Agrégateur de flux

Rhonda D'Vine: DebConf15

Planet Debian - ven, 21/08/2015 - 23:00

I tried to start to write this blog entry like I usually do: Type along what goes through my mind and see where I'm heading. This won't work out right now for various reasons, mostly because there is so much going on that I don't have the time to finish that in a reasonable time and I want to publish this today still. So please excuse me for being way more brief than I usually am, and hopefully I'll find the time to expand some things when asked or come back to that later.

Part of the reason of me being short on time is different stuff going on in my private life which requires additional attention. A small part of this is also something that I hinted in a former blog entry: I switched my job in June. I really was looking forward to this. I made them aware of what the name Rhonda means to me and it's definitely extremely nice to be addressed with female pronouns at work. And also I'm back in a system administration job which means there is an interest overlap with my work on Debian, so a win-win situation on sooo many levels!

I'm at DebConf15 since almost two weeks now. On my way here I was complimented on my outfit by a security guard at the Vienna airport which surprised me but definitely made my day. I was wearing one of these baggy hippie pants (which was sent to me by a fine lady I met at MiniDebConf Bucharest) but pulled up the leg parts to the knees so it could be perceived as a skirt instead. Since I came here I was pretty busy with taking care of DCschedule bot adjustments (like, changing topic and twittering from @DebConf at the start of the talks), helping out with the video team when I noticed there was a lack of people (which is a hint for that you might want to help with the video team in the future too, it's important for remote people but also for yourself because you can't attend multiple sessions at the same time).

And I have to repeat myself, this is the place I feel home amongst my extended family, even though I it still is sometimes for me to get to speak up in certain groups. I though believe it's more an issue of certain individuals taking up a lot of space in discussions without giving (more shy) people in the round the space to also join in. I guess it might be the time that we need a session on dominant talking patterns for next year and how to work against them. I absolutely enjoyed such a session during last year's FemCamp in Vienna which set the tone for the rest of the conference, and it was simply great.

And then there was the DebConf Poetry Night. I'm kinda disappointed with the outcome this year. It wasn't able to attract as much people anticipated, which I to some degree account to me not making people aware of it well enough, overlapping with a really great band playing at the same time in competition, and even though the place where we did it sounded like a good idea at first, it didn't had enough light for someone to read something from a book (but that was solved through smartphone lights). I know that most people did enjoy it, so it was good to do it, but I'm still a fair bit disappointed with the outcome and will try to work on improving on that grounds for next year. :)

With all this going on there unfortunately wasn't as much time as I would have liked to spend with people I haven't seen for a long time, or new people I haven't met yet. Given that this year's DebConf had an height in attendees (526 being here at certain times during the two weeks, and just today someone new arrived too, so that doesn't even have to be the final number) it makes it a bit painful to have picked up so many tasks and thus lost some chances to socialize as much as I would have liked to.

So, if you are still here and have the feeling we should have talked more, please look for me. As Bdale pointed out correctly in the New to DebConf BoF (paraphrased): When you see us DebConf old timers speaking to someone else and you feel like you don't want to disturb, please do disturb and speak to us. I always enjoyed to get to know new people. This for me always is one of the important aspects of DebConf.

Also, I am very very happy to have received feedback from different people about both my tweets and my blog, thank you a lot of that. It is really motivating to keep going.

So, lets enjoy the last few hours of DebConf!

Another last side notice: While my old name in the Debian LDAP did manage to find some wrongly displayed names in the DebConf website, like for speakers, or volunteers, it was clear to me that having it exposed through SSO.debian.org isn't really something I appreciate. So I took the chance and spoke to Luca from the DSA team right here today, and ... got it fixed. I love it! Next step is getting my gpg key exchanged, RT ticket is coming up. :)

/debian | permanent link | Comments: 1 | Flattr this

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Simon Kainz: DUCK challenge: Final week

Planet Debian - ven, 21/08/2015 - 22:30

Well, here are the stats for the final week of the DUCK challenge as well as DebConf15:

So we had 21 packages fixed and uploaded by 14 different uploaders. People were really working hard on this during DebConf. A big "Thank You" to you!!

