Agrégateur de flux

Mediacurrent: 10 Things I Wish I Knew About Drupal 2 Years Ago

Planet Drupal - mer, 29/10/2014 - 21:44

They say that hindsight is 20/20. With the many advances that have happened in the Drupal community recently, we asked our team "What is the one thing you wish you knew about Drupal two years ago?" 

"I wish I knew about the Headless Drupal initiative so I that I could be ahead of the curve as far as the Javascript technologies that it will require." - Chris Doherty

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Rhonda D'Vine: Feminist Year

Planet Debian - mer, 29/10/2014 - 20:47

If someone would have told me that I would visit three feminist events this year I would have slowly nodded at them and responded with "yeah, sure..." not believing it. But sometimes things take their own turns.

It all started with the Debian Women Mini-Debconf in Barcelona. The organizers did ask me how they have to word the call for papers so that I would feel invited to give a speech, which felt very welcoming and nice. So we settled for "people who identify themselves as female". Due to private circumstances I didn't prepare well for my talk, but I hope it was still worth it. The next interesting part though happened later when there were lightning talks. Someone on IRC asked why there are male people in the lightning talks, which was explicitly allowed for them only. This also felt very very nice, to be honest, that my talk wasn't questioned. Those are amongst the reasons why I wrote My place is here, my home is Debconf.

Second event I went to was the FemCamp Wien. It was my first event that was a barcamp, I didn't know what to expect organization wise. Topic-wise it was set about Queer Feminism. And it was the first event that I went to which had a policy. Granted, there was an extremely silly written part in it, which naturally ended up in a shit storm on twitter (which people from both sides did manage very badly, which disappointed me). Denying that there is sexism against cis-males is just a bad idea, but the background of it was that this wasn't the topic of this event. The background of the policy was that usually barcamps but events in general aren't considered that save of a place for certain people, and that this barcamp wanted to make it clear that people usually shying away from such events in the fear of harassment can feel at home there.
And what can I say, this absolutely was the right thing to do. I never felt any more welcomed and included in any event, including Debian events—sorry to say that so frankly. Making it clear through the policy that everyone is on the same boat with addressing each other respectfully totally managed to do exactly that. The first session of the event about dominant talk patterns and how to work around or against them also made sure that the rest of the event was giving shy people a chance to speak up and feel comfortable, too. And the range of the sessions that were held was simply great. This was the event that I came up with the pattern that I have to define the quality of an event on the sessions that I'm unable to attend. The thing that hurt me most in the afterthought was that I couldn't attend the session about minorities within minorities. :/

Last but not least I attended AdaCamp Berlin. This was a small unconference/barcamp dedicated to increase women's participation in open technology and culture named after Ada Lovelace who is considered the first programmer. It was a small event with only 50 slots for people who identify as women. So I was totally hyper when I received the mail that was accepted. It was another event with a policy, and at first reading it looked strange. But given that there are people who are allergic to ingredients of scents, it made sense to raise awareness of that topic. And given that women are facing a fair amount of harassment in the IT and at events, it also makes sense to remind people to behave. After all it was a general policy for all AdaCamps, not for this specific one with only women.
I enjoyed the event. Totally. And that's not only because I was able to meet up with a dear friend who I haven't talked to in years, literally. I enjoyed the environment, and the sessions that were going on. And quite similar to the FemCamp, it started off with a session that helped a lot for the rest of the event. This time it was about the Impostor Syndrome which is extremely common for women in IT. And what can I say, I found myself in one of the slides, given that I just tweeted the day before that I doubted to belong there. Frankly spoken, it even crossed my mind that I was only accepted so that at least one trans person is there. Which is pretty much what the impostor syndrome is all about, isn't it. But when I was there, it did feel right. And we had great sessions that I truly enjoyed. And I have to thank one lady once again for her great definition on feminism that she brought up during one session, which is roughly that feminism for her isn't about gender but equality of all people regardless their sexes or gender definition. It's about dropping this whole binary thinking. I couldn't agree more.

All in all, I totally enjoyed these events, and hope that I'll be able to attend more next year. From what I grasped all three of them think of doing it again, the FemCamp Vienna already has the date announced at the end of this year's event, so I am looking forward to meet most of these fine ladies again, if faith permits. And keep in mind, there will always be critics and haters out there, but given that thy wouldn't think of attending such an event anyway in the first place, don't get wound up about it. They just try to talk you down.

