 41 41 41 41
co Colombia 45566856 4 5 0,09 0,11 41 44 46 47 46 42 * kr South Korea 48754657 4 6 0,08 0,12 39 39 42 42 42 43 * gt Guatemala 13824463 1 1 0,07 0,07



43 44 * ec Ecuador 15007343 1 1 0,07 0,07
40 43 43 45 45
cl Chile 16746491 1 2 0,06 0,12 42 41 44 44 47 46 * za South Africa 50590000 3 10 0,06 0,2 38 48 48 48 48 47 * ru Russia 143030106 8 9 0,06 0,06 43 42 47 45 49 48 * mg Madagascar 21281844 1 1 0,05 0,05 44 37 40 40 50 49 * ro Romania 21904551 1 2 0,05 0,09 45 43 45 46 51 50 * ve Venezuela 28047938 1 1 0,04 0,04 40 45 50 49 44 51 * my Malaysia 28250000 1 1 0,04 0,04

49 50 52 52
pe Peru 29907003 1 1 0,03 0,03 46 46 51 51 53 53
tr Turkey 74724269 2 2 0,03 0,03 47 47 52 52 54 54
ua Ukraine 45134707 1 1 0,02 0,02 48 53 58 59 55 55
th Thailand 66720153 1 2 0,01 0,03 50 50 54 54 56 56
eg Egypt 80081093 1 3 0,01 0,04 51 51 55 55 57 57
mx Mexico 112336538 1 1 0,01 0,01 49 49 53 53 58 58
cn China 1344413526 10 14 0,01 0,01 53 53 57 56 59 59
in India 1210193422 8 9 0,01 0,01 52 52 56 57 60 60
sv El Salvador 7066403 0 1 0 0,14

36 58 61 61































969 1561 62,08%







A few interesting facts:
  • New Zealand bumps from rank 7 to rank 3, thanks to one new active developer
  • Switzerland loses one developer and goes donw to rank 6
  • Norway also slightly goes down by losing one developer
  • With two more developers, Austria climbs up to rank 8 and overtakes Germany...;-)
  • Hungary climbs a little bit by gaining one developer
  • Singapore doubles its number of developers from 1 to 2 and bumps from 33 to 27
  • One rank up too for Poland that gained one developer
  • Down to rank 31 for Lithuania by losing one developer
  • Up to rank 32 for Greece with 4 developers instead of 3
  • Argentina goes up by havign two more developers (it lost 2 last year)
  • Up from 46 to 42 for Colombia by winning one more developer
  • One more developer and Russia climps from 49 to 48
  • One less for Venezuela that has only one developer left...:-(
  • No new country this year. Less movement towards "the universal OS"?
  • We have 12 more active Debian developers and 26 more developers overall. Less progression than last year
  • The ratio of active developers increases is nearly stable though slightly decreasing
Catégories: Elsewhere

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