Since the start of this challenge, a total of 89 packages, were fixed.

Here is a quick overview:

Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 # Packages 10 15 10 14 10 9 21 Total 10 25 35 49 59 68 89

Thank you all for participating - either on purpose or "accidentially": Some people were really surprised as i sneaked up on them at DebConf15, confronting them with a green lighter! I just tried to put even more fun into Debian, i hope this worked out

Pevious articles are here: Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Week 4, Week 5,Week 6.

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Acquia Developer Center Blog: Now or later? Weighing the benefits of early adoption for Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - ven, 21/08/2015 - 17:36

If you’re considering a switch to Drupal 8, why not become an early adopter? Becoming an early adopter has some risks — and Acquia will work with you to mitigate those risks — but it also has huge benefits.

In this post, I want to talk to you about those benefits and also share with you my experience with Examiner and its early adoption of Drupal 7.

If you’re not familiar with it, Examiner is a news company powered by thousands of self-contributing writers. Currently, it’s read by 22 million people a month. But back in 2009, the company was having problems with its ColdFusion CMS, and those problems were hampering its growth.

Examiner decided to move away from the legacy homegrown platform to Drupal. So they acquired NowPublic, a citizen-journalism company I founded, for its Drupal expertise and leadership. That’s how I became the CTO of Examiner (I later joined Acquia in 2012).

Moving ahead, the big question we faced at Examiner was: Do we go with Drupal 6, a stable but mature technology? Or do we take a bold leap and implement the yet-to-be-released Drupal 7? Ultimately, we chose to become early adopters, going with Drupal 7.  

Here are the reasons that powered that decision:

1) You stay in front of the technology wave

While a good product at the time, there was no denying that Drupal 6 was closer to its end of lifecycle, while Drupal 7 was just taking off. We already understood the costs involved in supporting a legacy product. And we knew any extra investment early on would be offset by things like a longer lifecycle.

As a side note, unlike previous versions of the platform, Drupal 8 releases will come out every six months. So if you plan to become an early adopter of Drupal 8, not only are you taking advantage of the latest and greatest today — but you will continually upgrade to the latest features over the lifecycle of the product.

2) You differentiate yourself from the competitors

At Examiner, we wanted to set ourselves apart from the competition and we knew D7 would give us that edge. AOL was starting to invest in Patch at that time. And we felt that if we wanted to grow our audience and draw the best journalism to our site, we needed best-in-breed tools.  

3) You can attract the top talent

Great developers want to be on the cutting edge. Who wouldn’t want to jump on an opportunity to work full-time on their passion and be able to contribute back to Drupal? When we brought in a great platform at Examiner, we attracted the best Drupal developers in the world. Very quickly, we hired 15 of the top 50 developers in the Drupal community.  

4) You have the opportunity to shape your investment

Getting in on Drupal 7 earlier put us in the driver’s seat with the technology. That was important. We weren’t looking to adopt just any set of tools. We wanted an opportunity to shape the next generation of a platform. And we knew Drupal was going to meet our needs better than anything else out there. Plus, it’s a lot less risky than building your own CMS, because you are not going it alone. You’re going in as part of a community.  

5) It forces you to develop best practices

Being an early adopter forces you to use best practices with respect to software development. At Examiner, we were able to participate in the community and contribute code to the platform. So for us, being an early adopter forced us to do things the right way — and that set a standard within the company moving forward.

After a year of work, Examiner moved to a new platform built on Drupal 7. Thanks to Drupal 7, Examiner went from not being able to meet the needs of its users to exceeding them. We were able to deliver new features on a faster cadence. We had the best-in-breed platform, the easiest to use interfaces, and ultimately those features accelerated the growth of the company.

Examiner launched on Drupal 7 six months before the official release of the platform. We started developing on it almost a year and a half before the release. So we were really early adopters. Examiner faced tremendous risks, because at that time, Drupal 7 was nowhere near as put together as Drupal 8 is today, but we still decided to do it — and it paid off.  Today, Examiner is a top 60 website.