P.S.: Ah, almost forgot about one thing to mention, which also helps a lot to reduce some barrier for people to attend: The catering during the day and for lunch both at FemCamp and AdaCamp (there was no organized catering at the Debian Women Mini-Debconf) did take off the need for people to ask about whether there could be food without meat and dairy products by offering mostly Vegan food in the first place, even without having to query the participants. Often enough people otherwise choose to go out of the event or bring their own food instead of asking for it, so this is an extremely welcoming move, too. Way to go!

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Steve Kemp: A brief introduction to freebsd

Planet Debian - mer, 29/10/2014 - 19:37

I've spent the past thirty minutes installing FreeBSD as a KVM guest. This mostly involved fetching the ISO (I chose the latest stable release 10.0), and accepting all the defaults. A pleasant experience.

As I'm running KVM inside screen I wanted to see the boot prompt, etc, via the serial console, which took two distinct steps:

  • Enabling the serial console - which lets boot stuff show up
  • Enabling a login prompt on the serial console in case I screw up the networking.

To configure boot messages to display via the serial console, issue the following command as the superuser:

# echo 'console="comconsole"' >> /boot/loader.conf

To get a login: prompt you'll want to edit /etc/ttys and change "off" to "on" and "dialup" to "vt100" for the ttyu0 entry. Once you've done that reload init via:

# kill -HUP 1

Enable remote root logins, if you're brave, or disable PAM and password authentication if you're sensible:

vi /etc/ssh/sshd_config /etc/rc.d/sshd restart

Configure the system to allow binary package-installation - to be honest I was hazy on why this was required, but I ran the two command and it all worked out:

pkg pkg2ng

Now you may install a package via a simple command such as:

pkg add screen

Removing packages you no longer want is as simple as using the delete option:

pkg delete curl

You can see installed packages via "pkg info", and there are more options to be found via "pkg help". In the future you can apply updates via:

pkg update && pkg upgrade

Finally I've installed 10.0-RELEASE which can be upgraded in the future via "freebsd-update" - This seems to boil down to "freebsd-update fetch" and "freebsd-update install" but I'm hazy on that just yet. For the moment you can see your installed version via:

uname -a ; freebsd-version

Expect my future CPAN releases, etc, to be tested on FreeBSD too now :)

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Metal Toad: Seeing Long Term Technology Adoption as Evolution

Planet Drupal - mer, 29/10/2014 - 18:31

Much like an evolutionary tree our goal in technology adoption is too continue to move forward and evolve, rather than getting caught in a dead end.  In the natural world, becoming bigger can be good but can lead to extinction events should the environment or food source change.  Right now we are in a technology Jurassic...

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Patrick Matthäi: geoip and geoip-database news!

Planet Debian - mer, 29/10/2014 - 16:43

Hi,

geoip version 1.6.2-2 and geoip-database version 20141027-1 are now available in Debian unstable/sid, with some news of more free databases available :)

geoip changes:

* Add patch for geoip-csv-to-dat to add support for building GeoIP city DB. Many thanks to Andrew Moise for contributing! * Add and install geoip-generator-asn, which is able to build the ASN DB. It is a modified version from the original geoip-generator. Much thanks for contributing also to Aaron Gibson! * Bump Standards-Version to 3.9.6 (no changes required).

geoip-database changes:

* New upstream release. * Add new databases GeoLite city and GeoLite ASN to the new package geoip-database-extra. Also bump build depends on geoip to 1.6.2-2. * Switch to xz compression for the orig tarball.

So much thanks to both contributors!

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Code Karate: Finding the right brand

Planet Drupal - mer, 29/10/2014 - 12:28

If you have been around CodeKarate.com for awhile you have noticed that our branding has been, we

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Mike Gabriel: Join us at "X2Go: The Gathering 2014"

Planet Debian - mer, 29/10/2014 - 12:27

TL;DR; Those of you who are not able to join "X2Go: The Gathering 2014"... Join us on IRC (#x2go on Freenode) over the coming weekend. We will provide information, URLs to our TinyPads, etc. there. Spontaneous visitors are welcome during the working sessions (please let us know if you plan to come around), but we don't have spare beds anymore for accomodation. (We are still trying hard to set up some sort of video coverage--may it be life streaming or recorded sessions, this is still open, people who can offer help, see below).