Being an early adopter is definitely an investment. It will cost more to be an early adopter of Drupal 8, but as Examiner has demonstrated, those costs are set off by several factors. And if you are concerned about the risks, keep this in mind: more than 400 sites are already running Drupal 8. And Acquia has already announced we are ready to support anyone with Drupal 8.

What are your thoughts? Do you have any experiences on being an early adopter of Drupal 7? And how do you feel about the risks/benefits of being an early adopter for Drupal 8? We’d love to hear back from you and get the conversation going.

Workflow: PendingFeatured: NoTags: acquia drupal planetDrupal 8 related: YesAuthor: Michael Meyers
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ThinkShout: Relaunching the Southern Poverty Law Center's Website

Planet Drupal - ven, 21/08/2015 - 17:00

When projects get hectic around the office, we remind ourselves “We’re just pushing pixels.” We’re geeks. We sit in an air-conditioned office and play with cutting edge technologies on shiny MacBooks, drinking aeropress coffee. At the same time, we choose to work with nonprofit clients - experienced organizers and passionate advocates working on diverse issues in environmental protection, human rights, early childhood education, access to health care, and community building. We cannot do what they do; but it is wonderful to help them tell their stories and meaningfully engage their constituents online.

Over the last year, we’ve been particularly inspired to have had the chance to collaborate with the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) on the redesign of its website. At the same time, our work with them brought further attention to our team about the many human rights challenges that our country has faced over the last year.

Our initial conversations with SPLC took place days before the death of Eric Garner. And over the year that we’ve been working with the Center, 16 unarmed Black people have been killed by police in the U.S. The Southern Poverty Law Center has been at the forefront of the national conversation about this issue.

If you don’t know SPLC, it is a leading advocacy and educational organization dedicated to fighting hate and bigotry and seeking justice for the most vulnerable members of society. Since 1971, SPLC has been using litigation to fight for civil rights. So hated by the Ku Klux Klan, SPLC’s offices were burned to the ground in 1983 by Alabama Klansmen. Then, in 1987 SPLC won a historic $7 million verdict against the United Klans of America for the 1981 lynching of Michael Donald - effectively bankrupting the KKK and crippling their organization.

In addition to its fight against hate and extremism, SPLC works on a range of human rights issues, such as children’s rights, immigrant justice, economic justice, mass incarceration, and LGBT rights. And so, fortunately, in addition to watching SPLC weigh in tirelessly on the police’s deadly use of force this year, we have also been able to celebrate with its staff over the landmark win over gay marriage bans, as well as the 50th Anniversaries of the March on Selma and the Passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Again, we have nothing to do with the success of this organization, but to collaborate with this team and to be close to their work has been incredible. We couldn’t be more proud of the website that we designed and implemented along with SPLC’s incredible communications team. Over the next few weeks, we will be writing about the many technical and process innovations we had the chance to implement with the SPLC team. In the meantime, we hope that you will take some time to explore their new site and to join us in celebrating and supporting their mission.

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Six Mile Tech: Making a Drupal 8 Contrib Module - The Movie: Raw and Uncut

Planet Drupal - ven, 21/08/2015 - 16:44

As a contrib module developer that is starting to delve into Drupal 8 I wanted to share my experience working with Drupal 8. This is a video of me going through the process of re-creating the contrib module Token Conditions that I had created the week before. Along the way I delve into some new systems in Drupal 8 and give examples of how to figure out how to add functionality to this vastly changed version of Drupal.  

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InternetDevels: How DruDesk works: a closer look at our Drupal support service

Planet Drupal - ven, 21/08/2015 - 14:49

Created and powered by InternetDevels Drupal development company

If your website could speak, there’s one most important thing you would probably hear. And this thing is “Please send me to DruDesk!”. Such a silent request can come up in many cases — let’s see when.