Our event "X2Go: The Gathering 2014" is approaching quickly. We will meet with a group of 13-15 people (number of people is still slightly fluctuating) at Linux Hotel, Essen. Thanks to the generous offerings of the Linux Hotel [1] to FLOSS community projects, costs of food and accommodation could be kept really low and affordable to many people.

We are very happy that people from outside Germany are coming to that meeting (Michael DePaulo from the U.S., Kjetil Fleten (http://fleten.net) from Denmark / Norway). And we are also proud that Martin Wimpress (Mr. Ubuntu MATE Remix) will join our gathering.

In advance, I want to send a big THANK YOU to all people who will sponsor our weekend, either by sending gift items, covering travel expenses or providing help and knowledge to make this event a success for the X2Go project and its community around.

read more

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Acquia: Drupal in the Philipines, Own your Own Code & More - Luc Bézier

Planet Drupal - mer, 29/10/2014 - 12:00
Language English On being an open source developer

"Like a lot of people, I did both sides of technology; working on paid, proprietary systems [and open source]. There is a big difference. I can't imagine myself going back to any proprietary system where I have to pay; I can't share the code I am doing with anyone; I have to ask a company about the right tool to use. I love the way that everybody contributes to the same piece of code, trying to make it the best ... and for free!"

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The Cherry Hill Company: Islandora Camp Colorado - Bringing Islandora and Drupal closer

Planet Drupal - mar, 28/10/2014 - 23:40

From October 13 - 16, 2014, I had the opportunity to go to (and the priviledge to present at) Islandora Camp Colorado (http://islandora.ca/camps/co2014). These were four fairly intensive days, including a last day workshop looking to the future with Fedora Commons 4.x. We had a one day introduction to Islandora, a day of workshops, and a final day of community presentations on how Libraries (and companies that work with Libraries such as ours) are using Islandora. The future looks quite interesting for the relationship between Fedora Commons and Drupal.

  • The new version of Islandora allows you to regenerate derivatives on the fly. You can specify which datastreams are derivatives of (what I am calling) parent datastreams. As a result, the new feature allows you to regenerate a derivative through the UI or possibly via Drush, which something the Colorado Alliance is working to have working with the ...
Read more »
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groups.drupal.org frontpage posts: Drupal Camp Ohio

Planet Drupal - mar, 28/10/2014 - 21:30
Start:  2014-11-14 (All day) - 2014-11-15 (All day) America/Chicago Drupalcamp or Regional Summit Organizers:  themic8

http://drupalcampohio.org/

"DrupalCamp Ohio 2014 returns to The Ohio State University's Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, for another two-day camp to build on last year's success, and will include keynote speeches, topical sessions, Beginners Training, Birds of a Feather breakouts, and code sprints."
-- http://drupalcampohio.org/about

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Kurt Roeckx: DANE

Planet Debian - mar, 28/10/2014 - 20:32

I've been wanting to set up DANE for my domain, but I seem to be unable to find a provider that offers DNSSEC that can also do TLSA records in DNS. I've contacted several companies and most don't even seem to be offering DNSSEC. And if they offer DNSSEC they can't do TLSA records. I would like to avoid actually running my own nameservers.

So if someone knows someone that can provide that, please contact me at kurt@roeckx.be.

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Drupal Watchdog: Drupal 8 Modules

Planet Drupal - mar, 28/10/2014 - 20:08
Feature

This article will be more about the patterns you need to use during Drupal 8 development than how to fit the various pieces together.

There’s good reason for this approach: fitting the pieces together has plenty of examples, change records, and whatnot – but many pieces of the puzzle are entirely new to Drupal developers.

The Background

The first half of this article provides general PHP information which uses Drupal as an example, but is not Drupal specific. The idea behind this is that the knowledge can be reused well (indeed, this was also a design goal for Drupal 8).

Classes, Objects, Interfaces

In Drupal 7, stdClass was used at a lot of places; ergo, classes (like stdClass) and objects (instances of a class, like node, user, etc.) should be familiar. stdClass is a class without methods, and the properties are not defined ahead of time. In PHP, it’s valid to set any property on an object, even if it’s not defined on its class. So, stdClass worked much like an associated array, except that it used arrows instead of brackets. Another important distinction between arrays and objects is passing them to a function: in PHP5, if a function/method gets an object and then changes the object, it will affect the object everywhere – objects are not copied every time, while arrays are.

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Aten Design Group: Modularizing JavaScript

Planet Drupal - mar, 28/10/2014 - 19:17

I came to Drupal from a JavaScript background and was happy to see a module system in place. Have you ever wished you could write your JavaScript modularly just like your PHP in order to take advantage of testing, better documentation and the Do One Thing Well philosophy? Well I have the solution for you: Browserify and NPM!

Getting Started

In order to take advantage of JavaScript modularity you will need node and npm which can be installed together using one of these methods.

Creating a JavaScript Module

JavaScript modules are similar to the PHP include system in that they allow the developer to separate their code across multiple files. The key difference is that JavaScript uses the syntax require to pull the exported part of a JavaScript file into the current file's variable of choice. Let's take a look.

Simply create a JavaScript file, do whatever you’re trying to do and assign the resulting value (usually a class or object) to module.exports.

// src/lib/MyClass.js   module.exports = function MyClass(opts) {}   MyClass.prototype.magic = function() { console.log(‘magic’); }

You can now use MyClass.js from other JavaScript files like so:

// src/index.js var MyClass = require(‘./lib/MyClass’);   var classy = new MyClass();   classy.magic(); // ‘magic’ NPM

PHP developers may be familiar with Composer. NPM is the Composer of the JavaScript world. Both allow you to manage the dependencies of your project.

Before creating a custom module it's a great idea to see if it has already been written. npmjs.org is the place to look. When you find a module you’d like to include in your project, retrieve it and add it as a dependency with npm. For example, to install lodash:

npm install lodash --save

The save flag adds this dependency to the package.json file. It might help to think of this as the JavaScript version of composer.json. All the dependencies for a project can be installed by running npm install within the directory containing package.json or its sub-directories.

Requiring modules from NPM is done just like local modules but you don’t have to provide the path, just use the module name. require will look in the node_modules folder automatically.

var _ = require(‘lodash’);

Read more about NPM and package.json on the NPM website.

The Browserify command

Browserify reads your JavaScript files and resolves their module.exports and require's.

Your main JavaScript file should be a compilation of its dependencies resulting in a useful piece of functionality for your website. To compile your multiple files into one that is browser ready we will use the browserify CLI.

First install it globally with npm. Globally installed modules can be accessed from anywhere on your machine.

npm install -g browserify

Then tell Browserify where your main JavaScript file is and redirect the output to where you want your compiled, browser-ready JS to be.

browserify src/index.js > build/myModule.js

build/myModule.js is now browser ready! Now you can add it to your website.

Come see me at BADCamp

The above workflow is a great way to maintain custom Drupal modules with a lot of JavaScript. For more detailed information about using this workflow with Drupal — such as global dependencies, handling jQuery, task automation and testing — come check out my session at this year’s BADCamp!

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Open Source Training: Node Gallery: The Easiest Drupal Photo Gallery

Planet Drupal - mar, 28/10/2014 - 16:32

We have several different Drupal photo gallery tutorials on this blog. The most popular are Views Photo Galleries for Drupal 7 and Node Gallery for Drupal 6.

However, although Views is powerful, it is too complex for many Drupal users and Node Gallery remains popular. So here's an update that shows how to use Node Gallery in Drupal 7.

Node Gallery is still the easiest way to build a photo gallery in Drupal. It requires very little set-up and almost no configuration.

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Sooper Drupal Themes: Introducing SooperThemes.com version 5

Planet Drupal - mar, 28/10/2014 - 16:11


Welcome to the fifth redesign of sooperthemes.com!

What's new at SooperThemes

The fifth major update to sooperthemes.com is the biggest update ever. It's a completely new site, unlike the previous sites which were built on top of the original alldrupalthemes.com (2007!)!

The new site comes with a big shift in focus. With Drupal 7 sites becoming more complex, and the upcoming Drupal 8 introducing new power and flexibility, but also complexity, we work hard to offer tools, services and products that allow everyone to profit form Drupal's flexibility without having to suffer the steep learning curve (alone). In addition to selling Drupal themes with turn-key demo sites we now offer more services:

  • Custom built ticket system on sooperthemes.com, to work alongside e-mail support
  • Design to Drupal service, for affordable and top quality Drupal themes based on your own design
  • Enterprise Drupal services, including art direction, design, theming, data driven design and consulting.
  • No more one-off theme sales, total focus on club membership and long term support

Our new tools are the best part, read on to learn about our major plans to support Drupal for small/medium businesses.