Read more
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Midwestern Mac, LLC: Vagrant web development - is VMware better than VirtualBox?

Planet Drupal - ven, 21/08/2015 - 14:42

My Mac spends the majority of the day running at between one and a dozen VMs. I do all my development (besides iOS or Mac dev) running code inside VMs, and for many years I used VirtualBox, a free virtualization tool, along with Vagrant and Ansible, to build and manage all these VMs.

Since I use build and rebuild dozens of VMs per day, and maintain a popular Vagrant configuration for Drupal development (Drupal VM), as well as dozens of other VMs (like Ansible Vagrant Examples), I am highly motivated to find the fastest and most reliable virtualization software for local development. I switched from VirtualBox to VMware Fusion (which requires a for-pay plugin) a year ago, as a few benchmarks I ran at the time showed VMware was 10-30% faster.

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Drupal Easy: DrupalEasy Podcast 161 - No Custom Code (Jay Epstein - Relativity Data Model)

Planet Drupal - ven, 21/08/2015 - 09:26
Download Podcast 161

Jay Epstein (jeppy64), Senior Developer with TrakTek joins Mike, Ted, and Ryan to talk about his Relativity Data Model and why he feels it is a superior method for architectuing Drupal sites with a limited number of modules and no custom code. We dive into the techniques, contrib modules, and benefits of the model before our weekly roundup of Drupal news and events.

read more

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Norbert Preining: The sins of the past – adding Cyrillic glyphs without renaming fonts

Planet Debian - ven, 21/08/2015 - 02:16

The URW Base35 fonts are a great set of fonts, available for free as in free software. They have been part of various distributions and systems since long time. Big thanks to URW for their work. But these fonts don’t have Cyrillic or Greek glyphs. Be it as it is, world would be easy. People would need to use different fonts for these languages. Comes around someone who did the unthinkable – namely adding the Cyrillic and Greek glyphs to the fonts (by now nothing bad), but then NOT renaming the fonts. Here we see one point of the stupidity of GPL and absolute freedom. Because what we now have is that documents produced several TeX engines (in particular XeTeX and LuaTeX) which use fontconfig to search the fonts, suddenly pick up these changed fonts that fake their identity, and what comes out is this, a complete rubbish:

And now we are suffering huge pain from that. Look at the bug reports of that are coming in:

  • 796120 xdvipdfmx broken
  • 789391 developers reference fonts broken
  • 787759 fonts broken in dblatex

Just to name a few. And there is a simple way to circumvent this: Don’t install gsfonts which guarantees that fontconfig finds the real original URW fonts within the TeX Live tree first.

I have now spent many hours to track down these problems, find the reason, and at the end of the day there is always gsfonts with its broken fonts with added Cyrillic glyphs. I honestly don’t care about the history, there are now many fonts with Cyrillic and Greek glyphs, there is no need to fake fonts, and incorrectly take over font names.

This should be a lesson to all the GPL zealots that require absolute freedom of each and everything. Unfortunately things don’t work like that. Using AND RENAMING is ok, the Knuth license as I would say, but anything else is just a source of much pain.

End for today, I have to go to work now. Real work instead of fighting sins of the past.

Nothing to enjoy here.

Additional information Just to let you know, before starting a flame war, I have already contacted the upstream developers, that is TeX Live, and explained them the situation. I don’t see much chance for fixing, since the problem is with fonts without upstream and support, which are probably only used in Debian (I haven’t seen them anywhere else but some mentioning in RH), and which are not officially supported or distributed. It really needs a nice developer to look into why this breakage appeared. Let us hope. And instead of flaming, anyone here is invited to dig into the code him/herself and search for changes.

Additional information 2015-08-22 Just to back up my complaints and counteract several of the comments: I am quoting from an email of a colleague on the list where we are discussing the problem:

However, the fonts extended by Valek Filippov are quite problematic. The Type1 spec clearly requires that there may not exist two different fonts with the same /FontName. The modified fonts shipped with Ghostscript have the same /FontName as the original fonts donated by URW and not even the /UniqueID was changed. IMO they are broken because they don’t comply with the Type1 specification.