Drupal Developers will Love these New Tools: A new Distribution: Drupal CMS Powerstart

Drupal's awesome architecture is what makes it such an awesome alternative to competing CMS like Wordpress and Joomla, but setting up shop with Drupal is described by many as painful and too complicated. Here, Drupal's power in flexibility is also it's weakness. It takes too much time to install basic features like WYSIWYG with media management: you need to find modules and set up complicated configurations, sometimes needing patches or development versions of modules, external libraries, etc.
To solve this problem, we created a Drupal CMS Distribution, targeted to small business sites and aiming to make life easier for developers and shops who create small sites.

Drupal CMS Powerstart needs beta testers: https://www.drupal.org/project/cms

Dries has mentioned in several keynotes that Distributions are the key to make Drupal more accessible and therefore the Drupal ecosystem more succesful. We too believe distributions are the solution but we don't like how they are currently made and how they are managed by drupal.org. Therefore we have created a new interface: A user-friendly interface to our distribution that lets you pick features, so that you don't get a bulky distro with everything in it, and the kitchen sink.

Check out the custom build interface to Drupal CMS Powerstart:

Drupal CMS Custom Build

Twitter Bootstrap Fans will love what we did with Bootstrap 3

In order to create a truly responsive distribution, we developed and refined a lot Bootstrap 3 Drupal-integration. Responsive grid control from Views, content organisation with Bootstrap shortcodes: https://www.drupal.org/project/bs_shortcodes and all our features come with default layouts that regardless of whether you use a Bootstrap theme.

Development of Drupal CMS Powerstart is sponsored by sooperthemes.com and if you want to support future development of this new platform, please help beta testing and/or consider becoming a member of our premium themes club, you can see our "premium themed" version of CMS Powerstart here: http://glazed-demo.sooperthemes.com/ - more Drupal themes.

Tags sooperthemes drupal 7 drupal 8 distributions cms planet drupal planet cms powerstart Drupal 7.x
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ERPAL: Drupal design patterns – do we need them?

Planet Drupal - mar, 28/10/2014 - 14:56

After six years of working with Drupal, I’ve seen many successful Drupal projects. I’ve also felt how hard it is to become an experienced Drupal developer. When I asked myself why some Drupal projects succeed while others don’t, I came to this conclusion: the projects that integrate with Drupal core and the contrib ecosystem – i.e. the ones that use "best practice" deployment workflows and try to use configuration instead of custom code – keep their flexibility, stay maintainable and avoid "niche know-how". This then ensures that the project can be continued even if the team changes. Of course, there are lots of other non-technical factors that make projects successful but we’re focusing here on the technical ones. The problem is that there’s no central repository of "best practices": almost all developers or Drupal shops have their own.

This brings me to the point of considering some Drupal design patterns. Whereas in object-oriented programming, developers have patterns for their object models to solve specific problems that appear again and again, we haven’t yet established any in Drupal. But if we look at the configuration layer of Drupal as a "programming language", we could describe some patterns or best practices that would help others with problems that have already been solved hundreds of times before. This would have the same benefits as design patterns in other programming languages. Solutions for equivalent problems / requirements are always designed in a similar way. For any given workflow we could always use the same rules, so everybody would know where to go to change some behavior. The result would be that modules wouldn’t implement their own logic in code but provide actions, events and conditions, and some default rules. People still wouldn’t find a Drupal image gallery module but they would know how to build one according to some patterns. Of course we’d have a longer dependency chain for some modules, but is this really a problem if we’re depending on standard modules?

 

When to choose which module – would patterns work for this?

With more than 8000 modules available at Drupal.org, new Drupal users may find it hard to get started. What usually happens is that they enable lots of modules to test them; if the module works for their requirements, it remains enabled. If the user is a technical person, maybe even a developer, he/she will most likely use the Drupal API to extend the Drupal app.
But wouldn't it be great if we had a list of modules that were "state of the art" for best practices such as using rules for workflows and business logic, ECKs and fields for data structure modelling, views for lists and data queries, restWS and WSclient for communication with other applications, entity view modes in combination with panels for layouting, and features for the deployment. Considering the above, I’ve created the Drupal application stack poster to collect all our modules – along with their specific use cases –and to share this overview with the community. Shouldn't we always have a "Drupal-relevant set" of modules in mind when it comes to the modelling process of our Drupal app? This would keep Drupal apps sustainable and flexible.

 

Dos and don’ts

There are also some examples of what not to do. In a few projects that had crashed before they came to us to be rebuilt, it became clear that the previous developers had exactly the problems listed above. They had no guide to help them figure out when to use the API and when to choose which module, which further led to code and architectures that nobody but the developer could maintain. After the first release, the projects weren’t extendible, as there was no deployment process established. Wouldn't it help to collect these examples as well, to help people avoid them and get on the right path with Drupal? With a list of positive and negative patterns, we could give users some objective criteria for rating the implementation of their Drupal project.

 

Distributions – start from a higher level

Distributions built on such best practices as Drupal commerce kickstart or ERPAL Platform provide a good starting point for new Drupal developers, since they can see how experienced Drupalistas created the distros and which modules they used. Distros can be showcases for Drupal design patterns or a kick-start for vertical use cases like e-commerce sites or business applications.

If we want the Drupal community to grow, we should help others find the right starting point – not just any old one that could lead them off in the wrong direction: while they might see some quick results, if it wasn’t the right approach, they would only realize that after days of work. Once too much time has elapsed, with the money already spent and the deadline looming ever closer, nobody will ever refactor the Drupal application to improve its structure.

With Drupal design patterns, we’d be able to offer standard solutions to often-complex problems. What are your thoughts about Drupal design patterns? Would this bring us another step closer to making Drupal into a world-leading web application framework?

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Drupalize.Me: Free Halloween Icon Set

Planet Drupal - mar, 28/10/2014 - 14:04

With Halloween just around the corner, I thought it might be fun to hand out some tasty treats. Don't worry, you're not getting fruit or pennies. It's something much more fun! I designed a custom Halloween icon set, which is free to download and use however you want. With Drupalize.Me's scary good Drupal training, it's fitting that these icons can spook, sweeten, or surprise your next project.

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Clemens Tolboom: Which route belongs to which path fragment?

Planet Drupal - mar, 28/10/2014 - 13:21
AttachmentSize Drupal menu tree with GraphViz650.46 KB Drupal menu tree with d3js216.41 KB Drupal menu tree PNG55.17 KB Drupal menu radial tree with d3js217.39 KB Drupal-menu-tree-radial.png221.33 KB Drupal menu tree graphviz75.85 KB

Visualization some complex part of Drupal is helping understand Drupal better. This is about the menu tree using Graph Viz for a static SVG diagram and D3JS for a dynamic version.

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KnackForge: Ajax Autocomplete Customization for Textfield in Drupal

Planet Drupal - mar, 28/10/2014 - 12:23

Autocomplete is a feature for textfields in Drupal. It provides a dropdown list of matching options from the server. It is implemented through AJAX. To know how to add an autocomplete form element in Drupal visit https://www.drupal.org/node/854216

 

For customizing autocomplete we need to override the Drupal system file "misc/autocomplete.js". This can be achieved ideally in two ways:

  • Replace the entire "autocomplete.js" with your customised version

    function MY_MODULE_js_alter(&$javascript) { $javascript['misc/autocomplete.js']['data'] = drupal_get_path('module', 'MY_MODULE') . '/js/autocomplete.js'; }
  • Override "Drupal.ACDB.prototype.search" with a custom behaviour in theme script.js or module js file, as long as it's added after /misc/autocomplete.js it will override it.

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Jonny Lamb: Sciopero

Planet Debian - mar, 28/10/2014 - 12:11

Public transport strikes in Rome are so frequent that it’s hard to remember when they are. I wrote a Gnome Shell extension to help remind me when there’s one either coming up or in progress. Find it on extensions.gnome.org. It gets its data from another little service I just made.

A Roma gli scioperi dei mezzi pubblici sono così frequenti che spesso è facile dimenticarsi quando ci sono. Ho scritto un’estensione per Gnome Shell per avvisare quando c’è o si avvicina uno sciopero dell’Atac. La puoi trovare su extensions.gnome.org. Funziona grazie ad un altro piccolo servizio che ho creato.

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