I hope that convinced also the last in doubt.

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Savas Labs: Sassy Drupal theming: Setting up Bourbon and Neat

Planet Drupal - ven, 21/08/2015 - 02:00

When Savas built a custom Drupal 8 theme, we needed to include a grid framework and chose Bourbon's Neat for its ease of use, its light weight, and the library of useful Sass mixins provided by Bourbon. In this post I detail how to set all of this up and use Compass to compile SCSS.

Continue reading…

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Axel Beckert: German-written Debian Package Management Book

Planet Debian - ven, 21/08/2015 - 01:28
Thursday was our big day: After more than 2.5 years of working in the hidden, ups and downs, Frank Hofmann and myself were able to announce the availability of our book project Debian Package Management under a free license (Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 4.0 International License, short “CC BY-SA 4.0”) during a Lightning Talk at DebConf15 in Heidelberg.

This became possible because we found Onyx Neon, a publishing company which is specialised on books with contents under free licenses. Its founder does not only have a faible for Perl but also for Debian. (Since the question already came up: We also thought about self-publishing, e.g. via Lulu or Epubli — and it would have been our fallback solution —, but we prefer the professionalism and services of a real publisher. I’m though happy to share what I found out about self-publishing in the past few months.)

The source code of the book is written in the AsciiDoc format and available on GitHub.

The book is still work in progress. But if you want, you can already build an e-book out of the publically available source code:

sudo apt-get install asciidoc dblatex git git clone git://github.com/dpmb/dpmb.git cd dpmb make

(Works fine on Debian 7 Wheezy, Debian 8 Jessie and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Trusty. Does not work on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Precise.)

If you find an error in the book, please file an issue on GitHub. If you also know how to fix the error, please for the Git repository on GitHub, fix the error in your Git repository and file a pull request. (The first pull request already happenend and has been applied.)

Initially there will be only a German written issue as e-book (at least in HTML, PDF and EPUB formats, maybe also KF8/MOBI and EPUB3) and at some point in the future also as printed book at Onyx Neon. But we’re also planning a translation to English as well as a Debian package.

If your want to get informed when we publish a printed book, a translation or an official e-book release, please subscribe to one of our mailing lists: There’s one in German and one in English.

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Sune Vuorela: Debconf 2015 – 7

Planet Debian - ven, 21/08/2015 - 00:08

The other day, the main talk was “Lets encrypt”, today it was “Let’s reproduce”

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Promet Source: Responsive Design Testing the Promet Way

Planet Drupal - jeu, 20/08/2015 - 23:07

Responsive design is a watchword for many web design gurus, and it has become a kind of unspoken rule for online experiences: If your website can’t respond to users on every device, then it is an affront to those users. This rule, which maybe doesn’t have to include such unforgiving terms as “affront,” has to be acknowledged well before a user even has a chance to set their eyes and cursor on a website.

Responsiveness is arguably the first barrier to creating good user experiences. So if it’s such common knowledge, then why are we all still talking about it?

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Four Kitchens: drupal_practice_group_install()

Planet Drupal - jeu, 20/08/2015 - 21:26

How do you prepare for the inevitable, yet moving target of Drupal 8 when you’re busy with client work? Join Four Kitchens Web Chefs as we take the plunge with a practice group.

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Acquia Developer Center Blog: Five Ways to Leverage Third-Party APIs: The Drupal-Zendesk Integration

Planet Drupal - jeu, 20/08/2015 - 20:36

When Acquia’s Global Support Team outgrew their ticketing system in 2013, it was time to make a change. An outdated ticketing system was taxing their team and compromising their ability to support customers. In addition to lacking the core functionality required to meet increasing customer expectations, the third-party vendor lacked visibility and integration with existing systems like JIRA and Toggl, reporting was slow, and SLA was waning.

The Global Support Team decided to look for a new, flexible API that would deliver tight integration with existing systems and generate responsive channels for quick, direct and clear communications. Reporting needed to be real-time and fast, and the customer and agent UX needed to be streamlined. Acquia needed a new system.

In Walks Zendesk

After systematic vendor vetting, Acquia’s Global Support Team quickly determined that Zendesk’s documented API provided the flexibility needed to do things the Acquian way. Zendesk is a customer service platform that provides the ideal framework for an enterprise environment. Zendesk offers an out-of-the-box solution, which provides a front-end customer interface and a back-end agent UX. Instead of just “drinking their own champagne,” Acquia decided to split a bottle with Zendesk’s REST API and develop the front-end of their Acquia Help Center in Drupal.

Drupal-Zendesk Integration

With a Drupal-Zendesk solution, Acquia built a powerful ticket request system that provides unparalleled support to their customers and internal teams. Here are five ways Acquia’s Support team leveraged a third-party API to build a new ticketing system.

1. Using Zendesk’s API to create customer requests in Acquia’s Help Center on Drupal

Acquia needed to migrate nearly 100k pre-existing tickets into Zendesk. This kind of overhaul required some reconciliation. Reorganization consisted of deleting completed tickets, cleaning up the open ticket queue, and configuring data into Zendesk.

The new Acquia Help Center was built using Zendesk’s REST API in Drupal, providing a Customer UX that is easy to navigate. The Agent UX, utilized internally by the support team, is outfitted with all of Zendesk’s built-in functionality. Zendesk also offered Acquia’s Global Support Team the ability to customize their apps to guarantee top performance.

2. Additional Info Block Application

The flexibility of the Zendesk Apps Framework allows companies to extend the capabilities of the framework to leverage tickets, users and knowledgebases. Acquia customized their solution with an Additional Info Block Application, embedded in the Agent UX. The info block provides a global and integrated view of the customer.

The info box displays information such as the product the customer is using, the number of application support tickets their subscription enables them to register, what networks they are connected to, special handling notes and their account management team.

“This heightened customer visibility allows diverse members of Acquia’s Global Support Team to best support the customer’, says Jeannie Finks, Director of Global Support Systems and Programs at Acquia. “This supplementary ticket data is a necessity for our team to provide customers with the personalized assistance they need and now expect”.

3. Time Tracking App

By leveraging the flexibility of the Zendesk Apps Framework, Acquia was able to aggregate all of their systems in one place. Existing systems like JIRA and Toggl are essential to Acquia’s workflow, and needed to remain accessible in the Agent UX. Toggl is a time tracking app that allows you to sync your entries in real time. Toggl’s cloud based framework is Acquia’s default time tracking interface. Acquia’s custom Toggl-Zendesk app pushes ticket time to a central repo of daily agent activity:

Additionally, Zendesk’s partnership has enhanced the view of the customers through expert reporting. The Zendesk toolkit allowed Acquia to track tickets rolled in by account, customer backlog, and a root cause report. The introduction of expert reporting offers support teams a comprehensive overview of the customer. Real-time reporting provides Acquia’s Support Leadership with the resources needed to proactively identify critical issues and solve them quickly. This Info Block increases customer visibility, allowing Acquia to see what their customer needs, right when they need it.

4. Custom SLA Monitoring and Notification within Zendesk

The ticketing system also monitors the status of tickets based on a customer’s Service Level Agreement. Acquia continues to take advantage of Zendesk’s flexibility by configuring SLA data from a central customer data warehouse. This customization generates alerts that flow into all key communication channels, such as mail and chat. This custom monitoring system notifies teams when SLA expiration time is appended to a ticket, providing support teams with the visibility needed to best assist the customer.


 

5. JIRA and Zendesk Linked Tickets

In addition to Toggl, JIRA is a ticketing system that Acquia’s Global Support Team utilized internally. It was a workflow necessity to have continued access to JIRA, and Zendesk’s robust API enabled Acquia to do so. Acquia further customized their API with a mini app that linked tickets filed in JIRA and Zendesk.

The system scans Zendesk ticket comments, subject, and internal URL fields. After scanning, it will match any Acquia JIRA project keys. The system will then display the JIRA key, subject, status, time created, updated time, reporter and assignee. Comment links can also be added to any JIRA ticket.

“The benefit of these customized applications is that all of Acquia’s support systems are connected in one place”, says Finks. “The convenience of having JIRA, Toggl and a customer info block in the Agent UX relieves the major pain points that were taxing our internal teams. Through our integration with Zendesk, Acquia’s Help Center is able to offer unparalleled global support to customers 24/7”.

The next installment of our series will examine best practices when integrating with a third-party API.

Blog series: Integrating Drupal and ZendeskWorkflow: PendingFeatured: NoTags: acquia drupal planetDrupal 8 related: NoAuthor: Georgianna Anderson
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OSTraining: How to Use the AdvAgg Drupal Module

Planet Drupal - jeu, 20/08/2015 - 19:51

Over the last couple of years, I've seen one module appear on almost every high profile Drupal site.

That module is Advanced CSS/JS Aggregation, or AdvAgg, for short.

AdvAgg really helps to improve the frontend performance of your site. This module really helps to improve the aggregation and optimization of your site's CSS and Javascript files.

Here are two videos that will help you install and configure AdvAgg:

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Drupal Watchdog: Drush: The Swiss Army Knife for Drupal

Planet Drupal - jeu, 20/08/2015 - 18:21
Article

By now, if you have been using Drush for a while I assume you are comfortable with all the basics. (I consider the basics to be things like downloading modules or updating a site.) I also assume you are aware that Drush has plenty of other features built in, but you probably don't take advantage of them. In this article I want to show you a few things that are just as easy to use as the “basics” and only require a little upfront setup to use them. Once you learn them, they will quickly find their way into your daily workflow.

Shell Aliases

Consider how much time you spend typing out commands. Now think of all the commands you type over and over again. Next, think about all the commands that have a lot of options and how often you refer to help resources to remember which options you need to use. Wouldn’t it be better if we simplified those things? Conveniently, Drush allows you to do exactly that: create shortcuts or aliases in a file called drushrc.php. I'll refer to it as the command file later in this article.

Let's start with an easy example: the clear cache command. This command isn't very long but we can still improve on it. Plus, it's probably one of the most frequently used.

Edit your drushrc.php file; if it doesn't exist create it. It's typically in your home folder at:

~/.drush/drushrc.php

Add this line to the bottom of this file and save it:

$options['shell-aliases']['ca'] = 'cache-clear all';

We just added a shell alias. Now instead of typing this:

$ drush clear-cache all

You only need to type:

$ drush ca

That wasn't too hard, right? That was one line of code, and you just improved on an already very simple command.

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Raphael Geissert: Call for release goal: package reconsideration

Planet Debian - jeu, 20/08/2015 - 11:33
Based on a discussion around breakfast, and encouraged by the people at the table, I hereby call for a new release goal (or challenge, whatever you prefer to call it):


Every package maintainer should remove one of their packages from the archive.


It's dead simple. It is acceptable to adopt a package to replace the one that has been removed, or to add a new one to the archive.
For tracking purposes please include "for RG" (release goal) in the removal request to ftp.debian.org.


And how about a debconf challenge? how about filing over 100 removal requests before the end of Debconf 15 on Saturday night? blog about it, dent/twit about it, spam IRC about it!


The idea came up after discussing about how us as package maintainers refuse to remove our obsolete or unused packages. So yes, that may also include the very first package that you got into the archive.


Sad news, good news.
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Simon Kainz: vim in Heidelberg

Planet Debian - jeu, 20/08/2015 - 11:30

Following the tradition of Love Locks, apparently there is someone really in love with vim in Heidelberg!

Found at the Old Bridge in Heidelberg during DebConf15.

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Sune Vuorela: Debconf 2015 – 6

Planet Debian - jeu, 20/08/2015 - 09:48

There is more people with blue hair at Debconf than at an average Akademy. KDE – we need to do better :)

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